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'The Metropolitan' Royal Irish Constabulary Whistle & Chain.Early Issue1885 Made by Hudson and Co. 131 Barr St. [the address changed in 1888 to 13 Barr St.]. J. Hudson & Co. won the contract for supplying the Metropolitan Police with whistles in 1883. And with rare exceptions, 19th century stamps bearing a specific Police Force name are either made by Hudson or Dowler. The Royal Irish Constabulary was Ireland's armed police force from the early nineteenth century until 1922. A separate civic police force, the unarmed Dublin Metropolitan Police controlled the capital, and the cities of Derry and Belfast, originally with their own police forces, later had special divisions within the RIC. About seventy-five percent of the RIC were Roman Catholic and about twenty-five percent were of various Protestant denominations. The RIC's successful system of policing influenced the Canadian North-West Mounted Police (predecessor of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police), the Victoria Police force in Australia, and the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary in Newfoundland. In consequence of the Anglo-Irish Treaty, the RIC was disbanded in 1922 and was replaced by the Garda Síochána in the Irish Free State and the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Northern Ireland.
16th Cent. Close Helmet Formerly of the William Randolph Hearst Collection A fine 1590 close helmet, probably Italian, with funery face visor. Fine original brass rose head rivets. A stunning piece with amazing provenance, owned by one of the greatest yet notorious men in world publishing history. William Randolph Hearst ( April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper Moghul, a publisher who built the nation’s largest newspaper chain and whose methods profoundly influenced American journalism. His collecting took his agents around the Europe to acquire the finest treasures available, for his project of building the largest and finest private estate in the world, Hearst Castle in San Simeon. In much of this he succeeded. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after taking control of The San Francisco Examiner from his father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal and engaged in a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World that led to the creation of yellow journalism—sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. Acquiring more newspapers, Hearst created a chain that numbered nearly 30 papers in major American cities at its peak. He later expanded to magazines, creating the largest newspaper and magazine business in the world. He was twice elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, and ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of New York City in 1905 and 1909, for Governor of New York in 1906, and for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1910. Nonetheless, through his newspapers and magazines, he exercised enormous political influence, and was famously blamed for pushing public opinion with his yellow journalism type of reporting leading the United States into a war with Spain in 1898. His life story was the main inspiration for the development of the lead character in Orson Welles's film Citizen Kane. His mansion, Hearst Castle, on a hill overlooking the Pacific Ocean near San Simeon, California, halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, was donated by the Hearst Corporation to the state of California in 1957, and is now a State Historical Monument and a National Historic Landmark, open for public tours. Hearst formally named the estate La Cuesta Encantada (“The Enchanted Slope”), but he usually just called it “the ranch.” This helmet was acquired by Hearst for his mansion, Hearst Castle, but when his empire began to crumble much of his collection was sold at Gimbels In New York in 1941, which is where the Higgins Armory acquired this helmet. Orson Welles film, Citizen Kane, is thought by many to be one of the greatest masterpieces of film ever made, and it's portrayal of Charles Foster Kane was so mirroring WR Hearst that there was no doubt in any mind what it was meant to represent. So much so, Hearst dedicated some considerable time and effort during the next 10 years in order to destroy Orson Welles' career, and prevent him fulfilling his obvious potential as one of the greatest directors of all time. In much of this, once more, Hearst succeeded. Items from Hearst's collection rarely surface, as owners tend to keep hold of them for obvious reasons of historical posterity and provenance, and to be able to offer such a piece from that collection is a great privilege, and a rare opportunity for it's next fortunate owner.
1796 Infantry Sword of James Hilton, the 48th Foot, the Heroes of Talavera with photos of his Memoriam Card and medal [lacking two bars]. A sword that belonged to a man who served in the 48th foot, the Northamptonshire Regt. His name is inscribed on the folded guard of the gilt bronze hilt. It has a very good silver grip and typical blade. We have polished the silver grip but left the gilded hilt exactly as it is to show it's untouched authenticity. We show photos before and after polishing the silver grip. The memoriam card is a copy as is a photograph of his medal. These photographic copies are included with the sword [not the originals]. A Classic, Ornate, Sculpted Victorian "In Memoriam" Card documenting the Distinguished Military Career of James Hilton of Lancashire, England. Hilton fought with Wellington through the entire Peninsula War Campaign and earned the shown Victoria Medal with the following campaign bars: TALAVERA, ALBUERA, CUIDAD RODRIGO, BADAJOZ, SALAMANCA, BUSACO, VITTORIA, PYRENNES, NIVELLE, ORTHES AND TOULOUSE.'This ode was written by J W Croker for the 48th after their heroism at Talavera ' "Now from the summit, at his call, A gallant legion firm and slow Advances on victorious Gaul; Undaunted, tho' their leader's low! Fixed, as the high and buttressed mound, That guards some leaguered city round, They stand unmoved --" Last picture in the gallery of a watercolour of a soldier of the 48th at Talavera. Although this sword was made circa 1796 they were continually used by officer's and their heirs right up to and including the Crimean War. There are several 1796 infantry swords in regimental museums, that were last used in the Crimean War. One must presume they represent an ancestral sword used by two or more generations as much laxity was permitted to officers in the army in Victorian times, with 'uniform tailor's regulations' often no more than a suggestion of custom and practice. We have seen a photo of RN officers on board ship at the Crimea with almost every single officer wearing a different uniform and cap, many quite obscure in their form, and few of regulation pattern. However, we also currently have a sword used by an officer who was in service in the navy for over 68 years. A 70 year service veteran officer was not unheard of in the 19th century, and no necessity of the change in sword use was required.
1842 Swiss Sharpshooters Sword Wooden grip with six brass rivets. Single edged blade made by Horster of Solingen. Carried by the Swiss Infantry sharpshooters.
1845 British Sword Presented By General Power to J.P Boyd of the 63rd Regiment. Made by Wilkinson Sword Co. Mercurial gilt hilt in all brass scabbard. Deluxe presentation blade with Queen Victoria's cypher, full embellishment of scrolls and crowns, and a charming presentation inscription, within the etching, from General Power to his Godson, Lt Boyd of the 63rd Foot. This sword has just returned from two days in the cleaning workshop. Ensign Boyd served in the Crimean War at Sevastopol upon joining his initial regiment the 38th Foot the Staffordshire Regt. After a few years in 1859 he transferred to the 63rd Foot the Suffolk Regt, as a Lieutenant, and served in Canada. With his godfather [in 1862-1863], Boyd was based in Canada, and General Power was there as part of British contingent involved in the the “Trent Affair”. This was a situation, based in part in Canada, concerning two Confederate diplomats captured by USS San Jacinto from British mail packet RMS Trent on their journey to London. Their intended task was to influence Britain to recognise the Confederacy as a separate state during the war. An intolerable point of view from President Lincoln's perspective. Positions in Canada were put in place by the British, with the assistance of General Power, just in case Britain declared war on the northern States in the Civil War, or Lincoln declared war on the Empire. A state that Lincoln was anxious to avoid at all costs. Later, around this time, Boyd joined the Royal Canadian Rifles. The story of General Power. General Sir William Tyrone Power of Co. Managhan Ireland. served in China in 1943 and the Expeditionary Force at Amoy and Chusan. In New Zealand in 1846-7. In the Kaffir War in 1851-3. In The Crimean War 1854 -55 at Alma, Inkerman and Sebastopol.. At the taking of Kinbourn, gaining further medals, and the attack and capture of Canton 1857-8. And in the Trent Affair in Canada 1862-63. A highly decorated general born, raised and married in Ireland, and, after serving his Queen and Country for several decades with distinction, died, aged 92. The story of Ensign Boyd's 63rd regiment at Sebastopol. The siege of Sebastopol was to continue as grimly as before Inkerman with the troops suffering in the harsh winter conditions. On the 21st December the Russians made another sortie attacking a detachment of the 50th (West Kent) Regiment. Two companies of the 38th were sent to reinforce them launching a charge at the Russian forces driving them back and inflicting considerable losses on them. For this action a Lieutenant Gordon of the 38th was mention in Lord Raglan dispatches and promoted being transferred to the Coldstream Guards. Four soldiers of the 38th were killed during the fight. After this action there was little fighting during the winter of 1854-55 but the Regiment was kept busy repairing outposts and trenches. Conditions for the men improved little and disease killed far more than the actual fighting. A shortage of British troops meant they could not spare any for a major offensive against the Russians. The French however kept up pressure on the enemy, which although not always successful, inflicted heavy casualties upon them. One such attack included the assault on the fort at Redan and the 38th were to take part in a diversionary action to the left of the fort. The 5th Brigade, of which the 38th was part, captured the cemetery and occupied some of the suburbs of Sevastopol. Despite this the main French attack on the fort got pinned down so Raglan ordered British forces to directly attack Redan itself. It was during this attack that the former Colonel of the 38th, Brigadier Sir John Campbell, was killed. Lieutenant-Colonel Louth fought fiercely but was wounded in the head. Louth was removed to a house where his wounds were dressed only to be wounded again by an enemy shell which killed another officer, a corporal and wounded 4 others. Being invalided home Louth was to die shortly after reaching Portsmouth. The siege was to continue but on the 2nd Aril 1856 the Russians signed a peace treaty. For its actions during the Siege the 38th was awarded the Battle Honour “Sevastopol”. Awards and Casualties The men of the 38th Regiment of Foot received the Crimea Medal with many being entitled to the three clasps “Alma”, “Inkerman” and “Sebastopol”. However about 40 were present at Balaclava and so also received the clasp “Balaklava”. Although no Victoria Crosses were won by the Regiment for the Crimea some 15 Distinguished Conduct Medals were awarded to other ranks. Sparks was made CB while a number of officers received French or Turkish awards. A total of 3 officers and 43 other ranks were killed in action and 217 wounded. Another 2 officers and 486 men died of various reasons during the campaign while a further 23 officers and 260 men were invalided home. Nine men were captured by the enemy and 8 were convicted of being deserters. The Regiment left Balaclava for England on the 26th June 1856 on HMS Caser with a total strength of 850, less than half its original strength. The sword is most attractive and now restored to it's former beauty and considerable glory. The scabbard does have various areas of denting. A point of interest is as follows;The British and American Steam Navigation Company, was a pre-Cunard steamship line whose second vessel, the President, sank in 1841. On board was General William Power’s father. Family legend is that he had the title deeds in his possession for the land on which Madison Square Gardens now sits.
1888 Pattern Lee Metford Boer War Bayonet MkI, Type 2 Type 2With scarce non regulation scabbard.2 Rivet hilt. With scabbard. Good condition for age all usual British acceptance marks
18th Century Moghal Sword, of the Battle of Plassey 1757 Apparently, through family legend, captured at the Battle of Plassey by a British Officer, and bought back as a war souvenir. The Battle of Plassey was an East India Company victory over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies, establishing Company rule in India and British rule over much of South Asia for the next 190 years. The battle took place on 23 June 1757 at Palashi, West Bengal, on the riverbanks of the Bhagirathi River, about 150 km north of Calcutta, near Murshidabad, then the capital of the Nawab of Bengal. The opponents were Siraj Ud Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, and the British East India Company. The battle was waged during the Seven Years' War (1756–1763) and in a mirror of their European rivalry the French East India Company sent a small contingent to fight against the British East India Company. Overall russet finish with feint traces of gold decoration on the slightly loose hilt. Small picture in the gallery shows Robert Clive after the victory at Plassey. [Picture for historical information and context only, not included].
18th Century, Very Rare Reservoir -Butt Air Gun circa 1785, Likely German. As far back as 250BC, Pharaoh Ktesbias II of Egypt, first described the use of compressed air to propel a projectile. Modern air gun history began in the 15th century. These weapons were known as wind chambers and were designed using an air reservoir connected to a cannon barrel. These devices were capable of propelling a four pound lead ball over a distance of 500 yards, and able to penetrate 3 inch oak board. These weapons rivaled the power of gun powder based firearms of that time and came into use in the Napoleonic wars in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Due to the fact that high powered air guns were both silent and deadly, they were feared by many, Nobility tired to keep these air guns out of the hands of commoners Air guns even saw much combat in battle, an Austrian Army used a air rifle designed by Grandoni in 1779 that shot 20 rounds of .44 cal. bullets at speeds as high as 1,000 feet per second. They fought well against Napoleon's Army and even though the Austrian Army was out numbered and lost the battle, the Austrian's armed with air guns demoralized Napoleon's Army and they suffered had a great number of casualties. Air guns were so feared by Napoleon's Army that any enemy soldier captured with a air rifle was executed as an assassin. One important reason Napoleon was so upset about air guns was because there was no cloud of smoke upon firing which would allow the sniper to be pin-pointed and killed. One of the most famous air guns in history is the .36 caliber air gun that Lewis and Clark took along with them on their expedition of 1804-06. They took it along for hunting, just in case the black powder got wet and also used it to impress the Indians, the Indians call this air rifle, "The smokeless thunder stick.". In overall very fine condition. The round, smoothbore, appox .44 calibre, sighted, steel barrel with smooth untouched surfaces, fine bore with front site.. Exposed cocking "hammer" with an external mechanism and sculpted mainspring: matching, smooth, blued surfaces and in functional order. Complete with its original air release lever. Leather wrapped, conical, hollow, steel butt stock/air reservoir. Matching mechanism with all of its original components, a strong mainspring and air release valve. Very fine stock A very nice and complete example of a rare late 18th century German or Austrian Reservoir-Butt Air Rifle. Overall length, 55". As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
19th century Italian Artillery Sabre by Schnitzler and Kirshbaum Modelled on the British 1788 pattern, a good example of these early Italian Cavalry Sabres. Marked S&K at the Forte. Langets missing, with steel combat scabbard.
A 'Wild West' Sharps of Philadelphia 4 Barrel Derringer These guns were made from about 1860 to 1872 in Philadelphia and this specimen is in remarkable condition for being made around 1868. This is a nice example of a Sharps Pepperbox in caliber .30 Rimfire still showing a good amount of original finish. This Derringer has a brass frame, blued and fluted 3" barrels, and wooden grips with a squared frame juncture. Serial number on the bottomstrap is in the 19,000 range. The right side of the frame is marked in a circular pattern "C.SHARPS & CO. PHILADA. PA." while the left side is marked "C SHARPS PATENT 1859". This was a fascinating design that incorporated a rotating firing pin that turned 90 degrees over to the next barrel each time the hammer was cocked. The firing pin rotates on a small cylinder at the face of the hammer. A hand pushes a series of cams on the back of the cylinder to turn the pin...much the same way a revolver cylinder is turned by a similar mechanism.The Derringer pistol that we have here evolved from the name of a small calibre pistol used to assasinate Abraham Lincoln, from that time on, all small calibre concealable pistols have been called or utilised the name Derringer. In the century and a half since it happened, populist history has largely boiled down the assassination of Abraham Lincoln to the story of a single perpetrator: John Wilkes Booth. Four of the eight convicted for participating in the conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln in April of 1865 died on the gallows three months later. But in his appearance at the Camden County Historical Society, Lincoln scholar Hugh Boyle made clear that the real story is a sprawling epic. It involves a gang of Confederate operatives and sympathizers that first plotted to kidnap the President and, when that failed, decided to murder not only him, but the Vice President and Secretary of State as well. Their goal was to decapitate and destabilize the federal government in hopes of forcing a settlement to the war that would avoid the South's total defeat. In the end, they managed to kill Lincoln and seriously injure Secretary of State William Seward. By 1865, the South was a vast swath of utter destruction. It was a time of massive upheaval, great danger and high emotion for the South, so the idea that someone might be thinking about attacking the President or other high government officials was not a crazy one in the atmosphere of the times." The frustrations and angst of the Southern cause came to a boil in April of 1865. Its capital, Richmond, Va. -- now a burned out hulk of a city -- was captured and occupied by Ulysses S. Grant's forces on April 3. Six days later, Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia surrendered and was disarmed at Appomattox. Three days after that -- April 11 -- President Lincoln, standing in a second-story window of the White House, spoke to a huge crowd in a city gone wild in celebration of the Appomattox surrender. But among those listening in that crowd were John Wilkes Booth and 21-year-old Lewis Thornton Powell. John Wilkes Booth, one of America's most famous actors of the time, and Lewis Thornton Powell were enraged by the President's White House speech on April 11. Three days later, Booth killed Lincoln in Ford's Theater while Powell tried to kill Secretary of State William Seward in his home. Booth was one of the country's most famous actors and an ardent supporter of the Confederacy. His young companion, Powell, was a Confederate army veteran and a second cousin of Confederate general John B. Gordon The gang leader -- 27-year-old John Wilkes Booth -- was tracked down and shot to death by Union soldiers in Virginia. Eight others were convicted of being conspirators with Booth. Four were sentenced to death and hung, including the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A 12th to 15th Century Medieval Bearded Side Axe An iron long bearded axe with an off set blade. A good axe suitable for combat and craft. Since the days of the Roman Legionaries, soldiers were both warriors and builders. The Romans trained their soldiers not only for combat, but for engineering and fort building, for the times of combat may be few, but the times of construction were many. Forts, roads, defenses, siege engines and drain construction were all part of a Legionary's skills, and although the armies of ancient Rome died centuries before, the lessons for future warriors lived on. A medieval foot soldier would be simply armed, with a weapon that may have had many functions, and the axe was the most effective of them all. This side axe would have been incredibly effective in the hands of a trained exponant of the battle axe, but, it would have been just as effective for aiding the construction of forts, battlements, boats or engines of war. Affixed to a later haft. 13cm blade 13cm wide.
A 13th Century European Axe of Unusual Beard Form Used from circa the late 13th century to 14th century. Derived from the original Viking bearded axe form. Used at the time and era of the first War of Scottish Independence under Sir William Wallace against King Edward Ist [also known as Edward Longshanks] and during the period of the later battles with Robert The Bruce, and continually on during the Crusades era. This axe was most likely most effective [if or when used in battle] for foot use, but it could easily have been just as useful as a horsemounted small axe. It's design has a very unusual bottom section, with a curve. This is either a break, that was reformed, or it was designed as such, but we can't really decide which. The story of axes in warfare; An axe was famously used by the Scottish King Robert Bruce. The axe that he brought down onto the head of Sir Henry de Bohun, at Bannonckburn in 1313, cleaving it clean in two.If designed as such it is a scarce example, and there are no exactly similar examples [that we know of] in the London Museum Catalogue of 1940. There were several forms of axes that were favoured in combat in that era. The foot soldier's axe could be tall and substantial yet ideally not too heavy as to be unweildy, and yet highly effective for bringing down a knight on horseback. A belt axe like this example, smaller and for close quarter action or throwing. The horse-mounted axe was also smaller like this, with a shorter haft, yet must still have the power and cutting abilities to cleave through a Knights Great Helm or chain mail alike. That is the form that this axe takes. Some horse-mounted axes might also had a rear mounted spike, but the single blade was likely most effective, as the rotating action required for the knight to change his hand held position from spike to blade might leave one exposed for a vital second or two. This axe form was also used well into the Crusades era and is depicted in many early illuminated manuscripts of the time, showing them in use in many forms, in the great battles and seiges of the Holy Land by the Crusader Knights. All axes at that time also doubled as working tools, when appropriate, for iron was a hugely valuable commodity [long before the Industrial Revolution] and extremely costly to make. A soldier's axe, in time of peace, would, and did, make an eminently suitable woodworking axe, thus making the axe a unique and most valuable universally useful item during pre, and later Medeavil, Europe. Of course many soldiers were simply peasants outside of war time, and their return the land, or to manual craftwork meant their axe of war, became an axe of toil. Appox 0.5 kilo
A 13th Century Iron Head Battle Mace Pineapple shaped head with large mounting hole. The type as were also used as a Flail Mace, with the centre mount being filled with lead and a chain mounted hook, when it was not mounted on a haft, as this mace is. Flattened pyramidical protuberances, possibly English. Made for a mounted Knight to use as an Armour and Helmet Crusher in mortal combat. It would have been used up to the 15th to 16th century. On a Flail it had the name of a Scorpion in England or France, or sometimes a Battle-Whip. It was also wryly known as a 'Holy Water Sprinkler'. King John The Ist of Bohemia used exactly such a weapon, as he was blind, and the act of 'Flailing the Mace' meant lack of site was no huge disadvantage in close combat. Although blind he was a valiant and the bravest of the Warrior Kings, who perished at the Battle of Crecy against the English in 1346. On the day he was slain he instructed his Knights [both friends and companions] to lead him to the very centre of battle, so he may strike at least one blow against his enemies. His Knights tied their horses to his, so the King would not be separated from them in the press, and they rode together into the thick of battle, where King John managed to strike not one but at least four noble blows. The following day of the battle, the horses and the fallen knights were found all about the body of their most noble King, all still tied to his steed. Fitted on a late wooden haft, approx. 2.5 inch head.
A 13th Century, Knight's Iron Battle Mace Head Pineapple shaped head with large mounting hole. The type as were also used as a Flail Mace, with the centre mount being filled with lead and a chain mounted hook, when it was not mounted on a haft, as this mace is. Flattened pyramidical protuberances, possibly English or East European. Made for a mounted Knight to use as an Armour and Helmet Crusher in mortal combat. It would have been used up to the 15th to 16th century. On a Flail it had the name of a Scorpion in England or France, or sometimes a Battle-Whip. It was also wryly known as a 'Holy Water Sprinkler'. King John The Ist of Bohemia used exactly such a weapon, as he was blind, and the act of 'Flailing the Mace' meant that his lack of site was no huge disadvantage in close combat. Although blind he was a valiant and the bravest of the Warrior Kings, who perished at the Battle of Crecy against the English in 1346. On the day he was slain he instructed his Knights [both friends and companions] to lead him to the very centre of battle, so he may strike at least one blow against his enemies. His Knights tied their horses to his, so the King would not be separated from them in the press, and they rode together into the thick of battle, where King John managed to strike not one but at least four noble blows. The following day of the battle, the horses and the fallen knights were found all about the body of their most noble King, all still tied to his steed.
A 13th to14th Century Short Bearded Axe. Mounted As A Horseman's axe In excavated condition but very sound indeed, with a proud 'hammer' rear section, ideal for helmet breaking, or for an aid to wood splitting. The beauty of such axes is their incredible flexibility for use, either in combat, or, as a utility axe. Likely of Germanic Eastern European origin. An axe that could be most effectively used for splitting and smashing mail and armour while on horseback. This axe was made and used in the Crusades period, during the time and area of influence of the Teutonic Order. The Livonian Teutonic Knights were a German religious and military order originally founded during the siege of Acre in the Third Crusade and modeled after the Knights Templars and Hospitalers, the Teutonic Knights moved to eastern Europe early in the 13th century. There, under their grand master, Hermann von Salza, they became powerful and prominent. In 1198, the Teutonic Order started the Livonian Crusade. Despite numerous setbacks and rebellions, by 1290, Livonians, Latgalians, Selonians, Estonians (including Oeselians), Curonians and Semigallians had been all gradually subjugated. Denmark and Sweden also participated in fight against Estonians. In 1229, responding to an appeal from the Duke of Poland, they began a crusade against the pagan Slavs of Prussia. They became sovereigns over lands they conquered over the next century. In a series of campaigns, the Teutonic Knights gained control over the whole Baltic coast, founding numerous towns and fortresses and establishing Christianity. The Teutonic Order's attempts to conquer Orthodox Russia (particularly the Republics of Pskov and Novgorod), an enterprise endorsed by Pope Gregory IX, can also be considered as a part of the Northern Crusades. One of the major blows for the idea of the conquest of Russia was the Battle of the Ice in 1242. With or without the Pope's blessing, Sweden also undertook several crusades against Orthodox Novgorod. Old, replaced, wood haft. A most effective battle axe if and when used for that purpose. In the gallery there is an early, original illustration, from an early manuscript. It shows a Saxon coerl, [or churl] a non-servile peasant or common person, who is in combat against a warrior in mail armour, with his axe. This is a perfect example of illustrating how a weapon of this form, can, in one instance, be deemed an implement of battle and combat, then, in the next, to return to it's function as tool of toil [once the coerl returns to his labours, should he survive the battle of course]. This is why the axe is such wonderful implement of history, simply due to it's flexibility of use. During it's entire working life it has a useful function for every single occurrence that it's use is needed, albeit in peace or war. Handled and carried, either by a peasant warrior, horseman, knight, or freeman. And if lost on a battlefield, when recovered centuries later, it is still, in it's most part, complete, due to it's robust and powerful nature of construction. So often, when a sword or dagger of the same early era is recovered, there is so little left it may be barely a shadow of it's former self.
A 15th Century German Dagger With single edge and armour piercing reinforced tip. A rare piece from the period of the Battle of Agincourt. In battlefield recovery condition.
A 1756 Pattern Tower Of London, British Elliot Light Dragoon Pistol This is a truly superb example, with signs of combat use naturally, but in singularly good order with an exceptional patina, that can only accumulate through the passing centuries. This is a most rare version, of a very scarcely seen pistol, as this particular flintlock has the early land pattern type furniture, such as the elongated sideplate with ear extention, only usually seen on the old British heavy dragoon pistol that preceeeded it. This may well have been one of the earliest pistols used in the Americas, during the American Revolution period. Various surviving examples of American domestic dragoon pistols, such as in the Smithsonian [and similar elite collections] have such similar pattern furniture. The story of how the pistol pattern came about, and thus acquired it's name, is as follows; George Augustus Eliott was a man of renown efficiency. Scottish born in 1717, he rose through the ranks to become Aide-de-Camp to King George II by 1756. In 1759, he raised and commanded the 1st Light Horse and thus began the concept of Light Dragoons in the British Army. At the time, commanders of irregular forces could outfit the men as they chose, and Elliot went about designing improved weapons and equipment for his Troop of Horse. His legacy is the Elliot Light Dragoon Pistol, the Elliot Light Dragoon Carbine, and the Elliot Light Dragoon Saddle. The light dragoon pistol was the result of a need for a smaller lighter cavalry sidearm than the longer. Heavy Dragoon Pattern which had seen service throughout the Seven Year War. The Elliott Pattern saw service through the American War of Independence and into the Napoleonic Wars. Its short 9” barrel made it a light and extremely maneuverable weapon. Available in .62 cal. Smoothbore Fitted with brass furniture throughout it has much simpler lines than its predecessor. Lacking the raised carving around the trigger guard and lock, and also lacking a ramrod entry pipe, it was easier, faster to produce. One of the conclusions from battle experiences during the Seven Years War was the necessity of a pattern of pistol specifically for the Light Dragoon Regiments of the British Army. Introduced in the 1760s, the Light Dragoon pistol graced of holsters of the brave troopers of the 16th and 17th Light Dragoons along with American mounted units loyal to the crown. The latter included the King's American Dragoons, Tarleton's famous British Legion, along with the Hussars and Light Dragoons of the Queen's Rangers. Both the British Legion and the Queen's Rangers skirmished with the France's Lauzun Legion of Hussars during the Yorktown Campaign. After the American Revolution, this pistol continued to be used by Light Dragoons into the Napoleonic Wars. It was very slightly improved over the decades of it service with the earlier examples having a slightly banana shaped lock with swan neck cock, the later ones having a straighter lined lock and a ring neck cock. It was however, slowly fazed out after the Napoleonic Wars as the introduction of the New Land Pattern [with it's captive ramrod system] took hold. This pistol was a frontline issue arm that would have seen incredible service as the faithful sidearm to a British light dragoon/hussar trooper, over very likely four decades or more. This pistol requires attention to the ramrod and pipe which we are attending to.
A 1767 to the Revolutionary War Period, French Grenadier of Infantry Sword With brass hilt and steel blade. The hilt has a loss of quillon and half langet. A scarce sword from a most turbulent era of French history. Used from the era of France's alliance to America in the Revolutionary War of 1777, right through the French Revolution 1792. There are several such swords in Smithsonian in America. French participation in North America was initially maritime in nature and marked by some indecision on the part of its military leaders. In 1778 American and French planners organized an attempt to capture Newport, Rhode Island, then under British occupation. The attempt failed, in part because Admiral d'Estaing did not land French troops prior to sailing out of Narragansett Bay to meet the British fleet, and then sailed for Boston after his fleet was damaged in a storm. In 1779, d'Estaing again led his fleet to North America for joint operations, this time against British-held Savannah, Georgia. About 3,000 French joined with 2,000 Americans in the Siege of Savannah, in which a naval bombardment was unsuccessful, and then an attempted assault of the entrenched British position was repulsed with heavy losses. Support became more notable when in 1780; 6,000 soldiers led by Rochambeau were landed at Newport, abandoned in 1779 by the British, and they established a naval base there. Rochambeau and Washington met at Wethersfield, Connecticut in May 1781 to discuss their options. Washington wanted to drive the British from New York City, and the British force in Virginia, led first by turncoat Benedict Arnold, then by Brigadier William Phillips, and eventually by Charles Cornwallis, was also seen as a potent threat that could be fought with naval assistance. These two options were dispatched to the Caribbean along with the requested pilots; Rochambeau, in a separate letter, urged de Grasse to come to the Chesapeake Bay for operations in Virginia. Following the Wethersfield conference, Rochambeau moved his army to White Plains, New York and placed his command under Washington. De Grasse received these letters in July, at roughly the same time Cornwallis was preparing to occupy Yorktown, Virginia. De Grasse concurred with Rochambeau, and sent back a dispatch indicating that he would reach the Chesapeake at the end of August, but that agreements with the Spanish meant he could only stay until mid-October. The arrival of his dispatches prompted the Franco-American army to begin a march for Virginia. De Grasse reached the Chesapeake as planned, and disembarked troops to assist Lafayette's army in the blockade of Cornwallis. The arrival of a British fleet sent to dispute de Grasse's control of the Chesapeake was defeated on September 5 at the Battle of the Chesapeake, and the Newport fleet delivered the French siege train to complete the allied military arrival. The Siege of Yorktown and following surrender by Cornwallis on October 19 were decisive in ending major hostilities in North America.Starting with the Siege of Yorktown, Benjamin Franklin never informed France of the secret negotiations that took place directly between Britain and the United States. Britain relinquished her rule over the Thirteen Colonies and granted them all the land south of the Great Lakes and east of the Mississippi River. However, since France was not included in the American-British peace discussions, the alliance between France and the colonies was broken. Thus the influence of France and Spain in future negotiations was limited. Last photo in the gallery is of the depiction of the Second Battle of the Virginia Capes (Battle of the Chesapeake).
A 1770's Brass Hilted Boy's or Midshipman's Sword An interesting boy's or midshipman's sword from the period of the American revolutionary war. Cast brass rococo hilt, with shell guard and knuckle bow. Overall length 36 inches. Good condition. There is a picture in the gallery by Thomas Rowlandson of a similar sword worn by a young boy officer [midshipman] of the Royal Navy in the 18th century. In the 18th century there were no regualtions for sword patterns, so a sword such as this would have been perfect and worn by a young junior naval officer. The rank of midshipman originated during the Tudor and Stuart eras, and originally referred to a post for an experienced seaman promoted from the ordinary deck hands, who worked in between the main and mizzen masts and had more responsibility than an ordinary seaman, but was not a military officer or an officer in training. The first published use of the term midshipman was in 1662. The word derives from an area aboard a ship, amidships, but it refers either to the location where midshipmen worked on the ship, or the location where midshipmen were berthed. By the 18th century, four types of midshipman existed: midshipman (original rating), midshipman extraordinary, midshipman (apprentice officer), and midshipman ordinary. Some midshipmen were older men, and while most were officer candidates who failed to pass the lieutenant examination or were passed over for promotion, some members of the original rating served, as late as 1822, alongside apprentice officers without themselves aspiring to a commission. By 1794, all midshipmen were considered officer candidates. The everage age of entry in the 18th century was 12, but some of younger age were certainly known of.
A 1790 British Naval Officer's Sword, With a Fine Gilt and Ivory Hilt Good steel blade. In lovely condition, with 90% of it's original gilt remaining to the hilt, and superb fluted ivory. The form of sword was used by officer's of marines and navy during the Battle of The Nile, against Napoleon's forces in the Egyptian campaign. A most successful conflict for Britain, fought by Admiral Nelson against the French fleet, and it's infantry forces, including the Egyptian Mamlukes, commanded by Admiral François-Paul Brueys d'Aigailliers.
A 1796 British Flank Company Officer's Sabre. With Copper Gilt Hilt A most attractive sword based on the 1796 Light Dragoon sbare but slightly shorter for the benefit of an officer that fought on foot. The hilt is beautifully engraved with Union flag shield nd stands of arms, the lion's head pommel and wire bound fishskin grip. The blade has fine engraving with royal cyphers and crest of the king. There is a lot of dark blue remaining and gilt within the engraving. Old repair to the knucklebow.
A 1796 Volunteer Light Dragoon Sword With brass P hilt, ribbed wooden grip and typical deeply swept curved blade. Some thirty-four regiments of fencible cavalry regiments were raised in 1794 and 1795, in response to an invasion scare. At the same time, a large number of troops of volunteer cavalry were raised on a county level, consisting of local gentry and yeoman farmers; from the latter they took the description yeomanry. These troops formed into yeomanry regiments, organised broadly by county, around 1800; their history thereafter is complex, with many disbanding, reforming, and changing title intermittently. However, most remained in existence throughout the nineteenth century, seeing occasional service quelling riots and helping to maintain public order.
A 17th Century King Charles Iind Period Flintlock By F. Phillips Of London Almost certainly by Francis Phillips of who was free of the Gunmakers Co. then master. A most beautiful rare pistol, with brass furniture, including a grotesque mask long spurred buttcap, baluster barrel form ramrod pipes, a serpentine sideplate and a trigger guard with a fleur de lys end. The lock is of typical 17th century 'banana' form, with strawberry leaf engraving, and the makers name, F. Phillips. Ivory tipped ramrod a likely replacement. This is the form of pistol used in the era of the War of the Grand Alliance [The Nine Years War], such as The Battle of the Boyne in Ireland The Williamite War in Ireland {"the war of the two kings"} was a conflict between Jacobites (supporters of Catholic King James II) and Williamites (supporters of Protestant Prince William of Orange) over who would be King of England, Scotland and Ireland. It is also called the Jacobite War in Ireland or the Williamite–Jacobite War in Ireland. The cause of the war was the deposition of James II as King of the Three Kingdoms in the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688. James was supported by the mostly Catholic "Jacobites" in Ireland and hoped to use the country as a base to regain his Three Kingdoms. He was given military support by France to this end. For this reason, the War became part of a wider European conflict known as the Nine Years' War (or War of the Grand Alliance). Some Protestants of the established Church in Ireland also fought on the side of King James. James was opposed in Ireland by the mostly Protestant "Williamites", who were concentrated in the north of the country. William landed a multi-national force in Ireland, composed of English, Scottish, Dutch, Danish and other troops, to put down Jacobite resistance. James left Ireland after a reverse at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 and the Irish Jacobites were finally defeated after the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. William defeated Jacobitism in Ireland and subsequent Jacobite risings were confined to Scotland and England. However, the War was to have a lasting effect on Ireland, confirming British and Protestant rule over the country for over a century. A picture in the gallery by Benjamin West shows the King at the Battle of the Boyne with his similar pistol in his saddle holster. Stock with some minor period repairs at the forend. 17 inches long overall.
A 19th Century Mayanmar Kachin Naga Dao Headhunting has been a practice among the Naga tribes of India and Myanmar. The practice was common up to the 20th century and may still be practised in isolated Naga tribes of Burma. Many of the Naga warriors still bear the marks (tattoos and others) of a successful headhunt. In Assam, in the northeast of India, all the peoples living south of the Brahmaputra River—Garos, Khasis, Nagas, and Kukis—formerly were headhunters including the Mizo of the Lusei Hills who also hunt heads of their enemies which was latter abolished with Christianity introduced in the region. The simple wood handle is wrapped with basketry towards the blade. Differential corrosion has disclosed the blade to have a piled structure. The single edged blade, with a slightly convex curved edge, is illustrated edge up. The flat face of the blade is shown in the full length view and in the blade detail photograph; the side of the blade shown in the detail photograph of the handle has an indistinct bevel, occupying about two-fifths of the blade's width, where the blade thins to form the edge. Serpentine lamination to the blade. Overall length: 61 cm.; blade length:48 cm. One photo is of a Kachin villager wearing a near identical sword-dao photographed with Lt. Vincent Curl of special forces OSS Detachment 101 during World War II. A Naga is laying out his family skull trophies, a tree of Naga skulls in a national museum, and the last photo is of Naga tribesmen in 1875. All for information only.
A 19th Century 'Crimean War' Military Officer's Trunk, Probably Russian A wooden and steel strap banded military trunk from the Crimean war. Painted in faded pale Russian blue-grey. Said, from family history, to have been used by an officer of the 17th Lancers who acquired it from various kit captured from a Russian baggage train. The British officer then used it for his gun case and military kit during this campaign, and later by his sons.The last picture shows the bottom rear strap loops for mounting the trunk on the rear of a horse drawn baggage coach. 13 inches deep x 21.5 inches wide x 11.5 inches high.
A 19th Century British General's Ivory Hilted Mamaluke Sword With gilded mounts and ivory grip plates, langet cartouch of the scrossed sword and baton, the traditional symbol of a British General. The blade is nicely age patinated and has traces of inticate etching. The Mamaluke pattern British Army General's sword evolved from the swords captured at the Battle of The Nile and were brought back as war trophys by Admiral Lord Nelson. These beautiful ivory hilted swords so impressed The Duke of Wellington, and his senior officers, they were worn and adopted for wear during the Napoleonic Wars. There are several portraits of Wellington and his Generals in full uniform and adorned with such swords. The pattern was formally adopted by the British Crown as The Generals pattern in 1831. This 1831 pattern General's pattern sword, was carried by all Generals and Field Marshals in the British Army.
A 19th Century Dixon Musket Powder Flask With Embossed Body Copper body with brass adjustable measuring spout. Spring at fault. A beautiful flask but non working action due to spring. Circa 1840
A 19th Century English Copper Powder Flask A most charming 19th century late George Ivthpowder flask for a hunting fowling piece or musket. Spring lacking, opening to seam. Priced for decoration only.
A 19th Century French Cavalry Armour Back-Plate A great display piece of original French Heavy Cavalry Armour. Superb for a display of Stand-of-Arms
A 19th Century Long Prussian Cavalry Sabre By Alex Coppel of Solingen This is a very fine quality cavalry sabre, made by Alex Coppel of Solingen [his scales armourer's mark is present on the blade forte]. The hilt is three bar, in brass, with a carved horn grip. Likely from around 1840 to 1860. This is a most unusual form of sabre, similar to many, but identical to nothing quite we have seen with a very distinctive forward slant to the pommel.
A 19th Century Maasai Elders' Spear Head This long African spear is a very old with a long forged iron leaf shaped head and very good patina. The spear has long been the weapon of choice of the Maasai. It is used to defend cattle, community and the warrior himself against wild animals and invaders. Constructed from wood and iron, it is deemed to be the single most valued personal possession after livestock. There are countless romanticized tales that center around these tall, imposing Maasai giants, fighting courageously against man and beast. They are the mighty lion hunters of Africa, brave of heart and the able assassins of any human attacker. In fact, it is the dream of every Maasai warrior to kill an enemy by dispatching a deadly spear wound to the front torso. In doing so he would gain the highest honor from his kinsmen. This leaf bladed type was used by tribal elders and chiefs. The weapon has a three piece configuration. The spear heads are attached by hardened wax to the wooden grip. 38.5 inch long head
A 19th Century Medievil Style Knightly Sword 13th-14th Century style, but made in the Victorian era, most probably as a faithful representation and display piece for a country estate. In the early 19th century Sir Walter Scott's novels created a great resurgence in the interest in romantic Knightly tales of derring do and chivalry, and this was strongly followed in architecture at the time. To reflect the interest, numerous great castles and gothic mansions were built, and many were furnished with Knightly Armour and Weaponry such as this.
A 19th Century Scottish Highlanders Basket Hilted Regimental Sword 1828 Pattern, with traditional steel basket and double edged broadsword blade. As used by an officer in, say, the Thin Red Line at Balaklava, with the Highland Brigade, in the Sutherland Highlanders, the Black Watch or the Cameron Highlanders. The Scottish regiments fought with amazing distinction, and will well reknown ferocity and gallantry throughout the British Empire not least during Queen Victoria's reign. The Thin Red Line was a military action by the Sutherland Highlanders red-coated 93rd (Highland) Regiment at the Battle of Balaclava on 24 October 1854, during the Crimean War. In this incident, the 93rd, aided by a small force of Royal Marines and some Turkish infantrymen, led by Sir Colin Campbell, routed a Russian cavalry charge. Previously, Campbell’s Highland Brigade had taken part in actions at the Battle of Alma and the Siege of Sevastopol. There were more Victoria Crosses presented to the Highland soldiers at that time than at any other. The event was galvanized in the British press and became an icon of the qualities of the red coat in a war that was poorly managed and increasingly unpopular. Battle of Balaclava is noteworthy to history because of the bravery of the 93rd Highlanders stood solidly against repeated attacks by a larger Russian force. This stand led the 93rd Highlanders to be remembered in history as the "Thin Red Line". They served at all the great engagements in the Crimea, The Indian Mutiny the Afghan Wars, The Egypt Campaign, Tel el Kabir and at el Teb against the Mahdi, on the North West Frontier, and finally in the Boer War. One can only wonder what sights and sounds this sword has seen, and the great conflicts and battles it has served in. The sword is in very good condition but the grip fishskin is lacking in parts.
A 19th Century Victorian Royal Naval Officer's Sword Good brass hilt with traditional crowned anchor and wirebound fishskin grip. Etched blade with naval devices, dark patinated with overall areas of pitting. Used during the peak of the Empire from the Crimean War, the South African Wars, the Wars in Egypt, and the Boer War. The Napoleonic Wars left Great Britain the most powerful naval country in the world, with no meaningful rivals. The country's economic and strategic strength was buttressed by the fleet; localized military action was a staple of the not-entirely-peaceful "Pax Britannica". In addition, the threat of naval force was a significant factor in diplomacy. The navy was not idle however; the 19th century witnessed a series of transformations that turned the old wooden sailing navy into one of steam and steel. During the period of this swords use, the navy was often used against shore installations, such as those in the Baltic and Black Sea in the Crimean War of 1854 and 1855, also, to fight pirates; to hunt down slave ships; and to assist the army when sailors and marines were landed as naval brigades, as on many occasions between the siege of Sebastopol and the 1900 Boxer Rebellion. With a fleet larger than any two rivals combined, the British nation could take security for granted, but at all times the national leaders and public opinion supported a powerful navy, and service was of high prestige
A Beautiful 'Hounds Head' Charles IInd Horseman's Sword. Dated 'Anno 1665' This is truly an early sword of immense beauty and quality, in fact without question an absolute delight. The hilt has a superbly detailed, chiseled bronze, hound's head complimented by a very fine spiral twist, wire bound, ivory grip. With cast brass quillon. The blade is superbly engraved with mounted cavaliers and a motto [Latin?] that can be read reasonably easily but requires translation. Dated at the forte Anno 1665. The condition is overall superb. A very fine and rare piece. 77.5cm blade length. Although made 100 years before, there are several similar swords, in the Smithsonian and the Metropolitan, that were still in use by officer's during the Anglo-Indian-French wars during the 1760's in America, and in the American War of Independence 1776.
A Beautiful 17th Cent. Chinese-Tibetan Sword With Rayskin Coral & Turquoise A most rare and original antique sword, and what a find! Old original Chinese- Tibetan antique arms very rarely survive, and now are generally only to be seen in the biggest and best museums. This sword is a textbook representative example of the familiar Chinese-Tibetan form, well made and of good quality. The blade has traces still visible of the prominent hairpin pattern, the hallmark of traditional Tibetan blades, consisting of seven dark lines alternating with six light lines, caused by the different types of iron that were combined during the forging process. This was formed by combining harder and softer iron, referred to as "male iron" and "female iron" in traditional Tibetan texts, which was folded, nested together, and forged into one piece in a blade-making technique called pattern welding. The hilts are often made of engraved silver set with coral or turquoise, or in some rare instances are intricately chiseled and pierced in iron that is damascened in gold and silver. The different styles of swords that were once found in China and Tibet can be distinguished by several basic features, which include the type of blade, the form of hilt, the type of scabbard, and how the sword was designed to be worn. Traditional Tibetan texts divide swords into five principal types, each of which has a main subtype, for a total of ten basic types. These are in turn subdivided into dozens of further subtypes, many of which may, however, reflect legends and literary conventions rather than actual sword forms. Armour and weapons are certainly not among the images usually called to mind when considering the art or culture of Tibet, which is closely identified with the pacifism and deep spirituality of the Dalai Lama and with the compassionate nature of Tibetan Buddhism. However, this seeming paradox resolves itself when seen in the context of Tibetan history, which includes regular and extended periods of intense military activity from the seventh to the mid-twentieth century. Some excellent examples of Tibetan arms and armour can be found in museum collections today Other types were preserved for ceremonial occasions, the most important of which was the Great Prayer Festival, a month-long event held annually in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa. Historical armour and weapons were also preserved due to the long-standing tradition of placing votive arms in monasteries and temples, where they are kept in special chapels, known as gonkhang (mgon khang), and dedicated to the service of guardian deities. The title of Dalai Lama is first bestowed on Sonam Gyatso (1543–1588), the third hierarch of the Gelukpa school of Tibetan Buddhism, by the Mongolian prince Altan Khan, a descendent of the great Genghis Khan, in the sixteenth century. Because his two predecessors received the title posthumously, Sonam is called the Third Dalai Lama. His incarnation and successor, the Fourth Dalai Lama, is Mongolian and a relative of the Khan. In 1642, the Fifth Dalai Lama, Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (1617–1682), is installed as the undisputed ruler of Tibet. He becomes both a great scholar and an able administrator, earning the nickname "the Great Fifth." The Fifth Dalai lama creates the Tibetan theocratic state with the Dalai Lama at its head. For a dozen years, news of his death is hidden from the Chinese Qing emperor Kangxi by the regent Sangye Gyatso. Gyatso's protégé, the Sixth Dalai Lama, accedes in 1695. In 1717, after years of unrest, the Chinese emperor finally installs the Seventh Dalai Lama and proclaims Tibet a Chinese protectorate. Although there are representatives of the Manchus in Tibet, the region is largely left to function independently and does so for the next 200 years. Toward the end of the fifteenth century, Nepal is divided between the three sons of King Jayayakshamalla into three kingdoms: Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, and Patan. Over the next 250 years, the three kingdoms go through a process of consolidation and splintering, culminating in the reunification of the country under the Gorkha king Prithvi Narayana Shah in 1768–69. Kathmandu becomes the capital of the Gorkha kingdom shortly thereafter. Currently in one of the worlds greatest museums, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, there is an exhibition of Tibetan arms and armour. Item 36.25.1464., within the exhibition, is a near identical sword, dated as 17th century, used until the 19th century. Please note, for information purposes, almost every Chinese or Tibetan sword for sale today on the non specialist market, are common reproductions made in China, often sold as real. It is a sad reality that there are literally [for want of quantification] no original antique Sino -Tibetan swords remaining in China today. Despite many appearing for sale today within the Chinese market. Almost without exception, every sword that existed still in China, in the 1950's, was ordered destroyed under direction of the Cultural Revolution. Iron or steel was considered too precious, and all iron items, including cooking pots and eating vessels swords and daggers were ordered to be scrapped and destroyed. Everyone complied with this instruction. Overall 23 3/4 inches long.
A Beautiful 17th-18th Century, Moghul, Islamic Tulwar Sword With a very good steel blade with a fine armourer's seal mark. All steel hilt with single bar guard. Emperor Aurangzeb [or Muhiuddin Mohammed] was the last significant Mughal emperor. His reign lasted from 1658 to 1707. During this phase, the empire had reached its largest geographical expansion. Nevertheless it was during this time period that the first sign of decline of the great Moghul Empire was noticed. The reasons were many. The bureaucracy became corrupted and the army implemented outdated tactics and obsolete weaponry. The Moghul Empire was descended from Turko-Mongol, Rajput and Persian origins. It reigned a significant part of the subcontinent of Asia from the initial part of the 16th century to the middle of the 19th century. When it was at the peak of its power, around the 18th century, it controlled a major part of the Asian subcontinent and portions of the current Afghanistan. To understand it's wealth and influence, in 1600 the Emperor Akbar had revenues from his empire of £17.5 million pounds, and 200 years later, in 1800, the exchequer of the entire British Empire had revenues of just £16 million pounds. Photo in the gallery and thumbnail of Emperor Auranzeb with his Tulwar [information only, not included]
A Beautiful 1850's Victorian Albert Pattern South Salopian Cavalry Helmet In nice order for it's age and use that may well have been over 50 years. Good regimental badge with copper crown, replacement red horsehair plume. The Shropshire Yeomanry dates its origins to the French wars of 1793-1815. Volunteer cavalry units were raised throughout the country, with Shropshire raising many varied and exotic corps - the Brimstree Loyal Legion, the Pimhill Light Horse, the Oswestry Rangers and others. These mixed units were amalgamated in 1814 to form the Shrewsbury Yeomanry Cavalry, the South Shropshire Yeomanry Cavalry and the North Shropshire Yeomanry Cavalry. In 1828, the Shrewsbury Y.C. was absorbed into the South Shropshire, leaving two Regiments, known as the South Salopian and the North Salopian Yeomanry Cavalry. These in turn amalgamated in 1872 to form the Shropshire Yeomanry Cavalry. They date their origins to the raising of the Wellington Troop in 1795. The regiment's first active service came during the South African War, when volunteers served in the 13th (Shropshire) Company of the 5th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry. Three contingents of 13/5 served in South Africa, earning the first Shropshire Yeomanry battle-honour, 'South Africa 1900-1902'. During the 1914-18 War, The Shropshire Yeomanry served in the Western Desert of Egypt and in Palestine (against the Turks). The only V.C. to a Shropshire Regiment was won by Sgt. Harold Whitfield of the Yeomanry, for gallantry at Burj-el-Lisaneh in Palestine in 1918. This helmet is complete with it's original, 160 [or more] years old Victorian plume, but the plume is in very poor condition [not shown]. Overall light surface wear denting and surface fracture to the rear [see photos].
A Beautiful 18th Century Brass Blunderbuss By Barber of London Brass barrel engraved London and bears Tower armoury crossed sceptre proof marks. The blunderbuss furniture is all brass with an acorn finial trigger guard and a military style sideplate. The lock is somewhat in the early banana form, typical of the early to mid 18th century, with a the good and clear name of Mr. Barbar inscribed. It has a good and responsive action. The stock is fine walnut with some very fine 'fiddle back' grain on the butt. It has two ramrod pipes, and was made by one of the great makers and suppliers to the dragoon regiments and officers of his day, during the time of King George II. This would have seen service during the War known as King George's War of 1744-48, in America, and the 7 Years War, principally against the French but involving the whole of Europe, and once again, used in the era of the American Revolution and then in the Napaoleonic Wars. It would only have likeley to have stopped being used in the mid 19th century. Recognized experts like the late Keith Neal, D.H.L Back and Norman Dixon consider James Barbar to be the best gun maker of his day. Dixon states, "Almost without exception, original antique firearms made by James Barbar of London are of the highest quality". In Windsor Castle there are a superb pair of pistols by James Barbar and a Queen Anne Barbar pistol also appeared in the Clay P. Bedford exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Barbar supplied complete dragoon pistols for Churchill's Dragoons in 1745, also guns for the Duke of Cumberland's Dragoons during 1746 to 48, and all of the carbines for Lord Loudoun's regiment of light infantry in 1745. James was apprenticed to his father Louis Barbar in October of 1714. Louis Barbar was a well known gun maker who had immigrated to England from France in 1688. He was among many Huguenots (French Protestants) who sought refuge in England after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685. Louis was appointed Gentleman Armourer to King George I in 1717, and to George II in 1727. He died in 1741 . James Barbar completed his apprenticeship in 1722 and was admitted as a freeman to the Company of Gunmakers. By 1726 James had established a successful shop on Portugal Street in Piccadilly. After his father's death in 1741, James succeeded him as Gentleman Armourer to George II, and furbisher at Hampton Court. He was elected Master of the Gunmakers` Company in 1742. James Barbar died in 1773. The book "Great British Gunmakers 1740-1790" contains a detailed chapter on James Barbar and many fine photographs of his weapons. This lovely pistol is 19 inches long overall. It has had some past srvice restoration, but nothing at all onerous. The mainspring is replaced, the for-end stock has old repairs, and the rammer is a replacement. But, it is hardly surprising as this pistol may likely have seen rogourous combat service for upwards of 80 years. It is now a beauty and a fine example of the early British military gunsmiths art. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. Overall in very nice condition for age, with some old hammering at the barrel breech. We were sent a fabulous photograph of a painting by Sasha Beliaev showing a pirate holding his blunderbuss, a remarkably skillfull painting of immense quality. One of the best portraits we have seen of it's type in forty years. [Shown for educational purposes only]
A Beautiful 18th to 19th Century, Indo Persian Gold Koftgari Inlaid Ankus Steel blade hook and spike head with superb gold inlay known as Koftgari work with the matching hilt pommel, and a fine sectional haft [likely, either ivory or bone] inlaid with a red and black geometric ball and line pattern. The Ankus or elephant goad was the part of the elephant driver's equipment that was used to guide and instruct the elephant to follow his instructions. Although not strictly speaking a weapon, it is always traditionally revered as of the same status, and is always displayed alongside the normal armour and swords of the time in the great military museum collections. From about the mid 1st millennium BC elephants were used in warfare in India, gradually ousting war chariots from the battlefield. The last recorded use of elephants was in the late 18th century, although they continued to be used as draught animals. In the time of the Great Mughals in India (1526-1858) people either rode an elephant or sat in a ‘Howdah’. The most valuable elephants were protected by armour. Some were fully clad in armour, others had only their heads and parts of their trunk protected, others had no protection at all. Elephant armour was made of; plates and mail (As in the royal Armouries example), Scales sewn on a piece of cloth, brigandine (steel plates sewn in between layers of cloth), or just quilted cloth or leather. The armour also had a peculiarity – protective ‘ears’, two projections on the elephant’s head to protect the driver.
A Beautiful 19th Century English Copper Powder Flask Not maker marked, but of very fine quality indeed. I small body dent. Good spring action to the multi measure spout.
A Beautiful All Brass Mounted Early 19th Century English Flintlock Pistol From the Napoleonic Wars period a very fine condition brass barrel pistol indeed, with very fine engraved furniture, all in brass, including the lock plate. The all brass mounted pistols were often the weapon of choice for naval officer's due to the corrosive nature of sea spray on steel mounted pistols, similarly as ship's blunderbusses tended to bear brass rather that steel barrels. The action is as crisp as new. This is truly a delightful piece in wonderful condition.
A Beautiful Ancient Bronze Age Dagger Circa 12th Century B.C. This is a most handsome ancient bronze light dagger with double edged blade and panelled grip, in excellent condition, and fine ancient patination, with clay encrustation, from one of the most fascinating eras in ancient world history, the period of the so called Trojan Wars. The ancient Greeks believed the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern day Turkey near the Dardanelles. In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey . "The Iliad" relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy, while the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the Achaean leaders. Other parts of the war were told in a cycle of epic poems, which has only survived in fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets such as Virgil and Ovid. The war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked "for the fairest". Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris, who judged that Aphrodite, as the "fairest", should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus, fall in love with Paris, who took her to Troy. Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and the brother of Helen's husband Menelaus, led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy and besieged the city for ten years due to Paris' insult. After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse. The Achaeans slaughtered the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods' wrath. Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many founded colonies in distant shores. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern day Italy. This sword comes from that that great historical period, from the time of the birth of known recorded history, and the formation of great empires, the cradle of civilization, known as The Mycenaean Age, of 1600 BC to 1100 BC. Known as the Bronze Age, it started even centuries before the time of Herodotus, who was known throught the world as the father of history. Mycenae is an archaeological site in Greece from which the name Mycenaean Age is derived. The Mycenae site is located in the Peloponnese of Southern Greece. The remains of a Mycenaean palace were found at this site, accounting for its importance. Other notable sites during the Mycenaean Age include Athens, Thebes, Pylos and Tiryns. According to Homer, the Mycenaean civilization is dedicated to King Agamemnon who led the Greeks in the Trojan War. The palace found at Mycenae matches Homer's description of Agamemnon's residence. The amount and quality of possessions found at the graves at the site provide an insight to the affluence and prosperity of the Mycenaean civilization. Prior to the Mycenaean's ascendancy in Greece, the Minoan culture was dominant. However, the Mycenaeans defeated the Minoans, acquiring the city of Troy in the process. In the greatest collections of the bronze age there are swords exactly as this beautiful example. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art is the bronze sword of King Adad-nirari I, a unique example from the palace of one of the early kings of the period (14th-13th century BC) during which Assyria first began to play a prominent part in Mesopotamian history.Sword and weapons from this era were made in the Persian bronze industry, which was also influenced by Mesopotamia. Luristan, near the western border of Persia, it is the source of many bronzes, such as this sword, that have been dated from 1500 to 500 BC and include chariot or harness fittings, rein rings, elaborate horse bits, and various decorative rings, as well as weapons, personal ornaments, different types of cult objects, and a number of household vessels. A sword, found in the palace of Mallia and dated to the Middle Minoan period (2000-1600 BC), is an example of the extraordinary skill of the Cretan metalworker in casting bronze. The hilt of the sword is of gold-plated ivory and crystal. A dagger blade found in the Lasithi plain, dating about 1800 BC (Metropolitan Museum of Art), is the earliest known predecessor of ornamented dagger blades from Mycenae. It is engraved with two spirited scenes: a fight between two bulls and a man spearing a boar. Somewhat later (c. 1400 BC) are a series of splendid blades from mainland Greece, which must be attributed to Cretan craftsmen, with ornament in relief, incised, or inlaid with varicoloured metals, gold, silver, and niello. The most elaborate inlays--pictures of men hunting lions and of cats hunting birds--are on daggers from the shaft graves of Mycenae, Nilotic scenes showing Egyptian influence. The bronze was oxidized to a blackish-brown tint; the gold inlays were hammered in and polished and the details then engraved on them. The gold was in two colours, a deeper red being obtained by an admixture of copper; and there was a sparing use of neillo. The copper and gold most likely came from the early mine centres, in and around Mesopotamia, [see gallery] and the copper ingots exported to the Cretans for their master weapon makers. This dagger is in very nice condition . Although a lightweight piece, one would imagine it to be an extremely effective close quarter fighting knife. Approx 12 inches long overall
A Beautiful anf Fine Quality 18th Century German Hunting Sword, Cuttoe With a long maker marked blade, and with fine and elegant engraving. The hilt is eight sided carved horn, with brass S quillons and a brass button pommel. A most attractive and elegant long hunting sword. In America this form of sword was often called a cuttoe, a revolutionary war hangar sword. For similar examples please see G. C. Neumann's "Swords & Blades of the American Revolution"
A Beautiful Antique Renaissance Style 'Heroic' Armour Gorget Made in iron, in the Italianate 16th century style, somewhat reminiscent of the truly magnificent heroic amours made by master armourer Filippo Negroli (ca. 1510–1579) and his contemporaries. In the manner of armour that one can only now see in the greatest historical collections, such as the British Royal Collection, and in the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Of course, if this was by one of the finest renaissance armour masters, such as Negroli, it would quite simply be priceless, however, in many ways it is most fortunate it is not an original, as, in this case, it is easily affordable to most antique armour collectors, or, admirers and collectors of fine and beautiful things. It was likely made during the renaissance revival period, of the time of Sir Walter Scott, when that reknown Scots born British author was recreating the great historical periods. Such as in his heroic novels such as Ivanhoe, The Lady of the Lake and Rob Roy. The renaissance revival gripped the imagination of Europe, and many of the most famous armours were recreated, for the fortunate few, and cast from the originals held in the great museum collections. Fantastical neo classical and neo gothic mansions and great estates were created, by the new industrial magnates with the incredible wealth that they often commanded. The classical revival was superbly expressed in the extravagant décor, based on those earlier styles, that was commissioned to decorate their finest estates and grand palatial homes. This gorget is in very good condition, cast, and with fine patina. The last picture in the gallery is an original period portrait of a plain and simpler gorget being worn, without full armour [for information only not included]. When full armour was not suitable or required the gorget was often worn on it's own as a badge of rank. Width 9 inches approx.
A Beautiful Antique Royal Vienna Porcelain Cabinet Plate By Griener Hand painted by one of the finest artists of Royal Vienna, and signed Griener. A portrait bust of Graf von Zeppelin With gold reflief border. Pre WW1 early 20th Century. Royal Vienna mark in underglazed blue. Gilding of the finest quality 99% good or better condition.
A Beautiful British Dragoon Basket Hilted Sword, Mid 18th Century, As used by the Scot's Dragoon's and the 7th Queens Dragoons in the 1740's to 1790's. Made by English blade maker Harvey, and bearing the GR Cypher of King George. Harvey may be one of the marks of renown Birmingham maker, Samuel Harvey, 1718-1778, who supplied many basket hilted swords to the British Crown, mostly for use by Highland troops. This sword is marked with the surname alone, HARVEY below the Crown and Cypher [the overlapping monogramme of GR] for King George. His more common mark was a running wolf, his other marks could be Harvey or S.Harvey. The fabulous basket hilt has the large oval ring insert, for the holding of the horses reins while gripping the sword when riding to battle, and part of the original buff hide basket liner. Wire bound fishskin grip, discoid pommel. There is a near identical sword by Harvey, bearing the same form of maker mark and crown GR in a collection of American War of Independence weaponry featured in "Swords and Blades of the American Revolution" by George C. Neumann. Page 148 sword 261s The shortage of cavalry in the Revolutionary War was a major drawback for the British. A strong cavalry presence at battles like Long Island and Brandywine could have enabled the British to encircle the Americans and prevent their retreat. It is possible that a strong cavalry force would have captured Washington’s army entirely during the march south through New Jersey in 1776. This is the form of sword used by the Scot's Greys Dragoons in the 7 Years War against France, and by the 7th Queen's Dragoons. Portraits from the time show this very sword as worn.
A Beautiful British Heavy Dragoon Pattern Flintlock Pistol The pistol pattern as was used in the seven years war against France in the Americas by the British heavy dragoons. With it's typical long barrel, brass land pattern furniture, good tight mainspring on the double lined steel lock, that was engraved [refreshed]. It also bears the traditional crowned GR mark and ordnance pattern stamp. This is a beautiful looking pistol of superb proportions. It's patina is simply lustrous and we hope this is seen well enough in the photographs.12 inch barrel The battles of seven years war, in which British heavy dragoons served with distinction; French and Indian War 1754-1763 encompassed some famous battles, including in 1754 Fort Necessity 1755 Beauséjour 1755 Monongahela River 1755 Lake George 1756 Oswego 1757 Fort William Henry 1758 Fort Ticonderoga 1758 Louisbourg 1758 Fort Frontenac 1759 Fort Niagara 1760 Quebec 1760 Montreal. This pistol has had considerable restoration, and that is reflected in the price, but it is a beautiful piece of most decorative and impressive weaponry. It came from the 'Nepalese cache' a truly amazing source of old British weaponry that had been stored over the past centuries by the Kings of Nepal, in the former palace of an executed Nepalese Prime Minister, that were discovered and purchased by the eminent Christian Cranmer, and featured on a Discovery channel documentary.
A Beautiful Early 19th Century American Folk Art Pen Work Walking Stick Later mounted in England with a staghorn handle with a silver hallmarked collar made in Sheffield silver in 1904. The scene is beautifully done and highly intricate. It depicts a brick built house, within a garden of pine trees and a great tree. The scene also has mounted huntsmen, coming past the house, with whips and chasing a fox or a wolf with hounds. There is also a walking, pipe smoking figure, and a man holding an iron pronged capture device, and a dog walking from a kennel. All the men are wearing Shakos.
A Beautiful Fine Quality Napoleonic Wars Era Continental Dragoon Pistol With fine walnut stock, steel barrel, brass forend barrel band and brass furniture. Very similar to the French Royal and Imperial style and very possibly Austrian. Percussion conversion action to enhance it's performance and to increase it's working life into the 19th century. The Austrian cavalry consisted of cuirassiers, dragoons, chevaulegeres (light dragoons), hussars and uhlans. They were excellent swordsman and horsemen, well-trained and well-mounted and enjoyed great reputation in Europe. For French cavalry officer, de Brack, the Hungarian hussars were some of "the best European cavalry." Sir Wilson wrote about the Austrian cavalry: "... both cuirassiers and hussars are superb". Anoher British observer described their cuirassiers in 1814 in Paris as "outstanding". According to "The Armies of Europe": "The [Austrian] cavalry is excellent. The heavy or "German" cavalry, consisting of Germans and Bohemians is well horsed, well armed, and always efficient. The light cavalry has, perhaps, lost by mixing up the German chevau-légers with the Polish lancers, but its Hungarian hussars will always remain the models of all light cavalry." Possibly used at such great battlews such as Austerlitz. The Battle of Austerlitz, also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of Napoleon's greatest victories, where the French Empire effectively crushed the Third Coalition. On 2 December 1805 (20 November Old Style, 11 Frimaire An XIV, in the French Republican Calendar), a French army, commanded by Emperor Napoleon I, decisively defeated a Russo-Austrian army, commanded by Tsar Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, after nearly nine hours of difficult fighting. The battle took place near Austerlitz (Slavkov u Brna) about 10 km south-east of Brno in Moravia, at that time in the Austrian Empire. The battle was a tactical masterpiece of the same stature as the ancient battles of Gaugamela and Cannae, in the 4th and 3rd centuries BC. Napoleon's words to his troops after the battle were full of praise: Soldats! Je suis content de vous ( Soldiers! I am pleased with you). The Emperor provided two million golden francs to the higher officers and 200 francs to each soldier, with large pensions for the widows of the fallen. Orphaned children were adopted by Napoleon personally and were allowed to add "Napoleon" to their baptismal and family names. This battle is one of four that Napoleon never awarded a victory title, the others being Marengo, Jena and Friedland
A Beautiful Javanese Kris With Pure Gold Snake God Symbol Onlaid On of the most beautiful we have seen. A sarpa lumarka wavy blade with a gold Naga [snake] in sangkelat [13 waves, or lok]. Ladrang form of wrangka hilt crosspiece [boat form] of a simply stunning wood, which may be Javan pelet. In Java, the metal sleeve is called pendokbunton, which is a full metal sleeve. The keris is considered a magical weapon, filled with great spiritual power. In Javanese there is a term "Tosan Aji" or "Magic Metal" used to describe the keris. The keris is replete with the totems of Malay-Indonesian culture of hindu and islam. The blade is a mixture of meteoric steel and nickel According to traditional Javanese kejawen, kris contain all the intrinsic elements of nature: tirta (water), bayu (wind), agni (fire), bantolo (earth, but also interpreted as metal or wood which both come from the earth), and aku (lit: "I" or "me", meaning that the kris has a spirit or soul). All these elements are present during the forging of kris. Earth is metal forged by fire being blown by pumped wind, and water to cool down the metal. In Bali, the kris is associated with the n?ga or dragon, which also symbolizes irrigation canals, rivers, springs, wells, spouts, waterfalls and rainbows; thus, the wavy blade symbolizes the movement of the serpent. Some kris have a naga or serpent head carved near the base with the body and tail following the curves of the blade to the tip. A wavy kris is thus a naga in motion, aggressive and alive; a straight blade is one at rest, its power dormant but ready to come into action. In former times, kris blades were said to be infused with poison during their forging, ensuring that any injury was fatal. The process of doing so was kept secret among smiths. Different types of whetstones, acidic juice of citrus fruits and poisonous arsenic bring out the contrast between the dark black iron and the light colored silvery nickel layers which together form pamor, damascene patterns on the blade. The distinctive pamor patterns have specific meanings and names which indicate the special magical properties they are believed to impart
A Beautiful Noble's Antique Sinhalese [Ceylonese] Piha Kaetta Knife Dagger A most engaging ornate pihas and likely made exclusively by the Pattal Hattara (The Four Workshops). They were employed directly by the Kings of Kandy. Kandy, the independent kingdom, was first established by King Wickramabahu (1357–1374 CE). The last Kandyan king was in the early 1800's, and the workshops are no longer in existence today.The simplest are of plain steel, but very graceful form, with wooden or horn handles, and carried in the belt by every villager, to lop off inconvenient branches as he passes through the jungle, to open coconuts, or cut jungle ropes. From these knives there are all transitions to the most elaborate and costly of silver or gold inlaid and overlaid knives worn by the greatest chiefs as a part of the costume, and never intended for use. The workmanship of many of these is most exquisite but this fine work is done rather by the higher craftsmen, the silversmiths and ivory carvers, than by the mere blacksmith. Many of the best knives were doubtless made in the Four Workshops, such as is this example, the blades being supplied to the silversmith by the blacksmiths. "The best of the higher craftsmen (gold and silversmiths, painters, and ivory carvers, etc.) working immediately for the king formed a close, largely hereditary, corporation of craftsmen called the Pattal-hatara (Four Workshops). They were named as follows; The Ran Kadu [Golden Arms], the Abarana [Regalia], the Sinhasana [Lion Throne], and the Otunu [Crown] these men worked only for the King, unless by his express permission (though, of course, their sons or pupils might do otherwise); they were liable to be continually engaged in Kandy, while the Kottal-badda men were divided into relays, serving by turns in Kandy for periods of two months. The Kottal-badda men in each district were under a foreman (mul-acariya) belonging to the Pattal-hatara. Four other foremen, one from each pattala, were in constant attendance at the palace.This beautiful noble's dagger is stunningly decorated with veka deka liya vela [double curve vine motif] and the flower motif sina mal, and a bold vine in damascene silver. The blade is traditonal iron and the hilt beautifully carved horn
A Beautiful Pair of Boutet Style French 1st Empire Officer's Pistols From the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic era. These are typical pistols used by an officer in Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte's service, during the wars in Europe, in the Grande Armee against Britain, Russia, Prussia, Austria and Spain. Such as the Battles of Austerlitz, Wagram, and Moscow, the Battles of Wertingen, Marango, Salamanca Badajoz etc. etc.Typical Boutet style oval, flat butt caps beautifully engraved with an Revolutionary symbols of a Shield over a crossed Fasces, Arrow, Quiver and Club. All steel mounts and the finest octagonal to round Damascus barrels. Lacking rammers, one barrel end with some forend corrosion. A stunning pair of pistols from the greatest era in France's history. 6.5 inch barrels, both 12 inches long overall As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Beautiful Pair of Original Antique Native American Cowboy Gauntlets A Beautiful Pair, Circa 1850, from the early 'Wild West Frontier' period. These stunning and rare fringed gauntlets are beautifully embroidered with flowers, florid patterns and a western monogramme, and were likely from the Cree, or the Lakota Sioux tribes of North and South Dakota. The most famous members of the Lakota Sioux were Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. In yellow hide [likely buckskin] with long fringing. Excellent condition, small split in base of finger.The style of Gauntlets worn by 'Kit Carson' and his contemporaries. Superb, charming and highly collectable pieces from the old, American, Wild West Frontier. Gauntlets are protective gloves that have a flared cuff. For centuries, these cuffs protected European and Asian bow hunters and military archers from being snapped on the wrist by their bowstrings. Medieval soldiers and knights began wearing chain-mail gauntlets during the 1300s, and armored gauntlets appeared in Europe during the 1400s. Four hundred years later and halfway around the world, leather gauntlets appeared in the American West as military uniform accessories. They were soon appropriated by Indian artists, embellished with diverse ornaments, and incorporated into the civilian wardrobe. Here they became intrinsically linked with Western people, history, and landscape, and a symbol of the frontier. The original European form was reworked with a wild American veneer. Former mountain men -- Jim Bridger and Kit Carson among them -- occasionally worked guiding emigrant trains and military units through little-known country. They also helped track renegades of diverse stripes. These scouts were colorful characters, highly skilled, and not required to maintain a military dress code. Their attire was subsequently functional, comfortable, and drawn from a variety of media and cultural sources. By the 1870s, long and abundant fringe was in style and pinked edges provided decorative flair to leather clothing that was by nature quite showy.A similar pair [though later] of Lakota Sioux gauntlets can be seen in the Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art in the Fenimore Art Museum NY.
A Beautiful Pair, of Silver & Gold Alloy Inlaid Pistols. Ottoman Empire Likely with 17th century English proved barrels. From the Ottoman Empire a pair of most glorious pistols, mounted in niello decorated silver, and with 'Spanish' form barrels, that bear proof stamps of, most likely, John Cotterill, an English maker of the 17th century. His proof mark is recorded, and is the same as these guns bear, being the letters 'I C' with a crown above. This mark is stamped around three times on each barrel. The barrels are profusely over decorated with elaborate gold alloy inlay. These guns would have been used at the time of Mehmet IIIrd, possibly before and very likely after. We include in the gallery for your perusal a period portrait of Sultan Mehmet III, and above his right shoulder, hanging on his palce wall is his sword and his pair of pistols that are of the very same form as we offer here. During the eighteenth century, the Ottoman Empire was almost continuously at war with one or more of its enemies--Persia, Poland, Austria, and Russia. War with Russia, in fact, dominates the Ottoman scene from much of the eighteenth century; the two states clashed on 1711, between 1768 and 1774, and again between 1787 and 1792. In all these wars of the eighteenth century, there were no clear victors or losers. During the 18th century Turkish involvement in European affairs is limited mainly to the immediate neighbours. There is a succession of wars with Russia and constant adjustment to the frontier with Austria in the Balkans. But in 1798 the Ottoman empire finds itself unavoidably caught up in Europe's great war of the time, when Napoleon decides to invade Egypt as an indirect method of harming British imperial interests. It is a profoundly demoralized invading force which finally confronts the Mameluke army at Giza on July 21. But the French are arranged by Napoleon on the open terrain in solid six-deep divisional squares, and their fire-power slices with devastating effect through the wild charges of the Egyptian cavalry. Victory in the Battle of the Pyramids delivers Cairo to Napoleon. While emphasizing his respect for Islam, Napoleon set about organizing Egypt as a French territory with himself as its ruler, assisted by a senate of distinguished Egyptians. But there is already a major snag. Some ten days after Napoleon's victory, Nelson finally comes across the warships of the French fleet - at anchor in Aboukir Bay, near the western mouth of the Nile. On August 1, in the Battle of the Nile, he destroys them as a fighting force (only two French ships of the line survive). Napoleon, master of Egypt, is stranded in his new colony. He has no safe way of conveying his army back to France. Moreover he has provoked a new enemy. Turkey, of whose empire Egypt is officially a part, declares war on France in September 1798. In February news comes that a Turkish army is preparing to march south through Syria and Palestine to attack Egypt. One of the pistols is lacking it's top jaw on the cock, but we can replace it with another perfectly matched
A Beautiful Portrait Miniature of a King George IIIrd Dragoon Officer. An original early 19th century British portrait miniature of an named British hussar or dragoon officer. A painting of an unknown lady's loved one, hand painted on an ivory oval panel, mounted in a gold frame, [hallmarked 9ct] set within it's original gold tooled leather case, with a concealed foldaway easel stand for independent standing on a table or desk when travelling. A most stunning collectable, that, interestingly, is both desireable as an item of military object d'art, that would compliment any dragoon flintlock or sword as part of a Georgian military display, yet, it is also a thing of much beauty that both ladies and gentlemen will appreciate and a lady might wear suspended on a gold neck chain as a large pendant. A portrait miniature is a miniature portrait painting, usually executed in gouache, watercolour, or enamel. Portrait miniatures developed out of the techniques of the miniatures in illuminated manuscripts, and were popular among 16th-century elites, mainly in England and France, and spread across the rest of Europe from the middle of the 18th-century, remaining highly popular until the development of daguerreotypes and photography in the mid-19th century. They were especially valuable in introducing people to each other over distances; a nobleman proposing the marriage of his daughter might send a courier with her portrait to visit potential suitors. Soldiers and sailors might carry miniatures of their loved ones while traveling, or a wife might keep one of her husband while he was away. The portrait miniature developed from the illuminated manuscript, which had been superseded for the purposes of book illustration by techniques such as woodprints and calc printing. The earliest portrait miniaturists were famous manuscript painters like Jean Fouquet (self-portrait of 1450), and Simon Bening, whose daughter Levina Teerlinc mostly painted portrait miniatures, and moved to England, where her predecessor as court artist, Hans Holbein the Younger painted some miniatures. Lucas Horenbout was another Netherlandish miniature painter at the court of Henry VIII. The first miniaturists used watercolour to paint on stretched vellum. During the second half of the 17th century, vitreous enamel painted on copper became increasingly popular, especially in France. In the 18th century, miniatures were painted with watercolour on ivory. During the 18th century, watercolour on ivory became the standard medium. The use of ivory was first adopted in around 1700, during the latter part of the reign of William III; miniatures prior to that time having been painted on vellum, chicken-skin or cardboard, by Hilliard and others on the backs of playing cards, and also on very thin vellum closely mounted on to playing cards. One side one one door of the leather case is lacking it's small base. Miniature in gold frame 6.5cm x 4.5 cm, leather case 8cm x 9.5 cm [folded closed], when opened, 16.5cm x 9.5 cm.
A Beautiful, Ancient, 2000 Plus Year Old Chinese Jian Sword, Han Dynasty. Over the past 30 years we have only had just a few of these most ancient Chinese swords, and we are delighted to offer this most beautiful example. Between 2000 and 2400 years old this stunning sword was made by the Dian Peoples in South West China Yunnan Province. The Bronze hilt has amazing form and the blade very likely not the original fitted, although well corroded. Hilts were frequently remounted, as like the Samurai Culture in Japanese blades, and fittings were frequently changed and altered many times. Han Dynasty bronzes are practically indistinguishable from earlier Warring States bronzes so it could indeed be older than estimated. The Dian were first mentioned historically in Sima Qian's Shiji; according to Chinese sources, the Chinese Chu general Zhuang Qiao was the founder of the Dian Kingdom. Chinese soldiers who accompanied him married the natives. Zhuang was engaged in a war in conquer the "barbarian" peoples of the area, but he and his army were prevented from going back to Chu by enemy armies, so he settled down and became King of the new Dian Kingdom. The kingdom was located around Kunming, it was surrounded, on its east, the Yeh-lang tribes, to the west, Kunming tribes, and to the north in Chengdu, by the Chinese, and had relations with all of them. It is said that during King Qingxiang's (Ching-hsiang) rule over Chu (298 236 BC), a military force was sent on a mission to the area which makes up the present day provinces of Sichuan, Guizhou, and Yunnan which respsectively were the lands of the Ba and Shu, Chinzong, and the Tien. Native women married the Chu soldiers, who stayed in the area. The Dian were subjugated by the Han Dynasty under the reign of Emperor Wu of Han in 109 BC. The Dian King willingly received the Chinese invasion, in the hopes of assistance against rival tribes, it was at this time he received his seal from the Chinese, and became a tributary. The Han Dynasty incorporated the territory of the Dian Kingdom into the Yizhou Commandery, but left the King of Dian as the local ruler, until a rebellion during Han Chao-ti's rule. The Chinese proceeded with colonization, and conquered the Kunming tribes in 86 and 82 B.C., reaching Burma. Bronze is a metal primarily comprised of copper and tin but some lead may be added. Bronze has been used for implements in China since the Xia Dynasty (2100 BC to 1600 BC). During the Shang (1765 BC to ~1122 BC) and Zhou periods (1045 BC to 221 BC) new, more elaborate forms were developed and the bronze age reached its height during the Han period. During the earliest times, bronze items focused on ritual objects and themes, gradually more attention was placed on scenes from everyday life. It is this transition that signals the Second Bronze Age.
A Beautiful, Antique, Long Straight Bladed Executioner's Keris [or Kris] Carved buffalo horn hilt, meteoric metal blade of iron and nickel. Excellent and ancient grain shown in the blade Yearly cleanings, required as part of the spirituality and mythology surrounding the weapon, often left ancient blades worn and thin. The repair materials depended on location and it is quite usual to find a weapon with fittings from several areas. For example, a kris may have a blade from Java, a hilt from Bali and a sheath from Madura.The making of a kris was the specialised duty of metalworkers called empu or pandai besi (lit. "iron-skilled"). In Bali this occupation was preserved by the Pande clan to this day, members of whom also made jewellery. A bladesmith makes the blade in layers of different iron ores and meteorite nickel. Some blades can be made in a relatively short time, while more intricate weapons take years to complete. In high quality kris blades, the metal is folded dozens or hundreds of times and handled with the utmost precision. Empu are highly respected craftsmen with additional knowledge in literature, history, and the occult In many parts of Indonesia, the kris used to be the choice weapon for execution. The executioner's kris has a long, straight, slender blade. The condemned knelt before the executioner, who placed a wad of cotton or similar material on the subject's shoulder or clavicle area. The blade was thrust through the padding, piercing the subclavian artery and the heart. Upon withdrawal, the cotton wiped the blade clean. Death came within seconds. The kris blade is called a wilah or bilah. Kris blades are usually narrow with a wide, asymmetrical base. The kris is famous for its wavy blade; however, the older types of kris dated from the Majapahit era have straight blades. The number of luk or curves on the blade is always odd. Common numbers of luk range from three to thirteen waves, but some blades have up to 29. In contrast to the older straight type, most kris have a wavy blade which is supposed to increase the severity of wounds inflicted upon a victim. During kris stabbing, the wavy blade severs more blood vessels, creating a wider wound which causes the victim to easily bleed to death. According to traditional Javanese kejawen, kris contain all the intrinsic elements of nature: tirta (water), bayu (wind), agni (fire), bantolo (earth, but also interpreted as metal or wood which both come from the earth), and aku (lit: "I" or "me", meaning that the kris has a spirit or soul). All these elements are present during the forging of kris. Earth is metal forged by fire being blown by pumped wind, and water to cool down the metal. In Bali, the kris is associated with the n?ga or dragon, which also symbolizes irrigation canals, rivers, springs, wells, spouts, waterfalls and rainbows; thus, the wavy blade symbolizes the movement of the serpent. Some kris have a naga or serpent head carved near the base with the body and tail following the curves of the blade to the tip. A wavy kris is thus a naga in motion, aggressive and alive; a straight blade is one at rest, its power dormant but ready to come into action. In former times, kris blades were said to be infused with poison during their forging, ensuring that any injury was fatal. The process of doing so was kept secret among smiths. Different types of whetstones, acidic juice of citrus fruits and poisonous arsenic bring out the contrast between the dark black iron and the light colored silvery nickel layers which together form pamor, damascene patterns on the blade. The distinctive pamor patterns have specific meanings and names which indicate the special magical properties they are believed to impart The scabbard is damaged but we can repaier this near invisibly.
A Beautiful, Exceptionally Long Flintlock Holster Pistol 18th Century. This is a true beauty, with slender elegant lines and smooth texture. All brass furniture of nice quality. Finest walnut stock with a superlative original patina. The form of pistol used on horseback throughout the American War of Independence, the entire Napoleonic Wars and the Battle of Waterloo eras. This fine pistol has a long eared brass butt cap, a roccoco escutcheon, and long brass barrel cappucine. Barrel 14.5 inches . Overall 21.5 inches.
A Berber Warrior's Arm Dagger 19th Century. Part of a small collection of fine antique North African antique daggers. A most interesting Tuareg small arm or sleeve dagger. Traditionally worn on the left forearm with the hilt pointing down the arm, extremely effective blade, leather scabbard, skull-crusher steel pommel. The Tuareg, a nomadic people predominantly of Berber origin. The Tuareg long dominated the central and west-central areas of the Sahara desert, including portions of what is now Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, and Morocco, and had a reputation as effective warriors and as highwaymen. A late 19th century dagger 21 inches long 14 inch blade. Completely in untouched, long stored condition, with light red rust to blade, and should respond beautifully to gentle polishing
A Boer War 'Seige of Ladysmith' Bayonet Converted to Combat Knife This is a most interesting piece. It is a very rare 1880'S '3 rivet ' handle type, Metford rifle bayonet, that has been shortened and edged for use in the Seige of Ladysmith during the Boer War. It was later used by the Boer War soldier's son in the trenches of WW1. Before the regulation issue FS knife there was no close combat knife for use by British forces. It was the custom for soldiers to create their own. Examples from the Great War turn up in great variety, but the earlier ones from the war in South Africa are much more scarcely seen. This is a jolly intriguing piece and very competantly executed if a little crudely done. No scabbard
A Boer War Pair, Defence of Ladysmith, Elandslaagte 42nd Battery RFA Queens medal with 3 bars, the highly desireable bar the Defence of Ladysmith, the Belfast bar and the rare bar, Elandslaagte. The Kings medal has two standard bars, 1901 and 1902. Gunner C.R.McGill. These medals are well worthy of research as the Royal Field Artillery saw most gallant service in the defence, and that event is one of the most famous and significant of the whole Boer War. The 42nd was in Ladysmith when Sir George White arrived in Natal and along with the 21st Battery did excellent work at Elandslaagte, 21st October 1899 (see 1st Devons). Their services at Lombard's Kop or Ladysmith, 30th October, like those of Sir George White's other batteries, were invaluable, and prevented a check from being a defeat. 'The Times' historian has laid the greatest possible stress on this point, and undoubtedly Britain owed very much to the six batteries RFA engaged that day. Before the naval guns had arrived the little 15-pounders had actually pushed in under the nose of the 100-lb monster on Pepworth Hill, and had driven his workers from his side. The value of their services was freely acknowledged by Sir George White. After the siege commenced the artillery had plenty to do. On 3rd November the 21st, 42nd, and 53rd were sent out and again earned praise. On the day of the great attack the 21st was at Range Post to prevent reinforcements reaching the enemy from the west, and with the 42nd were "of great assistance in keeping down the violence of the enemy's fire from Mounted Infantry Hill". The 53rd took up a position on Klip River Flats, absolutely unconcerned by the huge projectiles hurtling from Bulwana; and they did much to ensure the enemy's defeat, "shelling the south-east portion of Ceesar's Camp with great effect and inflicting very heavy losses on the enemy "(Sir George White's despatch). Major Blewitt was mentioned in Sir George White's despatches of 2nd December 1899 and 23rd March 1900, and 1 other officer, 5 non-commissioned officers, and a trumpeter—all of the 21st —in that of 23rd March, In General Buller's northern advance the 21st, 42nd, and 53rd were again much in evidence, and frequently earned commendation. In Lord Robert's telegram of 24th August 1900, speaking of an attempted ambush, he said, "These guns [the enemy's] were silenced by a section of the 21st Battery under Lieutenant Hannay, and the trap failed". At Bergendal, 27th August (see 2nd Rifle Brigade), the Brigade Division again did well and was praised by General Buller, the 42nd being specially mentioned on this occasion. In Lord Roberts' despatch of 10th October 1900, para 35, the very skilful work of this Brigade Division was again recognised. In General Buller's final despatch 2 officers and 3 non-commissioned officers of the 21st were mentioned. In the second phase of the war this battery chiefly operated in the Eastern Transvaal. One section did excellent service with Colonel Benson in 1901. The Sergeant Major was mentioned in Lord Kitchener's despatch of 8th July 1901. Both medals are sleepers with wear overall and some denting. No ribbons.
A British 1796 Infantry Officer's Sword With single edged blade, copper gilt hilt and wire bound grip. No scabbard. The 1796 Pattern British Infantry Officers Sword was carried by officers of the line infantry in the British Army between 1796 and the time of its official replacement with the gothic hilted sword in 1822. This period encompassed the whole of the Napoleonic Wars, The Peninsular War and all it's battles and sieges and the American War of 1812. Overall in good condition for age, with a most interesting and distinctive, sword combat, parrying defensive cut, around one third up the outside edge of the blade
A British 1842 Pattern 'Brown Bess' Percussion Musket and Bayonet The stock bears an East India co. lion stamp. Excellent bayonet maker marked by Gill and ordnance stamped. Good walnut stock, barrel with large London View and Proof marks. All barss furniture. The pattern '42 musket is the last pattern of 'Brown Bess' musket used until the British Army changed over to rifles in the 1850's. 33 inch barrel. The mainstay of British Infantry, used in the famous British 'Squares' at Waterloo and all the famous battles of the Napoleonic Wars and beyond. Good overall condition, and a fine and highly collectable piece. The nickname Brown Bess started in the 1740's. Early uses of the term include the newspaper, the Connecticut Courant in April 1771, which said "…but if you are afraid of the sea, take Brown Bess on your shoulder and march." This familiar use must indicate widespread use of the term by that time. The 1785 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue, a contemporary work which defined vernacular and slang terms, contained this entry: "Brown Bess: A soldier's firelock. To hug Brown Bess; to carry a fire-lock, or serve as a private soldier.". Rudyard Kipling, wrote in 1911 "In the days of lace-ruffles, perukes, and brocade Brown Bess was a partner whom none could despise - An out-spoken, flinty-lipped, brazen-faced jade, With a habit of looking men straight in the eyes - At Blenheim and Ramillies, fops would confess They were pierced to the heart by the charms of Brown Bess. ” As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables39 inch barrel. Board of Ordnance marked with broad arrow. The mainstay of British Infantry, used in the famous British 'Squares' at Waterloo and all the famous battles of the Napoleonic Wars. Good overall condition, and a fine and highly collectable piece. The nickname Brown Bess started in the 1740's. Early uses of the term include the newspaper, the Connecticut Courant in April 1771, which said "…but if you are afraid of the sea, take Brown Bess on your shoulder and march." This familiar use must indicate widespread use of the term by that time. The 1785 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue, a contemporary work which defined vernacular and slang terms, contained this entry: "Brown Bess: A soldier's firelock. To hug Brown Bess; to carry a fire-lock, or serve as a private soldier.". Rudyard Kipling, wrote in 1911 "In the days of lace-ruffles, perukes, and brocade Brown Bess was a partner whom none could despise - An out-spoken, flinty-lipped, brazen-faced jade, With a habit of looking men straight in the eyes - At Blenheim and Ramillies, fops would confess They were pierced to the heart by the charms of Brown Bess. ” As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A British 1853 Pattern 3 Band Enfield Sergeants Prize Rifle 7th Kent Rifles Made by the London Armoury Co. of Bermondsey, dated 1861. Lock stamped Crown VR and LAC. Stock bears roundel stamp with London Armoury Co.. Bermondsey mark 1861. Very fine walnut stock with chequered wrist. Butt inlaid with silver prize disc, engraved to winner Corporal Soames 7th Kent Rifle Volunteers. Russetted surface to steel parts, very good walnut stock. The Enfield Pattern 1853 rifle-musket (also known as the Pattern 1853 Enfield, P53 Enfield, and Enfield rifle-musket) was a .577 calibre Minié-type muzzle-loading rifle-musket, used by the British Empire from 1853 to 1867. The term “rifle-musket” meant that the rifle was the same length as the musket it replaced, because a long rifle was thought necessary to enable the muzzles of the second rank of soldiers to project beyond the faces of the men in front, ensuring that the weapon would be sufficiently long enough when fitted with bayonet to be able to be effective against cavalry, should such an eventuality arise. The 39 in (99 cm) barrel had three grooves, with a 1:78 rifling twist, and was fastened to the stock with three metal bands, so that the rifle was often called a "three band" model. The rifle's cartridges contained 68 grains (4.4 g) of black powder, and the ball was typically a 530-grain (34 g) Pritchett or a Burton-Minié, which would be driven out at about 850 to 900 feet (259 - 274m) per second. It was developed by William Pritchett in the 1850s. The Enfield’s adjustable ladder rear sight had steps for 100 yards (91 m) – the default or “battle sight” range – 200 yards (180 m), 300 yards (270 m), and 400 yards (370 m). For distances beyond that, an adjustable flip-up blade sight was graduated (depending on the model and date of manufacture) from 900 yards (820 m) to 1,250 yards (1,140 m). British soldiers were trained to hit a target 6 feet (180 cm) by 2 feet (61 cm) – with a 2 feet (61 cm) diameter bull's eye, counting 2 points – out to 600 yards (550 m). The target used from 650 yards (590 m) to 900 yards (820 m) had a 3 feet (91 cm) bull's eye, with any man scoring 7 points with 20 rounds at that range being designated a marksman. We have part restored this fine gun by servicing the lock and having the stock properly conserved and cleaned. However, it still requires a small hammer screw and it is lacking a ramrod.
A British Tower Dragoon Pistol, Percussion Action Steel 9.25 inch barrel. Walnut stock, brass butt cap and furniture. Steel percussion lock 'Tower' marked with large crown stamp. Based on the 1756 pattern Light Dragoon pistol, but a 19th century percussion conversion to enable use into the 1840's and 50's. Used in the early Victorian period up to and including Crimea War and in the Indian Mutiny. The gunstock has had a very sucessful combat field repair by the wrist underneath.
A Bronze Age Dagger From the Era Of Achilles and Hector Circa 1200 B.C. This is a most handsome ancient bronze long bladed dagger, with a tapering hilt and crescent pommel form, from one of the most fascinating eras in ancient world history, the era of the so called Trojan Wars. The recessed grip panels within the hilt would likely be for slabs of ivory or horn. The ancient Greeks believed the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern day Turkey near the Dardanelles. In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey . "The Iliad" relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy, while the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the Achaean leaders. Other parts of the war were told in a cycle of epic poems, which has only survived in fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets such as Virgil and Ovid. The war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked "for the fairest". Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris, who judged that Aphrodite, as the "fairest", should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus, fall in love with Paris, who took her to Troy. Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and the brother of Helen's husband Menelaus, led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy and besieged the city for ten years due to Paris' insult. After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse. The Achaeans slaughtered the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods' wrath. Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many founded colonies in distant shores. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern day Italy. This dagger comes from that that great historical period, from the time of the birth of known recorded history, and the formation of great empires, the cradle of civilization, known as The Mycenaean Age, of 1600 BC to 1100 BC. Known as the Bronze Age, it started even centuries before the time of Herodotus, who was known throught the world as the father of history. Mycenae is an archaeological site in Greece from which the name Mycenaean Age is derived. The Mycenae site is located in the Peloponnese of Southern Greece. The remains of a Mycenaean palace were found at this site, accounting for its importance. Other notable sites during the Mycenaean Age include Athens, Thebes, Pylos and Tiryns. According to Homer, the Mycenaean civilization is dedicated to King Agamemnon who led the Greeks in the Trojan War. The palace found at Mycenae matches Homer's description of Agamemnon's residence. The amount and quality of possessions found at the graves at the site provide an insight to the affluence and prosperity of the Mycenaean civilization. Prior to the Mycenaean's ascendancy in Greece, the Minoan culture was dominant. However, the Mycenaeans defeated the Minoans, acquiring the city of Troy in the process. In the greatest collections of the bronze age there are swords exactly as this beautiful example. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art is the bronze sword of King Adad-nirari I, a unique example from the palace of one of the early kings of the period (14th-13th century BC) during which Assyria first began to play a prominent part in Mesopotamian history. Swords daggers and weapons from this era were made within the Persian bronze industry, which was also influenced by Mesopotamia. Luristan, near the western border of Persia, it is the source of many bronzes, such as this piece, that have been dated from 1500 to 500 BC and include chariot or harness fittings, rein rings, elaborate horse bits, and various decorative rings, as well as weapons, personal ornaments, different types of cult objects, and a number of household vessels. A sword, found in the palace of Mallia and dated to the Middle Minoan period (2000-1600 BC), is an example of the extraordinary skill of the Cretan metalworker in casting bronze. The hilt of the sword is of gold-plated ivory and crystal. A dagger blade found in the Lasithi plain, dating about 1800 BC (Metropolitan Museum of Art), is the earliest known predecessor of ornamented dagger blades from Mycenae. It is engraved with two spirited scenes: a fight between two bulls and a man spearing a boar. Somewhat later (c. 1400 BC) are a series of splendid blades from mainland Greece, which must be attributed to Cretan craftsmen, with ornament in relief, incised, or inlaid with varicoloured metals, gold, silver, and niello. The most elaborate inlays--pictures of men hunting lions and of cats hunting birds--are on daggers from the shaft graves of Mycenae, Nilotic scenes showing Egyptian influence. The bronze was oxidized to a blackish-brown tint; the gold inlays were hammered in and polished and the details then engraved on them. The gold was in two colours, a deeper red being obtained by an admixture of copper; and there was a sparing use of neillo. The copper and gold most likely came from the early mine centres, in and around Mesopotamia, [see gallery] and the copper ingots exported to the Cretans for their master weapon makers. This dagger sword is in very nice condition with typical ancient patina encrustations . 36 cm long. Picture in the gallery of Achilles and Penthesella on the Plain of Troy, with Athena, Aphrodite and Eros
A Bronze-Brass Cannon With Iron Carriage Modelled on two Relief Dragon A Victorian, most decorative piece, of a bronze barrel on cast iron carriage with heavy disc wheels, gun carriage is in a nicely rendered form of two winged dragons; the barrel has a raised medallion depicting a mounted knight; a very hefty model weighing nearly 25 lbs.
A Byzantine (Eastern Roman) 6th - 11th Cent. A.D. This kind of axe is a typical axe for infantryman, similar and a somewhat similar correspondent to the type 1 of the classification made by the Kirpichnikov for the Russian axes. Particularly, it seems akin to the specimens of Goroditsche and Opanowitschi, dated in the turn of 10th - 11th centuries however, its shape is slightly different, and considering the strong influence of the Roman Armies on the Russian ones in 11th century, a local prototype used in the Balkan wars of Basil II (976-1025). The general Nikephoros Ouranos remembers in his Taktika (56, 4) that small axes were used at the waist of the selected archers of infantry : "…You must select proficient archers - the so called psiloi - four thousand. These men must have fifty arrows each in their quivers, two bows, small shields and extra bowstrings. Let them also have swords at the waist, or axes, or slings in their belts…". The axe was inserted in its wooden shaft and fixed to it by means of dilatation of the wood, dampened by water. The Byzantine Empire is the great Greek-language Christian empire that emerged after 395AD from the eastern part of the Roman Empire, Thanks to efficient government and clever diplomacy that divided its many enemies, the empire survived. Much diminished after 1204 AD when it was sacked by Christian Crusaders from the west en route to liberate Jerusalem, it finally fell to the Turks in 1453--indeed its fall is often used to date the end of the Middle Ages. Its capital was Constantinople, built on the site of the Greek colony of Byzantium and which is now known as Istanbul). The center of Orthodox Christianity, it is famous as well for its art and culture. The inhabitants of the empire referred to themselves as 'Romans' and considered themselves as such, the term 'Byzantine' not being used to describe the empire and its peoples until the seventeenth century, but after the seventh century the language of empire changed from Latin to Greek.
A Cased Pair of Very Fine 19th Century 1840's Dueling Pistols Possibly made for Salles of Marseilles by G. Beuret et Fils, Liege. Excellent finest quality pistols such as these are typical examples made by Beuret and retailed by Salles, with lock left unnamed for Salles to add there company name if desired by the buyer. A simply stunning quality pair of French pattern duelling pistols of large calibre, with rifled Damascus twist octagonal barrels, with hooked breeches, with Liege proofs. The engraving is of the first division, with superb detailing of flowers and shells in great profusion and extravagance. The actions are crisp and as tight as a drum. Finest carved walnut stocks with microchequered grips and scalloped and flowered for end. All the steel has elements of original bluing and case hardening present. Fine percussion locks with set triggers, one with replaced hammer, in their original, fitted, oak case, with wooden barrel shaped mallet, a pair of rammer and cleaning rods with jag and percussion cap tin. Powder flask, turn screw and nipple key. As is usual with French style Dueling Pistols, they are far more extravagant than their English or Irish counterparts. The French taste displaying considerably more extravagance, and a more outward display of expense and quality, the English preference being for reserved simplicity. The original case woodwork is superb in finest oak, and in excellent condition, set with a very fine engraved escutcheon plate. While frequently forbidden by law, the tradition of dueling to resolve personal differences or restore honor was well established in both Europe and America of the 1800s. In the United States, dueling was a publicly declaimed, yet clandestinely observed activity that involved many Presidents, Senators and other statesmen or military officers. Not until 1883 did Congress pass a bill banning dueling within the District of Columbia. The arm of choice in Great Britain, France and America was the muzzle loading single-shot pistol, presented as identical pairs, and cased with a variety of specialized loading and cleaning accoutrements. Handcrafted for superb balance, these smoothbore pistols were made by some of the world’s finest gunsmiths. Seconds in a duel would prepare the firearms for the confrontation of the principals. The choice of a site depended on geography with many duels being fought on isolated sandbars or islands where maximum privacy was possible. A formal duel was a carefully choreographed affair, with a series of steps (the code duello) followed by the parties. In addition to the principals and seconds, a surgeon was also required to be in attendance. After the initial exchange of shots at ten paces without effect, both parties could elect to move closer or end the affair with honour upheld. A temporary exhibit in the galleries of the National Firearms Museum of America now offers visitors the rare opportunity to see the finest dueling pistols from many renowned British and Continental arms makers, with cased pairs just as these as part of the display. This cased set has been sent for lock servicing and to have a small crack in the lid restored. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Celtic, Iron, Votive Axe Circa 50 b.c. to 50 a.d. Around 2000 years old. A good and rare ancient Celtic museum piece. Used as a small Axe, set within a wooden haft, and carried as a token of good luck, then, it would be cast into a sacred lake or river as a offering to the Gods. In a well preserved condition. 65mm x 76mm.
A Charming British Bronze - Age Socket and Loop Axe Head. This piece dates from circa 900-800 BC, and still has its original binding loop in place. Some scaling and wear can be seen to the cutting edge. See Moore, C.N. and Rowlands, M. Bronze Age Metalwork in Salisbury Museum. Found in Derbyshire in the 1960's. Bronze implements were cast in moulds of stone or clay, or bronze, and then finished by hammering. The craftspeople of this period achieved extremely fine results, comparable to the best of any period since; embossing or ornamenting their work with designs. Although bronze was used for weapons and cutting tools, it was a highly versatile product and was used for making everything from mirrors to statues. Generally considered to be an alloy of copper and tin, (roughly 90% and 10%, respectively;) the mixture to make bronze often varied and included other metals in the mix such as lead and silver. An early classification by W. Graham of alloys of copper and tin: 12 to 20 parts copper with 1 of tin yield red coloured alloys; 5 to 10 parts copper with one of tin yield alloys of strength; 2 to 4 parts copper with 1 of tin yield alloys of sound (bell-metal); half to 1 part copper with 1 of tin yield alloys of reflection (speculum metal). The alloys of strength here referred to include the bronze used for statues.
A Chinese Cloisonne Enamel and Gilt Bronze Dagger straight bladed dagger, this hilt and sheath are both gold washed brass with wire cloisons used to create the compartments, ranging in thickness from around .7mm to 4.5mm, with the larger wire sections. The designs are a mixture of scrollwork, of floral patterns, with elongated tendrils, on a sang de boeof enamel ground, white white, yellows and greens in the floral panels accompanied with small areas of cobalt blue. The floral sections call for special note, having been enameled in blue, transitioning to white, green to white, and small pinkish polychrome areas, with an effect achieved by mixing pink and other colour enamels within a single compartment, without using cloisons [dividers]. Overall length in the sheath is 15.5 inches, with a flared pommel on the grip. Blade [with a single fuller] of 9.75 inches long. Blade has some pitting near the tip.
A Circa.1755 English, British Officer's Take-Down Fusil/Carbine.65 Bore Circa 1755. This is a beautiful private purchase long gun from one of the most interesting eras of British history, the Seven Years War [including the Indian-French War in the Americas] and the War of Independence, from 1776. With superb walnut juglans regia stock, military style lock, a very fine and beautiful silver openwork side plate and a matching rococo silver escutcheon plate. It also has a delightful carved apron at the breech. It has a military form, take-down stock, with an easily removable for end specifically designed for military campaign service. The take-down system was an ingenious way for a long musket to be reduced for military service as a fusil, to carbine length, in order to be fitted into a campaign, wooden gun case. Officers in the 18th and 19th century would often travel for months, or even years at a time on campaign, and all their kit and equipment , including beds, chests, desks and even wardrobes, could be made in manageable removable sections, and reassembled for use [by the other ranks] in their tents or bivouacs on arrival at camp. A most fine, light musket, used from the Indian Wars in America right through to the Napoleonic Wars in the Peninsular and Waterloo, by an officer of means. From the restoration of Charles II to the English throne in 1660. “Field Shooting” became a popular sport among gentry. By the middle of the 18th century the “fowling piece” had developed into a most graceful, slender, and full stocked form. The sporting gun became the pattern for a new class of lightweight military arms. in April of 1769 sergeants of Grenadiers were ordered to carry fusils instead of halberds. When the light infantry companies were raised again as flank companies in 1770-1771 sergeants of light infantry were also ordered to carry fusils. like Officer's fusils, Sergeant's fusils like their superior officers were often privately purchased and will have the lock and barrel markings of private arms, not the ownership, proof, and inspection marks of British Ordnance. Officer's guns were always private purchase, and could be militarised using this take-down system, mostly though, only during the 18th century. In the 19th century guns were made shorter, in the carbine length, which negated the necessity of the take-down, although we have seen later guns from the 19th century with this adjustment. Take-down guns for officers of the 18th century are very rare to survive, and we are only able to find them around one or two a decade. O/L 48.5 inches As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Civil War Remington New Model Army Revolver .44 CF.Remington Conversion The Cartridge Conversions are a most important part of sixgun history spanning the time frame between percussion revolvers and the Colt Peacemaker the Colt Single Action Army, and the Remington Single Action Army the Russian and Schofield. This fact has also been discovered to some degree by the movie makers and is starting to show up in more and more movies. Original Cartridge Conversions remaining from the 1860's and 1870's show evidence of being well used giving further evidence to their importance. We may live in a throwaway world but those inhabitants of the last century did not. Why discard a perfectly good gun when it could be easily converted to fire the 'modern' ammunition? Thousands of men of the Wild West found themselves armed with perfectly good cap-n-ball sixguns when both Colt and Smith & Wesson brought forth their cartridge firing sixguns. Most of those first new cartirdge taking guns went to the military so it was a natural step for a cap-n-ball shooter to step over into cartridge firing territory by having his sixgun converted. A super pistol in fully working order with a converted percussion cylinder and a separate ring for the .44 Russian/Remington cartridges. Clear maker's address. This is one of the very few Wild West big cartridge revolvers that collectors in the UK can own without license and without deactivation, as it's cartridge was declared obsolete under section 58,2 of the UK firearms legislation. Shown with an inert, antique .44 Russian round in the cylinder, for information only that round is not included
A Combat Weight 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officer's Broadsword Sword By Runkel Blade made and signed by Runkel of Solingen. A very good example of these most desirable of George IIIrd swords used by an officer in the heavy cavalry. However, this rare example has a substantial broadsword combat weight blade that is most impressive. The 'Boat Shell hilt' in very good order, with it's original multi wire bound grip [the wire is loosely tight], single fullered broadsword double. This is the pattern of sabre as was used by officer's of the Scots Greys, as part of the Union Brigade [so called as it was made up of a regiment of Heavy Cavalry from each part of Britain] were some of the finest heavy Cavalry in Europe and certainly one of the most feared. A quote of Napoleon of the charge at the Battle of Waterloo goes; "Ces terribles chevaux gris! Comme il travaillent!" (Those terrible grey horses, how they strive!) At approximately 1:30 pm, the second phase of the Battle of Waterloo opened. Napoleon launched D'Erlon's corps against the allied centre left. After being stopped by Picton's Peninsular War veterans, D'Erlon's troops came under attack from the side by the heavy cavalry commanded by Earl of Uxbridge including Major General Sir William Ponsonby's Scots Greys. The shocked ranks of the French columns surrendered in their thousands. During the charge Sergeant Ewart, of the Greys, captured the eagle of the French 45th Ligne. The Greys charged too far and, having spiked some of the French cannon, came under counter-attack from enemy cavalry. Ponsonby, who had chosen to ride one of his less expensive mounts, was ridden down and killed by enemy lancers. The Scots Greys' casualties included: 102 killed; 97 wounded; and the loss of 228 of the 416 horses that started the charge. This engagement also gave the Scots Greys their cap badge, the eagle itself. The eagle is displayed in the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards museum in Edinburgh Castle. The swords maker was Runkel, a famous and notorious gentleman of the 18th and 19th century as a supplyer of sword blades for British Officers. He was most interestingly, however, also infamous for being imprisoned in Newgate Prison, at least once, for evading import duty and other 'dubious' practices, probably bribery.
A Complete 19th Century Bushman's Hunting Set Of Bow, Arrows and Quiver A fabulous original antique set, worthy of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford. Arrows complete with steel heads. A typical and complete high quality 19th century bushman's hunting bow set. The indigenous people of Southern Africa, whose territory spans most areas of South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Mozambique, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia, and Angola, are variously referred to as Bushmen, San, Sho, Basarwa, Kung, or Khwe. The Bushmen are part of the Khoisan group. Though related to the traditionally pastoral Khoikhoi, they were traditionally hunter-gatherers. A set of tools almost identical to that used by the modern San Bushmen and dating to 44,000 BP was discovered at Border Cave in KwaZulu-Natal in 2012. Historical evidence shows that certain Bushmen communities have always lived in the desert regions of the Kalahari. However, nearly all other Bushmen communities in southern Africa were eventually forced into this region.
A Confederate Contract London Arms Co. Pocket Revolver In Case Gun number 7316. In oak case with three way, mould, nipple-key and turnscrew combination tool, plus powder flask. A most compact but good size calibre revolver. The London Armoury Company was a London arms manufactory that existed from 1856 until 1866. It was the major arms supplier to the Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War. The company was founded on February 9, 1856, with its factory established on the former site of the South-Eastern Railway Company in the Bermondsey section of London. The principal shareholder was Robert Adams, inventor of the Adams revolver. Another important stockholder was Adams' cousin, James Kerr, who later invented the Kerrs Patent Revolver. Adams had had a falling-out with his former partners, the Deane brothers, and intended that the Armoury manufacture his popular revolver. However the company obtained a British government contract for infantry rifles and in 1859 the company's board of directors decided to expand rifle production, for which there was greater demand. Revolver production was decreased and Adams, disagreeing with the decision, sold his stock and left the company. Kerr then became the Armoury's dominant figure. Kerr, a former foreman at Deane Brothers, made improvements to the Enfield 1853 pattern rifled musket which the Armoury was manufacturing under contract. When Adams left the company he had taken his revolver patents with him, and Kerr therefore designed a new revolver in .36 and .44 (54 bore) caliber. Production of the new revolver began in April 1859, but the company was not able to obtain a contract for it from the British government and civilian sales were modest. However the following year the U.S. Civil War began and the governments of both the United States and the Confederacy began purchasing arms in Britain. In November 1861 buyers for the Union army purchased 16 Kerr revolvers for $18.00 apiece. Two years later Confederate arms buyers Major Caleb Huse and Captain James Bulloch contracted for all the rifles and revolvers the Armoury could produce. The British company Willoughbe, Willoughbe & Ponsonby played a prominent role in the blockade running of these shipments to the south. The Confederacy was now the London Armoury Company's principal client and it manufactured and shipped more than 70,000 rifles and about 7,000 revolvers (out of a total production run of about 10,000) to the South. However these weapons had to pass through the Union blockade and the number that actually reached the Confederate army is unknown. Confederates acclaimed the Armoury's guns as the best weapons made in Britain. The London Armoury Company was almost completely dependent on sales to the Confederacy and survived for only a year after the end of the war, dissolving in the Spring of 1866- however, most of the gunsmiths and staff of the London Armoury Company went on to form London Small Arms Co. Ltd in that same year. The case has been restored throughout, the tools and flask later replacements. The action is a little temperamental.
A Continental Duelling Pistol, Percussion Action & Rifled Barrel Fine walnut stock finely scroll and pattern inlaid barrel. Excellent action, steel mounts all finely engraved, circa 1840. The golden era of the dueling pistol in Britain lasted from around 1770 to 1850. By 1780 it was stated that "pistols are the weapons now generally made use of." Robert Wogdon was the most celebrated of the manufacturers of pistols, whose object was to make a nicely balanced, fine handling, accurate and often intentionally beautiful pistol. Wogdon began working as a gunmaker in London in 1765 and opened a shop in the fashionable Haymarket at the end of 1774. Atkinson estimates the number of lives claimed by Wogdon pistols in the "many hundreds," earning Wogdon the sobriquet of the "patron of that leaden death." One of the most famous duels in United States history took place on July 11, 1804 between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton, the former Treasury secretary died as a result of his wound, former Vice President Burr was indicted for murder but not prosecuted. Three years earlier Alexander Hamilton's son had been killed in duel at the same spot using the same set of tricked-out .544 caliber Wogdon pistols. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Crimean War 'Balaklava' Imperial Russian Saw Back Sword. In well-used condition, with a worn russetted blade and the hilt re-seated, but this is a rare souvenir of the Russian guns at Balaklava. Russian maker's stamps still present at the ricasso. Original 'War Trophy' of the Crimean War, as used at the Charge of the Light Brigade by the Imperial Russian artillerymen. A Russian sawback short sword, manufactured in around 1834. A most interesting sword used by the Russian artillery, almost certainly brought back as a souvenir of the Crimean War. It was those very Russian artillery batteries that the British Light Cavalry regiment's charged in the world renown Charge of the Light Brigade, made so famous in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem of the same name. Every warrior that has ever entered service for his country sought trophies. The Mycenae from a fallen Trojan, the Roman from a fallen Gaul, the GI from a fallen Japanese, the tradition stretches back thousands of years, and will continue as long as man serves his country in battle. In the 1st century AD the Roman Poet Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis [Juvenal] wrote; "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions".The Battle of Balaclava, fought on 25 October 1854 during the Crimean War, was part of the Anglo-French-Turkish campaign to capture the port and fortress of Sevastopol, Russia's principal naval base on the Black Sea. The engagement followed the earlier Allied victory in September at the Battle of the Alma, where the Russian General Menshikov had positioned his army in an attempt to stop the Allies progressing south towards their strategic goal. Alma was the first major encounter fought in the Crimea since the Allied landings at Kalamita Bay on 14 September, and was a clear battlefield success; but a tardy pursuit by the Allies failed to gain a decisive victory, allowing the Russians to regroup, recover and prepare their defence. The Allies decided against an immediate assault on Sevastopol and instead prepared for a protracted siege. The British, under the command of Lord Raglan, and the French, under Canrobert, positioned their troops to the south of the port on the Chersonese Peninsula: the French Army occupied Kamiesh on the west coast whilst the British moved to the southern port of Balaclava. However, this position committed the British to the defence of the right flank of the Allied siege operations, for which Raglan had insufficient troops. Taking advantage of this exposure, the Russian General Liprandi, with some 25,000 men, prepared to attack the defences in and around Balaclava, hoping to disrupt the supply chain between the British base and their siege lines. The battle began with a Russian artillery and infantry attack on the Ottoman redoubts that formed Balaclava's first line of defence. The Ottoman forces initially resisted the Russian assaults, but lacking support they were eventually forced to retreat. When the redoubts fell, the Russian cavalry moved to engage the second defensive line held by the Ottoman and the Scottish 93rd Highland Regiment in what came to be known as the 'Thin Red Line'. This line held and repulsed the attack; as did General Scarlett's British Heavy Brigade who charged and defeated the greater proportion of the cavalry advance, forcing the Russians onto the defensive. However, a final Allied cavalry charge, stemming from a misinterpreted order from Raglan, led to one of the most famous and ill-fated events in British military history – the Charge of the Light Brigade. Pleaes see our Admiral Buckle family swords.
A Delightful 18th Century Flintlock Long Holster Pistol, Circa 1750 Octagonal long eared butt cap in brass, with a matching suite of brass furniture, including pear finial sideplate, tubular barrel pipes, and bevelled banana shaped lock plate. 9.6 inch barrel with silver crescent blade foresight. Fine walnut stock and good tight working action. Probably Prussian. Overall around 17 inches long.
A Delightful Wild West Era Marlin No. 32 Standard 1875 Pocket Revolver. .32 Rinfire Revolver. John Mahlon Marlin was born on May 6, 1836 near Windsor Locks, Connecticut. At the age of 18, he became an apprentice machinist with the American Machine Works. He later served as a machinist with Colt Patent Firearms of Hartford. In 1863, during the Civil War he started his own pistol manufacturing business in New Haven, concentrating on production of a small single-shot Deringers. Marlin expanded his efforts to include revolver in 1870, after the expiration of Rollin White's cylinder patents. This type of pocket revolver made a great hideaway gun for a gambler. Side of the barrel marked "J.M. Marlin New-Haven CT. Pat July 1, 1873" This is a .32 calibre five shot revolver that utilizes the rim fire metallic cartridge. It was manufactured circa 1875 to 1887. This is a nickel plated revolver with about 95% nickel remaining. The barrel swings upward to allow the cylinder to be removed for loading and unloading. A rammer pin located below the barrel is intended to assist in unloading spent cartridges. It has hard rubber grips with cross chequering anda star emblem, and they are in excellent shape. The gun is excellent working condition.
A Dyak's Mandau Headhunting Sword A Mandau of the Dayak people, of Kalimantan, Indonesia. Wooden sheath with upper and lower surfaces carved in relief with matching motif, bound with wonderfully woven reed wraps. The last photo in the gallery is a period photo of an indigenous Head Hunter, holding his 'prize', achieved with his Mandau.[Photo not included] This Mandau (sometimes also called “Parang Ihlang”) is the traditional sword of the Dyak tribes of Borneo. It was primarily associated with the Head Hunting tradition of the Dyaks. Carved wooden hilt, rattan bound scabbard. Traditional blade with convex obverse and concave reverse.The blade was apparently designed in such a way as the head could be decapitated more easily by a swinging arc while running. Likely late 19th century, and into the 20th century period.
A Early Antique Superb Bearded Axe. Extremely Effective Blade With good armourer's mark struck on blade face. Slightly bent blade. Triangular socket. Rehafted. Heavy stout blade of very good form. A most similar Battle Axe in the Staadtsmuseum in Munich is shown in the gallery. All axes at that time also doubled as working tools, when appropriate, for iron was a hugely valuable commodity before the Industrial Revolution and extremely costly to make.
A Eli Whitney Conversion Cartridge Revolver of the American Civil War Good action, originally percussion but converted to 32 cal rimfire cartridge. A very sound solid frame revolver it was a very good competitor to Colt's pocket revolver, but with a more stable solid frame, similar to Remington's revolver frame. This pistol was converted at the tail end of the war to take the more modern cartridge, which made it a useful contender to the post war Wild West market, of the late 60's and 70s. Eli Whitney (December 8, 1765 – January 8, 1825) was an American inventor best known for inventing the cotton gin. This was one of the key inventions of the Industrial Revolution and shaped the economy of the antebellum South. Whitney's invention made upland short cotton into a profitable crop, which strengthened the economic foundation of slavery in the United States (regardless of whether Whitney intended that or not). Despite the social and economic impact of his invention, Whitney lost many profits in legal battles over patent infringement for the cotton gin. Thereafter, he turned his attention into securing contracts with the government in the manufacture of muskets for the newly formed continental army. He continued making arms and inventing until his death in 1825. Eli Whitney, Jr., son of the inventor of the cotton gin, was born in New Haven, CT, where he attended the public schools and was fitted for college. Entering Princeton he was graduated in the class of 1841. The following year he took his father's business, for the manufacture of arms for the United States government. As Eli Whitney introduced mass production techniques, Whitney firearms were among the first products so made. In 1856 he ceased this branch of his manufacturing business, but resumed it again at the breaking out of the civil war in 1861, and continued it until 1866. The Whitney Arms Company had manufactured thousands of muskets, rifles and revolvers of the most improved models. The company also made many thousands of military arms for foreign governments, including muzzle-loading, breech-loading, magazine and repeating rifles. Mr. Whitney has been a member of both branches of the New Haven city government and a member of the board of public works. He was appointed one of the commissioners of the English exposition of 1862. He constructed from 1859 to 1861 the New Haven Water Works, and much of the work was done on his own credit, though built on contract for the New Haven Water Company, which organization he created. He made many improvements in fire arms of all sorts and patented them, and had made improvements in machinery for making arms. He was on the Republican electoral ticket in Connecticut as presidential elector at large in the November election of 1892; resided 29 Elm St., New Haven, CT. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Fabulous & Rare18th century 'Pineapple Pattern' Silver Hilted Small Sword Excellent all silver deep relief 'pineaple skin' nail head chisseling to all of the hilt Fully chisseled pommel, double shell crossguard, knuckle bow, quillon pas dans and grip. A finely engraved trefoil rapier type blade with an unusual design within the engraved pattern, of a stag under a resplendant sun. The pineapple is one of the most desirable symbolic representations for collector's of 18th century object d'art, but at the same time quite rare to find in the most expensive medium of silver. The depiction of pineapples in weaponry is quite often seen on the finest 18th century pistols, such as trigger finials, but very rare indeed to see in swords. Pineapples are a common fruit these days, something you see cut up in your salad or on sale at the grocery shop. However, in the 1700s the fruit's crown-like top and gem-like texture was seen as a symbol of wealth and power. Originally from South America, pineapples were discovered by Christopher Columbus on one of his voyages to the New World. When he brought them back to Spain, many Europeans -- royalty in particular -- were completely taken by the delicacy. It was a rare, beautiful fruit most people had never encountered before and artists began incorporating pineapples in their work -- whether lavishly depicted in a painting or elegantly carved into wooden furniture. The pineapple was often called the Treat of Kings In such a gastronomic milieu the New World's pineapple--whose ripe yellow pulp literally exploded natural sweetness when chewed--made the fruit an item of celebrity and curiosity for royal gourmet and horticulturist alike. Despite dogged efforts by European gardeners, it was nearly two centuries before they were able to perfect a hothouse method for growing a pineapple plant. Thus, into the 1600s, the pineapple remained so uncommon and coveted a commodity that King Charles II of England posed for an official portrait in an act then symbolic of royal privilege -- receiving a pineapple as a gift. The pineapple made its way to England in the 17th century and by the 18th century, being seen with one was an instant indicator of wealth -- a single pineapple could cost the equivalent of £5,000 today. In fact, the fruit was so desirable and rare that consumers often rented a pineapple for the night to show off to fellow party-goers.
A Fabulous 16/17th C Indian Shishpar or Gorz Flanged Mace With Khandar Hilt Also known as Gorz. With hollow haft and pointed spike finial, 16th to 17th century all steel. Eight flanged head. With the Hindu style khandar hilt. Probably from Rajasthan. Despite successive waves of Muslim conquest, Rajasthan remained predominately Hindu. It was divided into a number of small states centred around fortified cities such as Jaipur, Jodhpur and Udaipur, all of which had their own armouries that a few of these survive within today. The Gorz is a weapon often mentioned and variously described in Iranian myths and epic. In classical Persian texts, particularly in Ferdowsi’s Šha-nama , it is characterized as the decisive weapon of choice in fateful battles, and to kill the dragon of Kašafrud; by Gev, in the expedition to Mazandaran. In Indian mythology, Indra owns a club/mace (vajra-) called the Thunderbolt of Indra and made of the bones of Risi Dadici, a sacred figure in the Vedic literature. It has been also referred to by many other names and descriptions, including sky-borne, splitter, destructive
A Fabulous 16th Century Italian Halberd, Probably Venetian Circa 1590 Diamond pattern central blade of 13 inches, issuing from a looped openwork basal collar bearing detailed 5 mask faces [one missing]. Crescent axe blade with rear fluke and pierced designs on a pole haft with long, rivetted strap supports and braces. The halberd was inexpensive to produce and very versatile in battle. A halberd (also called halbard, halbert or Swiss voulge) is a two-handed pole weapon that came to prominent use during the 14th and 15th centuries. The word halberd may come from the German words halm (staff), and barte (axe). In modern-day German, the weapon is called a Hellebarde. The halberd consists of an axe blade topped with a spike mounted on a long shaft. It always has a hook or thorn on the back side of the axe blade for grappling mounted combatants. It is very similar to certain forms of the voulge in design and usage. The halberd was 1.5 to 1.8 metres (5 to 6 feet) long. As the halberd was eventually refined, its point was more fully developed to allow it to better deal with spears and pikes (also able to push back approaching horsemen), as was the hook opposite the axe head, which could be used to pull horsemen to the ground. Additionally, halberds were reinforced with metal rims over the shaft, thus making effective weapons for blocking other weapons such as swords. This capability increased its effectiveness in battle, and expert halberdiers were as deadly as any other weapon masters. A Swiss peasant used a halberd to kill Charles the Bold, the Duke of Burgundy—decisively ending the Burgundian Wars, literally in a single stroke. Researchers suspect that a halberd or a bill sliced through the back of King Richard III's skull at the battle of Bosworth. The halberd was the primary weapon of the early Swiss armies in the 14th and early 15th centuries. Later, the Swiss added the pike to better repel knightly attacks and roll over enemy infantry formations, with the halberd, hand-and-a-half sword, or the dagger known as the Schweizerdolch used for closer combat. The German Landsknechte, who imitated Swiss warfare methods, also used the pike, supplemented by the halberd—but their side arm of choice was a short sword called the Katzbalger. As long as pikemen fought other pikemen, the halberd remained a useful supplemental weapon for push of pike, but when their position became more defensive, to protect the slow-loading arquebusiers and matchlock musketeers from sudden attacks by cavalry, the percentage of halberdiers in the pike units steadily decreased. The halberd all but disappeared as a rank-and-file weapon in these formations by the middle of the sixteenth century. The halberd has been used as a court bodyguard weapon for centuries, and is still the ceremonial weapon of the Swiss Guard in the Vatican. The halberd was one of the polearms sometimes carried by lower-ranking officers in European infantry units in the 16th through 18th centuries. In the British army, sergeants continued to carry halberds until 1793, when they were replaced by pikes with cross bars. The 18th century halberd had, however, become simply a symbol of rank with no sharpened edge and insufficient strength to use as a weapon. It did, however, ensure that infantrymen drawn up in ranks stood correctly aligned with each other. Head 28.25 inches, total on haft 81.5 inches [Haft would need to be 'temporarily' halved for export]
A Fabulous 17th to 18th Century Indo Persian Moghul Tulwar Battle Sword A Moghul, Islamic sword. With a very good steel blade with an armourer's mark. All steel hilt with single bar guard, lined cap pommel. Strong and powerful blade of substance. Circa 1650. Emperor Aurangzeb [or Muhiuddin Mohammed] was the last significant Mughal emperor. His reign lasted from 1658 to 1707. During this phase, the empire had reached its largest geographical expansion. Nevertheless it was during this time period that the first sign of decline of the great Moghul Empire was noticed. The reasons were many. The bureaucracy became corrupted and the army implemented outdated tactics and obsolete weaponry. The Moghul Empire was descended from Turko-Mongol, Rajput and Persian origins. It reigned a significant part of the subcontinent of Asia from the initial part of the 16th century to the middle of the 19th century. When it was at the peak of its power, around the 18th century, it controlled a major part of the Asian subcontinent and portions of the current Afghanistan. To understand it's wealth and influence, in 1600 the Emperor Akbar had revenues from his empire of £17.5 million pounds, and 200 years later, in 1800, the exchequer of the entire British Empire had revenues of just £16 million pounds.
A Fabulous British Soldier's King's Shilling 1723 George Ist South Seas Co. Silver. Through family history this was an ancestor's 'King's Shilling' as was given to every newly recruited soldier as payment to serve the crown and fight for his king. "Taking ye King's Shylling" was the famous term of early England, and what followed could be anything up to 25 years service in the King's Army. This coin was a single soldier's King's Shilling [apparently in the 31st Regt. of Foot] which he had mounted with a silver loop and wore around his neck for the remainder of his service and civilian life, and apparently by his son following. That may explain why it is in such fine condition. It has only ever been worn against the skin and never in a coin purse abrading against other coins. Kept by the family in an old Harrod's keepsake case.The pay for a private in the English Army was originally one shilling a day. A soldier was expected to pay for food and clothing out of their wages after using the initial sign-up bounty to purchase their initial equipment. It was not until 1847 that a limit was placed on deductions, ensuring that each soldier was paid at least one penny (a twelfth of a shilling) a day, after deductions. This shilling was minted from silver from the South Seas Co. which is a most fascinating story in it's own right. An ideal artifact for a collector of early military history, or with an interest in the history of the world of high finance, and one of the greatest financial scandals in the western world. The Coin bears the legend GEORGIVS D G M BR FR ET HIB REX F D. the reverse has the shields of England and Scotland, France, Ireland, and Hanover. With the legend BRVN ET L DVX S R I A TH ET EL 1723 ("Duke of Brunswick and Lueneburg, Arch-Treasurer and Elector of the Holy Roman Empire"). The edge of the coin is milled diagonally The Coinage of the South Sea's Company were minted in Britain in 1723, after the South Sea Company (SSC) discovered silver in Indonesia in 1722. The coins minted were Crowns, Half Crowns, Shillings and Sixpences. All these coins carry "SSC" in the reverse quarters of the cruciform shields. The letters 'SSC' on the reverse of this coin denote the fact that the silver was supplied by the South Sea Company, which was at the centre of a major financial catastrophe known as the 'South Sea Bubble' in 1720. The South Sea Company had been granted a charter to trade with the Spanish colonies in South America, and the company vastly over-inflated its share price by giving the impression to shareholders, the government, and the public that its potential for growth was larger than it actually was. In fact, its opportunities were limited by the restrictions put upon it by the King of Spain, who only permitted one ship per year carrying a cargo of no more than 500 tons to land in a Spanish-controlled port, on top of which he demanded a hefty cut of the profits. By 1720, share prices had reached an astonishing £1,000 per share (unadjusted for modern-day inflation!), but doubts about the profitability of the company crept in, and shareholders started to doubt the viability of the company, with the result that share prices collapsed as shareholders tried to get rid of their shares before they became worthless. The scandal resulted in the imprisonment of John Aislabie, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and many of the company's directors. However, the company itself survived until the 1850s, helping to manage the government debt it had taken on before the collapse in its share price. This silver was sold to the mint in order to shore up a company which was, in modern parlance 'too big to fail'. These scarce 1723 silver coins are relics of an event which, given current events, have a certain resonance. The 31st Foot regiment sailed to Flanders in 1739, and in the following year took part in the Battle of Dettingen. It was at this engagement that the unit received the nickname "Young Buffs". They were part of a force led into action by King George II who mistook them for the 3rd Regiment of Foot, who were known as '"the Buffs" due to their buff facings and waistcoats, the sovereign called out, "Bravo, Buffs! Bravo!". When one of his aides, an officer of the 3rd Regiment of Foot, corrected the monarch, he then cheered, "Bravo, Young Buffs! Bravo!". It was subsequently at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745 where it suffered heavy losses, returning to England later in the year.They were posted to Minorca in 1749. From 1776 to 1781 the 31st Foot were in North America during the American War of Independence, losing a large number of prisoners at the Battle of Saratoga. In 1782 all regiments of the line without a royal title were given a county designation and the regiment became the 31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot. Following the ending of that war the 31st formed part of the garrison of Quebec before returning to England in 1787. The 31st took part in minor engagements in the West Indies, the Netherlands, Sicily and Egypt. In 1805 a 2nd battalion was again formed. In 1808 the 2nd Battalion landed in Portugal, and took part in the Peninsular War, including the Battle of Talavera in 1809, Albuera in 1811, Vittoria and Nivelle in 1813, and Orthes in 1814. The 31st was reduced to a single battalion regiment in 1814 when the two battalions merged in Sicily. There is no provenence to detail the soldier and his son were both in the 31st Foot but we have no reason to doubt the family repute
A Fabulous Coatee of a Lord of His Majesty King Edward VII Privy Council One of the most beautiful and expensive uniforms of State. Each paid for by the councillor, and consisting of the finest quality cloth and woven solid silver covered in pure gold. The coat is in superb condition and commissioned for a Lord Privy Councillor to the King. To give one an idea just how much such fine and extravagent gold bullion costs today this coat would cost likely more than £20,000. Almost a thousand years ago, during the reigns of the Norman monarchs, the English Crown was advised by a royal court, which consisted of magnates, clergy and officers of the Crown. This body originally concerned itself with advising the Sovereign on legislation, administration and justice. Later, different bodies assuming distinct functions evolved from the court. The courts of law took over the business of dispensing justice, while Parliament became the supreme legislature of the kingdom. Nevertheless, the Council retained the power to hear legal disputes, either in the first instance or on appeal. Furthermore, laws made by the Sovereign on the advice of the Council, rather than on the advice of Parliament, were accepted as valid. Powerful Sovereigns often used the body to circumvent the courts and Parliament. For example, a committee of the Council — which later became the Court of the Star Chamber — was during the fifteenth century permitted to inflict any punishment except death, without being bound by normal court procedure. During Henry VIII's reign, the Sovereign, on the advice of the Council, was allowed to enact laws by mere proclamation. The legislative pre-eminence of Parliament was not restored until after Henry VIII's death. Though the royal Council retained legislative and judicial responsibilities, it became a primarily administrative body. The Council consisted of forty members in 1553, but the Sovereign relied on a smaller committee, which later evolved into the modern Cabinet. The Council developed significantly during the reign of Elizabeth I, gaining political experience, so that there were real differences between the Privy Council of the 1560s and that of the 1600s. By the end of the English Civil War, the monarchy, House of Lords and Privy Council had been abolished. The remaining house of Parliament, the House of Commons, instituted a Council of State to execute laws and to direct administrative policy. The forty-one members of the Council were elected by the Commons; the body was headed by Oliver Cromwell, the de facto military dictator of the nation. In 1653, however, Cromwell became Lord Protector, and the Council was reduced to between thirteen and twenty-one members, all elected by the Commons. In 1657, the Commons granted Cromwell even greater powers, some of which were reminiscent of those enjoyed by monarchs. The Council became known as the Protector's Privy Council; its members were appointed by the Lord Protector, subject to Parliament's approval. In 1659, shortly before the restoration of the monarchy, the Protector's Council was abolished. Charles II restored the royal Privy Council, but he, like previous Stuart monarchs, chose to rely on a small committee of advisers. The Acts of Union 1707 united England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain, replacing the Privy Councils of both countries with a single body, the Privy Council of Great Britain. The Sovereign, when acting on the Council's advice, was known as the "King-in-Council" or "Queen-in-Council". The members of the Council were collectively known as "The Lords of His [or Her] Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council", or sometimes "The Lords and others of …"). The chief officer of the body was the Lord President of the Council, one of the Great Officers of State. Membership was generally for life, although the death of a monarch brought an immediate dissolution of the Council, as all Crown appointments automatically lapsed. The Council formally advises the Sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and together (as the Queen-in-Council) they issue executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other things are used to make Regulations. The Council by itself also has a delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, which are mostly used to regulate certain public institutions. The Council also advises the Sovereign on the issuing of Royal Charters, which are used to grant special status to incorporated bodies, and city or borough status to local authorities. It was formerly regarded by the Privy Council as criminal, and possibly treasonous, to disclose the oath administered to Privy Counsellors as they take office. However, the oath was officially made public in a written parliamentary answer in 1998, as follows: "You do swear by Almighty God to be a true and faithful Servant unto the Queen's Majesty, as one of Her Majesty's Privy Council. You will not know or understand of any manner of thing to be attempted, done, or spoken against Her Majesty's Person, Honour, Crown, or Dignity Royal, but you will lett and withstand the same to the uttermost of your Power, and either cause it to be revealed to Her Majesty Herself, or to such of Her Privy Council as shall advertise Her Majesty of the same. You will, in all things to be moved, treated, and debated in Council, faithfully and truly declare your Mind and Opinion, according to your Heart and Conscience; and will keep secret all Matters committed and revealed unto you, or that shall be treated of secretly in Council. And if any of the said Treaties or Counsels shall touch any of the Counsellors, you will not reveal it unto him, but will keep the same until such time as, by the Consent of Her Majesty, or of the Council, Publication shall be made thereof. You will to your uttermost bear Faith and Allegiance unto the Queen's Majesty; and will assist and defend all Jurisdictions, Pre-eminences, and Authorities, granted to Her Majesty, and annexed to the Crown by Acts of Parliament, or otherwise, against all Foreign Princes, Persons, Prelates, States, or Potentates. And generally in all things you will do as a faithful and true Servant ought to do to Her Majesty. So help you God"
A Fabulous Light Infantry Rifles Officer's Sword Circa 1800 With almost all it's original mecurial gilt remaining. With an 1803 variant P shaped slotted hilt of incredible rarity, depicting a full relief, chisseled strung bugle regimental device of the rifles regiments. With Lion head pommel and carved ivory grip, denoting for use by senior officer. Typical 1803 type curved blade. It's blade is superbly etched throughout with royal cypher and monogram but very difficult to photograph in the right light. Used by Officer's of the 95th and 60th Rifles, during the Iberian Peninsular War, the American War of 1812 and The Battle of Waterloo. This is the pattern of British Officer's sword carried by gentlemen who relished the idea of combat, but found the standard 1796 Infantry pattern sword too light for good combat. The light infantry regiments were made up of officers exactly of that mettle. The purpose of the rifles light infantry regiments was to work as skirmishers. The riflemen and officers were trained to work in open order and be able to think for themselves. They were to operate in pairs and make best use of natural cover from which to harass the enemy with accurately aimed shots as opposed to releasing a mass volley, which was the orthodoxy of the day. The riflemen of the 95th were dressed in distinctive dark green uniforms, as opposed to the bright red coats of the British Line Infantry regiments. This tradition lives on today in the regiment’s modern equivalent, The Royal Green Jackets. The standard British infantry and light infantry regiments fought in all campaigns during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing sea-service at the Battle of Copenhagen, engaging in most major battles during the Peninsular War in Spain, forming the rearguard for the British armies retreat to Corunna, serving as an expeditionary force to America in the War of 1812, and holding their positions against tremendous odds at the Battle of Waterloo.The sword was used, in combat, in some of the greatest and most formidable battles ever fought by the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars in Europe the Peninsular Campaign and Waterloo. This is a very attractive sword indeed and highly desirable, especially for devotees of the earliest era of the British Rifle Regiments, such as the 95th and the 60th. As a footnote, in Bernard Cornwall's books of 'Sharpe of the 95th', this is the Sabre Major Sharpe would have carried if he hadn't used the Heavy Cavalry Pattern Troopers Sword, given to him in the story in the first novel. Overall this battle cum dress sword is in very good order and quite stunning.
A Fabulous Original Wild West 1874 Smith& Wesson 'Russian' Revolver Nicely tight and crisp action, good revolution, original walnut grips. Butt marked with lozenge stamp of model date 1874. Barrel address with full Smith & Wesson address patents and Russian model name. Overall surface wear but a most honest original example of these behemoths of the gunslinger's arsenal of weaponry. Initially designed at the behest of the Russian Czar's representative for arms procurement, General Alexander Gorloff, the 44 Russian Calibre Pistol became one of the best, most efficient guns ever made. Although initially ordered [and thus named] for the Russian Czar's army they became so renown for their ability they became the weapon of choice for the American frontiersmen. This revolver has a 6.5 inch barrel, frame fully nickle plated, a true Wild West cowboy revolver. Among one of the big 44 Smith 7 Wesson owner's was Cole Younger. His Smith & Wesson was surrendered by Cole Younger at the abortive robbery of the First Bank of Northfield, Minnesota in September 1876 by the Younger - James Gang. Jesse James was assassinated with an 'Old Model' owned by Bob Ford, and notorious outlaw John Wesley Hardin killed a Texas Lawman with his 'Old Model' 44 Russian Smith & Wesson. The story of the Younger - James Gang goes as follows; After the Civil War Jessie and his brother Frank James became outlaws and established a gang that included Jessie James, Bob Younger, Cole Younger, James Younger, Bill Chadwell, Clell Miller and Charlie Pitts. On 13th February, 1866, the gang robbed a bank at Liberty, Missouri. Over the next few years the brothers took part in twelve bank robberies, seven train robberies, four stage-coach robberies and various other criminal acts. During these crimes at least eleven citizens were killed by the gang. As well as their home state of Missouri they were also active in West Virginia, Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas and Minnesota. On 7th September, 1876, the gang attempted to rob the First National Bank in Northfield, Minnesota. During the raid Jessie James killed the cashier, Lee Heywood. Members of the town decided to fight back and they opened fire on the gang. Bill Chadwell, Clell Miller and Charlie Pitts were killed whereas Bob Younger, Cole Younger and James Younger, were all wounded and captured. Cole Youngers 'Old Model' pistol was captured then. Jessie James and Frank James were also wounded but managed to get away from Northfield. After this disaster Jessie decided to go into hiding. Jessie took the name J. D. Howard and rented a home in Nashville, Tennessee. He also began to recruit a new gang that included Robert Ford, Charlie Ford and Dick Liddel. On 8th October, 1879, Jessie James and his gang held up the Chicago & Alton Railroad at Glendale, Missouri and stole $6,000. This was followed by other raids, in one, at Blue Cut, Missouri, in September, 1881, the gang killed the conductor and a pensioner. The Governor of Missouri, Thomas Crittenden, now responded by offering a reward of $10,000 for the capture of Jessie James. Robert Ford, a member of the Jessie James gang, contacted Governor Crittenden and offered his services in order to gain this reward. On 3rd April, 1882, Ford visited Jessie James in his home and when he stood on a chair to straighten a picture on the wall, he shot him in the back of the head with his 'Old Model' Smith and Wesson revolver. Ford was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death. Two hours later he was pardoned by Crittenden and given his reward. Jesse James had a Smith and Wesson, also extremely similar, and there is a photo of his gun [with his hand-shortened barrel] that was displayed by Merle Gill, a ballistics expert with the Kansas City police department. Gill's collection of guns and artifacts were collected, starting in the 1920s, by him, and he displayed them in the back of his truck at state and county fairs until J.M. Davis acquired them in the early 1940s. There is also a photo of Cole Younger's gun from the front cover of John Walters book 'The Guns that Won the West', This is one of the very few Wild West big cartridge revolvers that collectors in the UK can own without license and without deactivation as it was declared obsolete under section 58,2 of the UK firearms legislation.
A Fabulous Rare Light Infantry Sword, Circa 1790's, With Talisman Blade A superb King George IIIrd Light Infantry or Rifles Regt officer's sabre. With it's original mercurial gilt hilt bearing almost all it's original burnished gilt finish. It has it's original wire bound fish skin grip, Light Infantry bugle langet, and a deeply curved blade superbly engraved with King George IIIrd Royal cypher and secret Talismanic symbols. The crescent moon, a resplendent sun, and a turbaned Turk's head, and an enigmatic astrological inscription in a secret cypher. It is said in some quarters these beautiful yet intriguing blades were engraved at the time to award the sword bearer good fortune and invulnerability in battle. They can be seen on both English and French blades, and are sometimes referred, in France, as Cabalistic. It has also been said they were used by members of a secret society, by way of identifying oneself to a combatant protagonist as a brother of the society. Somewhat like the Masonic order. We have seen such symbols on British and French 17th, 18th and very early 19th century blades, but very rarely later. We have also seen their like on swords that we have had in the past once used by known members of the infamous Hellfire Club. This was a name for several exclusive clubs for high society rakes established in Britain and Ireland in the 18th century. The name is most commonly used to refer to Sir Francis Dashwood's Order of the Friars of St. Francis of Wycombe. Such clubs were rumoured to be the meeting places of "persons of quality" who wished to take part in immoral acts, and the members were often very involved in politics. Neither the activities nor membership of the club are easy to ascertain. The first Hellfire Club was founded in London in 1719, by Philip, Duke of Wharton and a handful of other high society friends. The most notorious club associated with the name was established in England by Sir Francis Dashwood, and met irregularly from around 1749 to around 1760, and possibly up until 1766. In its later years, the Hellfire was closely associated with Brooks's, established in 1764. Other clubs using the name "Hellfire Club" were set up throughout the 18th century. Most of these clubs were set up in Ireland after Wharton's were dispelled. Francis Dashwood was well known for his pranks: for example, while in the Royal Court in St Petersburg, he dressed up as the King of Sweden, a great enemy of Russia. The membership of Sir Francis' club was initially limited to twelve but soon increased. Of the original twelve, some are regularly identified: Dashwood, Robert Vansittart, Thomas Potter, Francis Duffield, Edward Thompson, Paul Whitehead and John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The list of supposed members is immense; among the more probable candidates are George Bubb Dodington, a fabulously corpulent man in his 60s; William Hogarth, although hardly a gentleman, has been associated with the club after painting Dashwood as a Franciscan Friar and John Wilkes, though much later, under the pseudonym John of Aylesbury. Benjamin Franklin is known to have occasionally attended the club's meetings during 1758 as a non-member during his time in England. However, some authors and historians would argue Benjamin Franklin was in fact a spy. As there are no records left (if there were any at all), many of these members are just assumed or linked by letters sent to each other
A Fabulous Renaissance Style 19th Century Revival Main Gauche Dagger This large and beautiful left handed dagger is absolutely stunning, and almost the size of a short sword. It's chiselling is most fine and the gilding is superb. The blade is fully chiselled and gilded to match. The pommel is deeply carved with knights armour in combat, the quillon are sea serpents and the scabbard mounts are chiselled with fantastical faces, putti and winged creatures all within rococo scrolls. Formerly from the Higgins Armory Museum Collection in Mass. USA. Purchased by Giula Morosini, and sold by the American Art Association, Anderson Galleries Inc., New York, in October 1932. There was an enormous revival of interest in Classical and Renaissance art from about 1850. Archaeological discoveries in Greece, Italy and Egypt fuelled the imagination of designers. Renaissance art and architecture of the 15th and 16th centuries, itself inspired by ancient Rome, also had a great influence. Classical and Renaissance pieces were sometimes copied quite closely, but often a variety of forms and motifs were combined or reinterpreted. Figures from Classical history and mythology provided subject matter for many 19th -century artists and designers. The Elgin Marbles, brought to Britain from the Parthenon in Athens in 1812, provided particular inspiration. Renaissance bronze sculptures of Classical figures were also much admired and emulated. The distinctive shapes of various Classical objects were often employed by 19th-century designers. Ancient Greek vessels were usually copied directly, while the forms of other objects were adapted for different materials. The use of architectural elements from ancient Greek and Roman buildings was a key characteristic of the Classical and Renaissance Revival style. Classical columns, capitals and pediments were often featured. The scrolling decorative forms of the Renaissance were revived in the second half of the 19th century. An abundance of garlands and foliage often surrounds Classical figures or mythical creatures. Classical and Renaissance styles had first been introduced to Britain in the 16th century. At this time artists and designers relied on printed books of designs for their inspiration. By the 19th century they were able to travel to Italy to see the original sources for themselves. Knowledge of the Classical world had also been dramatically increased by various archaeological discoveries in Italy and in Greece. The blade has a small nick on one edge, the original velvet is worn and faded. This could left as is to show natural aging, or replaced with fresh velvet. 22 inches long overall, 14.5 inch blade.
A Fabulous RN Medal With A Royal Naval 1870 Lead Cutter Cutlass The monster of a size, 4th type with a 34.25 inch blade, also with the Chief Petty Officer's King George Vth solid silver Long Service Good Conduct Medal, HMS Blenheim. The Royal Navy CPO served on HMS Blenheim, and this Cruiser was present on the China Station during the Boxer Rebellion, and later in WW1 at Gallipoli. The Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal was introduced on 24 August 1831. It is silver and circular in shape. The medal of 1831 had on its obverse side an anchor surmounted by a crown and enclosed in an oak wreath. The medal's reverse side was engraved with the recipient's details. The silver medal has changed dimensions and ribbon colour twice during its period of issue. The original medal of 1831 was 34mm in diameter and was suspended from a ring by a dark blue ribbon. In 1848 the medal became 36mm in diameter with a dark blue ribbon with white edges. A narrow suspender was introduced in 1874. The Long Service & Good Conduct Medal (Navy) evolved into the the pattern of 1848. The obverse of the medal shows the effigy of the reigning monarch, while the reverse shows the image of a three-masted man-of-war surrounded by a rope tied at the foot with a reef knot with the words 'For Long service and Good Conduct' around the circumference. An Other Rank who completes 15 years of reckonable service from the date of attestation or age 17½, whichever is later, and who holds all three good conduct badges, shall be eligible to receive the medal. However, there are a number of offences which would normally preclude award of the LS&GCM. Awards are only made after a thorough check of a sailor's record of service. The Wilkinson marked sword is a massive bladed Victorian Naval sword that is in nice order for it's age and a fabulous cutlass of amazing presence.
A Fabulous Tudor Period 'Dog of War' Multi Spiked Forged Iron Collar. 15th to 16th Century. In forged iron with it's multiple rows of spikes within a frame body, complete with it's circular neck shape form intact. Between years 1387-1388, in the ¨Hunting Book¨, Gastón Fébus speaks about dogs ¨Alaunts are able to cross all other bloods, to which it cuts their ears to evenness to avoid to them be wounded in the fight”. In Spain the great war dog was the alaunt or prey-dog, in Britain it was the similar Mastiff or Bull Mastiff. In the stories of the writers of the time, it was spoken of the Alaunts that the Spanish explorers took to cross the virgin forests of South America. There was some of these stories, in which they narrated an infinity of anecdotes with respect to intelligence, bravery and fidelity that owned the Alaunts. In March 24, 1495, within the Antilles was the first battle of the native Indians, and commanded by the Caonabo Cacique was a battle with dogs. The brother of Cristóbal, Bartolomé Colón, employed 200 men, 20 horses and 20 Alaunts like Spanish forces. It was the “debut” of the Alaunts in the American Conquest. Some Alaunts deserved, for their services, that one pays to them their fair due. Fernandez de Oviedo speaks of a Alaunt called “Becerrillo", which always accompanied the conqueror Diego de Salazar. One said that ten soldiers with “Becerrillo", were made more fearful than more than one hundred soldiers without the dog. For that reason it had its part in booties, and received it's pay like any soldier. War Dogs were trained to fight in combat either against man or beasts such as bulls. We show pictures in the gallery of famous war dogs from the time of Ancient Rome by Romans, by Ancient Britons, being used in Medieval England and in the US Civil War.
A Fabulous, Huge, 2nd Model 'Dragoon' Double Action Tranter Revolver Single trigger model. In fabulous condition for age, excellent action and much original blue remaining. These world famous second model Tranters were well recorded as being used by British officers during the Zulu War, in fact only a few years ago a relic of one was found under a rock at a famous battle site of the 1879 war, apparently also sold by Hayton of Grahamstown. World reknown Confederate General 'Jeb' Stuart' was also given the very same second model example [see photo] by his aide and friend, and used it in the Civil War. This is the big, Tranter 'Dragoon', a large calibre revolver sold by the famous South African gunsmith, John Hayton of Grahamstown. Of officer quality with blued finish, octagonal sighted barrel engraved around the muzzle and with scrolling foliage at the breech, blued border engraved top-strap with retailer's details, bright cylinder with knurled forward edge, blued border engraved frame, trigger-guard and ovoidal butt-cap decorated with scrolling foliage, blued hinged safety-stop and arbor-pin catch, bright foliate engraved patent rammer, and chequered rounded butt. John Hayton is recorded working in Grahamstown, South Africa, from about 1850 to 1873. He became famous as the designer of the Hayton or 'Cape' rifle. The Tranter revolver was a double-action cap & ball revolver invented around 1856 by English firearms designer William Tranter (1816–1890). Originally operated with a special dual-trigger mechanism (one to rotate the cylinder and cock the gun, a second to fire it) later models employed a single-trigger mechanism much the same as that found in the contemporary Beaumont-Adams Revolver. Early Tranter revolvers were generally versions of the various Robert Adams-designed revolver models, of which Tranter had produced in excess of 8000 revolvers by 1853. The first model of his own design used the frame of an Adams-type revolver, with a modification in the mechanism which he had jointly developed with James Kerr. The first model was sold under the name Tranter-Adams-Kerr. After the American Civil War, production continued of the Tranter percussion revolver (despite the increasingly availability of cartridge-firing designs) because many people thought percussion firearms were safer and cheaper than the "new-fangled" cartridge-based designs of the time. In 1863, Tranter secured the patent for rimfire cartridges in England, and started production using the same frame as his existing models. As early as 1868, Tranter had also began the manufacture of centrefire cartridge revolvers. Famous users of Tranter revolvers included Allan Pinkerton, founder of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, the Confederate General James Ewell Brown Stuart, and Ben Hall, the Australian bushranger, and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. It is also known that Dr Richard Jordan Gatling, inventor of the Gatling Gun owned a Tranter First Model (Pocket 109mm barrel) 80 bore retailed by Cogswell London in 1857. In 1878, Tranter received a contract from the British Army for the supply of revolvers for use in the Zulu War. Original antique percussion action revolver, no licence required in order to own or collect.
A Fabulous, Original, George IIIrd British 4 Pounder Carronade Cannon As used on Nelson's ship, HMS Agamemnon, from 1793, when he served under Lord Hood in the Mediterranean fleet , and began to make his reputation as England's finest and most famous Admiral. Agamemnon fought in the battle of Trafalgar in 1805 and sailed the globe, wreaking havoc off every continent for more than 20 years. Nelson loved the responsive vessel, built by master shipbuilder Henry Adams in Bucklers Hard, near Beaulieu in the New Forest in 1777. Painting HMS Agamemnon in the Mediterranean by Geoff Hunt He met Lady Hamilton in Naples while serving as captain and wooed her on board the vessel he commanded between 1793 and 1796. But it was on board the Agamemnon that he lost the sight of his right eye during the siege of Calvi in 1794. The ship proved vital not only at Trafalgar, but at the battles of Saintes and Copenhagen. Later it led the British in the battle of Santa Domingo in South American waters before being wrecked in 1809 near Gorriti Island in Maldonado Bay. Two famous ships carried 10 4pounder cannon . HMS Indefatigable & Agamemnon – These were both ships of the Ardent-class of 3rd Rate, 64-gun line ships. These were 46m long on the gun deck, with a 40.13m long keel and 13.51m wide beam. The Indefatigable was launched in 1784 with 26 x 24lb guns on the lower deck, 26 x 18lb guns on the upper deck, 10 x 4lb guns on the quarter deck, and 2 x 9lb guns on the forecastle. Famous under Captain Sir Edward Pellew, the Indefatigable captured some 27 prizes over her service. Between 1794 and 1795, the Indefatigable (and Agamemnon) were raised to 38 guns and reclassified as a frigate. Iron barrel, approx 44.5 inches long, cast with Royal Crown and '4'. Weight approx 200 Kilos. No carriage. We are having our gunstock maker estimating the cost of a replacement carriage, however we have much of the carriage's original ironwork. This is, condition wise, one of the best examples we have ever seen.
A Fascinating Bronze Age Spear or Lance Around 3400 Years Old It is mounted on an early haft in the early wire bound manner. The old haft is a later replacement. Spearheads were mostly made in two-piece moulds which have been found in Ireland and the Highlands. During the Early Bronze Age soft stone moulds were used but in the late Bronze Age clay moulds became more popular. There is no evidence to indicate that bronze moulds were used to cast spearheads. After casting a spearhead would have been finished, hammered and occasionally decorated. The remains of hafts are occasionally recovered inside spearheads and they indicate that hafts were mostly made of ash and pinewood. Looped spearheads were probably secured by a cord or leather thong. Pegged spearheads would have been pegged to the spear haft by bronze or wooden pegs. The variation of spearhead size indicates they may have been used for different purposes. For example smaller spearheads may have been thrown while larger ones may have been used as thrusting weapons. Evidence suggests that they were used in warfare and hunting. Some large decorative and barbed spearheads may have been used in ceremonies as appear to be too large and valuable for fighting or hunting. Like many weapons, a spear may also be a symbol of power. In the Chinese martial arts community, the Chinese spear is popularly known as the "king of weapons". The Celts would symbolically destroy a dead warrior's spear either to prevent its use by another or as a sacrificial offering. In classical Greek mythology Zeus' bolts of lightning may be interpreted as a symbolic spear. Some would carry that interpretation to the spear that frequently is associated with Athena, interpreting her spear as a symbolic connection to some of Zeus' power beyond the Aegis once he rose to replacing other deities in the pantheon. Athena was depicted with a spear prior to that change in myths, however. Chiron's wedding-gift to Peleus when he married the nymph Thetis in classical Greek mythology, was an ashen spear as the nature of ashwood with its straight grain made it an ideal choice of wood for a spear. The Romans and their early enemies would force prisoners to walk underneath a 'yoke of spears', which humiliated them. The yoke would consist of three spears, two upright with a third tied between them at a height which made the prisoners stoop. It has been surmised that this was because such a ritual involved the prisoners' warrior status being taken away. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the arrangement has a magical origin, a way to trap evil spirits.The word subjugate has its origins in this practice In Norse Mythology, the God Odin's spear (named Gungnir) was made by the sons of Ivaldi. It had the special property that it never missed its mark. During the War with the Vanir, Odin symbolically threw Gungnir into the Vanir host. This practice of symbolically casting a spear into the enemy ranks at the start of a fight was sometimes used in historic clashes, to seek Odin's support in the coming battle. In Wagner's opera Siegfried, the haft of Gungnir is said to be from the "World-Tree" Yggdrasil. Other spears of religious significance are the Holy Lance and the Lúin of Celtchar, believed by some to have vast mystical powers. Sir James George Frazer in The Golden Bough noted the phallic nature of the spear and suggested that in the Arthurian Legends the spear or lance functioned as a symbol of male fertility, paired with the Grail (as a symbol of female fertility). The picture in the gallery is of the Norse god Odin, carrying the spear Gungnir on his ride to Hel, note the thickness of the haft and the binding of the tang. The central rib has had an old repair on the blade. Blade 15.5 inches long [not including tang]
A Fine "Tower of London" Front Rank 'Brown Bess' Crown GR Musket The form of superior British Infantry musket used only by front line regiments in the British army throughout the entire Napoleonic Wars, Peninsular War, the American War of 1812 and The Battle of Waterloo era. An 1800's 'Tower of London' Brown Bess Musket, Front Line regt Issue, fine walnut stock with superb patina, traditional brass furniture, 39 inch barrel with ordnance view and proof of 1790, crown ordnance stamp to barrel tang. The mainstay of British Infantry, used in the famous British 'Squares' at Waterloo and all the famous battles of the Napoleonic Wars. Good overall condition, and a fine and highly collectable piece. The nickname 'Brown Bess' started in the 1740's. Early uses of the term include the newspaper, the Connecticut Courant in April 1771, which said "…but if you are afraid of the sea, take Brown Bess on your shoulder and march." This familiar use must indicate widespread use of the term by that time. The 1785 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue, a contemporary work which defined vernacular and slang terms, contained this entry: "Brown Bess: A soldier's firelock. To hug Brown Bess; to carry a fire-lock, or serve as a private soldier.". Rudyard Kipling, wrote in 1911 "In the days of lace-ruffles, perukes, and brocade Brown Bess was a partner whom none could despise - An out-spoken, flinty-lipped, brazen-faced jade, With a habit of looking men straight in the eyes - At Blenheim and Ramillies, fops would confess They were pierced to the heart by the charms of Brown Bess. ” As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables.
A Fine 1690 Smallsword With a Finely Embossed Bronze Shell Guard Hilt As used by the infamous and notorious Privateers of the late 17th to early 18th century. In very nice overall condition with a signed double edged armourer's marked blade by Hn.Vincent. Cast bronze hilt beautifully relief decorated with cornucopia and seated figures bearing baskets of fruit. A most beautiful sword made from the era of King William IIIrd, and the Battle of the Boyne, through to the 7 years War, known as the French Indian Wars in Europe and America, and into the American War of Independence in the 1770's. The form of sword that was carried and used by gentleman and officers for almost 100 years. It is said they were particulaly popular with the infamous maritime Privateers, and Buccaneers, who, in the most part, became notorious around the world as the Pirates of the Spanish Maine, such as Captain's William Kidd, George Booth, Edward Teach [Blackbeard] & Henry Jennings, or Capt. Bartholomew Roberts, as he is to be seen, in a period engraving, in the gallery, carrying the very same sword. 28.5 inch blade.
A Fine 17th Century Italian Stilletto With all steel hilt and triangular triple edged slender blade. Hounds head quillon baluster grip. A truly elegant piece of great style.
A Fine 1875 Pattern Japanese Officer's Parade Sabre In superb condition with original gilt hilt, steel blade with pseudo hamon, and plated steel scabbard. Based on the European style of sabre that the Meiji and Taisho Emporor's General Staff designated for officer use, by the Japanese Army. They were used in the disastrous Japanese-Russian War in which both countries almost bankrupted themselves in a conflict that effectively destroyed Russia as a world power for several decades, and into WW1. There is a photo in the gallery of Emperor Taisho wearing his same sword. The Russo-Japanese War (8 February 1904 – 5 September 1905) was "the first great war of the 20th century." It grew out of rival imperial ambitions of the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over Manchuria and Korea. The major theatres of operations were Southern Manchuria, specifically the area around the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden; and the seas around Korea, Japan, and the Yellow Sea. Russia sought a warm water port on the Pacific Ocean, for their navy as well as for maritime trade. Vladivostok was only operational during the summer season, but Port Arthur would be operational all year. From the end of the First Sino-Japanese War and 1903, negotiations between Russia and Japan had proved impractical. Russia had demonstrated an expansionist policy in Manchuria dating back to the reign of Ivan of the Terrible in the 16th century. Japan offered to recognize Russian dominance in Manchuria in exchange for recognition of Korea as a Japanese sphere of influence. Russia refused this, and demanded that Korea north of the 39th parallel be a neutral buffer zone between Russia and Japan. The Japanese government perceived a Russian threat to its strategic interests and chose to go to war. After the negotiations had broken down in 1904, the Japanese Navy opened hostilities by attacking the Russian eastern fleet at Port Arthur, a naval base in the Liaotung province leased to Russia by China.
A Fine 3rd Pattern 'Brown Bess' Crown GR Musket By Samuel J.Galton The form of superior British Infantry musket used only by regiments in the British army throughout the entire Napoleonic Wars, Peninsular War, the American War of 1812 and The Battle of Waterloo era. An 1800's Brown Bess Musket, regt Issue, good walnut stock with nice patina, traditional brass furniture, 39 inch barrel with ordnance view and proof mark. Good flintlock action with makers name and GR crown. The mainstay of British Infantry, used in the famous British 'Squares' at Waterloo and all the famous battles of the Napoleonic Wars. Good overall condition, and a fine and highly collectable piece. The nickname 'Brown Bess' started in the 1740's. Early uses of the term include the newspaper, the Connecticut Courant in April 1771, which said "…but if you are afraid of the sea, take Brown Bess on your shoulder and march." This familiar use must indicate widespread use of the term by that time. The 1785 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue, a contemporary work which defined vernacular and slang terms, contained this entry: "Brown Bess: A soldier's firelock. To hug Brown Bess; to carry a fire-lock, or serve as a private soldier.". Rudyard Kipling, wrote in 1911 "In the days of lace-ruffles, perukes, and brocade Brown Bess was a partner whom none could despise - An out-spoken, flinty-lipped, brazen-faced jade, With a habit of looking men straight in the eyes - At Blenheim and Ramillies, fops would confess They were pierced to the heart by the charms of Brown Bess. ” Areas of field repairs to stock near wrist. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables.
A Fine and Rare Caucasian Cossack Pistol 18th to 19th Century Fine striped wood stock possibly elm. Overlaid with decorated metalwork. Shortened steel barrel and typical miquelet lock and ball trigger. During the French Revolutionary War the Don and Ural Cossacks were in the vanguard of the Austrian and Russian armies in 1799, their military prowess soon got the attention of Europe and the Russians under Marshal Suvorov proved equal to the French armies. Western Europe also felt the depredation of the Cossacks for the first time as they foraged for food, taking what they needed from the local population. In 1800 the Russian armies returned home. The Cossacks next military campaign saw them thrust into one of the strangest schemes of Tsar Paul I, known to his subjects as the “Madman”. After renouncing an alliance with Britain, Paul’s plan, hatched in conjunction with Napoleon, was to attack India and retake lost French holdings from the British. A force of 22,000 Don Cossacks was assembled under the command of Cossack Major-General Matvei Platov, General Basel Orlov led the expedition. The expedition set off on 12 January 1801 in the depths of winter, their aim to march to Bukhara on the Silk Road, through Afghanistan to northern India then down the Ganges. Buy the time that had cleared the Steppe and entered the deserts of central Asia their supplies had already dwindled, but they were reprieved when a messenger caught them three weeks into the trek. Paul had been assassinated and the expedition was called off. A march to certain death had been avoided. The new Tsar Alexander I was soon involved in war in Europe and in 1805 Cossacks were at the head of a Russian army heading for Austria to aid them against Napoleon. During the intervening years Alexander had increased the number of Cossacks in service to 50 Regiments totalling 50,000 men, over half from the Don. Cossack uniforms were standardised to some extent and some Cossacks served as infantry and horse artillery. For the Russians the battle of Austerlitz was a disaster, but the Russian army would improve and its Generals would become more able to deal with Napoleon’s style of war. From 1805 to 1815 the Cossack would be involved in even Russian battle and campaign and would earn a fearsome reputation. After Napoleons defeat in Russia in 1812 it was the Cossack who harried the French retreat all the way back to Germany. After the 1813 German campaign, Cossacks left memories of terror imbedded in the minds of the German population that would be rekindled in 1945. 19th Century During the European revolutions of the 1830s and 1840s Cossacks were used extensively to crush uprisings. Tsar Nicolas I used them to crush the Poles in Russian Poland and Cossack regiments were sent into Hungary and Czechoslovakia to aid the Austrians against uprisings. The pistol has a very old crack through the butt [although perfectly sound] that likely occurred during it's working life. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Fine and Rare Long Barrel Miniature Percussion Muff Pistol A rare third size pocket pistol with carved ivory butt [with hairline crack], and boxlock percussion action, but with a very rare, exceptionaly long, damascus twist barrel. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Fine Caucasian Priming Flask in Silver and Brass. 18th -19th Century. This priming powder flask was used to carry small grain gunpowder. A measured quantity of powder was drawn off by using the spring-loaded pivoting cap on the nozzle.The case is silver and brass nicely tooled and decorated. Firearms became more and more sophisticated during the 16th-century but still required a number of accessories to load and operate them. The main charge, placed in the barrel with the shot, was carried in the powder flask. Smaller priming flasks contained fine-grain powder for priming the pans of wheel-lock firearms. Flasks were attached to a bandolier, a type of sling worn over the shoulder or around the waist, from which hung the various accessories required for a weapon including spanners for the mechanism, measured charges, powder flasks and priming flasks. The flasks were continually used in much the same way right throughout the evolution of the firearm until the 1870's and the development of cartridge taking guns where loose powder was no longer required. Arms and armour are rarely associated with art. However, they were influenced by the same design sources as other art forms including architecture, sculpture, goldsmiths' work, stained glass and ceramics. These sources had to be adapted to awkwardly shaped devices required to perform complicated technical functions. Armour and weapons were collected as works of art as much as military tools. Like the pistols and guns that accompanied them, decorated flasks were costly items. Inlaid firearms and flasks reflected the owners' status and were kept as much for display as for use. Daggers, firearms, gunpowder flasks and stirrups worn with the most expensive clothing projected an image of the fashionable man-at-arms. The most finely crafted items were worn as working jewellery. 4 inches across approx.
A Fine Indo Persian 19th Century Pesh-Kabz Dagger Very well tempered blade of fine quality. With iron handle and traces of light silver inlay. T section re-inforced blade. The straight blade is the more common form in South Asia. In all variants the blade is invariably broad at the hilt, but tapers progressively and radically to a needle-like, triangular tip. Upon striking a coat of mail, this reinforced tip spreads the chain link apart, enabling the rest of the blade to penetrate the armor. One knife authority concluded that the pesh-kabz "as a piece of engineering design could hardly be improved upon for the purpose". During the First and Second Anglo-Afghan wars, the pesh-kabz along with the Afghan knife was frequently the weapon of choice for finishing off wounded British and colonial troops, as the Afghan tribesmen did not take prisoners except for use as hostages. 15.5 inches long 11 inch blade.
A Fine Old Large Ship Model of a British Naval 100 Gunner Ship of the Line A Beautiful George IIIrd model of an unrigged 100 Gunner 'Ship of the Line' such as HMS Victory. In a large glazed case. Most likely mid Victorian. Collection from store only, delivery not available. 36 inches x 17 inches x 23inches [case size]
A Fine Pair of 19th Century Police Handcuffs, from Era of 'Jack The Ripper' Good flattened head key type, made in the late Georgian to early Victorian era from the very beginnings of the British Police service. Excellent working order early open frame key type. A good and fine condition pair of original 'Derby' cuffs used by the 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers', with the traditional rotating spiral key action. The very type that were used, and as can be seen, in all the old films of the White chapel Murders, and Sherlock Holmes' adventures in the gloomy London Fog. Marked warranted wrought
A Fine Victorian G & J W Hawksley Powder Flask A very good copper and brass powder flask for a gun with the oak leaf design incorporating a fox and stag head, the nozzle stamped Drams and graduation values of 2¼, 2½, 2¾ , the nozzle signed G & J. W. Hawksley, slight dent one side at the top of the body, and in working order. Overall 8 by 3½ inches. See THE POWDER FLASK BOOK, Ray Riling page 315 fig 580. Riling says in the book that the flask illustrated as fig 580 was made by Hawksley for Barton of New York and implies that this was an exclusive design to them and does not mention having seen one marked Hawksley which might suggest that this is rare.
A Fine, Kentucky Pattern Rifle By Charles Osborne of London A beautiful light rifle made for the burgeoning American market in the 1840's. A Kentucky pattern rifle with the usual fancy patch box, elongated trigger guard and a browned damascus twist barrel, platinum safety breech plug . This is a very charming and beautiful long gun with very nice quality features, and absolutely typical of a traditional Kentucky or Pensylvania Rifle, but around twenty percent lighter than usual, likely for ease of aiming while shooting on horseback. British gunmakers had been supplying the American market, just as the British blade makers had, since the very earliest days of the Pilgrim settlers. It is likely that over 80% of all the arms used in the Revolutionary war were British, and a vast percentage of the infantry guns used in the American Civil War were made at Enfield in England. Makers such as Ketland even had members of their family emigrate to the Americas in order to maintain supply to this highly lucrative market, as, although there were many fine American makers, demand for good quality arms was always usually higher than the local producers could supply.
A Flintlock Holster Pistol by Ketland & Co, Circa 1780. Possibly American made with typical American plainer mounts and non proved barrel. Ketland & Co. Lock. With round steel barrel, flat lock plate signed ‘Ketland & Co’ figured walnut full-stock decorated with plain barrel tang and completed with plain engraved brass mounts comprising long-eared butt cap, open pierced side plate, steel belt hook, trigger guard with acorn finial, turned ramrod pipes, and oval escutcheon at the wrist. Ketland [1740-1804] William Ketland, Sr., established a gunsmithy at Birmingham in 1740, and after his death his eldest grandson, William Ketland, carried on the business until his death in 1804. During this period they operated under the name of Ketland & Co. It is not definitely known when they opened the London shop but it is believed to be about 1760, and were one of the first birmingham gunmakers to compete with London gunmakers of fine workmanship. The Ketlands arms mark later developed into the Birmingham Proof Mark. William Ketland II's brother-in-law, Thomas Izon continued to operate the company under the name Ketland & Co. until 1831, when they got into financial difficulties and the firm ceased operations. William Ketland, Sr., had two other grandsons, Thomas and John Ketland, both gunsmiths who worked on a co-operative basis with William Ketland under the name Ketland & Co. However, Thomas and John emigrated foto the USA in 1780. A number of American Kentucky rifles had Ketland & Co locks.
A French 19th Century Cup Hilt Long Rapier By Coulaux Freres Klingenthal A superb duelling sword with a light and elegant blade. With typical large cup bowl guard, long quillons, single knuckle bow guard and twisted wire bound grip. Ovoid pommel. Triple edged blade with armour piercing long spear point. In France, duelling was common but by the 19th Century, French duels were rarely fatal as most were performed with swords and would stop when blood was drawn rather than continue to the death. France also provided some of the most peculiarly inventive duels. In 1808, two French duellers fought in air balloons; one shot the other’s balloon out, resulting in the death of both the opponent and his second. In 1843, two French duellers threw billiard balls at each other. In England and America most duels were with pistols or small swords, however, in Germany and France, the earlier style longer rapiers were much more popular. In England in 1712, the Duke of Hamilton and Lord Mohun were at odds over a lawsuit brought by Hamilton against Mohun that was still pending after 11 years. Hamilton remarked to a court officer that a witness for Mohun was not partial to truth and justice. Mohun retorted that the witness had as much truth and justice as Hamilton. Later, Mohun challenged Hamilton to a duel. The latter accepted. On November 15, 1712, they fought with swords. Mohun died on the ground, Hamilton died as his servants carried him away and the lawsuit died with them. According to writer Stephen Bands, there were “at least 277 fatalities in British duels between 1785 and 1844 but these homicides resulted in the capital sentence being carried out on only one perpetrator of a duelling fatality, the unfortunate Major Campbell who was executed in Ireland in 1808.” The reason Campbell hanged was that his duel with Captain Boyd observed none of the usual conventions of duelling such as including seconds and deciding in advance on specific conditions of the duel. Banks writes that it was “hurriedly fought in a locked room,” which gave it the appearance of a fatal brawl. While the precise origins of duelling are unclear, it became common in the late medieval and early modern periods in Europe. It was originally a practice of the nobility that later filtered down to other class groups. Duelling was widely practiced in England, Ireland, France, Italy, Germany, Russia and other countries. In medieval times, duelling was often thought of as a kind of “judicial combat” in which God would ensure the winner was the man in the right. 34" blade, 43" overall
A French Brass-Mounted Horn Powder-Flask Attributed To Nicolas Boutet A rare 18th century French flask with a most unusual fold down nozzle system. With large rounded lanthorn body (minor damage) flattened on the back, with shaped top mount and folding swelling nozzle, reeded brass medial mount, and rings for suspension High. For an almost identical example mounted in silver see Herbert G. Houze, The Sumptuous Flaske, 1989, pp. 116-117 (illustrated). Nicolas Noel Boutet was one of the world's greatest gunsmiths, and he made guns for most of the crowned heads of Europe, including Napoleon Bonaparte.
A French Gladius Short Sword Circa 1830 This pattern of Gladius [named after it's direct original version, the ancient Roman sword used by the Roman Empire for hundreds of years] was made and used in France from the 1830's till the 1850's. Many were sold in the early 1860's to the US in order to supply their desperate need for arms for the Civil War. The US in fact found this pattern sword so effective it directly copied the French gladius sword, and made their own [slightly differrent version with an Eagle decorated pommel] for use by the US foot. In it's scabbard, leather rucked.
A French Napoleonic Light Cavalry a la Chasseur, & Hussar Officer's Sabre With deluxe Damascus blade. A fabulous French 1st Empire Sword in very nice condition. Used in the great Napoleonic eras, from earliest Napoleonic period to the Empire, the March on Moscow [with the Grande Armee], the War of the Iberian Peninsular, and finally Waterloo. Lion's head pommel leather bound grip, single bar brass guard, Damascus steel blade with etching of crescent moon, and mystical symbols, as were popular within certain higher levels of French officers. It has a brass combat scabbard with reinforced steel drag maker marked AB. Highly evocative of the last great era of French victorious military might created by Napoleon, but was ultimately lost [and never repeated] after the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. These are a few of the battles the Regt. Chasseur-a-Cheval took part during the latter part of the Napoleonic wars;1812: Passage of the Niemen, Vitepsk, Krasnoe, Smolensk, Valoutina, La Moskowa, and le Beresina 1813: Katzbach, Wachau, Leipzig, and Glogau 1814: Montmirail and Arcis-sur-Aube 1815: Ligny and Waterloo. Originally a mixed corps of light infantry and horsemen, this force proved sufficiently effective to warrant the creation of a single corps: Dragoons-chasseurs de Conflans. In 1788 six dragoon regiments were converted to Chasseurs à cheval and during the period of the Revolutionary Wars the number was again increased, to twenty-five. Both Napoleon's Imperial Guard and the Royal Guard of the Restoration each included a regiment of Chasseurs à cheval. In addition Napoleon added a further five line regiments to those inherited from the Revolutionary period. The Chasseurs did, however, take part in Napoleon's triumphal entry into Berlin. At Eylau (8 February 1807) the regiment took part in Murat's great charge of 80 squadrons, which relieved the pressure on the French centre at the crisis of the battle. Seventeen of the officers were hit. In addition Dahlmann was mortally wounded. He had recently been promoted general (30 December 1806), but having no command he asked to be allowed to lead his old regiment and fell at their head. Major Guyot commanded the regiment for the rest of the year, and Thiry was also promoted major (16 Febr] The scabbard has a dent below the mid section.
A George IIIrd Campaign Sheffield Plate Candelabra of Col. 10th Hussars We acquired this stunning campaign, Sheffield silver plated candeladra, with a yataghan sword, used by a former Colonel of the 10th Hussars throughout his campaigning years in the army. The Sheffield plating has wear on all the dominant edges and this is referred to as copper bleeding. It is actually a traditional good sign of orginality, as it shows it is early Sheffield hammered onto a copper base, not the later modern electrotype of plate, usually on nickle or brass. The use of "sheffield plate" began in 1742 when Thomas Boulsover, a Sheffield cutler (bladesmith), discovered that a sheet of silver fused to a piece of copper could then be rolled or hammered out without fracturing the bond. This made possible the use of "plated" base metal, which appeared, outwardly, to be silver, but as the silver "skin" could be only a small proportion of the gauge of the metal the saving in expense was considerable and objects made from the product looked exactly like sterling silver, because the applied 'plate' was indeed sterling. Boulsover's idea was exploited in Sheffield, first by Joseph Hancock from 1755 onwards and Matthew Boulton, one of the greatest and successful manufacturers of his age. This candelabra from the early 1800's and the reign of King George IIIrd was use allegedly by Capt Wood during his campaign. It disassembles into several smaller pieces and would likely have fitted into a wooden, leather bound travelling case for use in military campaigns around the Empire. It may well have been used originally by an ancestor in the Napoleonic wars era. His medals were sold in auction some 10 years ago. Manners Charles Wood was born on 20 January 1852. He was appointed as Ensign to the 44th Foot on 1 September 1869, but was transferred on the same day to the 66th Foot, becoming Lieutenant in October 1871. He transferred to the 10th Hussars on 15 April 1874, and joined the regiment in India. In 1876 he was selected for escort duty with the Prince of Wales during his visit to India, and was given a silver commemorative medal struck on that occasion. Promoted to Captain on 2 February 1878, Manners Wood accompanied the regiment from Rawal Pindi in the Afghan campaign of 1878-79, and commanded “B” Troop at Fattehabad on the 2nd April 1879, in which action he was wounded, and his life saved by a brother officer, in an incident reported on the front page of the Illustrated London News, published on 17 May 1879. ‘Captain Wood and Lieutenant Fisher dismounted with most of the men, leaving as few as possible to hold the horses and advanced up the hill in skirmishing order, to dislodge the enemy, who were firing upon them from their strong position. On approaching the top, Captain Wood and Lieutenant Fisher, who were well in front, noticed a Ghazi, lying on the ground, pointing his jezail at them. He was a typical hillman, of powerful build. Having fired and missed, he jumped to his feet, and rushed at Captain Wood, whose sword was of little use against the long jezail and impetuous rush of the Afghan. He was brought to his knees, and his fanatical assailant, discarding his firearm, with a ponderous knife made a cut at his head, which clove his helmet in two, but, fortunately, did not do more than inflict a slight wound. ‘As Captain Wood lay on the ground, at the mercy of the Afghan, Lieutenant Fisher rushed at the Ghazi, and felled him with the butt end of a carbine which he was carrying and Private Hackett, who had by this time come up with other men of the Troop, gave him the coup-de-grace with his sword. The Troop now fired two volleys into the enemy, which completely dispersed them, and Captain Wood took his men back to Fattehabad. The casualties in the Troop were seven men wounded, one horse killed, eleven wounded, and one missing.’ Captain Wood served with the regiment throughout the remainder of the war, and accompanied it during the march of pestilence to Rawal Pindi, when so many Tenth Hussars died of cholera. He became Major in April 1882, and Lieutenant-Colonel in August 1892, on taking command of the 10th Hussars. The regiment served in Ireland throughout the 4 years of his command. He became Brevet Colonel in August 1896, and retired on 5 April 1899. Wood was almost immediately recalled on the outbreak of the war in South Africa, and was appointed a Special Service Officer with the Rhodesian Field Force. He was afterwards in command of the troops in Rhodesia, from 7th January to 21st June 1901, graded as a Colonel on the Staff. He again left the Army, leading a very active life, and later became a Colonel in the Army Cadet Force. For his services with the Cadets, he received the 1935 Silver Jubilee medal, at the age of 83. Colonel Manners Wood died at Camberley on 12 September 1941, aged 89.
A George IIIrd Carved Ivory Dog's Head 'Blue and Gilt' Bladed Sword Stick A most beautiful carved ivory dog's head with glass bead eyes. An elegant wedge shaped, single edged, blue and gilt blade. Good bamboo haft with a very nice amber patina. This very charming fine and elegant stick has spent two whole days [with no expense spared] in our conservator's workshop, removing paint splatters to the hilt, and attending to the bamboo finish. It now looks just as it once did, but with all it's natural aged patina restored Blade 1cm across 35 inches long overall. A sound and effective concealed personal protection sword that was highly popular during the georgian to Victorian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most trecherous place at night, and every gentleman, would carry a weapon for close quarter personal protection or deterrence. The early London Police force recruits 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [name after Sir Robert Peel their founder] were initially poorly selected. Of the first 2,800 new policemen, only 600 kept their jobs, and the first policeman, given the number 1, was sacked after only four hours service! Eventually, however, the impact upon crime, particularly organised crime led to an acceptance, and approval, of the Bobbies. Meanwhile, as they were so initially unpopular, and as the public of London had little or no coinfidence in them, armed personal protection was considered essential. Many would carry a small boxlock pistol or two, others might effect a sword stick.
A Good .41 Cal Remington Derringer Double Barrel Pistol A true icon of the American Wild West era. The Remington double barrel Derringer is one of the all time famous guns, that has a profile recognised around the whole world. Colonel George Armstrong Custer is known on one occasion to have been given a derringer pistol in case of capture before going into an Indian encampment under a truce. The fear of Indian mutilation whilst an officer was still a live may have made the ‘secret’ carrying of such weapons a common practice. One eyewitness claim about the body of Custer is that he shot himself in the head with a Derringer type pistol. The famous Remington Derringer design doubled the capacity of the normal Derringer single shot, while maintaining the compact size, by adding a second barrel on top of the first and pivoting the barrels upwards to reload. Each barrel then held one round, and a cam on the hammer alternated between top and bottom barrels. The earliest Remington Derringer was in .41 Rimfire caliber and achieved wide popularity. The .41 Rimfire bullet moved very slowly, at about 425 feet per second (a modern .45 ACP travels at 850 feet per second). It could be seen in flight, but at very close range, such as at a casino or saloon card table, it could easily kill. The Remington Derringer was sold from 1866. Deringers sometimes had the dubious reputation of being a favoured tool of assassins. The single most famous Derringer, a single shot used for this purpose, was fired by John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Good 17th C. 'Venetian' Schiavona Basket Hilted Sword wooden grip, overall in nice condition for age, a very nice impressive and powerful sword 33.5 inch blade. The Schiavona was a Renaissance sword that became popular in Italy during the 16th and 17th centuries. Stemming from the 16th-century sword of the Balkan mercenaries who formed the bodyguard of the Doge of Venice, the name may have from the fact that the guard consisted largely of Istrian and Dalmatian Slavs (Schiavoni) late Italian for slave, but some say it could derive from the older Venetian feminine term of 'a woman' alluding to it as the 'Queen' of weapons. Interestingly enough, in Drummond's famous book, "Ancient Scottish Weapons", there are several Schiavonas. It was widely recognisable for its "cat's-head pommel" and distinctive handguard made up of many leaf-shaped brass or iron bars that was attached to the cross-bar and knucklebow rather than the pommel. Classified as a true broadsword, this war sword had a wider blade than its contemporary civilian rapiers. It was basket hilted (often with an imbedded quillon for an upper guard) and its blade was double edged thus this blade was useful for both cut and thrust. The schiavona became popular among the armies of those who traded with Italy during the 17th century and was the weapon of choice for many heavy cavalry. It was popular among mercenary soldiers and wealthy civilians alike; examples decorated with gilding and precious stones were imported by the upper classes to be worn as a combination of fashion accessory and defensive weapon. Lord Stefan d'Gascon: Living in the later half of the 16th Century, in London, he was an ex-mercenary from a number of large and small armies. He wandered the continent, [generally staying out of France.] and visited the Far East for a time, while serving as a personal guard. One time he was a city guard for the Doge of Venice, where he developed a liking for the Schiavona He remarked that; " The Schiavona came in handy while traversing the Sulu Sea and the Sea of Japan in 1549 with Father Francis Xavier’s ship and spent two years in the Japans with Fathers Francis, Cosme de Torres and Juan Fernandz." He was born of English stock, in the Armagnac region of Gascony, near Auch. See Wagner, E. , Cut and Thrust Weapons, Hamlyn, UK (1969). Schiavona. Wooden grip, overall in nice condition for age, a very nice impressive and powerful sword 33.5 inch blade, 40 inches overall
A Good 19th Century Ghurka Kukri In Chased Leather Covered Wood Scabbard Typical steel blade. Scabbard carved with fan patterns. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old. A cavalry sword (The Machaira, Machira) of the ancient Macedonians which was carried by the troops of Alexander the Great when it invaded northwest India in the 4th Century BC and was copied by local black smiths or Kamis some knife exports have found similarities in the construction of some Khukuris to the crafting method of old Japanese sword. Thus the making of Khukuri is one of the oldest blade forms in the history of world, if not in fact the oldest. Some say it originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even more among them one belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD But the some facts shows that the Khukuri's history is centuries old then this. But other suggest that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, about 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder this Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, the Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon the skill that the strength of the wielder and thus it happens that the little Gurkha, a mere boy in point of stature, will cut to pieces of gigantic adversary who does not understand his mode of onset. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with the Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against.
A Good 19th Century Hawksley Powder Flask Maker marked, adjustable measuring spout, copper fluted body with brass spout. A very nice flask by a most desirable maker. 8.25 inches overall Slight seam opening at base
A Good 19th Century Powder Flask Fluted copper body and brass adjustable spout.
A Good 19th Century Sykes Pistol Powder Flask Absolutely ideal for pistol casing. A nice example with a few small dents. Small pistol flasks are certainly the most desireable type as they can beautifully set off a cased pistol set [and thus increase it's value dramatically], for either a flintlock or percussion gun, that is lacking it's original flask. 4.5 inches long
A Good 200 Year Old George IIIrd Officer or Gentleman's Sword Cane Bearing an early 18th century blade engraved with hunting dogs. Staghorn handle and Malacca cane. An officer's military sword blade, taken from his regular service sword and then mounted, likely for retirement, within a country cane. It has not been particularly disguised, in fact it was likely left to be quite clear as to it's purpose. The retirement on half pay was a common fate for former serving officers in the 18th and early 19th century, which would often leave many officer's at home awaiting or hoping for the recall to service in times of national peril. While ensconced in their country cottages [or estates, for the fortunate and wealthy], a former officer and now latterly retired gentleman, however aged, would always feel naked without bearing his sword for protection. It locates in it's sheath but often needs rotating to fit correctly as it has lain untouched for likely 130 years or more.
A Good and Most Attractive Antique Indo Persian Spear With fully decorated blade faces and silver inlay. The haft mount is similarly decorated. The décor on the blade face appears to be a form of Islamic script.
A Good and Scarce Antique Malaysian Kampilan Sword The standard kampílan is a type of single-edged long sword, used in the Philippine islands of Mindanao, Visayas, and Luzon. This unusual variant has a long 33.5 inch double edged blade more reminiscant of a European broadsword. The kampílan has a distinct profile, with the tapered blade being much broader and thinner at the point than at its base, sometimes with a protruding spikelet along the flat side of the tip and a bifurcated hilt which is believed to represent a mythical creature's open mouth. The Maguindanao and the Maranao of mainland Mindanao preferred this weapon as opposed to the Tausug of Sulu who favoured the barung. The Kapampangan name of the Kampilan was "Talibong" and the hilt on the Talibong represented the dragon Naga, however the creature represented varies between different ethnic groups. Its use by the Illocanos have also been seen in various ancient records. A notable wielder of the kampílan was Datu Lapu-Lapu (the king of Mactan) and his warriors, who defeated the Spaniards and killed Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan at the Battle of Mactan on April 27, 1521. The mention of the kampílan in ancient Filipino epics originating from other non-Muslim areas such as the Hiligaynon Hinilawod and the Ilocano Biag ni Lam-Ang is possible evidence for the sword's widespread usage throughout the archipelago during the ancient times. Today, the kampílan is portrayed in Filipino art and ancient tradition. The hilt is quite long in order to counterbalance the weight and length of the blade and is made of hardwood.[1] As with the blade, the design of the hilt's profile is relatively consistent from blade to blade, combining to make the kampílan an effective combat weapon. The complete tang of the kampílan disappears into a crossguard, which is often decoratively carved in an okir (geometric or flowing) pattern.The guard prevents the enemy's weapon from sliding all the way down the blade onto bearer's hand and also prevents the bearer's hand from sliding onto the blade while thrusting. The most distinctive design element of the hilt is the Pommel, which is shaped to represent a creature's wide open mouth. The represented creature varies from sword to sword depending on the culture. Sometimes it is a real animal such as a monitor lizard or a crocodile, but more often the animal depicted is mythical, with the naga and the bakonawa being popular designs. Some kampílan also have animal or human hair tassels attached to the hilt as a form of decoration.
A Good Antique George IIIrd Flintlock Holster Pistol by Wheeler of London. Walnut stock with fabulous age patina, with slab-sided grips, all brass furniture and trigger guard with acorn finial. Two stage octagonal to round steel barrel with silver X foresight. A very nice officer's and gentleman's flintlock pistol from the 1790's into the Napoleonic Wars period. The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of wars declared against Napoleon's French Empire by opposing coalitions. As a continuation of the wars sparked by the French Revolution of 1789, they revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. French power rose quickly as Napoleon's armies conquered much of Europe but collapsed rapidly after France's disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. The alliance led by Britain and one of it's finest General's, the Duke of Wellington, brought about Napoleon's empire ultimately suffering a complete and total military defeat resulting in the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy in France and the creation of the Concert of Europe.
A Good Boxlock Flintlock Derringer Pistol Circa 1800 With walnut grips and all steel frame and barrel. A sound and highly effective personal protection pistol that was highly popular during the late Georgian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most treacherous place at night, and every gentleman, or indeed lady, would carry a pocket pistol for close quarter personal protection or deterrence. The early London Police force recruits 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [name after Sir Robert Peel their founder] were initially poorly selected. Of the first 2,800 new policemen, only 600 kept their jobs, and the first policeman, given the number 1, was sacked after only four hours service! Eventually, however, the impact upon crime, particularly organised crime led to an acceptance, and approval, of the Bobbies. Meanwhile, as they were so initially unpopular, and as the public of London had little or no confidence in them, armed personal protection was considered essential. However, as a sobering thought, in the regards to the justification of being permitted to carry arms for protection, in 1810 the total number of recorded murders throughout the entire UK, and at that time it included all Ireland, was 15 people, for the entire year!. Although the population was much much smaller then, it is still barely a figure of 2% of today's currrent rate of around 650 murders per year [excluding Ireland].
A Good British Large Calibre Pinfire Revolver As a British import these pistols were very popular indeed during the Civil War [but very expensive] as they took the all new pinfire cartridge, which revolutionised the way revolvers operated, as compared to the old fashioned percussion action. In fact, while the percussion cap & ball guns were still in production [such as made by Remington, Colt and Starr] and being used in the American Civil War, the much more efficient and faster pinfire guns [that were only made from 1861] were the fourth most popular gun chosen, by those that could afford them, during the war. General Stonewall Jackson was presented with two deluxe pinfire pistols with ivory grips, and many other famous personalities of the war similarly used them. The American makers could not possibly fulfill all the arms contracts that were needed to supply the war machine, especially by the non industrialised Confederate Southern States. So, London made guns were purchased, by contract, by the London Arms Company in great quantities, as the procurement for the war in America was very profitable indeed. They were despatched out in the holds of hundreds of British merchant ships. First of all, the gun and sword laden vessels would attempt to break the blockades, surrounding the Confederate ports, as the South were paying four times or more the going rate for arms, but, if the blockade proved to be too efficient, the ships would then proceed on to the Union ports, [such as in New York] where the price paid was still excellent, but only around double the going rate. This pistol is full military army size, and is the very type that was so popular, as a fast and efficient military arm , by many of the officers of both the US and the CSA armies. Folding trigger, trigger return spring inoperable. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Good British Officer's Flintlock By Samuel Harrison of London Circa 1740. With fine walnut stock, brass butt cap with grotesque mask and long ears. Good signed flintlock action, fully serviced, and in good operating order. Made and used by an officer in the era of the second Jacobite Rebellion, and the Battle of Culloden. The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden decisively halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. Charles Stuart's Jacobite army consisted largely of Scottish Highlanders, as well as a number of Lowland Scots and a small detachment of Englishmen from the Manchester Regiment. The Jacobites were supported and supplied by the Kingdom of France from Irish and Scots units in the French service. A composite battalion of infantry ("Irish Picquets") comprising detachments from each of the regiments of the Irish Brigade plus one squadron of Irish cavalry in the French army served at the battle alongside the regiment of Royal Scots raised the previous year to support the Stuart claim. The British Government (Hanoverian loyalist) forces were English, along with a significant number of Scottish Lowlanders and Highlanders, a battalion of Ulstermen and some Hessians from Germany and Austrians. The battle on Culloden Moor was both quick and bloody, taking place within an hour. Following an unsuccessful Highland charge against the government lines, the Jacobites were routed and driven from the field. Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle, while government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded, although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300. The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet "Butcher". Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain. As with all our antique guns they must be considered as inoperable with no license required and they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Good Civil War Period Extra Large American Flask and Cap Co Flask Copper flask with brass measure cap but around 60% bigger than a usual flask. One dent either side at the neck.
A Good Crimean War Artillery Officer's Sword Very similar in design to the British Army 1821 Cavalry pattern sword [that British officer's used in Charge of the Light Brigade] this is the Artillery officer's version 3 bar hilted sword but with a slightly straighter blade. No scabbard. Russetted blade and hilt, good original fishskin grip with twisted wire binding. With some judicious polishing this sword may reveal considerable beauty
A Good Crimean War Medal 72nd Seaforth Highlanders. Of William Begg. A Cpl. William Begg of the 72nd appears on a memorial in St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh. To the men that were killed in action and died of wounds the Indian Mutiny etc. the Duke of Albany’s 72nd Highlanders were dispatched to the Crimea, where they arrived in May 1855, and from that date to the close of the war served in all the duties, which our troops were called upon to perform. After the Crimea followed with deadly haste the Mutiny, where the 72nd earned lasting praise. Their chief exploits were while serving with Sir Hugh Rose’s force in Central India, and at Kotah, the fortune of war decreed that their chief opponents should be the revolted 72nd natïve regiment, whose uniform in some degree resembled that of the Duke of Albany’s. The storming party was to abide the blowing up of the great gate, and owing to the unexpected delay in doing this found them exposed for some time to the fierce ire of the enemy. But when the explosion was heard, and the pipes struck up their martial tune, it required but a very few minutes to capture the town, thanks to the impetuous ardour of the 72nd and their comrades, who with a ringing shout-“Scotland for ever!” literally drove all before them. Throughout the struggles in Baroda the 72nd, who were subsequently with the Rajpootana Field Force, fought well and successfully, well meriting the unstinted meed awarded to them. The next important campaign in which the 72nd were engaged was in the Afghanistan in 1878. Here they were brigaded under General Roberts, and rendered most signal service at the storming of the Peiwar Kotal. Here the 72nd and the “brave little Ghoorkas” fairly divided the honours of the day between them, though Lieutenant Munro and several rank and files were in the list of casualties. During the march through the Sappri defile Sergeant Green gained his commission from the gallant defence he made of Captain Goad, and it it is recorded by a Scotch writer that “a sick Highlander (of the 72nd), who was being carried in a dhooley, fired all his ammunition, sixty-two rounds, at the enemy, and as he was a good marksman, he never fired without getting a fair shot.” The following year they were still more actively employed, and round and about Cabul, under Roberts, came in for much more fierce fighting, from which they gained a full sheaf of honours. Sergeant MacDonald, Cox, and M’Ilvean distinguished themselves at the assault of the Takt-I-Shah; Lieutenant Ferguson was twice wounded; Sergeant Jule (who was killed the next day) was the first man to gain the ridge, capturing at the same time two standards. Corporal Sellars, the first man to gain the top of the Asmai heights, gained a Victoria Cross; before that day’s sun had set Captain Spens and Lieutenant Gainsford of the regiment had fallen fighting like heroes to the last; Lieutenant Egerton was badly wounded, and several rank and file put hors de combat. The regiment fought well in the attack on Sherpur, and in Robert’s famous march to Candahar were brigaded with the Gordon highlanders and 60th Rifles. In the attack on Candahar Sir Frederick reported that “the 72nd and the 2nd Sikhs had the chief share of the fighting;” of the second brigade Colonel Brownlow, Captain Frowe and Sergeant Cameron were among the killed; Captain Stewart Murray and Lieutenant Munroe were badly wounded. A photo in the gallery are of his comrades who served with him at Sebastopol. [Not included with medal]
A Good Early 19th Century 'Brown Bess' Contract Musket Marked Warranted and with ordnance stamp, and Tower Proof. Good 39 inch barrel with proofs. Sound walnut stock and part traditional brass furniture and four ramrod pipes. Made for the Empire service contracts in the reign of King George IIIrd. Spring in lock loose which we are fixing. This musket was used in the era of the of the British Empire and acquired symbolic importance at least as significant as its physical importance. It was generically in use for over a hundred years with many incremental changes in its design. These versions include the Long Land Pattern, Short Land Pattern, India Pattern, New Land Pattern Musket, Sea Service Musket and others. The Long Land Pattern musket and its derivatives, generally .75 caliber flintlock muskets, were the standard long guns of the British land forces from 1722 until 1838 when they were superseded by a percussion cap smoothbore musket. The British Ordnance System converted many flintlocks into the new percussion system known as the Pattern 1839 Musket. A fire in 1841 at the Tower of London destroyed many muskets before they could be converted. Still, the Brown Bess saw service until the middle of the nineteenth century. In 1808 Sweden purchased significant numbers from the United Kingdom. Then in 1812 after the Finnish War the Swedish Army was in need of weapons as the Swedes had sold out large parts of their material to Russia and got thousands of Brown Bess muskets in British aid. Some were used by Maori warriors during the Musket Wars 1820s–1830s, having purchased them from European traders at the time, some were still in service during the Indian rebellion of 1857, and also by Zulu warriors, who had also purchased them from European traders during the Anglo-Zulu War in 1879, and some were sold to the Mexican Army who used them during the Texas Revolution of 1836 and the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. One was even used in the Battle of Shiloh in 1862.
A Good Early Victorian Bamboo and Ivory Swordstick With some cracking to the bamboo and ivory but a nice honest stick of charm and beauty. Blade with old pitting. The hilt could be restored. A sound and effective concealed personal protection sword that was highly popular during the georgian to Victorian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most trecherous place at night, and every gentleman, would carry a weapon for close quarter personal protection or deterrence. The early London Police force recruits 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [name after Sir Robert Peel their founder] were initially poorly selected. Of the first 2,800 new policemen, only 600 kept their jobs, and the first policeman, given the number 1, was sacked after only four hours service! Eventually, however, the impact upon crime, particularly organised crime led to an acceptance, and approval, of the Bobbies. Meanwhile, as they were so initially unpopular, and as the public of London had little or no coinfidence in them, armed personal protection was considered essential. Many would carry a small boxlock pistol or two, others might effect a sword stick
A Good Early Victorian Bamboo Sword Cane Circa 1840 With excellent patina and and a good elegant and narrow 18th century single edged rapier type blade. Silver loop ferrules, and knop pommel. A great conversational piece, and one can ponder over of the kind of gentleman who would have required such a piece of personal defense paraphernalia. Although one likes to think that jolly old Victorian England had a London full of cheerful cockneys and laddish chimney sweeps, it was also plagued with political intrigue, nefarious characters and caddish swine prowling the endless foggy thoroughfares and dimly lit passageways.
A Good English 18th Century, Double Barrel, Tap Action Over-Coat Pistol By Richardson. Large bore and good action and pan swivel. Slab sided walnut grips, all steel mounts and turn off barrels. Gadget weapons that have unusual actions such as this rotational tap-action meant the gun could be fired each barrel singly or both barrels simultaneously. They were much more expensive than standard guns, but with two barrels they fufilled the function of pair of pistols but on it's own. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Good French Boche Powder Flask, 19th Century, Shell Pattern By Boche of Paris, a fine quality flask with good working spring action. Boche apparently signed only his best examples and flasks by Boche belong to the highest in society.
A Good King George IIIrd Duelling Pistol, Possibly By Rigby of Dublin. A fine walnut stock, steel barrel held with barrel slides, steel lock and fine steel furniture, stock of juglans regia and slab sided grips and pineapple finial steel trigger guard. Original ramrod with horn tip and worm-screw. All the steel is very nicely patinated. Irish census marked for County Clare. The golden era of the dueling pistol in Britain lasted from around 1770 to 1850. By 1780 it was stated that "pistols are the weapons now generally made use of." Britain was most celebrated for the manufacturers of flintlock pistols, whose object was to make a nicely balanced, fine handling, accurate and often intentionally beautiful pistol. One of the most famous duels in United States history took place on July 11, 1804 between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton, the former Treasury secretary died as a result of his wound, former Vice President Burr was indicted for murder but not prosecuted. Three years earlier Alexander Hamilton's son had been killed in duel at the same spot using the same set of tricked-out .544 caliber English-made Wogdon pistols. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. A pistol in sleeper condition [untouched for likely over 100 years] with small natural age related polished surface imperfections.
A Good Medieval Teutonic Knight's Battle Mace of Bronze Circa 13th-14th C , Made of Bronze Copper Alloy. Four stout pyramidal knobs on a cubic body. Likely of Germanic Eastern European origin. A weapon made at the time at great cost, and only for the most affluent knight, a battle mace for the crushing and smashing of armour. Crusades period of the Teutonic Order, The Livonian Knights were a German religious and military order originally founded during the siege of Acre in the Third Crusade and modeled after the Knights Templars and Hospitalers, the Teutonic Knights moved to eastern Europe early in the 13th century. There, under their grand master, Hermann von Salza, they became powerful and prominent. In 1198, the Teutonic Order started the Livonian Crusade. Despite numerous setbacks and rebellions, by 1290, Livonians, Latgalians, Selonians, Estonians (including Oeselians), Curonians and Semigallians had been all gradually subjugated. Denmark and Sweden also participated in fight against Estonians. In 1229, responding to an appeal from the Duke of Poland, they began a crusade against the pagan Slavs of Prussia. They became sovereigns over lands they conquered over the next century. In a series of campaigns, the Teutonic Knights gained control over the whole Baltic coast, founding numerous towns and fortresses and establishing Christianity. The Teutonic Order's attempts to conquer Orthodox Russia (particularly the Republics of Pskov and Novgorod), an enterprise endorsed by Pope Gregory IX, can also be considered as a part of the Northern Crusades. One of the major blows for the idea of the conquest of Russia was the Battle of the Ice in 1242. With or without the Pope's blessing, Sweden also undertook several crusades against Orthodox Novgorod Old, replaced, wood haft. A most effective battle mace. Excellent patina highly evocative signs of use. The mace head is approx. the size of a pool or billiard ball. A similar Mace is preserved in the Hungarian National Museum in Budapest. The last picture in the gallery is of Tuetonic Livonian Knights, the top left mounted knight is using his mace.
A Good Original Antique Nickel G &JW Hawksley Gun Case Oil Bottle 19th century Ideal for all kinds of cased pistols or long guns. Excellent condition. 3cm across [at widest] 5.5cm inches high
A Good Original GR Crown Tower 1800's Third Pattern Brown Bess Musket Marked regimentally for the 1st Company. An absolute archetypal example as used by the Foot Guards in the War In The Peninsular and Waterloo. With fabulous rich dark patina to the walnut stock. Stock marked by maker TG. Lock marked Crown GR but very aged surface pitting to the steel obscures this somewhat. Excellent regimental markings of the 1st Co. No 32 [musket number]. During this time regimental markings of companies are rare, and usually, for frontline regiments, and militia, if listed at all, they were listed alphabetically, A.Co., B.Co. etc, however, for the elite British Foot Guards they were traditionally numbered numerically, ie.1st Co., 2nd Co. etc. The Second Battalion , fought in the most decisive battle of the whole war at Waterloo. It was here that the Second Battalion Coldstream Guards, along with the light company of the Scots Guards, held Hougoumont Farm. The farm secured the Allied right flank and was crucial to Wellington's plan. The French attacked the farm all through the day of 18 June with sixteen thousand troops, but failed to take it. The defence of the farm was commanded by Lt Col Macdonell, who along with Sgt Graham shared the honour of being "the bravest man in the army." They earned this title by shutting the north gates of Houqoumont when the French managed to break into the farm. Wellington said afterwards that "the outcome of the Battle of Waterloo rested upon the closing of the gates at Hougoumont". Wellington also said, "No troops but the British could have held Hougoumont, and only the best of them at that". The mainstay of British Infantry, used in the famous British 'Squares' at Waterloo and all the famous battles of the Napoleonic Wars. Good overall condition, and a fine and highly collectable piece. The nickname 'Brown Bess' started in the 1740's. Early uses of the term include the newspaper, the Connecticut Courant in April 1771, which said "…but if you are afraid of the sea, take Brown Bess on your shoulder and march." This familiar use must indicate widespread use of the term by that time. The 1785 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue, a contemporary work which defined vernacular and slang terms, contained this entry: "Brown Bess: A soldier's firelock. To hug Brown Bess; to carry a fire-lock, or serve as a private soldier.". Rudyard Kipling, wrote in 1911 "In the days of lace-ruffles, perukes, and brocade Brown Bess was a partner whom none could despise - An out-spoken, flinty-lipped, brazen-faced jade, With a habit of looking men straight in the eyes - At Blenheim and Ramillies, fops would confess They were pierced to the heart by the charms of Brown Bess. ” As with all our antique guns no licence is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Good Original Masai Lion Hunter's Simi Dagger In traditional dyed skin covered wooden scabbard. Wide leaf shaped double edged blade. Skin covered wooden hilt.The Maasai people have traditionally viewed the killing of lions as a rite of passage. Historically, lion hunts were done by individuals, however, due to reduced lion populations, lion hunts done solo are discouraged by elders. Most hunts are now partaken by groups of 10 warriors. Group hunting, known in Maasai as olamayio, gives the lion population a chance to grow. Maasai customary laws prohibit killing a sick or infirm lion. The killing of lionesses is also prohibited unless provoked. At the end of each age-set, usually after a decade, the warriors count all of their lion kills to compare them with those hunted by the former age-set in order to measure accomplishment
A Good Plain Sykes Patent Copper Powder Flask. Early 19th Century. Good working spring action and measure.
A Good Victorian 1856 Mk I Drummer's Sword The unusual and scarce curved blade model. The Greeks sent warriors off to battle with music. The Romans incorporated music on the battlefield, using assorted fanfares to signal troop movements. The Europeans carried on the tradition -- Napoleon's army traveled with musicians. The tactics, customs and ceremonies of the Civil War came from the Napoleonic tradition The Civil War was something of a bridge war between the wars of old and the wars of modern time. Even during the war, there was an evolution. At the beginning of the war, a lot of units traveled with loud brass bands. As the warfare changed, so did the accompaniment, stripped down to fife and drum corps. The field musicians played a vital role in the life of the regiment. They woke the troops in the morning with reveille and put them to bed with taps. The drummers, during battle, would signal troops when to attack or fire or retreat. Often, during battle, the musicians would retreat to the rear and serve as stretcher bearers. Some generals - Custer among them - had the band play during battle, Guthmann said, believing "it made the men fight harder." Drummer Boy of Waterloo. By Woodland Mary. When battle rous'd each warlike band, And carnage loud her trumpet blew, Young Edwin left his native land, A Drummer Boy for Waterloo. His mother, when his lips she pressed, And bade her noble boy adieu, With wringing hands and aching breast, Beheld him march for Waterloo. With wringing hands, But he that knew no infant tears, His Knapsack o'er his shoulder threw, And cried, ' Dear mother, dry those tears, Till I return from Waterloo." He went—and e'er the set of sun Beheld our arms the foe subdue, The flash of death—the murderous gun, Had laid him low at Waterloo. The flash of death, O comrades ! comrades !' Edwin cried, And proudly beam'd his eye of blue, ' Go tell my mother, Edwin died A soldier's death at Waterloo.' They plac'd his head upon his drum, And 'neath the moonlight's mournful hue, When night had stilled the battle's hum, They dug his grave at Waterloo. When night had still'd. In the painting of the drummer boy, if one looks behind his left leg one can see the bottom of the drummer boy's sword blade. Also in the gallery there is a snippet from the Siege of Lucknow in the Indian Mutiny 1857. An account of Drummer Ross of the 93rd playing his bugle under fire from the rebels and singing Yankee Doodle standing on the dome of the highest Mosque in Lucknow. On 28 November at the Second Battle of Cawnpore, 15-year-old Thomas Flynn, a drummer with the 64th Regiment of Foot, was awarded the Victoria Cross. "During a charge on the enemy's guns, Drummer Flynn, although wounded himself, engaged in a hand-to-hand encounter with two of the rebel artillerymen". He remains the youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross. A widely reported incident at the Battle of Isandlwana during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, spelled the end of boys being sent on active service by the British Army. Part of the British force returned to their camp at night to find that it had been overrun by the Zulu army a few hours previously. An eyewitness reported that "Even the little drummer boys that we had in the band, they were hung up on hooks, and opened like sheep. It was a pitiful sight". Drummer boys although still with the title 'drummer boy' used bugles by then.
A Good Vintage 'Leg O'Mutton' Leather Guncase Superior grade handmade leather gun case, circa 1890 to 1920. Monogrammed 'M.P' Overall length 30 inches x 7 inches at widest. Barrel length capacity 28.5 inches. I strap AF [easily replaceable].
A Good Volunteer Metford Bayonet By Greener of Birmingham. Scarce maker In good overall condition with maker mark of Greener of Birmingham. No locking button. The Magazine Lee-Metford Rifle was in service 1888–1926 Boer War, various Colonial conflicts and World War I Variants MLM Mk II MLM Carbine Charlton Automatic Rifle Specifications Length 49.5 in (1,257 mm) Barrel length 30.2 in (767mm) Cartridge .303 Mk I Calibre .303 inch (7.7 mm) Action Bolt-action Rate of fire 20 rounds/minute Muzzle velocity 2,040 ft/s Effective range c. 800 yards (730 m) Maximum range 1,800 yards Feed system 8 or 10-round magazine Sights Sliding leaf rear sights, Fixed-post front sights, "Dial" long-range volley sights The Lee-Metford rifle (a.k.a. Magazine Lee-Metford, abbreviated MLM) was a bolt action British army service rifle, combining James Paris Lee's rear-locking bolt system and ten-round magazine with a seven groove rifled barrel designed by William Ellis Metford. It replaced the Martini-Henry rifle in 1888, following nine years of development and trials, but remained in service for only a short time until replaced by the similar Lee-Enfield.
A Good, English Use, Spherical Iron Head Battle Mace 600 to 800 years old A fine and original weapon from the 13th to 15th century with a multi spiked head of rounded pyramidical projections. On a replaced old haft. One of the oldest forms of battle weaponry that can trace it's origins back to the stone age, long before the use of daggers and swords.This is a super Medievil example, that most likely inflicted a terrible yet most effective result in hand to hand combat. Used from the time of the early Crusades.
A Good, Non-Regulation Pattern British Sea Service Flintlock Pistol Bearing many of the standard sea service pistol traits, such as the long elegant lines, the short eared brass butt cap, the ring neck cock and the brass tailed sideplate, but all with very slight variances, and the stock is a slightly lighter gauge. We believe it may likely be a British Merchant Navy service flintlock pistol, of the circa 1790's. Fine walnut stock, good tight action, but with a replaced side-plate nail that does not locate correctly. Old working life forend stock repair. 9.5 inch barrel with oval 1740 cp & v proofs. The whole raison d'etre of the Royal Navy is to protect British interests, property, colonies and vessels on the high seas, and in the 18th and early 19th century, many British merchant vessels suffered badly from French and Spanish Naval attacks, during the Anglo French Wars, and from rogue corsairs and pirates. The British maritime matelots were armed very similarly to their regular Royal Navy counterparts, as conflicts at sea were a very serious hazard, and an adequate form of defense for every vessel was an absolutely necessity in those perilous days.
A Good, Original 1796 Heavy Cavalry Trooper's Combat Sword An impressive original combat sword complete with it's unaltered disc guard hilt, and [unaltered] hatchet blade [both the disc and the blade were frequently altered at the time of use during the Napoleinic wars era]. Leather bound ribbed wood grip. Surface pitting overall. The 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword is probably the most famous and collectable British service combat sword of the Napoleonic Wars and Waterloo era. Certainly in part due to this pattern of sword being famously used by Major Sharpe of the 95th Rifles, in Bernard Cornwall's novels. Naturally their main interest is due to them being used by the elite heavy cavalry dragoon regiments. This is the pattern of sword used by the Union Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, and a very popular and historical sword indeed. The pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Sword was the sword used by the British heavy cavalry (Lifeguards, Royal Horse Guards, Dragoon Guards and Dragoons), and King's German Legion Dragoons, through most of the period of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. It played an especially notable role, in the hands of British cavalrymen, at the battles of Salamanca and Waterloo. The sword was a dedicated cutting weapon with a broad heavy blade and was renowned as being completely unfit for delicate swordsmanship. This was also the foundation for respect it gained from those who appreciated it; most cavalry troopers used the blades like bludgeons and the guards as knuckle dusters (as Le Marchant observed) and the 1796 was significantly more suited for this than most other swords. A well-known description of the brutal power of the weapon was made by Sgt. Charles Ewart, 2nd Dragoons (Scots Greys) concerning how he captured an Imperial Eagle at Waterloo: "It was in the charge I took the eagle off the enemy; he and I had a hard contest for it; he made a thrust at my groin I parried it off and cut him down through the head. After this a lancer came at me; I threw the lance off my right side, and cut him through the chin upwards through the teeth. Next, a foot soldier fired at me, then charged me with his bayonet, which I also had the good luck to parry, and I cut him down through the head; thus ended the contest"…………….. This sword we are pleased to offer is overall very nice indeed, in it's original scabbard. The hilt is engraved with regimental troop markings. One photo in the gallery is of Lady Butler's painting, the Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo.
A Good, Original 1796 Heavy Cavalry Trooper's Combat Sword By Bate Ordnance supplier of swords during the Napoleonic Wars. An impressive original combat sword complete with it's unaltered disc guard hilt, and langets and spear pointed blade [ their blade's tip were frequently altered at the time of use during the Napoleonic wars era and at Waterloo]. Leather bound, ribbed, wooden grip. Surface pitting overall on the scabbard. The 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword is probably the most famous and collectable British service combat sword of the Napoleonic Wars and Waterloo era. Certainly in part due to this pattern of sword being famously used by Major Sharpe of the 95th Rifles, in Bernard Cornwall's novels. Naturally their main interest is due to them being used by the elite heavy cavalry dragoon regiments. This is the pattern of sword used by the Union Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, and a very popular and historical sword indeed. The pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Sword was the sword used by the British heavy cavalry (Lifeguards, Royal Horse Guards, Dragoon Guards and Dragoons), and King's German Legion Dragoons, through most of the period of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. It played an especially notable role, in the hands of British cavalrymen, at the battles of Salamanca and Waterloo. The sword was a dedicated cutting weapon with a broad heavy blade and was renowned as being completely unfit for delicate swordsmanship. This was also the foundation for respect it gained from those who appreciated it; most cavalry troopers used the blades like bludgeons and the guards as knuckle dusters (as Le Marchant observed) and the 1796 was significantly more suited for this than most other swords. A well-known description of the brutal power of the weapon was made by Sgt. Charles Ewart, 2nd Dragoons (Scots Greys) concerning how he captured an Imperial Eagle at Waterloo: "It was in the charge I took the eagle off the enemy; he and I had a hard contest for it; he made a thrust at my groin I parried it off and cut him down through the head. After this a lancer came at me; I threw the lance off my right side, and cut him through the chin upwards through the teeth. Next, a foot soldier fired at me, then charged me with his bayonet, which I also had the good luck to parry, and I cut him down through the head; thus ended the contest"…………….. This sword we are pleased to offer is overall very nice indeed, the scabbard has been blackened and has overall service denting. A picture in the gallery of Sgt. Ewart capturing the French Eagle at Waterloo using his identical 1796 Heavy Cavalry trooper's sword
A Good, Robust, British 1853 'Charge of the Light Brigade' Lancer's Sabre A very good British 1853 pattern 'Heavy & Light Cavalry Lancer's Battle Sabre'. In good stout order but russetted overall. The chequered leather rivetted grips are completely original and very good. Maker marked blade by Reeve. This sword, through family repute, was used by a lancer in the 17th Lancers in the fateful Charge at Balaklava. However, of course 'by family repute' has little basis in provenence, sadly, but, it is withought doubt an intriguing possibility none the less. An identical sword, used in the charge, is exhibited in the 'Charge Regimental Museum' 13/18th Royal Hussars and Light Dragoons [also, see photo page 183 in 'Crimean Memories, Artifacts of the Crimean War' by William Hutchison, Micheal Vice and BJ Small]. The blade is good with natural age patina. The British Cavalry were issued with the 1853 pattern just before many regiments, including, the 4th, 8th, 11th, and the 13th Hussars, were sent to the Crimean War. In the Crimean War (1854-56), the 13th Light Dragoons were in the forefront of the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized by Tennyson's poem of that name ("Into the valley of death rode the six hundred"). The regiments adopted the title hussars at this time, and the uniform became very stylish, aping the hussars of the Austro-Hungarian army. But soon the blues and yellows and golds gave way to khaki as the British army found itself in skirmishes throughout the far-flung Empire, in India and South Africa especially. In 1854 the regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of Cardigan) were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera. On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route. On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry in reserve. During the 25 October the regiment, as part of the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade. The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line along with the on the left. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the 4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed, they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavouring to surround them by closing in on either flank. However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. Leather 5 rivet grip, triple bar guard.
A Gordon Highlanders Queen's South Africa Boer War Medal In very nice untouched and unpolished condition. Four clasps. The clouds were gathering in South Africa as Queen Victoria's reign drew to its close. The 2nd Battalion had reached there from Bombay and were at Ladysmith when war was declared. Resolved to stem the Boer invasion of Natal the garrison made a thrust towards Elandslaagte and it was there in October, 1899, that they first met the Boers in battle. The Boers were in a strong position and their arms and musketry were more modern and better than those of the British forces. The Gordons attacked as the pipers played and paid a heavy price, but the contested ridge was reached at last and shouting `Majuba` to remind them of what had befallen their comrades there at the hands of the Boers, they went after the retreating enemy. But the victory failed to disengage Ladysmith and they settled down to the dwindling amenities of a siege life which was to last until the 28th February, 1900. The 1st Battalion came out from Britain in time to join Lord Methuen`s attempt to relieve Kimberley and suffered heavily with the rest of the Highland brigade at Magersfontien so that the century ended in dismal fashion for the British troops. But with the arrival of Lord Roberts to take command the tide began to turn. The 1st Battalion saw Kitchener win his victory at Paardeberg and then they swept on to Bloemfontein, while in the east relief came to Ladysmith. The 1st Battalion distinguished themselves with rare gallantry at Hout Nek and then at Doornkop, led by Ian Hamilton, the Gordons won fresh laurels. Much has been written of that battle, but there is surely no better account than that given by Winston Churchill in his book, "Ian Hamilton's March." ` The honours, equally with the cost of victory, making every allowance for skilful direction and bold leading, belongs to the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders more than to all the troops put together. The rocks against which they marched proved to be the very heart of the enemy's position. The grass in front of the position was burnt and burning, and against this dark background the khaki figures showed distinctly. The Boers held their heaviest fire until the attack was within 800 yards, and then the ominous rattle of concentrated rifle fire burst forth. The advance neither checked or quickened. With remorseless stride, undisturbed by peril or enthusiasm. The Gordon Highlanders swept steadily onwards, changed direction half left to avoid as far as possible an enfilade fire, changed again to effect a lodgement on the end of the ridge most suitable to attack and at last rose up together to charge. The Boers shrunk from the attack……they fled in confusion……" The South African war ended, the 2nd Battalion returned to India
A Great Helm of the European Style Circa 1370, 19th century. Formerly the property of The Higgins Armory Collection. Purchased by Mr Higgins from James Graham & Son in New York in April 1946. A Great Helm in 14th century style. Almost certainly from the workshop of Samuel Luke Pratt. Formed of five riveted plates, with horizontal vision slit pierced on the right with a cruciform ventilation hole, adomed crown with several aged holes, and in patinated 'aged' condition throughout (holed at the rear, blackened throughout) 41.3cm; 16 in high. Higgins Armory Inventory no 2831. This amazing example was most probably made to the order of the celebrated 19th century arms dealer, Mr Pratt of Bond St. London. He was the chief provider of original and copy armour to the great English collectors of the time, that were inspired by the Gothic Revival. Parts of this great helm appear to have some very early plates which possibly may have come from original, period armour. This Antique helm may well have been sold at the time, for the greater part, as being original, which it is not, but such is it's immediate appearance, when it was originally acquired and very similar to another great helm acquired by Lord Warwick. Lord Warwick acquired some armour from the Meyrick Collection, for the Castle armoury, from Mr Pratt, probably during the renovations after the great fire at Warwick Castle in 1871. Two similar original examples are in St. George's Hall at Windsor Castle, and another with the 'Achievements' of the Black Prince at his mausoleum in Canterbury Cathedral. Windsor Castle is an official residence of The Queen and the largest occupied castle in the world. A Royal home and fortress for over 900 years it was started by William the Conqueror and the Castle remains a working palace today. This form of Great Helm is one of the very rarest, with very few confirmed originals remaining in the world. There is one in The Tower of London Collection. William the Conqueror ordered the start of the building of Warwick in the 11th century, and by the 14th century the great Towers were completed. We consider ourselves very fortunate to have the opportunity to acquire some wonderful arms and weaponry from a small disposal from the Castle Armoury, in order to benefit the restoration of the Castle. In the year 1264, the castle was seized by the forces of Simon de Montfort, who consequently imprisoned the then current Earl, William Mauduit, and his Countess at Kenilworth (who were supporters of the king and loyals to the barons) until a ransom was paid. After the death of William Mauduit, the title and castle were passed to William de Beauchamp. Following the death of William de Beauchamp, Warwick Castle subsequently passed through seven generations of the Beauchamp family, who over the next 180 years were responsible for the majority of the additions made to Warwick Castle. After the death of the last direct-line Beauchamp, Anne, the title of Earl of Warwick, as well as the castle, passed to Richard Neville ("the Kingmaker"), who married the sister of the last Earl (Warwick was unusual in that the earldom could be inherited through the female line). Warwick Castle then passed from Neville to his son-in-law (and brother of Edward IV of England), George Plantagenet, and shortly before the Duke's death, to his son, Edward. Several Kings owned Warwick including King Henry VIIth, and Henry VIIIth, James Ist, and also Queen Elizabeth. One picture in the gallery shows a faithful replica of the Helm of the Black Prince as appears in The Times of Edward the Black Prince. [for information only, not included] Great Helms are so rare that if another original example with provenence was found it would likely be priceless.
A Great, Original 1840's Double Rifled Barrell Howdah Pistol Made in Europe for the British Empire market with English Damascus twist rifled barrels, marked in gold 'Damas Anglais'. Large bore barrels, back action locks finely engraved throughout. Carved walnut stock. Circa 1840. With a pair of over and under rifled barrels. Early rifled percussion examples are particularly rare, as most percussion models were smoothbore, before the introduction of the cartridge taking breech loading Howdah pistols. A formidable and singularly impressive double barrel large bore pistol, for use when seated in the Howdah, when riding on an Elephant, for protection against Tiger attack. Scroll engraved all steel mounts. The name "Howdah pistol" comes from the sedan chair- known as a Howdah which is mounted on the back of an elephant. Hunters, and officers, especially during the period of the British Raj in India, used howdahs as a platform for hunting wild animals and needed large-calibre side-arms to protect themselves, the elephant, and their passengers from animal attacks at close range. Even though Howdah pistols were designed for use in the “gravest extreme” against dangerous game (such as tigers), they were used in combat by some officers, for both offence and defence, as their effectivenes was simply unrivalled in close quarter action. Demand for these potent weapons outstripped supply, and many seen still surviving today are in fact converted shotguns, with shortened barrels and pistol grip restocking, and in later years gunmakers responded with revolvers, in calibres as large as .500, in order to fill the need. Firearms like these were one source of inspiration for the overtly powerful .44 magnum revolver. A 1996 movie, called 'The Ghost and the Darkness', starring Michael Douglas, featured the Douglas character, Charles Remington, using an identical "howdah" pistol in several scenes. This pistol has signs of use and has two small screw, a lanyard ring and rammer lacking. Fortunately, these are small not significant pieces and would be very easy to replace or leave as is. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables 7.5 inches barrels, 14.25 inches overall long
A Great, Victorian, Kaffrarian Volunteer Artillery Officer's Battle Sword 1870's. A wide heavy gauge battle sword with full Volunteer Artillery corps etching, and a monogrammed panel. Traditional 3 bar guard. Overall russet surface, with bright polished blade. Through family research the officer served in the Kaffrarian Volunteer Artillery in the Zulu War, and was transferred to the Frontier Caribiniers. He obtained his Zulu War medal, one of only 12 men to receive such a medal, while serving in the Kaffrarian Volunteer Artillery. No scabbard. Later etched with secondary owner's monogramme W.A.C
A Horn Hilt Jambiya With solid horn hilt double edged blade and leather scabbard.19th century.
A Huge 18th Century East India Company Blunderbuss Now beautifully restored. Possibly made by William Henshaw of The Strand, London, maker of heavy particularly large blunderbusses, and contractor to the East India Co. from 1778. With an extraordinarily large bell mouth barrel very elaborately decorated, a carved walnut stock inlaid with carved numbered stock. Flintlock with EIG company lion mark. Used in India during the time of two of England's greatest Generals were there, Clive of India, and General Wellesley [later to become the Duke of Wellington] and the fall of rebellious Mogul Ruler, known as The Tiger of Mysore, Tipu Sultan. The East India Company (EIC), originally chartered as the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies, and more properly called the Honourable East India Company, was an English and later (from 1707) British joint-stock company formed for pursuing trade with the East Indies but which ended up trading mainly with the Indian subcontinent, North-west frontier province and Balochistan. The Company continued to experience resistance from local rulers during its expansion. Robert Clive led company forces against Siraj Ud Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, Bihar, and Midnapore district in Odisha to victory at the Battle of Plassey in 1757, resulting in the conquest of Bengal. This victory estranged the British and the Mughals, since Siraj Ud Daulah was a Mughal feudatory ally. With the gradual weakening of the Marathas in the aftermath of the three Anglo-Maratha wars, the British also secured Ganges-Jumna Doab, the Delhi-Agra region, parts of Bundelkhand, Broach, some districts of Gujarat, fort of Ahmmadnagar, province of Cuttack (which included Mughalbandi/the coastal part of Odisha, Garjat/the princely states of Odisha, Balasore Port, parts of Midnapore district of West Bengal), Bombay (Mumbai) and the surrounding areas, leading to a formal end of the Maratha empire and firm establishment of the British East India Company in India. Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan, the rulers of the Kingdom of Mysore, offered much resistance to the British forces. Having sided with the French during the war, the rulers of Mysore continued their struggle against the Company with the four Anglo-Mysore Wars. Mysore finally fell to the Company forces in 1799, with the death of Tipu Sultan. The East India Company traded mainly in cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea and opium. The Company was granted a Royal Charter by Queen Elizabeth in 1600, making it the oldest among several similarly formed European East India Companies. Shares of the company were owned by wealthy merchants and aristocrats. The government owned no shares and had only indirect control. The Company eventually came to rule large areas of India with its own private armies, exercising military power and assuming administrative functions. Company rule in India effectively began in 1757 after the Battle of Plassey and lasted until 1858 when, following the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the Government of India Act 1858 led to the British Crown assuming direct control of India in the era of the new British Raj. This formidable blunderbuss weighs 13 pounds [6 kilos], the muzzle is over 3.5 inches across, and overall it is 37 inches long.
A Huge Zweihänder, or, Great Sword, Late 16th Century Style A massively impressive piece. Probably a late 18th century example, this is a fabulous historismus sword based on those illustrated in Meyer's fechtbuch of 1570, with tapering blade formed with a pronounced broad ricasso, steel hilt including a pair of straight quillons with globular terminal, side-rings, gadrooned pommel, and in age patinated condition, The Zweihänder (German for "two hander", also called Great sword, Bidenhänder or Bihänder), is a two-handed sword primarily of the Renaissance. It is a true two-handed sword because it requires two hands to wield it. This is in comparison with other large swords that can be used with two hands, but also can be used with one. The Zweihänder swords develop seamlessly out of the German "Langschwert" (longsword) of the Late Middle Ages, and they became a hallmark weapon of the German Landsknechte from the time of Maximilian I (d. 1519) and during the Italian Wars of 1494–1559. The Goliath Fechtbuch (1510) shows an intermediate form between longsword and Zweihänder These swords represent the final stage in the trend of increasing size started in the 14th century. In its developed form, the Zweihänder has acquired the characteristics of a polearm rather than a sword. Consequently, it is not carried in a sheath, but across the shoulder like a halberd. By the second half of the 16th century, these swords had largely ceased to have a practical application, but they continued to see ceremonial or representative use well into the 17th century and beyond. Some ceremonial zweihänder, called "bearing-swords" or "parade-swords" (Paratschwert), were much larger, weighing about 10 pounds. The weapon is mostly associated with either Swiss or German mercenaries known as Landsknecht, and their wielders were Doppelsöldner. However, the Swiss outlawed their use, while the Landsknecht kept using them until much later. The Black Band of German mercenaries (active during the 1510s and 1520s) included 2,000 two-handed swordsmen in a total strength of 17,000 men. Zweihänder wielders fought with and against pike formations. There are some accounts of Zweihänders cutting off pike heads. Soldiers trained in the use of the sword were granted the title of Meister des langen Schwertes. Sword 63.75 inches long overall, Crossguard 13 inches across
A Jager Military Rifle, As used by the Early, British, 60th Rifles Regt. During the Napoleonic Wars, The Peninsular War The War of 1812 in America and at Waterloo. The near identical predecessor to the Baker military rifle, a super and fine example, but with the traditional German style patch box in wood [as opposed to the Baker's brass version]. A very fine walnut stock, brass furniture, including scroll trigger guard, large ramrod pipes, heavy steel ramrod. 28.75 inch rifled octagonal barrel, 44 inches long overall, and covered in military regimental markings. It is matching serial numbered 157 D [company] on the butt plate, rammer and barrel. The barrel tang has another number [possibly applied when converted to percussion action], and a King George IIIrd crown stamp is on the stock. It also bears a CJH which may be Corps[ Jager ] Hompesch. Incredibly, inside the patch box is it's original hand written label circa 1800 that gives what we believe the name of the rifleman [Kluge] it's calibre, the gun's number [157] promise right of supply?? and notes on it's accuracy at 100 ,150, 200, 250, 300, 400, 500, 600 & 700 meters. Before the standard Baker rifle [which was a near direct copy of the Jager rile] replaced the Jager rifles, this was the type of gun acquired from Prussia by the British ordnance and issued to the earliest British rifle regiments formed in the late 18th century. They were then used in America and Ireland, and then in Spain, Portugal & France in the Napoleonic Wars. These rifles are referred to in British Military Firearms 1650 to 1850 by Howard Blackmore. The story of the earliest British rifle regiment goes as follows; at the end of 1797 - the year in which the Duke of York became colonel in-chief -of the 60th, it was decided to increase British forces in America, and an Act of Parliament was passed authorizing the Crown "to augment His Majesty's 60th Regiment of Infantry by the addition of a Fifth Battalion," to serve in America only, and to consist of foreigners. This battalion, the first green-coated rifle battalion in the Army, was organized under the command of Lieut-Colonel Baron de Rottenburg, of Hompesch's Corps. It was formed of 17 officers and 300 men from Hompesch's Chasseurs, and was dressed in bottle-green cut-away coats with scarlet facings, white waistcoats, blue pantaloons, with black leather helmets and black belts. They were armed, at first, with inferior 'contract' rifles imported from Germany, but after those were rejected this better type was chosen. This fifth or "Jager" battalion served in Ireland in 1798 during the Rebellion, and then proceeded to the West Indies, where, in June, 1799, it received 33 officers and 600 men from Lowenstein's Chasseurs, another regiment of foreigners, at the capture of Surinam in 1791 and afterwards in South and North America. In 1804 an Act was passed authorizing 10,000 foreign troops to serve in England, and the 5th Battalion was brought home in consequence in 1806. It went to Portugal in June, 1808, and from the opening skirmish at Obidos, on 15th August, two days before the battle of Roleia or Rolica down to the end of the war, took part in Wellington's campaigns in Portugal, Spain and the South of France. After the peace, this battalion was disbanded. This rifle is a superb piece and all the metal is in great condition. In the last picture in the gallery there is a picture of a 60th Rifleman next to a 95th in the Peninsular War. Note the 60th Rifleman's patchbox on his Jager Rifle. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Jolly Nice English Box Lock Flintlock Pistol By Garratt Of London Good action with sliding safety, and a nice turn off barrel for breech loading. Good walnut stock. Made when William Garratt had a shop at Mile End Old Town, London, around 1800. A great conversational piece, and almost all gentlemen required such a piece of personal defense weaponry. Although one likes to think that jolly old Georgian England had a London full of cheerful cockneys and laddish chimney sweeps, it was also plagued with political intrigue, nefarious characters and caddish swine prowling the endless foggy thoroughfares and dimly lit passageways, wishing to do harm to their unsuspecting victim. As with all our antique guns there is no license required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Khedive Star Medal Five pointed star with a central raised circle bearing an image of the Sphinx with the Pyramids behind, the word ‘EGYPT’ above followed by a year (for the first three issues and undated for the fourth) with the same written in Arabic below. The reverse has the monogram of the Khedive under a crown within a raised circle. The Khedive of Egypt presented a bronze star to all Officers and men of the Navy and Army who were engaged in the suppression of the rebellion of Egypt in 1882. The suspender [lacking] was straight with a crescent and five pointed star in the centre which is attached to the star with a small metal loop passing through a small ring between the two top points of the star. Ist issue dated 1882. Good Very Fine condition. No ribbon,mount.Unnamed as issued.
A King George IIIrd 1805 East India Co. Baker Rifle 'Type' Sword- Bayonet Most similar to the 1805 Baker rifle sword-bayonet, but, with a lighter grade hilt. Likely made to fit a gun similar to ours [stock number 17100] that is also not a Baker, but similar, and from the same era. The hilt is brass and the small quillon is lacking. Rounded tip.
A King George IIIrd East India Co. Dragoon Cavalry Pistol. With walnut stock, steel barrel and mounts, steel lock with EIC Lion, and British ordnance mark. Manufactured around 1800. The East India Co. was an English and latterly a British company with an Army that was led by British officer's with a mixture of British and [mainly] Indian other ranks. It had a most effective and powerful Navy and it's Army rivalled that of any in the world. It had many famous historical figures amongst it's members including, General Robert Clive [Of India] Lord Arthur Wellesley the Duke of Wellington, and a past Governor was Elihu Yale who was a British merchant and philanthropist, Governor of the East India Company settlement in Bengal, at Calcutta and Chennai and a benefactor of the Collegiate School of Connecticut, which in 1718 was renamed Yale College [of Connecticut USA] in his honour. The East India Company was, an anomaly without a parallel in the history of the world. It originated from sub-scriptions, trifling in amount, of a few private individuals. It gradually became a commercial body with gigantic resources, and by the force of unforeseen circumstances assumed the form of a sovereign power. The company's encounters with foreign competitors eventually required it to assemble its own military and administrative departments, thereby becoming an imperial power in its own right, though the British government began to reign it in by the late eighteenth century. Before Parliament created a government-controlled policy-making body with the Regulating Act of 1773 and the India Act eleven years later, shareholders' meetings made decisions about Britain's de facto colonies in the East. The Company continued to experience resistance from local rulers during its expansion. The great Robert Clive led company forces against Siraj Ud Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, Bihar, and Midnapore district in Odisha to victory at the Battle of Plassey in 1757, resulting in the conquest of Bengal. This victory estranged the British and the Mughals, since Siraj Ud Daulah was a Mughal feudatory ally. With the gradual weakening of the Marathas in the aftermath of the three Anglo-Maratha wars, the British also secured the Ganges-Jumna Doab, the Delhi-Agra region, parts of Bundelkhand, Broach, some districts of Gujarat, the fort of Ahmmadnagar, province of Cuttack (which included Mughalbandi/the coastal part of Odisha, Garjat/the princely states of Odisha, Balasore Port, parts of Midnapore district of West Bengal), Bombay (Mumbai) and the surrounding areas, leading to a formal end of the Maratha empire and firm establishment of the British East India Company in India. Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan, the rulers of the Kingdom of Mysore, offered much resistance to the British forces. Having sided with the French during the Revolutionary war, the rulers of Mysore continued their struggle against the Company with the four Anglo-Mysore Wars. Mysore finally fell to the Company forces in 1799, with the death of Tipu Sultan. The British government took away the Company's monopoly in 1813, and after 1834 it worked as the government's agency until the 1857 India Mutiny when the Colonial Office took full control. The East India Company went out of existence in 1873. During its heyday, the East India Company not only established trade through Asia and the Middle East but also effectively became of the ruler of territories vastly larger than the United Kingdom itself. In addition, it also created, rather than conquered, colonies. Singapore, for example, was an island with very few Malay inhabitants in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles purchased it for the Company from their ruler, the Sultan of Johor, and created what eventually became one of the world's greatest trans-shipment ports. The gun is in good operational order and condition. What may have been a date has been removed from the lock. This was often done in the mid 19th century when older military pistols were sold off by military surplus retailers, with their earlier manufactured dates removed, so the weapon did not appear to old for current use.
A King George IIIrd Fowling Piece A most charming long gun, circa 1790, with a walnut stock, steel furniture with pineapple trigger guard finial, gold lInd damascus twist barrel, that at one time had a gold makers seal inlaid at the breech, now lacking. A long gun that would make an eminently attractive display piece. The action has been percussion converted and no longer functions.As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A King George IIIrd Root Wood Cudgel Or Sheighleyle A shillelagh is a wooden walking stick and club or cudgel, typically made from a stout knotty stick with a large knob at the top, that is associated with Ireland and Irish folklore. Most also have a heavy knob for a handle which can be used for striking as well as parrying and disarming an opponent. Many shillelaghs also have a strap attached (hence the Irish name), similar to commercially made walking sticks, to place around the holder's wrist. The name, an Anglophone corruption of the Irish sail éille, appears to have become convolved with that of the village and barony in County Wicklow. The shillelagh was originally used for settling disputes in a gentlemanly manner—like pistols in colonial America, or the katana in Japan. Modern practitioners of bataireacht study the use of the shillelagh for self defense and as a martial art.Methods of shillelagh fighting have evolved over a period of thousands of years, from the spear, staff, axe and sword fighting of the Irish. There is some evidence which suggests that the use of Irish stick weapons may have evolved in a progression from a reliance on long spears and wattles, to shorter spears and wattles, to the shillelagh, alpeen, blackthorn (walking-stick) and short cudgel. By the 19th century Irish shillelagh-fighting had evolved into a practice which involved the use of three basic types of weapons, sticks which were long, medium or short in length
A King George IInd Silver 6d Made From Captured Spanish Silver from Peru Dated 1746. A 'Lima'-hallmarked sixpence, which was coined from silver seized at sea by Commodore [later Admiral] Anson on his global voyage in search of Spanish treasure. It's a great sea story, told many times in many sources, and fictionalized by Patrick O'Brian in the novel called "The Golden Ocean." The specie taken by Anson had been mined at the rich silver town of Lima, Peru, and was enroute to Spain when it was captured by the British and shipped to Portsmouth, where a great enclave of Englishmen met it and the returned navalmen. The silver specie was minted into sixpence, shillings, halfcrowns and crowns; the small amount of gold, into half-guineas, guineas and five-guineas. Most of the coins were readily spent during the era; few of any denomination survive today. This sixpence is particulary interesting in that it has been overstuck with a hallmark and a number 7. The silver was 'liberated' by Commodore Anson during his voyage around the world to capture Spanish booty from the treasure ships leaving South America. His early years of the voyage were riddled with strife and disaster, losing much of his six warship fleet, however, the indomitable perseverance he had shown during one of the most arduous voyages in the history of sea adventure gained the reward of the capture of an immensely rich prize, The Spanish, Manila Galleon, Nuestra Señora de Covadonga, possessing 1,313,843 pieces of eight, which he encountered off Cape Espiritu Santo on 20 June 1743. Anson took his prize back to Macau, sold her cargo to the Chinese, and sailed for England, which he reached via the Cape of Good Hope on 15 June 1744. The prize money earned by the capture of the galleon had made him a rich man for life, and it enabled his heirs to rebuild Shugborough Hall, the family estate. Anson's chaplain, Richard Walter, recorded the circumnavigation, which he included in A Voyage Round the World published in 1748. It is, "written in brief, perspicuous terms", wrote Thomas Carlyle in his History of Friedrich II, "a real poem in its kind, or romance all fact; one of the pleasantest little books in the world's library at this time". Anson's success is all the more remarkable when it is understood that although the Admiralty gave him six ships, it availed him no crew, which he had to endeavour to find himself. As a last resort he crewed his ships with 'Invalides' from the Chelsea Hospital. Men regarded as too old to fight, or too infirm or disabled. In fact, before sailing, over half his crew were brought aboard on stretchers. When the prize from his voyage was appraised, Anson took three-eighths of the prize money available for distribution from the Covadonga which by one estimate came to £91,000 [around £60,000,000 in today's equivalent ] compared with the £719 [around £450,000 today] he earned as captain during the 3 year 9 month voyage. By contrast, a seaman would have received perhaps only £300 bounty [£250,000 today], although even that amounted to 20 years' wages in those days. In May 1747, he commanded the fleet that defeated the French Admiral de la Jonquière at the First Battle of Cape Finisterre, capturing four ships of the line, two frigates and seven merchantmen. In consequence, Anson became very popular, and was promoted to Vice Admiral and elevated to the peerage as Lord Anson, Baron of Soberton, in the County of Southampton
A King George IVth Police Constable's Truncheon Painted with the King's cypher and crown. A fair amount of paint wear but still a nice example. The 18th century had been a rough and disorderly age, with mob violence, violent crimes, highwaymen, smugglers and the new temptations to disorder brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Clearly something had to be done. In 1829 the Metropolitan Police Force, organised by Sir Robert Peel, was established to keep the order in London. The force, under a Commissioner of the Police with headquarters at Scotland Yard, was essentially a civilian one: its members were armed only with wooden truncheons and at first wore top-hats and blue frock-coats. The "Peelers" or "Bobbies" were greeted largely with derision by Londoners, but they did become accepted fairly quickly. Thier primary purpose was to prevent crime, and some London criminals left their haunting grounds of London for the larger provincial towns, which in turn established their own forces on the Metropolitan model. The pattern followed through to the small villages and countryside. To secure co-operation between the spreading network and establish further forces, Parliament passed an act in 1856 to co-ordinate the work of the various forces and gave the Home Secretary the power to inspect them. In the counties, under the Police Act of 1890, the police became the combined responsibility of the local authorities - the County Councils - and the Justice of the Peace, while in London, the Metropolitan Police at Scotland Yard remained under the Commissioner appointed by the Home Office. At the turn of the century, the British police force established a reputation for humane and kindly efficiency. Their mere existence undoubtedly did a lot to prevent crime, and they built up what was on the whole a highly effective system of investigation and arrest.
A King George IVth Police Tipstaff With areas of painted finish lacking. Traditional of uppermost cylindrical form with a turned grip. The 18th century had been a rough and disorderly age, with mob violence, violent crimes, highwaymen, smugglers and the new temptations to disorder brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Clearly something had to be done. In 1829 the Metropolitan Police Force, organised by Sir Robert Peel, was established to keep the order in London. The force, under a Commissioner of the Police with headquarters at Scotland Yard, was essentially a civilian one: its members were armed only with wooden truncheons and at first wore top-hats and blue frock-coats. The "Peelers" or "Bobbies" were greeted largely with derision by Londoners, but they did become accepted fairly quickly. Thier primary purpose was to prevent crime, and some London criminals left their haunting grounds of London for the larger provincial towns, which in turn established their own forces on the Metropolitan model. The pattern followed through to the small villages and countryside. To secure co-operation between the spreading network and establish further forces, Parliament passed an act in 1856 to co-ordinate the work of the various forces and gave the Home Secretary the power to inspect them. In the counties, under the Police Act of 1890, the police became the combined responsibility of the local authorities - the County Councils - and the Justice of the Peace, while in London, the Metropolitan Police at Scotland Yard remained under the Commissioner appointed by the Home Office. At the turn of the century, the British police force established a reputation for humane and kindly efficiency. Their mere existence undoubtedly did a lot to prevent crime, and they built up what was on the whole a highly effective system of investigation and arrest.
A King William IVth 1830 Police Special Constable's Truncheon Decorated body with remains of crown WR and Special Constable . Made by Parker of Holborn. A fair amount of surface wear, but a very honest early piece by the best maker.
A Knights Rowel Spur of the 16th Century With Buckle From the era of the War of The Holy League. An alliance between King Henry VIII, Pope Julius II, Venice and Ferdinand of Spain against the feared force of France and Germany under the brilliant command of the 21 year old Gaston de Foix. The Papal alliance suffered very badly against the young General but they eventually defeated and killed him at the Ronco River during the siege of Ravenna. After his death the French forces were crushed at Novara by the Swiss, the German Landsknechts fled their French army comrades and the English marched into France from Calais, and it was only due to the indecisiveness of the alliance forces that France was eventually saved immediately before the war was over.
A Large And Hugely Impressive Antique Chief's Spearhead Extraordinary large size leaf shaped spear head in forged iron with central rib, likely a lance head for the tribal chief or king to carry as his badge of rank. 17.5 inches long o/a, 4.75 inches wide, weighs just over 1.5 pounds. Likely from the Gogo, Nyaturu, Irangi North at the Southeast side of Lake Victoria from the Sukuma and Washashi. The GoGo , a fierce, warlike tribe that Stanley passed on his way to Ujiji, looking for Livingstone .
A Late 18th Century Arabian Pirate's Long Miquelet Pistol A pistol with a most distinctive miquelet lock, most highly prized by the Barbary Corsairs. A pistol with most flamboyant yet naïve brass fittings and steel lock, and a good strong tight action. A most effective pistol that once discharged made an excellent club for knocking an opponant insensible [if he was lucky]. The Barbary pirates, sometimes called Barbary corsairs or Ottoman corsairs, were pirates and privateers who operated from North Africa, based primarily in the ports of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli. This area was known in Europe as the Barbary Coast, a term derived from the name of its Berber inhabitants. Their predation extended throughout the Mediterranean, south along West Africa's Atlantic seaboard and even South America, and into the North Atlantic as far north as Iceland, but they primarily operated in the western Mediterranean. In addition to seizing ships, they engaged in Razzias, raids on European coastal towns and villages, mainly in Italy, France, Spain, and Portugal, but also in Great Britain and Ireland, the Netherlands and as far away as Iceland. The main purpose of their attacks was to capture Christian slaves for the Muslim market in North Africa and the Middle East. While such raids had occurred since soon after the Muslim conquest of the region, the terms Barbary pirates and Barbary corsairs are normally applied to the raiders active from the 16th century onwards, when the frequency and range of the slavers' attacks increased and Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli came under the sovereignty of the Ottoman Empire, either as directly administered provinces or as autonomous dependencies known as the Barbary States. Similar raids were undertaken from Salé and other ports in Morocco, but strictly speaking Morocco, which never came under Ottoman dominance, was not one of the Barbary States. Corsairs captured thousands of ships, and long stretches of coast in Spain and Italy were almost completely abandoned by their inhabitants, discouraging settlement until the 19th century. From the 16th to 19th century, corsairs captured an estimated 800,000 to 1.25 million people as slaves. Some corsairs were European outcasts and converts such as John Ward and Zymen Danseker. Hayreddin Barbarossa and Oruç Reis, the Barbarossa brothers, who took control of Algiers on behalf of the Ottomans in the early 16th century, were also famous corsairs. The European pirates brought state-of-the-art sailing and shipbuilding techniques to the Barbary Coast around 1600, which enabled the corsairs to extend their activities into the Atlantic Ocean, and the impact of Barbary raids peaked in the early to mid-17th century. The scope of corsair activity began to diminish in the latter part of the 17th century, as the more powerful European navies started to compel the Barbary States to make peace and cease attacking their shipping. However, the ships and coasts of Christian states without such effective protection continued to suffer until the early 19th century. Following the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna in 1814-5 European powers agreed upon the need to suppress the Barbary corsairs entirely and the threat was largely subdued, although occasional incidents continued until finally terminated by the French conquest of Algiers in 1830. The pistol has an old crack in the butt.
A Late 18th Century Infantry Officer's Hangar From The 1780's Good steel hilt in the spadroon form, with a carved fluted ebony hilt and curved fullered blade. A good original King George IIIrd period officer's sword, from the late American War of Independence period.
A Late Victorian Model Desk Cannon Cast Bronze Cannon Barrel set on an oak Ship's Deck Carriage. A beautiful and most attractive gentleman's desk ornament. 9 inch barrel 11,5 inches overall. Brass wheels [1 missing]. A simple and small item to replace with the most basic of engineering skills required.
A Long, Horse Holster Flintlock Pistol Of the Ottoman Empire Fancy cast and chisseled brass mounts, including a long eared butt with very fine and elegant casting designs. Long 12 inch steel barrel. Fully engraved lock with fine intricate floral scrolls. Good quality walnut stock, of an excellent close grain, very nicely scroll engraved. Circa 1790. Pistols of this form were not only popular in the whole Ottoman Empire, but also throughout the whole Mediterranean region and southern Europe during the entire Napoleonic wars period and for some considerable time after. Very tight lock indeed. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Magnificent 1763 Silver Sword, Identical To George Washington's Sword. And it is very rare to be complete, in it's original silver and leather scabbard, By London silversmith, William Kinman. 99.9% of all swords from this era do not survive with their original scabbards. With two volumes of the life of George Washinton, publ' 1832. Including a copy of the hand drawn letter "A Declaration by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress assembled." This is a near identical, original, example to Washington's sword that was worn by Washington during his inauguration as President in New York on April 30, 1789. It was given to him by his friend, Maj. Gen. William Drake. Washington's sword now resides in Morristown National Historic Park. This sword was made in hallmarked solid silver in 1763, by famed London smith Walter Brind. London was the primary base as makers of finest swords for famous notables. This sword was worn in the revolutionary war by either an American or British officer. It was part of a 'George Washington' collection of original American Revolutionary War Swords, used in the war, that match famous swords, either worn by or surrendered to, General George Washington. George Washington was the first President of the United States (1789–1797), the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He presided over the convention that drafted the United States Constitution, which replaced the Articles of Confederation and which remains the supreme law of the land. Washington was elected President as the unanimous choice of the electors in 1788, and he served two terms in office. He oversaw the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that maintained neutrality in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion, and won acceptance among Americans of all types. His leadership style established many forms and rituals of government that have been used since, such as using a cabinet system and delivering an inaugural address. Further, the peaceful transition from his presidency to the presidency of John Adams established a tradition that continues into the 21st century. Washington was hailed as "father of his country" even during his lifetime. Washington was born into the provincial gentry of Colonial Virginia; his wealthy planter family owned tobacco plantations and slaves. After both his father and older brother died when he was young, Washington became personally and professionally attached to the powerful William Fairfax, who promoted his career as a surveyor and soldier. Washington quickly became a senior officer in the colonial forces during the first stages of the French and Indian War. Chosen by the Second Continental Congress in 1775 to be commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolution, Washington managed to force the British out of Boston in 1776, but was defeated and almost captured later that year when he lost New York City. After crossing the Delaware River in the dead of winter, he defeated the British in two battles, retook New Jersey and restored momentum to the Patriot cause. Because of his strategy, Revolutionary forces captured two major British armies at Saratoga in 1777 and Yorktown in 1781. Historians laud Washington for his selection and supervision of his generals, encouragement of morale and ability to hold together the army, coordination with the state governors and state militia units, relations with Congress and attention to supplies, logistics, and training. In battle, however, Washington was repeatedly outmaneuvered by British generals with larger armies. After victory had been finalized in 1783, Washington resigned as Commander-in-chief rather than seize power, proving his opposition to dictatorship and his commitment to American republicanism. Dissatisfied with the weaknesses of the Continental Congress, in 1787 Washington presided over the Constitutional Convention that devised a new Federal government of the United States. Elected unanimously as the first President of the United States in 1789, he attempted to bring rival factions together to unify the nation. He supported Alexander Hamilton's programs to pay off all state and national debt, to implement an effective tax system and to create a national bank (despite opposition from Thomas Jefferson). Washington proclaimed the United States neutral in the wars raging in Europe after 1793. He avoided war with Great Britain and guaranteed a decade of peace and profitable trade by securing the Jay Treaty in 1795, despite intense opposition from the Jeffersonians. Although he never officially joined the Federalist Party, he supported its programs. Washington's Farewell Address was an influential primer on republican virtue and a warning against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars. He retired from the presidency in 1797 and returned to his home, Mount Vernon, and his domestic life where he managed a variety of enterprises. He freed all his slaves by his final will. In 1976 Wilkinson Sword company made limited edition copies of this sword and these modern copies can now fetch four figure sums.
A Magnificent Ship's Captain's Blunderbuss Pistol With Spring Bayonet Made by Richards of London Circa 1795. They were well recorded finest English gunmakers, and documented makers of [Captain's] 'Blunderbuss Pistoles with Cannone barrels, and some wythe Bayonettes'. This wonderful and delightfully large bore cannon barrel pistol has a brass barrel with an undersprung bayonet, with spring release from the trigger guard, a slab sided walnut grip and a bronze frame superbly and finely engraved with stands of arms and the maker's name and London, side mounted horn tipped ramrod. Ship's Captains found such impressive guns so desireable as they had two prime functions to clear the decks with one shot, and the knowledge to an assailant that the pistol hads the capability to achieve such a result. In the 18th and 19th century mutiny was a common fear for all commanders, and not a rare as one might imagine. The Capt. Could keep about his person or locked in his gun cabinet in his quarters a gun just as this. The barrel could be loaded with single ball or swan shot, ball twice as large as normal shot, that when discharged at close quarter could be devastating, and terrifyingly effective. Potentially taken out four or five assailants at once. The muzzle was swamped like a cannon for two reasons, the first for ease of rapid loading, the second for imtimidation. There is a very persuasive psychological point to the size of this gun's muzzle, as any person or persons facing it could not fail to fear the consequences of it's discharge, and the act of surrender or retreat in the face of an well armed blunderbuss could be a happy and desirable result for all parties concerned. However, this gun also has the rarely seen feature of a spring loaded bayonet, that could double it's effectiveness by threat or action. Please be aware this pistol, may, from the photographs, appear to look the same size as a standard boxlock pocket pistol of that era, but, it is much larger, of 'Manstopper bore' and weighing around 1 kilo. 17.5 inches long with bayonet extended. Bayonet spring with lack of tension [repairable]. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Magnificent Victorian Merryweather Stately Home Fire Service Helmet This helmet is an absolute beauty and one of the best preserved we have seen in many, many, years. Although the liner has faired somewhat poorly over time. Made for a great estate, somewhat similar to the world reknown Downton Abbey [that of course is an estate of fiction] but that great house and it's estate are still very much real. It has a superb stately home badge for the Pylwell Park Fire Brigade. These fire helmets created for the landed gentry great estates of England are now very rare and highly collectable. There may have only been half a dozen ever made for this brigade, and the old estate fire brigades very much a thing of the long distant past.
A Mandinke Empire Prestigous Warrior's Sword From The Era Of Samori Ture A superb example of a Samori Toure's Mandinke [Wassoulou] Empire senior warrior's sword brought back from a French military campaign in the early 1890's. Made around the early 1870's. With superb tooled leather hilt and matching scabbard with paddle like form. These weapons are well known for their leather-work and the tattooing applied to the leather of the scabbards. Very good quality imported French blade. In 1851 Samori Toure, a merchant from the upper Niger basin, deserted his trade and for the next twenty years lived as a war chief in the service of several African leaders. In the 1870s, he struck out on his own, to create an empire that stretched from the right bank of the Niger, south to Sierra Leone and Liberia. Islam gave Samori's empire a veneer of ideological unity. But the real solidity of Samori's dominion resided in his formidable military organization. His territories were divided into ten provinces, eight of which raised an army corps of 4--5,000 professional sofas or warriors, supplemented by agricultural work the other six months. Samori’s army was powerful, disciplined, professional, and trained in modern day warfare. They were equipped with European guns. The army was divided into two flanks, the infantry or sofa, with 30,000 to 35,000 men, and the cavalry or sere of 3,000 men. Each wind was further subdivided into permanent units, fostering camaraderie among members and loyalty to both the local leaders and Samori himself. Samori Touré created the Mandinka empire (the Wassoulou empire) between 1852 and 1882. His empire extended to the east as far as Sikasso (present-day Mali), to the west up to the Fouta Djallon empire (middle of modern day Guinea), to the north from Kankan to Bamako (in Mali); to the south, down to the borders of present-day Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Cote d’Ivoire. His capital was Bisandugu, in present day Gambia. "Samori managed to unify an empire that survived for almost two decades against repeated French advances. After a particularly bloody skirmish with Samori's sofas in the Diamanko marshes in January 1892, Colonel Gustave Humbert conceded that Samori's troops 'fight exactly like Europeans, with less discipline perhaps, but with much greater determination. Among the Manding and related peoples of the western Sudan the most prestigious swords, owned only by men of some standing, have a slightly curved single-edged blade, often of French manufacture, set in a hilt without hand guard or quillons. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of these swords is their scabbards of exquisitely decorated leather broadening into a leaf-shaped point" In 1882, at the height of the Mandinka empire, the French accused Samori Touré of refusing to comply to their order to withdraw from an important market center, Kenyeran (his army had blockaded the market). They thus started war on him. This was an excuse to start war! From 1882 to 1885, Samori fought the French and had to sign various treaties in 1886 and then 1887. In 1888, he took up arms again when the French allegedly attempted to foster rebellion within his empire. He defeated the French colonial army several times between 1885 and 1889. After several confrontations, he concluded further treaties with the French in 1889. In March 1891, a French force under Colonel Louis Archinard launched a direct attack on Kankan. Knowing his fortifications could not stop French artillery, Ture began a war of maneuver. Despite victories against isolated French columns (for example at Dabadugu in September 1891), Ture failed to push the French from the core of his kingdom. In June 1892, Col. Archinard's replacement, Humbert, leading a small, well-supplied force of picked men, captured Ture's capital of Bissandugu. In another blow, the British had stopped selling breech loaders to Ture in accordance with the Brussels Convention of 1890. Ture shifted his base of operations eastward, toward the Bandama and Comoe River. He instituted a scorched earth policy, devastating each area before he evacuated it. Though this maneuver cut Ture off from Sierra Leone and Liberia, his last sources of modern weapons, it also delayed French pursuit.[4] The fall of other resistance armies, particularly Babemba Traoré at Sikasso, permitted the French colonial army to launch a concentrated assault against Touré. He was captured 29 September 1898 by the French captain Henri Gouraud and was exiled to Gabon. Ture died in captivity on June 2, 1900, following a bout of pneumonia. His tomb is at the Camayanne Mausoleum, within the gardens of Conakry Grand Mosque.
A Marlin 1870's 'Wild West' Revolver. John M. Marlin was born in Connecticut in 1836, and served his apprenticeship as a tool and die maker. During the Civil War, he worked at the Colt plant in Hartford, and in 1870 hung out his sign on State Street, New Haven, to start manufacturing his own line of revolvers and derringers. This is a beautiful example of an early Marlin Model 1872 Pocket Revolver known as the XXX Standard. Standard 3 1/8" round barrel with S&W style tip-up action. 5 shot cylinder in caliber .30 Rimfire. With cylinder flutes..made in 1873. Nickle plated barrel is marked "XXX STANDARD 1872" on top of the rib with left side of the barrel marked "JM Marlin New-Haven CT. Pat July 1, 1873"..30 rim fire caliber, 5 shot revolver spur trigger, tip-up reloading action. Manufactured from 1873 to 1876, and production was only approximately 10,000. This revolver is serial number 856. It made a great hideaway gun for a gambler, with the cartridge remover taken off for ease of positioning and sliding into a boot, and, most intrigueingly, it has an inset sideplate of a Victorian farthing [a 'quarter of a penny' coin]. Maybe a souvenir of a card game against an Englishman in the 1880's. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Massive Mortimer of London, Boxlock Pistol Of An Incredible .75 inch Bore Circa 1840. We cannot recall ever seeing a boxlock pistol of such a bore, weight and size, ever before. For a pistol of this type it is absolutely massive, as large a bore as a brown bess musket. The surface is overall russetted and the grip to one side has had an old contemporary repair. Mortimer is one of the greatest ever names in English guns, and this was likely a special one-off order for a customer than needed something immensely powerful, with the power of a hand cannon, yet easy to carry. It feels like a version of the specialised truncheon pistol, where it can be utilized as a most powerful deadly cosh after it has been discharged. We show in the gallery a photo of it alongside a standard, more normal boxlock, and that way one can see it's incredible mass by comparison. The foldaway trigger opens loosely by itself.
A Massive Original Antique Brookes and Crookes Bowie Knife A finest Sheffield Bowie US import. One of the great Sheffield Bowies, by one of the distinguished Gold Medal winning cutlers that were so famous and eargerly sought after in the burgeoning American West in the 19th century. All the best knives used at that time in the States were more often than not Sheffield imports, and the big bladed ones, such as this, the most expoensive and sought after. At the blades forte it bears the makers mark of Brookes and Crookes, and Sheffield. Very large double edged Bowie blade 10.75 inches long. With all it's original cross grain polish, some edge nicks and hand edge sharpening, original leather scabbard with belt loop. Brookes & Crookes was a knife and instrument maker partnership founded in around 1850 by John Brookes and Thomas Crookes. In Melville & Co's Commercial Directory of Sheffield 1859 the company appears as " manufacturers of spring-knives and dressing case instruments". The company was always a smaller operation when compared to one of the larger firms such as Joseph Rodgers, employing at most 200 workers compared to tens times that at Rodgers. But they produced quality products, with their renown name a "Badge of Excellence". In the Paris Exhibition of 1867 they were awarded the only Gold Medal as Cutlers In the Philadelphia Centennial of 1876 they were awarded the first class prize. And in the Paris Exhibition of 1878 they were awarded the gold medal. A writer in the Sheffield Weekly Independent for November 19th, 1887, having heard that the famous cutler Mr. 'Brookes of Sheffield' was living at 'Woodbourne,' says that he went there to call upon him. "I found that it was a large, handsomely-built house but with its former glories sadly dimmed by the soot and grime from the neighbouring colliery . . , After ringing twice, I was admitted by Mrs. Brookes, a kind-looking lady of fifty or sixty years of age, and in the comfortable dining room, seated in a large easy chair by the side of a brightly blazing fire, was Mr. Brookes, to whom I was introduced. Courteously he motioned me to be seated, and I then explained the nature of my errand. I said I had been informed that he was the original Brookes of Sheffield, to whom reference was made by Charles Dickens in 'David Copperfield.' 'That is so,' he replied, and at once asked Mrs. Brookes to bring him the author's copy which the great-novelist sent to him in 1851, with a statement on the fly leaf in Dickens' handwriting to the effect that it was presented to Brookes of Sheffield by Charles Dickens.". Although this blade has signs of use at it's edge and the hand sharpening, it is in remarkable condition and to have original polish crossgraining is pretty exceptional.
A Mid 19th Century Prussian Cavalry Sword With three bar brass hilt and curved blade by W.Walschied of Solingen. A typical cavalry sword from the Crimean War period, and many were purchased by for the US and Confederate States for use in the Civil War.
A Most Amusing and Scarce Pepperbox Derringer Revolver Or "Fist" Pistol A stunning little English 6 barrel revolver of small proportions that simply ticks all the boxes of the unusual and rare Victorian gun collector's desires. In 19th century France these pistols were called "Apache" or "Fist" pistols ["coup de poing", translating to "fist blow"] and were much favoured by the Parisian street gangs. It is unusual to see one of the rare English examples as most were made in France or Belgium. Its long, fluted cylinder is a modified pepperbox design made from a single piece of metal, and the front end of the cylinder axis pin is supported by a bracket screwed to the front end of the lower frame. The breech consists of a thick, flat, circular plate with a semi-circular opening cut out on the right-hand side so that the weapon could be loaded from the breech end. This opening is filled by a bottom-hinged gate shaped to match the circular breech block, which is held closed by a small, horizontal, L-shaped spring lever screwed below it on the frame. Within the butt is the lanyard ring. Folding trigger. 2.75 inch long cylinder barrel, 4.25 inches long overall. The whole pistol fits comfortably within a single hand. Good working action, but, ineffective trigger return spring.
A Most Attractive 18th-19th Century Dagger Silver, Horn and Ivory Décor This is an unusual dagger, most charming indeed, with some very nice quality features. The scabbard is un hallmarked solid silver and the hilt is carved horn with an ivory centre section and inlaid with silver. The pommel is silver, egg shaped with central abnd of horn. The blade has a most elegant shape with fine line engraving and a complimentary engraved overlaid brass ricasso. There is a near identical dagger in the British Museum collection. It is also described In "African Arms and Armour" by Christopher Spring with a most similar dagger is assigned to Reguibat Arabs of Southern Morocco. These daggers show the influence of the Hispano-Moorish civilisation which flourished in the Iberian peninsula and North Africa at the beginning of the second millenium AD. This influence is also reflected in local textile traditions. Reguibat fractions extended from Western Sahara into the northern half of Mauritania, the edges of southern Morocco and northern Mali, and large swaths of western Algeria (where they captured the town of Tindouf from the Tajakant tribe in 1895, and turned into an important Reguibat encampment). The Reguibat were known for their skill as warriors, as well as for an uncompromising tribal independence, and dominated large areas of the Sahara desert through both trade and use of arms. Reguibat Sahrawis were very prominent in the resistance to French and Spanish colonization in the 19th century This beautiful dagger is, overall 32cm long 19cm blade. Our thanks to Martin Lubojacký for information as to it's origins
A Most Attractive 19th Century Powder Flask Decorated With Game Embossed on both sides with roccoco moulding and panels of hanging game including, stags and large game birds. Brass spout with god spring action. All original lacquer present.
A Most Attractive 19th Century Sword Circa 1840. Boat Form Hilt Possibly either American or French. Inspired by the 18th century French guard officer's sword this is very similar to both the 1831 pattern American Infantry sword, or, the 1840 US militia pattern NCO's sword. The helmet pattern pommel was most popular in America at this time, and both the French Army and American State militias used it. Very nice order throughout, old metal band repair to leather scabbard midsection. Solingen, 'Weyersberg' King's head makers mark to blade forte. A recorded maker to both France and America both before and during the Civil War era
A Most Attractive 19th Century W. Ingrams Patent Musket Powder Flask Decorated with fine shell repousse work. Very nice condition, good spring. 7.75 inches long overall
A Most Attractive and Intriguing Antique Ivory Mounted Kabyle Musket A nice quality 18th century long gun with an earlier lock, probably of a Berber tribesman or of the Kabyle people. The Kabyle Musket or moukalla (moukhala) was a type of musket widely used in North Africa, produced by many native tribes and nations. Two systems of gunlock prevailed in Kabyle guns, one, which derived from Dutch and English types of snaphance lock, usually with a thicker lockplate. Half cock was provided by a dog catch behind the cock. At full cock, the sear passing through the lockplate engaged the heel of the cock. The other mechanism was the so-called Arab toe-lock, a form of miquelet lock, closely allied to the agujeta lock (which required a back or dog catch for half cock) and the Italian romanlock. The term miquelet is used today to described a particular type of Snaplock. The miquelet lock, in all varieties, was common for several centuries in the countries surrounding the Mediterranean, particularly in Spain, Italy, the Balkans, and the Ottoman Empire domains including the coastal states of North Africa. The type of musket would be described as a Kabyle snaphance or a Kabyle miquelet. The calibre of musket ball fired was large in the .67 range. These guns were very long, this one is around 65 inches. The barrel alone is 50 inches in length, and bears British proof marks . The barrel is retained in the stock by 8 iron and brass, (capucines). The stock and trumpet-shaped butt is enhanced with a carved ivory butt. With a good Snaphaunce lock of 17th century form, fine detailed engraving around the stock, distinctive deep flattened butt, and the stock is inlaid with Ivory and an Ivory butt plate. 8 barrel cappucines. In Europe these most distinctive and elaborate Snaphaunce guns gained great favour in the Elizabethan era and their influence was greatly felt in Arabia, originally along the eastern trade routes, that were travelled and used by early Europeans in order to buy the finest eastern silks, gemstones & spices. They were continually used in the Middle East and the Maghrib long after they had become unfashionable in Europe. One of the most renown Berbers in history was Saint Augustine it is said of him "Of all the fathers of the church, St. Augustine was the most admired and the most influential during the Middle Ages ... Augustine was an outsider - a native North African whose family was not Roman but Berber ... He was a genius - an intellectual giant" Interestingly this gun would have been likely last used in the resistance battle against French colonial conquest of Algeria, and one of the most famous was a woman, a warrior leader called Lalla Fadhma n'Soumer (born Fadhma Nat Sid Hmed in Abi Youcef, Algeria c.1830) She was an important figure of the Algerian resistance movement during the first years of the French colonial conquest of Algeria. She was seen as the embodiment of the struggle. Lalla, the female equivalent of sidi, is an honorific reserved for women of high rank, or who are venerated as saints. Fadhma is the Berber/French spelling of the Arabic name Fatima, which is colloquially pronounced Fatma in most Arabic dialects as well as Berber. She is shown in the gallery posed with her Kabyle and pistol engaged in combat with French soldiers.
A Most Attractive Carved Bone Walking Stick of a Serpent and Globe Compass A ball held in the mouth of a monster sea serpent carved with a removable top, that reveals a card compass, printed Salem Semery [a well fitted new replacement]. The globe is engraved with points of the compass, sailing ships, whales and a man observing with his spy glass. The handle terminates with a multi wire bound turks head knot . Mallacca cane in good sound order. One very small retaining pin has been expertly replaced
A Most Attractive Kurdish 19th Century Jambiya. Carved wooden hit brass embossed and leather scabbard over wood. Double edged steel blade. Blade would polish nicely.
A Most Attractive Late 18th Century Holster Pistol. Chiseled Barrel Fine walnut stock, cast brass mounts and very finely engraved flintlock action. Late 18th century and used in the Napoleonic Wars era. Made in the Ottoman Empire with heavy Continental influences. Made for use on horseback and carried in a saddle holster. Typical simulated ramrod in bone or ivory.10.5 inch barrel 16.5 inches long overall
A Most Attractive, French 19th Century, Officer of the Third Republic Sword From the Chinese French War of the 1880's. Bronze hilt with flaming grenade on the shell guard. Polished grip with single knuckle bow. Long and elegant double edged blade with central double fullers. Steel scabbard. Overall in excellent condition overall. The Sino–French War was a limited conflict fought between August 1884 and April 1885 to decide whether France should replace China in control of Tonkin (northern Vietnam). Because the French achieved their war aims, they are usually considered to have won the war. Nevertheless, the Chinese armies performed better than they had in other nineteenth-century foreign wars, resulting in a number of French defeats in individual battles. In Taiwan and in some quarters near Guangxi, the war is even regarded as a Chinese victory. French interest in northern Vietnam dated from the late 18th-century, when the political Catholic priest Pigneau de Behaine recruited French volunteers to fight for Nguyen Ánh to start the Nguyen Dynasty in an attempt to gain privileges for France and the Roman Catholic Church. In 1858, France began their colonial campaign and in 1862 annexed several southern provinces of Vietnam to become the colony of Cochinchina, laying the foundations for its later colonial empire in Indochina. French explorers followed the course of the Red River through northern Vietnam to its source in Yunnan, arousing hopes that an extremely profitable overland trade route could be established with China, bypassing the treaty ports of the Chinese coastal provinces. The main obstacle to the realisation of this dream was the Black Flag Army, a well-organized bandit force under a formidable leader, Liu Yongfu, which was levying exorbitant dues on trade on the Red River between Son Tây and the town of Lào Cai on the Yunnan border.
A Most Beautiful 13th Century Ancient Bronze Eastern Hand or Pole Cannon In many respects we can comfortably say this is potentially the earliest, oldest and most ancient gun for sale in the country today. Guns of this vintage are more often than not only available to be admired, with awe and respect within the great and hallowed halls of establishments such as the British Museum or the Smithsonian in Washington. This cannon is, as to be expected, one piece cast bronze with a slanted touch hole, tubular in form with an expanded breech section, and rear socket for a pole mount. It has superb natural age patina. Early firearms ranging from hand cannons to harquebusiers are referred to in texts of the period by many spellings: gonne, gunne, canon being a few examples. The hand cannon dates back to the late 13th century in Egypt and China, and was used until at least the 1520s in Europe and the Middle East, and until modern times in the Far East. However, where it was invented remains an area of controversy. The Arabs, Chinese and Mongols all have a claim - as do the Europeans. A 16th-century legend about a 14th-century German or Greek monk called Berthold Schwarz (Black Berthold, Bertholdus Niger) having invented gunpowder has long been proven to be fictitious. The earliest evidence of a portable hand cannon dates back to the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, when they were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols. Like this gun, which likely hails from Cambodia, the hand cannon was a simple weapon, but effective in sieges and ambushes. It was less effective in open battle and in wet or windy conditions. Despite its crude appearance, the hand cannon could kill even armoured opponents at short ranges - if the gunner could manage to hit them. Experiments indicate an effective range of about 50 metres and a maximum range of about 300 metres, depending on calibre and type of powder used. Hand cannon ranged in barrel length from 190 to 600 mm and from 12 to 36 mm in calibre. Approximate weights ranged from 1.5 kg to a monstrous 15 kg for some siege models. Barrels were typically short compared to later firearms and made from wrought iron or cast in bronze. For ease of handling, the barrels were often attached to a wooden stock. This was done in two ways: either by resting the barrel in a groove in the stock and securing it with metal bands, or by inserting the stock into a socket formed in the rear part of the barrel. Some gonnes merely had a metal rod formed as an extension to the rear of the barrel as a handle. For firing, the hand cannon could be held in two hands while an assistant applied ignition (such as hot coals or burning tinder) to the touch hole, or propped against something and set off by the gunner himself. Illustrations depict gunners holding the stock in the armpit, or over the shoulder like a modern bazooka to aim their weapon. During sieges, hand cannon were rested on the edges of walls, over the sides of armoured carts, or on forked rests hammered into the ground. Hooks are often found attached to the bottom of the barrel to support the gonne against stationary objects or to reduce the recoil. 14 inches long overall.
A Most Beautiful Ancient Bronze Dagger From the Time of Cyrus The Great Circa 600bc. As the founder of the Achaemenid Empire, one of Cyrus' objectives was to gain power over the Mediterranean coast and secure Asia Minor. Croesus of Lydia, Nabonidus of Babylonia and Amasis II of Egypt joined in alliance with Sparta to try and thwart Cyrus - but this was to no avail. Hyrcania, Parthia and Armenia were already part of the Median Kingdom. Cyrus moved further east to annex Drangiana, Arachosia, Margiana and Bactria to his territories. After crossing the Oxus, he reached the Jaxartes. There, he built fortified towns with the object of defending the farthest frontier of his kingdom against the Iranian nomadic tribes of Central Asia such as the Scythians. The exact limits of Cyrus' eastern conquests are not known, but it is possible that they extended as far as the Peshawar region in modern Pakistan. After his eastern victories, he repaired to the west and invaded Babylon. On 12 October 539BCE Cyrus, "without spilling a drop of blood", annexed the Chaldaean empire of Babylonia - and on October 29 he entered Babylon, arrested Nabonidus and assumed the title of "King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, King of the four corners of the world". Almost immediately he then extended his control over the Arabian peninsula and the Levant also quickly submitted to Persian rule. Although Cyrus did not conquer Egypt, by 535BCE all the lands up to the Egyptian borders had acceded to Persian dominance. Newly conquered territories had a measure of political independence, being ruled by satraps. These (usually local) governors took full responsibility for the administration, legislation and cultural activities of each province. According to Xenophon, Cyrus created the first postal system in the world, and this must have helped with intra-Empire communications. Babylon, Ecbatana, Pasargadae and Susa were used as Cyrus' command centres. Cyrus' spectacular conquests triggered the age of Empire Building, as carried out by his successors as well as by the later Greeks and Romans. Dagger in very fine order, excellent patina, small fracture at the central hilt. 38cm long
A Most Beautiful British 1790's Sabre With Lion's Head Pommel and Langet This is a glorious swash buckling sabre of great quality and in fine condition. A lot of it's original mercurial gilt is remaining and it's wire bound grip is near mint. We have seen these swords refered to as every thing from British flank officer's sabre, Royal Naval officer's [when with ivory grips], and 1790's British East India co. Infantry officer's swords [often though more crudely made and with carved bone grips]. We believe it was made before regulation types were more standard [in the 1790's], and in the period when officers could carry any sword as they saw fit, provided it followed a suitable functionable ability as per their needs. Either way, this is a fabulous King George IIIrd period English sword from the Napoleonic Wars, and the Tippu Sultan revolt at The Siege of Seringapatam (5 April – 4 May 1799). This was the final confrontation of the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War between the British East India Company and the Kingdom of Mysore. The British achieved a decisive victory after breaching the walls of the fortress at Seringapatam and storming the citadel. Tipu Sultan, Mysore's ruler, was killed in the action. The British restored the Wodeyar dynasty to the throne after the victory, but retained indirect control of the kingdom. When the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War broke out, the British assembled two large columns under General George Harris. The first consisted of over 26,000 British East India Company troops, 4,000 of whom were European while the rest were local Indian sepoys. The second column was supplied by the Nizam of Hyderabad, and consisted of ten battalions and over 16,000 cavalry. Together, the allied force numbered over 50,000 soldiers. Tipu's forces had been depleted by the Third Anglo-Mysore War and the consequent loss of half his kingdom, but he still probably had up to 30,000 soldiers
A Most Beautiful English 12 Shot Revolver With Much Original Blue Finish By G.Hanson of Doncaster, Yorkshire. Likely the son and successor to S. Hanson who was a recorded Doncaster maker in the 1820's and 30's. Birmingham proofed barrel. This is a true untouched beauty. In fabulous condition with much of it's original deluxe finish remaining. The 12 shot pinfire revolver was rare at the time of it's use, during the 1860's to 1890's, but they are even rarer now, as so few survived the past century. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables . Barrel 4.75 inches, 7mm calibre.
A Most Beautiful Silver Don-Kuban Cossack Nagaika Daggar.19th Century. Purchased by us as untouched or uncleaned for over 60 years it has spent two weeks in the conservators workshop being hand cleaned in order to return the silver work back to how it once looked. It is now in it's totally original condition. It was most certainly a labour of love as to ensure the enamel work remains totally original and undamaged by crude cleaning. Such work is punitively expensive and can never be recouped within it's cost, but, we felt such a piece was well worthy of every expense incurred. It was made between the Turkish Ottoman Empire and the Caucasus region within the Russian, Romanov Empire. The Kuban Cossacks (Russian Kubanskiye Kazaki) were Cossacks who lived in the Kuban region of Russia. Although numerous Cossack groups came to inhabit the Western Northern Caucasus most of the Kuban Cossacks are descendants of the Black Sea Cossack Host, (originally the Zaporozhian Cossacks) and the Caucasus Line Cossack Host. The Kuban Cossack Host was the administrative and military unit from 1860-1918. The native land of the Cossacks is defined by a line of Russian/Ruthenian town-fortresses located on the border with the steppe and stretching from the middle Volga to Ryazan and Tula, then breaking abruptly to the south and extending to the Dnieper via Pereyaslavl. This area was settled by a population of free people practicing various trades and crafts. These people, constantly facing the Tatar warriors on the steppe frontier, received the Turkic name Cossacks (Kazaks), which was then extended to other free people in northern Russia. The oldest reference in the annals mentions Cossacks of the Russian city of Ryazan serving the city in the battle against the Tatars in 1444. In the 16th century, the Cossacks (primarily those of Ryazan) were grouped in military and trading communities on the open steppe and started to migrate into the area of the Don (source Vasily Klyuchevsky, The course of the Russian History, vol.2). Cossacks served as border guards and protectors of towns, forts, settlements and trading posts, performed policing functions on the frontiers and also came to represent an integral part of the Russian army. In the 16th century, to protect the borderland area from Tatar invasions, Cossacks carried out sentry and patrol duties, observing Crimean Tatars and nomads of the Nogai Horde in the steppe region. The most popular weapons used by Cossack cavalrymen were usually sabres, or shashka, but all Cossacks traditionally carried a Kindjal and nagaika whip. However this one is most unusual in that it conceals a hidden dagger blade. Russian Cossacks played a key role in the expansion of the Russian Empire into Siberia (particularly by Yermak Timofeyevich), the Caucasus and Central Asia in the period from the 16th to 19th centuries. Cossacks also served as guides to most Russian expeditions formed by civil and military geographers and surveyors, traders and explorers. In 1648 the Russian Cossack Semyon Dezhnyov discovered a passage between North America and Asia. Cossack units played a role in many wars in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries (such as the Russo-Turkish Wars, the Russo-Persian Wars, and the annexation of Central Asia). During Napoleon's Invasion of Russia, Cossacks were the Russian soldiers most feared by the French troops. Napoleon himself stated "Cossacks are the best light troops among all that exist. If I had them in my army, I would go through all the world with them." Cossacks also took part in the partisan war deep inside French-occupied Russian territory, attacking communications and supply lines. These attacks, carried out by Cossacks along with Russian light cavalry and other units, were one of the first developments of guerrilla warfare tactics and, to some extent, special operations as we know them today. Western Europeans had had few contacts with Cossacks before the Allies occupied Paris in 1814. As the most exotic of the Russian troops seen in France, Cossacks drew a great deal of attention and notoriety for their alleged excesses during Napoleon's 1812 campaign. In silver niello, is a black mixture of copper, silver, and lead sulphides, used as an inlay on engraved or etched metal. It can be used for filling in designs cut from metal. The Egyptians are credited with originating niello decoration, which spread throughout Europe during the late Iron Age and is common in Anglo-Saxon, Celtic and other types of Early Medieval jewellery. The goldsmiths of Florence in the middle of the 15th century ornamented their works by means of engraving the metal with a burin, after which they filled up the hollows produced by the burin with a black enamel-like compound made of silver, lead and sulphur. The resulting design, called a niello, was of much higher contrast and thus much more visible. Niello was most popular from all the regions of Russia to the Black Sea and the Bospherous. Pistols swords and knives from the Ottoman Turks may be decorated with niello, and it even reached popularity within Hindu India and Thailand. This piece is most likely from the Ottoman & Caucasian region. The Tribes of the High Caucasus favored a descendent of a high Ottoman form of horse crop called a Nagaika. This form of whip became popular with Russians living in and around the Caucasus and between the exodus of Caucasian refugees and the arrival of the dominant Russians the people of Bukhara became exposed to it. It is certainly easy to understand why displaced craftsmen would begin to apply decorative techniques in different circumstances than were customary in their homeland. It was also most popular with Russian craftsman such as Faberge, maker to the Czar, but naturally all his work was marked with his makers stamp. This piece bears no makers marks. A picture in the gallery of a Kuban Cossack holding his nagaika [seated left in around 1900], another of a General of Don Cossacks holding his while mounted on his steed.
A Most Charming American 18th Century Officers and Dueling Sword Circa 1740 Used in the Indian French War and the American War of Independence. A beautiful and historical small-sword with it's original plain black Japanning, and a very fine trefoil colishmarde blade. Plain and serene iron hilt, in very good shape, with low pas de ane. An egg-shaped pommel which is signally elegant. It also has it's original triple wound fine wire grip binding, mounted top and bottom with Turk's head knots. See the standard work "Swords and Blades of the American Revolution" by George C. Neumann Published 1973. Sword 216s. Page 133, for near a identical sword. The colishmarde blade has very fine scrollwork engraving. The colishmarde blades first appeared in 1680 and were popular during the next 40 years or so years at the royal European courts, and they continued to have a special popularity with the officers of the French and Indian War. Even George Washington had a very fine one, with a blade just as this example. The colichemarde descended from the so-called "transition rapier", which appeared because of a need for a lighter sword, better suited to parrying. It was not so heavy at its point; it was shorter and allowed a limited range of double time moves.The colichemarde in turn appeared as a thrusting blade too and also with a good parrying level, hence the strange, yet successful shape of the blade. This sword appeared at about the same time as the foil. However the foil was created for practising fencing at court, while the colichemarde was created for dueling. With the appearance of pocket pistols as a self-defense weapon, the colichemardes found an even more extensive use in dueling. This was achieved thanks to a wide forte (often with several fullers), which then stepped down in width after the fullers ended. The result of this strange shape was a higher maneuverability of the sword: with the weight of the blade concentrated in one's hand it became possible to maneuver the blade at a greater speed and with a higher degree of control, allowing the fencer to place a precise thrust at his/her adversary. Due to the original blackened hilt, one could also dub this a "mourning" sword. A mourning sword was one that would generally have blackened fittings (hilt and grip) and was worn at funerals, but they were also worn as an everyday item of informal dress, which would rule out the idea that they were only worn for somber occasions, and also worn by officers in service, with a gilt or parcel-gilt knot for embellishment. A particular painting showing a very good example of this is in the National Maritime Museum and it is most similar. The painting is of British Naval Captain Hugh Palliser, who wears a 'mourning' sword with a blackened hilt and gold sword knot which gave it a sleek overall appearance. A full-length portrait of Sir Hugh Palliser, Admiral of the White, turning slightly to the right in captain's uniform (over three years seniority), 1767-1774. He stands cross-legged, leaning on the plinth of a column, holding his hat in his right hand. The background includes a ship at sea. From 1764 to 1766, when he was a Captain, Palliser was Governor of Newfoundland, where James Cook, who had served under him earlier, was employed charting the coast. He was subsequently Comptroller of the Navy and then second-in-command to Augustus Keppel at the Battle of Ushant in 1778. Very good original condition overall. Blade 31.5 inches long
A Most Charming Carved and Turned Bone Oriental Sword Stick With brass ferule and domed top. Double edged blade in need of polishing [we can attend to this]. The bone is very good with natural colouring one small section has a body crack. In China and Japan there was a great fondness of the use of ox bone for the decorative mounting swords daggers and canes that started in the late 19th century. Most was intended as items for the early luxury steamship company's visitors trade, started by such companies as the Thomas Cook Co., and the burgeoning export markets enjoyed by the Manchu Chinese Qing dynasty, and the Meiji and Taisho Emperors of Japan.
A Most Charming English Flintlock Officer's Semi-Holster or Belt Pistol A very nice pistol with a finest Damascus steel barrel. Fine walnut stock, good walnut stock. Engraved brass furniture and stepped flintlock. Early 19th century from the reign of King George IIIrd. By Egan. Good working order, fine damascus 7 inch barrel. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Charming English Sidelock Percussion Manstopper Pistol Finely engraved with micro chequered butt, octagonal barrel. A nice English large bore side hammer pocket pistol circa 1840. Scroll engraved side lock action with bun nut retained dolphin head hammer. Chequered walnut bag grip with vacant silver diamond escutcheon to the rear. The heavy octagonal smooth bore barrel is Birmingham proofed and brass front sight with fixed v notch to the rear. A very pretty medium size, big bore, man stopper pistol made by the Birmingham trade around 1840 and sold without a retailers name, but of very good quality. Designed to be carried in the coat pocket of a traveller or gentleman about town, to provide effective close range personal defence at a time when the forces of law and order were often patchy at best. In good condition with good bores and mechanics, nice finely chequered grips and bright steel metal work. A very nice pistol likely by one of the better Birmingham makers of the day. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Charming King George IIIrd Officers' Horn Small Drinking Cup In carved horn used from the 1790's until the Crimean War. A super Napoleonic wars collectable.
A Most Fine, 1855,59,& 65 Patent Nickel Plated Smith & Wesson Revolver With a all nickel plated barrel and cylinder and frame, and around 95% of the 'deluxe grade' original nickel remaining. This fabulous condition of the nickel makes this pistol truly exceptional and absolutely beautiful. It has as one might expect a very good tight action, and a fine and clear Smith and Wesson address to barrel top strap, with all the patent dates. All it's original mother o'pearl grips. This is one of the nicest condition examples we have seen in the past 5 years. Smith and Wessons have been owned by all the greatest and infamous characters in Wild West history, such as Jesse James, Cole Younger, Bob Ford and Wyatt Earp. The Smith & Wesson Model No. 1 1/2. The boot or vest pocket pistol. Part of the great popularity of the Smith and Wessons during the Civil War is due to the way they loaded. It is a "Tip Up" design. A "tip up" loading system is where the barrel tips up and the entire cylinder can is replaced with a full cylinder if needed. That, was a massive improvement in the aid to fast reloading, With the exception of Smith & Wesson pistols, all other pistols during the Civil War were tediously loaded with either combustible paper cartridges or with loose powder and ball. Both loading methods consisted of inserting the powder and bullet from the front, and then with the rammer was built into the gun you would swage the bullet into place. The swaging held the bullet from falling out when the gun recoiled when fired. Finally, a percussion cap was individually fitted to the back of the cylinder with one required for each of the five or six chambers. Because reloading could take minutes, if extra cylinders could be found, two or more spare cylinders were carried pre-loaded. The cylinders would be switched much more quickly than reloading a fired one. Because of this, and even though it was lower powered with its .32 calibre round, the early cartridge taking Smith & Wesson Models can hold the distinction of probably being the most popular secondary pistol carried in the Civil War. And due to the Great Western Migration still going strong after the Civil War, they was not only popular during the Civil War - but it also very popular afterwards on the Western frontier. It is widely said that General George Armstrong Custer, who owned a lot of different makes of guns, owned a pair of .32 Smith & Wesson pistols. It is also said that Wild Bill Hickok carried one on the night that he was shot in the head during a fateful and infamous card game This revolver is called the "Model One and a Half." It appears that after Smith & Wesson produced the Model 2, they then set out to provide the more powerful .32 rimfire in a more handy "pocket" size revolver. That's when they came up this, a five shot .32 rimfire with a shorter 3½" barrel. Since they already had the small Model 1 and the Model 2, the new model was in between those sizes , so Smith & Wesson came up with the somewhat awkward name of "Model One and a Half." Overall length 7.75 inches. Barrel 3.5 inches 32 Rimfire calibre. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Handsome, Honest & Original Victorian British Fire Service Helmet In good condition with part liner, chinsclales and strap but with a few skull dents hairlines and missing mounting screws. The desirable standard pattern of Fire Service helmet used by all British county and city Fire Services in the Victorian era and past WW1. In superb condition, with original chain curb strap, with just a few small surface dents. With all original liner. The first Roman fire brigade of which we have any substantial history was created by Marcus Licinius Crassus. Marcus Licinius Crassus was born into a wealthy Roman family around the year 115 BC, and acquired an enormous fortune through (in the words of Plutarch) "fire and rapine." One of his most lucrative schemes took advantage of the fact that Rome had no fire department. Crassus filled this void by creating his own brigade—500 men strong—which rushed to burning buildings at the first cry of alarm. Upon arriving at the scene, however, the fire fighters did nothing while their employer bargained over the price of their services with the distressed property owner. If Crassus could not negotiate a satisfactory price, his men simply let the structure burn to the ground, after which he offered to purchase it for a fraction of its value. Emperor Nero took the basic idea from Crassus and then built on it to form the Vigiles in AD 60 to combat fires using bucket brigades and pumps, as well as poles, hooks and even ballistae to tear down buildings in advance of the flames. The Vigiles patrolled the streets of Rome to watch for fires and served as a police force. The later brigades consisted of hundreds of men, all ready for action. When there was a fire, the men would line up to the nearest water source and pass buckets hand in hand to the fire. Rome suffered a number of serious fires, most notably the fire on 19 July AD 64 and eventually destroyed two thirds of Rome. In the UK, the Great Fire of London in 1666 set in motion changes which laid the foundations for organised firefighting in the future. In the wake of the Great Fire, the City Council established the first fire insurance company, "The Fire Office", in 1667, which employed small teams of Thames watermen as firefighters and provided them with uniforms and arm badges showing the company to which they belonged. However, the first organised municipal fire brigade in the world was established in Edinburgh, Scotland, when the Edinburgh Fire Engine Establishment was formed in 1824, led by James Braidwood. London followed in 1832 with the London Fire Engine Establishment.
A Most Impressive & Fine 19th Century Iron 'Signalling' Cannon With a fine oak carriage and iron carriage mounts. An accurate model of a 32 pounder cannon as used on HMS Victory and the 100 gunner man o'war ships of His Majesty's Royal Navy during the time of the Battle Of Trafalgar. A superb desk ornament, and ideal these days, say, for a yacht club commodore to start a transatlantic race. Historically cannon of this sort were also often made and presented to the Royal children [males] of Sovereign issue. Young King Charles Iind [when Prince of Wales] had around fifteen of such pieces of armament. It would look astounding on a desk, or as an embellishment to a fine and stately gentleman's library or office or indeed conference room. No better statement of power, grandeur and distinction can be reflected by this finest, original King George IIIrd period, working signal cannon based, on the great Royal Naval Cannon that bestrode the great 18th century 100 gunner warships, such as Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory, the leviathan of the seven seas.By the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars in 1793, technical innovations and the disorganization of the French Navy wrought by the revolution had combined to give British ships a distinct superiority over the ships of the French and Spanish navies. Britain had a far larger ocean trade than any of her principal enemies, and a much bigger reserve of professional seamen from which to man her warships. Throughout the 18th century the French and, particularly, the Spanish navy suffered from serious manning difficulties and were often forced to complete the ships’ crews with soldiers or landsmen. British ships not only had a higher proportion of seamen in the first place, but the long months at sea on blockade or convoy escort gave British captains plenty of opportunities to train their crews. British gun crews seem to have achieved a much higher rate of fire than French or Spanish gun crews, contributing to the much higher casualties suffered by ships from those fleets. The better seamanship, faster gunnery and higher morale of British crews was a decisive advantage that could not be compensated for by any amount of bravery on the part of their opponents. The leading British admirals like Howe devoted their thoughts to how to break the enemy’s line in order to bring on the kind of pell mell battle that would bring decisive results. At the Battle of the First of June in 1794, Lord Howe ordered his fleet to steer through the enemy, and then to engage the French ships from the leeward, so as to cut off their usual retreat. This had the effect of bringing his fleet into a melee in which the individual superiority of his ships would have free play. Nelson's unorthodox head-on attack at the Battle of Trafalgar produced a mêlée that destroyed the Franco-Spanish fleet Throughout the wars, which lasted, with a brief interval of peace, from 1793 to 1815, British admirals like Jervis, Duncan and particularly Nelson grew constantly bolder in the method they adopted for producing the desired mêlée or pell-mell action at the battles of Cape St. Vincent, Camperdown and Trafalgar. The most radical tactic was the head-on approach in column used by Nelson at Trafalgar, which invited a raking fire to which his own ships could not reply as they approached, but then produced a devastating raking fire as the British ships passed through the Franco-Spanish line. This fabulous piece is around 40cm long overall and 17cm wide. Height max 20 cm Weighing approx 7 kilos
A Most Impressive 19th Century Scottish Basket Hilted Sword With a very wide, probably 18th century, broadsword blade. Most likely mounted by a highlander, from the Highland Brigade who fought in the Egyptian campaign of 1882, with a captured trophy blade. Many warriors of the Mahdi used swords mounted with blades based on imported early German blades, that bore Soligen crescent moon armourer's stamps. Those captured trophy blades were ideal for mounting with highlander's sword basket hilts, and this is absolutely typical of one of those swords. The Egyptian Campaign 1882. Arabi Pasha led an uprising against the corrupt Khedive of Egypt declaring a new constitution in January 1882. Britain and France sent a combined fleet to Alexandria to protect their interests but domestic political events resulted in the French returning home. Admiral Beauchamp Seymour bombarded the city and occupied it. The British Expeditionary Force under Lieut Gen Sir Garnet Wolseley was prevented from advancing on Cairo at Kafr el Dawwar and then went by sea via the Suez Canal to Ismailia. Successful actions were fought at Kassassin and the Egyptians were finally defeated at the Battle of Tel el-Kebir. Cairo was captured, the Khedive restored and Urabi sent into exile. The 1st Battalion Black Watch served in Africa taking part in the Highland Brigade's dawn assault on the Egyptian position at Tel-el-Kebir in 1882. Two years later it was in the thick of the fight with the Mahdi's tribesmen at El Teb and Tamai. The following year 1885, saw it taking part in the Nile Expedition and fighting at Kirbekan and Abu Klea. The 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders were in General Hamley's Division, in the 3rd (Highland) Brigade, commanded by Major-General Alison, along with the 1st Black Watch, 1st Cameron Highlanders and the 2nd HLI. The Gordons were commanded by Lieut-Colonel Denzil Hammill. It was decided to surprise the rebels with a pre-dawn attack. This involved a highly organised night march up to the position marked out for the final assault. The enemy trenches were placed in a 4 mile line running north-south, just north of the railway and canal. The Highland Brigade were in front, and in the centre, with the Gordons between the Black Watch and Cameron Highlanders. The assault required that they cross a deep ditch and clamber over a high redoubt to reach the trenches. The men of the Gordons were mostly over 24 years old with many veterens of the Afghan War and 154 men on Reserve. The Gordons and Camerons had less trouble than the battalions of HLI and Black Watch, and secured the enemy trenches by 5.20am. They continued forward and came under heavy fire on their flanks. The enemy's second line of defence did not cause them much of a problem as the Egyptians lost heart and tried to retreat. The battle of Tel-el-Kebir was a swift and decisive victory for the British who lost 54 killed and 342 wounded. The 1st Gordon Highlanders lost 5 men killed. They went on to Cairo which was occupied and the remaining Egyptian troops neutralised. The war was officially over by 17th September.
A Most Impressive British King George IIIrd Pioneer- Artillery Sword With steel sawback blade, cast bronze hilt with beast pommel and cast ribbed grip. A stout and manly sword. Carried by the pioneer and also thought to have been used by artillery. The tradition of the pioneer sergeant began in the eighteenth century, when each British infantry company had a pioneer who marched at the head of the regiment. The pioneer wore a “stout” apron and carried an axe, ostensibly to clear a path for all who followed, and a powerful but short sword with sawback. The apron served to protect the pioneer sergeant's uniform whilst performing his duties, which included being the unit blacksmith. The beard was allowed in order to protect his face from the heat and the slag of the forge. The axe was also used to kill horses that were wounded in battle. A general order of 1856 allowed for one pioneer per company in each regiment. The tools carried by the pioneers included a sawback sword. An example of this v.scarce sword is in the Tower of London collection, our last example we had in the 1960's.
A Most Impressive English Long Musket Circa 1830 Extra long barrel, percussion action, good walnut stock with chequered grip, 68 inches long [approx] overall. A good stout musket of fine proportions. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Impressive Jazail With Likely An East India Company Flintlock Long Damascus barrel, long highly recurved-butt distinctive stock fully geometrically inlaid with mother o'pearl. This flintlock long gun from the North West Frontier has a simply stunning Damascus barrel of very nice quality, with what looks like top piece of a mosque dome chiseled and detailed at the breech. This is a handsome piece used from the 18th century, during the wonderfully fascinating days of the Indian Empire, where skullduggery and intrigue were interspersed with incredible conflicts, battles and wars around the North West Frontier of India. These stunning Damascus long guns, with their finest barrels, also saw a lot of service in the Ottoman Empire , and they were well known for their beauty, and a world renown reputation for quality and accuracy which was legendary. The makers were renown for their quality guns but the locks were often the matchlock type of low tech simplicity, they often captured guns from the Infantry of the East India Company, and removed the locks and transferred them to their Jazails. Rudyard Kipling's poem of the Afghan War refers to the feared deadly accuracy of the Jazail, and it goes; A scrimmage in a Border Station A canter down some dark defile Two thousand pounds of education Drops to a ten-rupee jezail. 49 inches long overall, barrel 34 inches
A Most Impressive Vintage Middle Eastern Silver Jambiya Dagger A dagger with an all over silver laminated hilt and matching scabbard. Curved steel double edged blade with central ridge. A beautiful quality dagger of typical form of the famous middle eastern Jambiya, and in Oman it is called the Khanjar. This deluxe example is all silver, except the blade which is steel, and Jambiya of this quality were almost always usually for presentation. Lawrence of Arabia had several very similar ones presented to him, they were his favourite dagger, and he was frequently photographed wearing them. One picture is a portrait of Lawrence with his silver Jambiya [Information only not included]. Arab domestic silver coin-metal, not of English hallmarked silver grade.
A Most Interesting Brevet Colt Navy Long Barrel Pocket Revolver,.36 Cal In polished steel, overall scroll & foliate engraved with a most unusual engraved cylinder decorated with iron clad steam ships and a bridge, with beautifully patinated horn or ivory grips. Barrell stamped Address Col Colt London, cylinder has continental Belgian proof mark. The Pocket Navy calibre pistol is most scarce, and quite sought after as that it was a most useful, slightly reduced size, but still fired the large .36 calibre round. During the Civil War both protagonists required huge quantities of arms, and frankly, neither side could fulfill the required manufactured quantity, especially the South. Contractors were sent by both sides to scour Europe for arms, and Britain and Belgium became the dominant suppliers. This pistol is from the latter country, modelled on the Colt, and even marked as such. A jolly interesting and intrigueng arm from the most fascinating period of American 19th century history. Fully cocking action without half cock and the cylinder revolves comfortably. 11 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Interesting Early 19th Century Troubadour Romantic Stiletto Dagger With skull pommel. Of extremely nice quality, bronzed hilt depicting two figures, one male one female, the male with a bow and an eagle at his feet, the female with a serpent at her feet, and the pommel is both a skull on one side and a judicial head on the other. The quillon are fantastic beasts heads and it has an armour piercing triple edged steel stiletto blade. A wonderful product of the Troubadour movement in the arts in France in the years following the restoration of the monarchy: a Romantic fascination with medieval and Renaissance forms and myths. Napoleon recognized the Middle Ages in the forms of his coronation. Ancient chivalric romances were published in adaptations by the Comte de Tressan and contributed to the rise of the troubadour style. In painting, the style showed up most often in realistic depictions of edifying historical events in smooth finishes and vibrant colors.” Think of some of Ingres’s paintings, such as The Death of Leonardo da Vinci (1818) in the Louvre, in which the French king, Francis I, holding the dying Leonardo, conspicuously wears a sword that might have accompanied a similar dagger. See last photo in the gallery.
A Most Interesting Edwardian, British Empire Nigerian Chief's Walking Staff With brass ball top bearing King Edward's crown, engraving for the Nigerian Chief [third class] and mounted upon a four foot six inch staff. It was part of the regalia and status symbol of the authority of a colonial chief in Colonial Nigeria. Influence of the British Empire on the territories which now form Nigeria began with prohibition of slave trade to British subjects in 1807. The resulting collapse of African slave trade led to the decline and eventual collapse of the Oyo Empire. British influence in the Niger area increased gradually over the 19th century, but Britain did not effectively occupy the area until 1885, and then under competition from France and Germany. The colonial period proper in Nigeria lasted from 1900 to 1960. In 1900, the Niger Coast Protectorate and some territories of the Royal Niger Company were united to form the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, while other Royal Niger Company territories became the Northern Nigeria Protectorate. In 1914, the Northern and Southern Nigeria Protectorates were unified into the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria while maintaining considerable regional autonomy among the three major regions. Progressive constitutions after World War II provided for increasing representation and electoral government by Nigerians. In October 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence.
A Most Interesting French Post Chaise Horn. Brass Trumpet, Horn Mouthpiece. 19th century. In France and Switzerland in the Alp regions, as the post chaise drives around the numerous deadly bends, on the mountain passes, in the fog, the post chaise horn is blown to warn on-coming vehicles. Of course the British poste chaise used them as well but this one is French made. A post chaise, is a four-wheeled, closed carriage, containing one seat for two or three passengers, that was popular in 18th-century England and France. The body was of the coupé type, appearing as if the front had been cut away. Because the driver rode one of the horses, it was possible to have windows in front as well as at the sides. At the post chaise’s front end, in place of the coach box, was a luggage platform. The carriage was built for long-distance travel, and so horses were changed at intervals at posts (stations).In England, public post chaises were painted yellow and could be hired, along with the driver and two horses, for about a shilling a mile. The post chaise is descended from the 17th-century two-wheeled French chaise.
A Most Interesting Late 18th Century Eastern Wide Mouth Blunderbuss With a superb Damascus steel flared mouth barrel, with an EIC [East India Co.] style flintlock, fine walnut stock and iron mounts. Sling swivel mount to the offside for carrying on a belt while climbing rigging of a galleon, or for hooking onto a horse's saddle. The stock bears some fascinating armouer's 'in the field' repairs that have lasted some 200 years and should ideally never be removed. They are simplistic, yet they have been hugely effective and they certainly add an incredible amount of character to a flintlock gun already abundant in curiosity and flair. The flare at the muzzle is incredible and finishes off this wonderful characterful piece perfectly. This is just the kind of intimidating weapon as was used and carried by Corsairs, Janissaries protecting their masters, and those that need the maximum amount of protection and intimidation in equal measure. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Interesting Persian, 'Russian' Cossack Brigade Martini Henry Carbine One of the very scarce Belgian made Martini Henry marked Mascate [made for the Middle East Market, Franco-Belgian spelling for Muscat] and with the Imperial Russian Romanov eagle crest on the gun frame, that were acquired for the newly formed [in 1879 and 1880] Russian - Iranian Cossack Brigade of cavalry. Nasir al-Din Shah made a visit to Europe, and subsequent to this a Russian and Austrian mission came to Iran to re-organize the Iranian cavalry. The Russians formed what was known as the Cossack Brigade and Russian officers remained to command this new part of the Iranian Army. The brigade was part funded by Russia in the supply of Russian weapons, which created great influence for Russia in Iran, and the Austrian mission sold to the Iranian Minister of War, Na-ib al-Saltana, Werndle rifles, which were sold by him at great profit to the northern Iranian tribesmen. Many Martinis and Lee Metfords were acquired by 'Martini Khan' [who was said to be Shah] through Bushire from Muscat, and this is almost certainly one of those arms. It is the rare Romanov crest on the frame that shows that it was an arm that very likely went to the Cossack Brigade as opposed those that went to the non Russian commanded irregular units. This gun also has an Islamic inscription [mash'allah] frequently seen on the scarce 'Mascate' Martinis. See reference to the 'Muscate' Martinis in Firearms of the Islamic World in the Tareq Rajab Museum by Robert Elgood. Decorated with leather and studwork. A fascinating gun with an incredibly interesting and circuitous Russian and Islamic history. Action works fine, some time long past the breech has been internally blocked to render inactive. Floridly engraved, now worn, similarly to the Romanov crest. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Intriguing 18th century Officer's Sabre With Armourer's Mark Brass stirrup hilt with fishskin grip and very unusual hinge assembled guard, that is not intended to open ??. The armourer's mark is a lion's face somewhat similar to the 18th century London silver hallmark. A beautiful sword with some most scarce features. 31.75 inch blade. Likely bespoke made but for what kind of officer?, that is the question. Research must be undertaken!
A Most Intriguing King George IIIrd Tipstaff With Estate Crest A superb looking long tipstaff in fine colouring bearing the cypher of King George IIIrd and the estate name of Dysart, this may well encompass the town of Dysart in Scotland. 26.25 inches long. Top end unevenly worn down.
A Most Rare & Desireable Martini-Henry 1875 Sawback Bayonet This is a Martini Henry 1875 experimental sawback bayonet made by Kirschbaum under contract for the War Dept. It has both the Kirschbaum and WD stamps making it rather rare. The blade is in good condition, with blueing, with a small section about 1" long with minor pitting. The hilt, leather on the scabbard and bottom of the scabbard are in nice condition. The top of the scabbard has rusted at the front and appears to have been at one time stamped with a serial number or unit name. The straight crossguard, has a muzzle ring and a spade shaped quillon. The leather grips are secured to the tang by four rivets, only three being visible on the right hand side due to the locking bolt spring. The Pommel has a locking bolt press stud is on the left side. The sawback blade has a single fuller on each side for half the length to 200mm from the double edged spear point. The sawback has 29 teeth and extends for nearly 175 mm. The scabbard is black leather with a sheet steel chape and button stud locket. The bayonet was designed as a multi-tool to assist the gunners, a close support sword, a bayonet and also a cutting device to saw bushes and branches when gun laying. The blade has opposing saw teeth to give aggressive wood cutting capabilites, and is fullered.
A Most Rare 1859 British Rifle Cutlass-Bayonet with Bowl Guard This is a superb example of a rare Victorian bayonet with it's most impressive naval bowl guard. Made for the Royal Navy to fit on the Enfield rifle it had a duel purpose being a very long and effective bayonet when mounted on the rifle, and just as effective when used on it's own in close combat boarding and land patrol actions. 26.75 inch blade One original photo in the gallery of Bayonet Cutlass Drill, and another of a print of an exhibition of the new Gatling hand revolving Machine Gun, shown alongside two stands of arms bearing cutlass bayonets mounted on Enfield rifles. We have heard that at one or two auctions, where these fabulous sword bayonets have rarely appeared, and due to their combined scarcity and desirability for collectors they have fetched upwards of 2000 pounds or more.
A Most Rare and Collectable 19th P.W.O. Hussars 1898-1902 Cap Badge Indian elephant on the earlier one line scroll [as opposed to the later, two line scroll, used till 1909]. An original, very fine quality, near mint example. This is one of the scarcest and most collectable Victorian cap badges in the field, and in the past 20 years we have seen only two or three original examples of this badge, and hundreds, if not thousands of copies. Part of a small collection of original rare Victorian badges we have just been most pleased to acquire. The regiment was originally raised in Bengal by the British East India Company in 1857 as the 1st Bengal European Light Cavalry, for service in the Indian Mutiny. During the Mutiny, a lieutenant of the regiment, Hugh Henry Gough, received the Victoria Cross. As with all other "European" units of the Company, they were placed under the command of the Crown in 1858, and subsequently formally moved into the British Army in 1862 when they were designated as hussars as the 19th Hussars. At this time, the regiment was authorised to inherit the battle honours of the disbanded 19th Light Dragoons. The 19th Hussars saw service in the 1882 Egyptian expedition, fighting at Tel el Kebir, and in the 1884-5 expedition to the Sudan at the Battle of Abu Klea. During the South African War they fought in the relief of Ladysmith. The regiment was titled 19th (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own) Hussars after Alexandra, Princess of Wales.
A Most Rare Antique 17th to 18th Century Sinhalese Kastane Sword Interesting kastane with the carved wood makara pommel a recurved knuckleguard and two quillon also with the Makara head and counter quillon with Makara [5 in all]. The hilt is delictely inlaid with brass inlays as is the blade. A typical 17th to 18th century sword from ancient Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) which was in ancient times known as the Kingdom of Lions (Sinhaladwipa) often termed Sinhala. The term Sinha is lion in Hindu. These lionheads in grotesque form are of course representing this heritage. The makara represents the Hindu water beast (fish/crocodile) ridden by Varuna. Pommel with small jaw section lacking.The kastane is the national sword of Sri Lanka. It typically has a short curved single-edged blade, double-edged at the point. The hilt comprises a knuckle-guard and down-turned quillons, each terminating in a dragon's head. The swords were intended to serve as badges of rank; the quality of ornamentation depending on the status of the wearer. The establishment of European trading contacts with South Asia by the late 16th and early 17th century led to these swords becoming fashionable dress accessories among European gentlemen. A kastane can be seen in an equestrian portrait of Colonel Alexander Popham at Littlecote House in the care of the Royal Armouries Collection (I.315).
A Most Rare Civil War Army 44 Cal. Revolver by Allen and Wheellock Serial numbered '76'. A big and substantial American martial pistol of the Civil War cavalry, and the Wild West era thereafter. This example is one of only around 700 examples ever made, and the first 536 of those were bought by contract by the Union Army for the Civil War. The first 198 were purchased from William Read & Sons of Boston on December 31, 1861, and the remainder came directly from the company. Many of that contract going to the Michigan Cavalry, this gun is amazingly only serial numbered as 76. These guns were made between 1861-1862. These centre hammer percussion revolvers are believed to have been made after the Allen & Wheelock lipfire cartridge Army & Navy production. The action is good and the surface finish is certainly good for it's age. The Michigan Brigade, sometimes called the Wolverines, the Michigan Cavalry Brigade or Custer's Brigade, was a brigade of cavalry in the volunteer Union Army during the latter half of the American Civil War. Composed primarily of the 1st Michigan Cavalry, 5th Michigan Cavalry, 6th Michigan Cavalry and 7th Michigan Cavalry, the Michigan Brigade fought in every major campaign of the Army of the Potomac from the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 to the Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House in April 1865. The brigade first gained fame during the Gettysburg Campaign under the command of youthful Brigadier General George Armstrong Custer. After the war, several men associated with the brigade joined the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment and later fought again under Custer in the Old West frontier. An Allen & Wheelock Centre Hammer Percussion Army Revolver, Serial no 88, sold for $7,945.00 04/24/2006. But that example did have some original finish. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Rare Early J. Gordon Bennett Ballooning Cup Medal. Bronze J. Gordon Bennett Cup commemorative medal; Obverse: relief of the J. Gordon Bennett Trophy Cup depicted, embossed text "COUPE AERONAUTIQUE, J. GORDON BENNETT", inscribed text "WON BY THE AERO CLUB OF AMERICA, FRANK P. LAHM 1906, EDGAR W. MIX 1909, ALAN R. HAWLEY 1910"; Reverse: embossed text of the St. Regis hotel dinner menu. There is an example in the Smithsonian. The Coupe Aéronautique Gordon Bennett, is the most prestigious event in aviation and the ultimate challenge for the balloon pilots and their equipment. The goal is simple: to fly the furthest distance from the launch site. The international balloon competition was initiated by adventurer and newspaper tycoon Gordon Bennett in 1906, when 16 balloons launched from the Tuileries Gardens in Paris, France. The reverse of the medal shows the menu of the celebration meal at the St Regis Hotel, March 29th 1911
A Most Rare King Charles Ist Hunting Sword, Scabbard and Baldric 1640's all steel hunting swords are pretty rare, but to have it's original scabbard and baldric is exceptionaly rare. This is the form of sword that was highly desirable in it's day as it's length made it extremely useful in all manner of uses, from hunting wild boar to use as a senior officer's naval cutlass. There are numerous portraits of British Admirals from the 1640's to 1750's each depicted armed with a similar form of hunting sword.
A Most Rare King James Iind 'Gun Money' Half Crown Coin Dated May 1690 Minted in Ireland for the War In Ireland. The title means exactly what it says! These coins were struck in Ireland and used to pay the common soldiers of James II's army, who were helping him to regain the English throne from William and Mary. Most historians believe that the foreign officers - mostly French, Spanish and Portuguese - refused to be paid in anything other than gold or silver.30 penny piece half crown. Gun money was an issue of coins made by the forces of James II during the Williamite War in Ireland between 1689 and 1691. They were minted in base metal (copper, brass or pewter), and were designed to be redeemed for silver coins following a victory by James II and consequently bore the date in months to allow a gradual replacement. As James lost the war, that replacement never took place, although the coins were allowed to circulate at much reduced values before the copper coinage was resumed. They were mostly withdrawn from circulation in the early 18th century. The name "gun money" stems from the idea that they were minted from melted down guns, they consisted mostly of old cannon or church bells, and they looked brassy or coppery according to the "mix". The main mint was at Dublin, but in 1690 - when Limerick was under siege until 1691 - a second mint was set up. There were two issues. The first "large" issue consisted of sixpences, shillings and half crowns (2½ shillings). The second, "small" issue consisted of shillings, halfcrowns and crowns (5 shillings). Some of the second issue were overstruck on large issue pieces, with shillings struck over sixpences, half crowns on shillings and crowns on half crowns. The most notable feature of the coins is the date, because the month of striking was also included. This was so that after the war (in the event of James' victory), soldiers would be able to claim interest on their wages, which had been withheld from proper payment for so long. Specimen strikings were produced in silver and gold for most months, and these tend to be extremely rare. Though all these coins are unique in having the month and date on them, as they are the only British coins to have this distinction. The war in Ireland the War of the Grand Alliance [The Nine Years War], such as The Battle of the Boyne in Ireland The Williamite War in Ireland {"the war of the two kings"} was a conflict between Jacobites (supporters of Catholic King James II) and Williamites (supporters of Protestant Prince William of Orange) over who would be King of England, Scotland and Ireland. It is also called the Jacobite War in Ireland or the Williamite–Jacobite War in Ireland. The cause of the war was the deposition of James II as King of the Three Kingdoms in the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688. James was supported by the mostly Catholic "Jacobites" in Ireland and hoped to use the country as a base to regain his Three Kingdoms. He was given military support by France to this end. For this reason, the War became part of a wider European conflict known as the Nine Years' War (or War of the Grand Alliance). Some Protestants of the established Church in Ireland also fought on the side of King James. James was opposed in Ireland by the mostly Protestant "Williamites", who were concentrated in the north of the country. William landed a multi-national force in Ireland, composed of English, Scottish, Dutch, Danish and other troops, to put down Jacobite resistance. James left Ireland after a reverse at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 and the Irish Jacobites were finally defeated after the Battle of Aughrim in 1691.
A Most Rare Matchlock Musket of the Elizabethan to Civil War Period A most long impressive and historically interesting musketeer's musket from the late Tudor to the Stuart period. A very rare musketeer's military arquebuss, that was used in warfare from the 1500's till the mid 1650's, in conjunction with a arquebuss rest, as the gun was so heavy and long.Used by a musketeers with his 12 apostles pre loaded with powder, this would prove to be a devastating weapon used at long and short distance. It has a long octagonal tapered iron barrel terminating with a later, bronze three stage ring and octogonal muzzle piece. At the breech, on the top strap, is a long tubular facetted and moulded peep site, and to the ignition side is the integral touchhole pan with a rotating pivoted pan cover. The later stock is in plain timber of either walnut or beech. The lock, with a later plate, is typically simple lever that lowers the taper arm into the pan. One of the greatest scientists of the Middle Ages was Roger Bacon, born in 1241 in Somerset, England. Between 1257 and 1265, Bacon wrote a book of chemistry called Opus Majus which contained a recipe for gunpowder. The earliest picture of a gun is in a manuscript dated 1326 showing a pear-shaped cannon firing an arrow. Crude cannons were used by King Edward III against the Scots in the following year. In general, the design of the firearm components has remained almost unchanged since the first hand-held weapons were built - except for the ignition system. The earliest guns had a simple hole in the barrel, called a touch-hole, where the powder inside the barrel was exposed. The gun was fired by touching either a burning wick, taper or a red-hot iron to the exposed gun powder. Over the centuries, the development of more sophisticated and reliable ignition systems distinguished later period guns from earlier ones.The one real advantage the musketeers possessed was the intimidation factor which their weapons provided. The first important use of musketeers was in 1530 when Francis I organized units of arquebusiers or matchlock musketeers in the French army. By 1540 the matchlock design was improved to include a cover plate over the flash pan which automatically retracted as the trigger was pressed. The matchlock was the primary firearm used in the conquering of the New World. In time, the Native Americans (Indians) discovered the weaknesses of this form of ignition and learned to take advantage of them. Even Henry Hudson was defeated by an Indian surprise attack in 1609 due to unlit matches. The matchlock was introduced by Portuguese traders to Eastern countries around 1498, particularly India and Japan, and was used by them well into the 19th century. 63 inches long overall,
A Most Scarce 52nd Regt, of Light Infantry Pioneer Sword This sword is an absolute beauty, and such a rare piece from the late Georgian era. It has a stunning cast brass hilt with a superb cast lion pommel and the regiment number of the 52nd and the Light Infantry Bugle. This sword was made specifically for the 52nd and we very rarely see examples of it from one decade to the next. Most examples have the saw back form, but this is the adapted, back-sword blade with double edged fore-section. Overall 29.5 inches long, blade 24 inches.
A Most Scarce and Beautiful Antique Balinese Executioner's Keris The hilt is a gilt metal figure modelled likely as Bayu, Hindu god of wind, seated on a rock, his right hand holding the flask with life-elixer, the left a part of his shawl, his face with ferocious expression and bulging eyes studded with coloured glass-beads. It has a very nice very long blade of the excecutioner's form. This is a nice piece and a most unusually seen variation of these interesting weapons, called the Kris or Keris. Good antique gold coloured metal hilts of Bayu, studded with glass beads such as this, are most collectable and they occassionally appear, on the collector's market, frequently mounted on a base, without their blades, and sold as Asian Object D'art. In Sale No.2501, at Christie's, their sale of Asian Ceramics and Works of Art, on the 8 May 2001, in Amsterdam, a gold coloured metal figure of this very kind, also studded with similar glass beads, sold for $9,390 US Dollars.
A Most Scarce Crown Painted Scottish Tipstaff of Office, Broughton 1830's Turned wood in ebonised finish, painted and named with a Crown and King William IVth's cypher. Named to Broughton in Scotland. The early Police or Sheriff's Officer's authority was represented not by a badge, but by a tipstaff. The tipstaff represented the officer's direct authority from the crown to make an arrest. A tipstaff is a staff of office mounted with a tip or cap of metal, or with a painted crown, which is carried by a constable or sheriff's officer. Tipstaffs are attached to the courts of justice and their major duty is to arrest or take into custody any person on an order of committal, if within the precincts of the court and convey them to prison
A Most Scarce Reading Borough Police Cutlass No 53 Circa 1840 The Reading Borough Police was a police force for the borough of Reading in the United Kingdom. The force was created in 1836, at which time it had a strength of 30 constables, two sergeants and two inspectors. With brass hilt, sharkskin bound grip brass and leather scabbard., and blade etched with R.B.P No 53. Current Police Officers, on late night duty, do, what is now very commonly called the 'graveyard shift'. This old English term is in fact derived from the early days of the British constabulary force, when undertaking the late night duty of patrolling graveyards. Which was to a regular patrol made in order to prevent body snatchers from defiling late burials, and the stealing of bodies, for medical experimentation. This was a highly dangerous part of Victorian policing, as grave robbing was a capital crime, so, the police constables were armed with these swords to protect them from 'grave' assault. These swords were also issued in case of riot, and in various times for general service wear as well. Small loss to top of grip and leather stitching on the scabbard separated.
A Most Scarce Spanish Peninsular War, 1796 Pattern Bilboa Cavalry Sword A fabulous, original, example of these scarce rapier type Spanish 18th century broadswords. The hilt is in superb order, with excellent wire bound grip and large shaped bowl, as is the very long broadsword blade. In 1796 (although there is a controversy around the precise date) a new model sword for Spanish cavalry troopers was adopted. This beautiful example, showing very classic lines and a very similar construction to the previous pattern, presents an almost full cup-hilt in a rapier style, curved quillons and knuckle-bow. The blade was very similar to that of 1728 pattern, having these dimensions: length 940 mm, width 35, thickness 6 mm. Alongside the later 1803 pattern change these were predominantly used by cavalry at the Battle of Baylen, the crushing defeat of Napoleon's Grande Armee in the Spanish invasion. Battle of Baylen Fought July 19, 1808, between 15,000 Spaniards under Castaflos, and 20,000 French under Dupont. The French were totally defeated with a loss of over 2,000 men, and Dupont surrendered with his whole army. The Battle of Bailén [Baylen] was contested in 1808 between the Spanish Army of Andalusia, led by Generals Francisco Castaños and Theodor von Reding, and the Imperial French Army's II corps d'observation de la Gironde under General Pierre Dupont de l'Étang. The heaviest fighting took place near Bailén (sometimes anglicized Baylen), a village by the Guadalquivir river in the Jaén province of southern Spain. In June 1808, following the widespread uprisings against the French occupation of Spain, Napoleon organized French units into flying columns to pacify Spain's major centres of resistance. One of these, under General Dupont, was dispatched across the Sierra Morena and south through Andalusia to the port of Cádiz where an French naval squadron lay at the mercy of the Spanish. The Emperor was confident that with 20,000 men, Dupont would crush any opposition encountered on the way.[7] Events proved otherwise, and after storming and plundering Córdoba in July, Dupont retraced his steps to the north of the province to await reinforcements. Meanwhile, General Castaños, commanding the Spanish field army at San Roque, and General von Reding, Governor of Málaga, travelled to Seville to negotiate with the Seville Junta—a patriotic assembly committed to resisting the French incursions—and to turn the province's combined forces against the French. Dupont's failure to leave Andalusia proved disastrous. Between 16 and 19 July, Spanish forces converged on the French positions stretched out along villages on the Guadalquivir and attacked at several points, forcing the confused French defenders to shift their divisions this way and that. With Castaños pinning Dupont downstream at Andújar, Reding successfully forced the river at Mengibar and seized Bailén, interposing himself between the two wings of the French army. Caught between Castaños and Reding, Dupont attempted vainly to break through the Spanish line at Bailén in three bloody and desperate charges, losing more than 2,500 men. His counterattacks defeated, Dupont called for an armistice and was compelled to sign the Convention of Andújar which stipulated the surrender of almost 18,000 men, making Bailén the worst disaster and capitulation of the Peninsular War, and the first major defeat of Napoleon's Grande Armée. When news of the catastrophe reached the French high command in Madrid, the result was a general retreat to the Ebro, abandoning much of Spain to the insurgents. France's enemies in Spain and throughout Europe cheered at this first check to the hitherto unbeatable Imperial armies[8]—tales of Spanish heroism inspired Austria and showed the force of nation-wide resistance to Napoleon, setting in motion the rise of the Fifth Coalition against France.
A Most Scarce Victorian Wiltshire Constabulary Walking Stave Quarter Staff. Bearing the hand painted decoration of a large gilt and coloured crown, Wiltshire Constabulary, and a gilt VR monogram for the monarch. Based on the old English quarterstaff a policeman's walking stave was originally used in the days before a uniform had been designed for the British police service. It was a mean's of identifying the bearer as to his rank, status and authority as a police constable, yet still a most effective weapon of defence and restraint when required. Stick fighting was prevalent throughout historical European martial arts and indeed worldwide. The oldest systematic descriptions of stick-fighting methods in Europe date to the 15th century. The oldest surviving English work giving technical information on staff combat dates from the 15th century - it is a brief listing of "strokes of the 2-hand staff", which shares terminology with the preceding "strokes of the 2-hand sword" in the same manuscript.[4] George Silver (1599) explains techniques of short staff combat, and states that the use of other polearms and the two-handed sword are based on the same method. Later authors on the subject included Joseph Swetnam, Zachary Wylde, and Donald McBane. Silver,[5] Swetnam,[3] and Wylde[6] all agreed that the staff was among the best, if not the very best, of all hand weapons. During the 16th century quarterstaves were favoured as weapons by the London Masters of Defence. Richard Peeke, in 1625, and Zachary Wylde, in 1711, refer to the quarterstaff as a national English weapon. By the 18th century the weapon became popularly associated with gladiatorial prize playing. A modified version of quarterstaff fencing, employing bamboo or ash staves and protective equipment adapted from fencing, boxing and cricket was revived as a sport in some London fencing schools and at the Aldershot Military Training School during the later 19th century. Works on this style were published by Thomas McCarthy and by Allanson-Winn and Phillips-Wolley. Around 5 foot 8 inches long.
A Most Scarce, Victorian Military '7th Royal Fusiliers March' Polyphon Disc Ideal for both collectors of Royal Fusiliers items, and musical Polyphon discs. Polyphon is the trade name of a large coin-operated music box, a mechanical device first manufactured in the late 1800s and early 1900s in Germany or Switzerland. In March, 1854, France, Turkey and Britain declared war on Russia, and the theatre for the fighting was the Crimean peninsula on the Black Sea. The Royal Fusiliers were dispatched as part of the Allied expedition and arrived to fight at the Battle of the Alma in September of 1854 and at Inkerman in November of the same year. The Regiment endured the brutal winter conditions of the Crimea during the siege of Sevastopol through the following winter, and were present at the end of that siege in September, 1855. The Regiment returned to England in 1856. Five members were awarded the newly-instituted Victoria Cross for valiant service in the Crimea. They were Assistant Surgeon Thomas Hale Egerton, Lieutenant William Hope, Private Matthew Hughes, Captain Henry Mitchell Jones and Private William Norman. The Regiment was granted battle honours for the Battles of the Alma, Inkerman and Sevastopol. The second battalion was sent to Ireland in 1872 and then to India in 1874, eventually returning to England in 1889 after service on campaign in Afghanistan in 1880. In Afghanistan, Private Thomas Ashford was awarded a Victoria Cross for rescuing a wounded comrade while under fire. The Regiment was granted battle honours for the Afghanistan Campaign (1879-1880) and Kandahar (1880).
A Most Unusual 19th Century British Sword Stick For A Retired Fusilier This is extraordinarily unusual. A sword stick with it's haft completely covered in wound and lacquered string with Turk's Head knots, spirals and banding. The handle is shaped like a bird of paradise and it's plumage is a British regimental shako fusilier's plume. The blade is long, single edged. The plume can be unscrewed for regular use.
A Most Unusual French Cavalry Pistol Circa 1830 to 1840 Made at the arsenal at St Etienne [proof marks the barrel underside] it conforms in part to the earlier, 1822 pattern Guarde du Roi pistol, with it's distinctive ovoid butt cap, as opposed the standard line-cavalry pattern with the bird's head butt cap. Although this is most similar to the earlier Guarde du Roi pattern, we have yet to find reference works to confirm this. It may have been a subsequent model, with a back action lock, that may only have seen brief service, or, a prototype model not officially adopted. The French cavalry and the French Guarde Du Corps in the 19th century had numerous patterns, model changes, transitional patterns, conversions and variations, and as such, a few models remain unidentifiable to us at present. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Most Unusual Spadroon Hilted Sword, King George IIIrd Of The 1780's A very nice British officer's sword. With a ribbed ebony grip with steel side ribs, 3 stage ovoid facetted pommel, double edged blade engrave with loyal motto, 'For My Country and King' on both sides.
A Most Unusual, Charming, Austrian Influence Flintlock Pistol Circa 1810 With a carved stock very much in the Austrian manner with chisseling and line engraving. Carved horn fore end, copper ramrod pipe and steel furniture. The barrel is decoratively engraved down it's length. The kind of pistol used by gentlemen in the Napoleonic Wars around central and Southern Europe.
A Napoleonic Colonel's or Staff Officer's Sword In 'Post Combat' Condition One of the most desirable, scarcest and beautiful swords used by senior officer's in Napoleon's Grande Armee. Known as the Marengo pattern hiIt, It is in post hand to hand combat order, and has obviously seen some combat damage and wear. In original condition swords of this pattern are highly rare and valued very, very highly indeed. For example a very similar hilted, of an unknown officer of the Imperial Guarde example, [but of course in better order] sold in 1991, at the Delevenne-Lafarge saleroom in Paris, for an astounding £32,830. However, it is, in certain respects, very much to it's advantage, to be in battle worn order, as this fine and very rare sword is now easily within reach of many average French Napoleonic weaponry collector's, whereas in perfect order, a sword such as this, that was used by a senior staff officer, under, for example Marshal Ney's command, would be beyond the reach of most collector's pockets. Unusually it has a straight blade, which may suggest it was a staff officer controlling the French heavy cavalry, such as cuirassiers or carabiniers. A truly fabulous French sword of much scarcity and collect ability, as so few of these swords, that were used officer's within the echelons of Napoleon's personal influence survive today. And it is perfectly possible that Napoleon himself knew it's officer owner personally. The last picture in the gallery is of Napoleon's brother Joseph and Marshal Jourdan ans Suchet, Jourdan is carrying a very similar sword to this. No scabbard, extreme end of quillon lacking.
A Napoleonic Wars Era 'Brown Bess' Type Musket 16 Bore Tower marked lock with Crown stamp. Ring necked cock. Proved barrel. Good walnut stock, brass furniture Good bayonet with maker mark of T. Gill [maker to the ordnance] and numbered 37. The form of 'Brown Bess' type musket made for trade contracts using a slightly smaller bore than the standard Bess. Excellent working action, wonderful patina and a very good sound piece in great order.
A Native North American Pair of Child's Boots. Reservation Period Probably Cree Tribe. Beautifully made and thoroughly charming. Not antique, 20th century, but very interesting and Native American art is never normally to be seen in Europe. Superb detail and workmanship
A Nice 19th Century Patent Powder Flask A jolly attractive flask in nice operating order with original lacquer finish. Decorated with stags and hounds on both sides.
A Nice Early 19th century, King George IIIrd Old Sheffield Decanter Coaster a wine and spirit decanter gallery coaster in fine old plate, with deep turned carved mahogany base, pierced sides, multi ribbed rim edge and beize cloth on the bottom. Measures 5" in diameter x 2.25" tall. Excellent period condition.
A Nice Indo Persian Tulwar With Likely a 17th 18th Century German Blade Long fullered blade, predominantly straight with a very slight curve. Armourers mark of parallel waves. Traditional iron hilt with cursive knucklebow.
A Nice Victorian Silver Topped Walking Cane, Mallacca Wood Haft Hallmarked repousse silver top.
A Nickle Plated 19th Century Pinfire Engraved Revolver Very charmingly engraved with New York scroll engraving. Micro cross hatched carved wooden grips. Folding trigger, good tight mainspring good rotating action. As a British import, pinfire pistols were very popular indeed during the Civil War and the Wild West [but very expensive] as they took the all new pinfire cartridge, which revolutionised the way revolvers operated, as compared to the old fashioned percussion action. In fact, while the percussion cap & ball guns were still in production [such as made by Remington, Colt and Starr] and being used in the American Civil War, the much more efficient and faster pinfire guns [that were only made from 1861] were the fourth most popular gun chosen in the US, by those that could afford them, during the war. General Stonewall Jackson was presented with two deluxe pinfire pistols with ivory grips, and many other famous personalities of the war similarly used them. The American makers could not possibly fulfill all the arms contracts that were needed to supply the war machine, especially by the non industrialised Confederate Southern States. So, London made guns were purchased, by contract, by the London Arms Company in great quantities, as the procurement for the war in America was very profitable indeed. They were despatched out in the holds of hundreds of British merchant ships. First of all, the gun and sword laden vessels would attempt to break the blockades, surrounding the Confederate ports, as the South were paying four times or more the going rate for arms, but, if the blockade proved to be too efficient, the ships would then proceed on to the Union ports, [such as in New York] where the price paid was still excellent, but only around double the going rate. This pistol is pocket size, and is the very type that was so popular, as a fast and efficient personal defender by many of the officers of both the US and the CSA armies and by gamblers and n'ear do wells in the Wild West. Trigger needs returning by hand [return spring inoperative]. Liege proofs. 7mm. Cal. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A North African Antique Koummya Jambiya The koummya is the characteristic traditional dagger of the Berber and Arabic peoples of Morocco. Stone classifies these as being one localized variant of the Arabic jambiya, and the contoured handles, curved double-edged blades and exaggeratedly upturned scabbard tips are all features consistent with such an interpretation. In the context of the traditional regional manner of dress, the koummya is worn visibly at the left side, generally about at the level of the waist and is suspended vertically, with the scabbard tip forward, by a long woolen baldric, attached at either end to one of the two scabbard rings, and worn crossing in front and back of the torso and over the right shoulder. A much greater diversity in forms and decoration exists than is represented by the examples presented here and presumably such features could be used to place particular examples geographically and temporally. Koummya blades are curved and double edged with the portion nearer the hilt remaining relatively straight while the curvature becomes pronounced in the half towards the tip. The length of the blade which is beveled and sharpened is longer along the concave side than along the opposite convex side. Blade thickness tapers from the base of the blade, where it is thickest, to the tip. While the edge bevels may give the blade a flattened diamond or lenticular cross-section towards the tip, the cross-section is rectangular at the forte. These blades are characteristically relatively thin and utilitarian and the presence of fullers or ridges is not typical. Typical piece in average order for age, bruising and wear averall.
A North African Sudanese Arm Dagger With leather scabbard and arm loop to hide and conceal the dagger up a warriors sleeve. The scabbard has leather areas lacking repaired with canvas..
A North European Early 17th Century Burgonet Helmet Rounded two piece skull joined medially at the apex with high roped comb with some losses, projecting forward to an acutely pointed peak. Fairly corroded overall, but this is a good, honest early helmet, now quite scarce, and from around the late Queen Elizabeth Ist era.
A Pair of 16th Century Style Armour Demi- Gauntlets In iron with articulated hand defences. Probably 19th century. Historically, gauntlets were used by soldiers and knights. It was considered an important piece of armour, since the hands and arms were particularly vulnerable in hand-to-hand combat. With the rise of easily reloadable and effective firearms, hand-to-hand combat fell into decline along with personal armour, including gauntlets. Some medieval gauntlets had a built-in knuckle duster. When the hand was bunched into a fist the backhand protection becomes pronounced from the fist just above the knuckles, this allowed the user to utilize the gauntlet as a melee weapon while still protecting the hand from damage when punching. However, against an armed combatant the use of this feature would have been risky so it was very unlikely that a gauntlet would have been used in this way when a more suitable weapon was within reach. But if the user had no other means to defend themselves the tactics they would have employed would be to attempt to surprise the opponent with this inconspicuous attack, possibly by dodging and countering, aiming for exposed areas of flesh such as the face or weak areas of armour, such as under the arm or the groin. A "Demi-gauntlet" (also called a "demi-gaunt" for short) is a type of plate armour gauntlet that only protects the back of the hand and the wrist; demi-gaunts are worn with gloves made from mail or padded leather. The advantages of the demi-gaunt are that it allows better dexterity and is lighter than a full gauntlet, but the disadvantage is that the fingers are not as well protected. To "throw down the gauntlet" is to issue a challenge. A gauntlet-wearing knight would challenge a fellow knight or enemy to a duel by throwing one of his gauntlets on the ground. The opponent would pick up the gauntlet to accept the challenge. The phrase is associated particularly with the action of the King's Champion, which officer's role was from mediæval times to act as champion for the King at his coronation, in the unlikely event that someone challenged the new King's title to the throne.
A Pair Of Boxlock Pocket Percussion Pistols Circa 1835 In very good order, with what appears to be very nice original finish. All steel furniture with engraved side plates, barrel tangs and trigger guards, slab sided walnut butts, oval name cartouches to sides, one engraved D.EGG. Durs Egg was one of England finest ever gunsmiths, but at this period his working life was coming to an end, and after his death, his relatives [John and George Frederick[son] ] carried on working in his name. Good turn-ff breech loading barrels with excellent proof markings. Both actions are very crisp indeed, but one pistol is reticent to engage past first cock. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Pair of Late 18th Early 19th Century Napoleonic Crossbow Pistol Bolts Very finely made steel quarrel heads, beautifully facetted, with brass lined collars. On wooden hafts. Superbly made pieces and very scarce indeed. Illustrated with the kind of pistol used from the Napoleonic era. A weapon as silent as the grave, yet more deadly than a pistol as it's range was greater and penetrating power more effective. The heads could easily be beautifully polished to brighter steel. A picture in the gallery of a Napoleonic pistol that used such bolts.
A Pair of Monumental and Fabulous Gaucho 'Cowboy' Spurs Silver inlaid steel with huge 5.5 inch multi spiked roundels. The South American Cowboy or Gaucho was the first range cowboy, whose existance is first recorded back in the 1600's, they wandered the Pampas for centuries, working cattle and living off the land and the herd, just as the later North American Cowboy did in the 19th century. Like the North American cowboys gauchos were generally reputed to be strong, honest, silent types, but proud and capable of violence when provoked. The gaucho tendency to violence over petty matters is also recognized as a typical trait. Gauchos' use of the famous "facón" (knife generally tucked into the rear of the gaucho sash) is legendary, often associated with considerable bloodletting. Historically, the facón was typically the only eating instrument that a gaucho carried. As Charles Darwin said of these distinctive famous men of the pampas, and the men who wore and used the facón, "Many quarrels arose, which from the general manner of fighting with the knife often proved fatal." The gauchos spurs could be fantastically flamboyant, such as these, and the best example of their status and position
A Pair Of Very Good 19th Century, King George IIIrd Period Leg Manacles An intriguing piece from the days of manacled restraint and torture. In iron, with screw bolt locks and link chain. Used for the restraint of prisoners in dungeons, goals, such as Newgate Prison, or on prison galleys for deportation.
A Pair of Very Nice Meteoric Steel Indonesian Kris Daggers A pair of old keris or Kris with a superbly sculpted serpentine seven wave blade Keris Melayu Semenanjong with a serpentine blade with 7 Luk [seven curves or waves]. A good and scarce example of a keris from the southern Malaysian peninsular region of Johor or Selangor. Handle in the jawa demam form. This form of hilt is common in central or southern Sumatra, as well as the Malay peninsular regions. The Minang variant is usually more upright with a more flaring top. The top sheath in the typical Malay tebeng form, are made from very well selected kemuning woods with flashing grains. Bottom stem is likely made from well selected angsana woods with tiger’s stripe grains. Pamor patterns are arranged in the mlumah technique of the wos utah or scattered rice variations which is said to enhance the owner’s material well being. 9 inches long overall
A Pair of Victorian Coaching Prints in Rosewood Veneer Frames With super old labels of Arthur Ackerman Gallery of Fine Arts, 191 Regent St. London, W. A charming pair of original Victorian coloured prints in delightful frames. 6.75 inches x 8.75 inches
A Percussion Ring Trigger, Self Cocking Pepperbox Revolver, Circa 1840. A J. R.Cooper's Patent Revolver with good ring pull trigger action. A scarce pistol and this is a nice example of it's kind. A Coopers patent 6 barreled, pepperbox revolver c1840 with walnut bag shaped butt and foliate engraving, signed J. R. Coopers Patent.
A Persian Percussion Horse Pistol [Tapance] from the Qajar Period From the mid 19th century, a Persian pistol with likely a high carbon steel octagonal barrel with traces of 8 groove rifling. Fully engraved, probably Persian lock, with matching florid scroll engraving to the barrel breech tang and fore end. Chequered stock with steel butt cap and lanyard ring. Half stocked with rammer lacking. Plain steel trigger guard. Persian pistols are very scarcely seen, even within Iran, and more often than not with imported locks, usually British, this example though has more likely a Persian lock [based on a British import] As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Police Bulls Eye Lantern. A Super Piece From the Era of 'Jack The Ripper' A Victorian Constable's oil lantern probably made by Hiatt & Co. [Well known Police equipment suppliers and makers of police handcuffs, leg-irons, manacles and shackles for over 200 years]. The very type as can be seen in all the old films of the White chapel Murders, and Sherlock Holmes' adventures in the gloomy London Fog. An ingenious design that can also be used as a hand warmer, on a bitter Victorian winter's night, and for brewing the odd cup of tea. Complete with it's original burner
A Prussian 100 Year Medal of Kaiser Willhelm 1779-1879 In gilt bronze with original silk ribbon. In near mint condition. A large, beautiful and impressive Imperial German medal in remarkable condition. The best example we have ever seen.
A Queen Elizabeth Ist Period Morion Helmet, in Black and White Armour. The morion helmet is one of the great iconic designs of German helmet, made in the German states, and used by the Conquistadors of Spain, that conquered the South American nations, and the early English settlers of America in the mid 16th century. They were used by the bodyguards of the rulers of the German states, such as the Elector of Hanover, and the Spanish armies that attempted the invasion of Britain, in the great Spanish Armada, that was beaten by Elizabeth's Grand Admiral, Sir Francis Drake. In fact the British and many nations used them from the 1500's and into the English Civil War.
A Queen's South Africa Medal to South African Constabulary Cavalryman. A rare medal of the Boer War with three bars. Issued to 3rd Class Trooper R.G,Phillips.. 12 squadrons of the SAC were raised in Canada by General Baden-Powell. Many Canadians stayed on to live there after the war's end. One photo in the gallery of a group of SAC probably outside the HQ at Koffiefontein
A Rare & Super 17th -18th Century Tibetan Matchlock Musket From the a small ancient arms collection and from the same source as a fine 17th century Tibetan sword we have just been delighted to acquire. Old original Tibetan antique arms very rarely survive and now are generally only to be seen in the biggest and best museums. This is a good example of a nicely decorated, well-made and attractive, Tibetan matchlock, with distinct Indian influences, in near complete condition. Its fittings consist of a small engraved Tibetan silver cap at the tip of the fore stock and an iron lock plate on both sides of the stock decoratively decorated with geometric zig zag pattern. The breech has a slot for the upper arm of the serpentine (see detail). The Damascus twist iron octagonal barrel, of typical high quality North Indian construction flares at the muzzle and has a line sight and a peep sight. The twist pattern of the barrel forging is also faintly visible. The barrel is attached by a muzzle capuchin to the stock, and by five flattened brass bands and seven thinner rounded iron and brass bands (the former most likely being restorations). The stock had areas of applied brass plates and roundels of typically Tibetan form and decoratively engraved. The two piece butt has two applied brass bandings, likely as strengthening pieces. The offside breech has a sling swivel mount for when on horseback. The action is fully functioning well, and the pan has a sliding foul weather cover. The ramrod is missing. It would have originally had two extending and folding prongs at the forend for resting on the ground to fire on foot, but mostly this gun would have been used on horseback. Firearms were probably introduced into Tibet gradually during the sixteenth century from several sources, including China, India, and West Asia, as part of the general spread of the use of firearms throughout Asia. The traditional Tibetan gun is a matchlock musket, which appears to have changed little if at all in its construction and technology from the time of its introduction until the early twentieth century. The decoration found on Tibetan matchlock guns varies, but even the most utilitarian examples generally have some degree of ornament. It is not uncommon to find stocks with applied plaques of pierced or embossed silver, copper, or iron, which range from being relatively simple to fairly elaborate. More rarely, some stocks were painted or inlaid with bone. The match-cord pouches and pan covers often have appliqués of colored leather or textile and decorative rivets or bosses. The barrels are usually plain except perhaps for some fluting at the muzzle, ring moldings toward the breech, or simple engraved designs. There are, however, some notable exceptions of barrels decorated with damascening or made of Damascus steel such as this one. This gun has the combination of Indian decorative features and the styling in the stock form of Tibetan. Likely made in an area straddling both domains. The Tibetan warrior we show in a photograph wears his matchlock across his back although you can only see it's two folded prongs that stick up from the muzzle [lacking on this gun] In Europe, the matchlock was primarily an infantry weapon, but in Tibet and Central Asia it was also used on horseback in the same way as the bow. As essential military training, and as part of various ceremonies and festivals, riders would shoot at targets while riding past them at a gallop. From the seventeenth century onward, fairly realistic depictions of matchlocks are also sometimes included in paintings of offerings to the guardian deities.
A Rare 10th Royal Hussars Victorian Senior NCO Hallmarked Silver Rank Badge And a pair of collar badges. Worn on the uniform sleeve of the regiment's senior NCO as his badge of rank. A fine example, by an English silversmith WTM, who is an unknown maker to us, as unfortunately no records of his name survives. A large silver badge of Prince of Wales' plumes, hollow construction, with flat backplate. Three mounting loops to reverse. Slight polishing to highpoints of plumes, generally excellent to very fine condition. The rank badge is over 1 oz in weight, Victorian London silver hallmarked, and 2.2 inches high. The collar badges are not hallmarked silver, maker marked for London and 1.25 inches high each, with gold 'applied' crowns, with two mounting lugs apiece The 10th or Prince of Wales’s Own Light Dragoons took the title of “Hussars’ in 1811. From 1860 until 1873 it was commanded by the famous Lt.Col. Valentine Baker, a brave and talented cavalryman, later Lieutenant General and Pasha. During his 13 year command, the regiment was known as “Bakers Light Bobs”. 10th (The Prince of Wales's Own) Royal Hussars. The senior NCO that wore this rank badge and collar badges would have likely seen action in the Second Anglo-Afghan War, at the Battle of Ali Masjid in 1878, and in the Sudan, Battle of El Teb, and Egypt in 1884. With the outbreak of the Second Boer War, the regiment sailed for South Africa in 1899. After fighting at Colesberg, the regiment participated in the relief of Kimberley in February 1900, the Battle of Paardeberg immediately afterwards, and then two years of fighting in the Transvaal. The nco and his regiment also saw action on the North-West Frontier in 1908.
A Rare 1840 Constabulary Carbine Bayonet with Deep Defensive Sword Cut With spring recess in the blade [no spring]. The most amazing feature of this bayonet is that it has parried a sword thrust, which has deeply cut into the blade elbow. A fabulous battle scar that undoubtedly saved the mans life. The socket is numbered 60. Ordnance stamped blade
A Rare 6 Shot US Civil War Moore's Patent 32 Cal. 'Teat Fire' Revolver. Beautifully engraved with scrolling and rococo curls. Very fine original grips, good blued cylinder and barrel. Good action. Moore's address to the barrel. The Moore Caliber .32 Teat-fire, which used a unique cartridge to get around the Rollin White patent owned by Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson, proved very popular during the Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. The "Teat-fire" cartridges did not have a rim at the back like conventional cartridges, but were rounded at the rear, with a small "teat" that would protrude through a tiny opening in the rear of the cylinder. The priming mixture was contained in the "teat" and when the hammer struck it, the cartridge would fire. Thus, it was akin to a rimfire cartridge, but instead of having priming all the way around the edge of the rim, it is centrally located in the teat. Moore's Calibre .32 Teat-fire Pocket Revolver proved very popular during the American Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. National Arms produced the revolvers from 1864, when it was acquired by Colt's Manufacturing Company As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Rare Central Indian 18th C.Battle Axe, Used in Chinese Boxer Rebellion Brought Back From the Boxer Rebellion and used in the Ching Dynasty, but likely imported from central India in the middle of the 18th century. A very rare Central Indian battle axe, that somehow has ended it's working life used by a Boxer, in the rebellion. Part of a small colonial collection of antique arms that have just arrived. A super fighting axe that can be used in conjunction with the Chinese Dao fighting sword.The Boxer Rebellion, more properly called the Boxer Uprising, or the Righteous Harmony Society Movement was a violent anti-foreign, anti-Christian movement called the "Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists" in China, but known as the "Boxers" in English. The main 'Boxer' era occured between 1898 and 1901. This fascinating era was fairly well described in the Hollywood movie classic ' 55 Days in Peking' Starring Charlton Heston and David Niven. The film gives a little background of Ching Dynasty's humiliating military defeats suffered during the Opium Wars, Sino-French War and Sino-Japanese war or the effect of the Taiping Rebellion in weakening the Ching [Qing] Dynasty.Pictures in the gallery of a watercolour of the Boxers [1900] and the combat in the siege. A photo in the gallery shows a contemporary group of Boxers in Peking during the seige of the legations. For information only not included
A Rare Extra Large Size 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officer's Sword By Prosser Maker to the King and the Duke of York. Blade made by Runkel of Solingen. A very good example of these most desirable of George IIIrd swords used by an officer in the heavy cavalry in full dress. However, this rare example has a 'boat shell' hilt around 50% bigger than usual and is most impressive. The 'Boat Shell hilt' in very good order, with it's original multi wire bound grip, fully engraved blade with the royal cypher of King George, and maker marked, copper gilt mounted leather scabbard. This is the pattern of sabre as was used by officer's of the Scots Greys, as part of the Union Brigade [so called as it was made up of a regiment of Heavy Cavalry from each part of Britain] were some of the finest heavy Cavalry in Europe and certainly one of the most feared. A quote of Napoleon of the charge at the Battle of Waterloo goes; "Ces terribles chevaux gris! Comme il travaillent!" (Those terrible grey horses, how they strive!) At approximately 1:30 pm, the second phase of the Battle of Waterloo opened. Napoleon launched D'Erlon's corps against the allied centre left. After being stopped by Picton's Peninsular War veterans, D'Erlon's troops came under attack from the side by the heavy cavalry commanded by Earl of Uxbridge including Major General Sir William Ponsonby's Scots Greys. The shocked ranks of the French columns surrendered in their thousands. During the charge Sergeant Ewart, of the Greys, captured the eagle of the French 45th Ligne. The Greys charged too far and, having spiked some of the French cannon, came under counter-attack from enemy cavalry. Ponsonby, who had chosen to ride one of his less expensive mounts, was ridden down and killed by enemy lancers. The Scots Greys' casualties included: 102 killed; 97 wounded; and the loss of 228 of the 416 horses that started the charge. This engagement also gave the Scots Greys their cap badge, the eagle itself. The eagle is displayed in the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards museum in Edinburgh Castle. The swords maker Prosser of Charing Cross London was one of the best and most famous swordmakers of the Georgian era, and examples of his swords are in the Royal Collection, The Tower of London Collection, The National Maritime Museum, The British Army Museum, and most of the finest British sword collections in the world. Runkel, blade maker, was as equally famous a gentleman in the 18th century for the supplying of finest sword blades for British Officers. He was most interestingly, however, also infamous for being imprisoned in Newgate Prison, at least once, for evading import duty and other 'dubious' practices, probably bribery. This sword is in very good but used condition, with most of it's original finest gilt remaining to the copper hilt.
A Rare Full Dress Life Guards Officer's Sword Circa 1825-1857 A Scarce Full Dress Life Guards Officer's Sword Circa 1825-1857. The Royal mounted personal bodyguard of Her Majesty Quenn Victoria. Gilt hilt of boatshell form with flat left side with distinctive elevated pommel button, original copper silvered wire bound grip, in very nice order. There are two identical swords of this kind in York Castle museum, once worn by Sir William Fraser, 1st Life Guards, also a small number at Windsor Castle Royal Collection, and two in the National Army museum, one being formerly worn by General Lord Hill of the Life Guards. The hilt of this sword is in very nice condition for age with some good original gilt remaining, the blade is good in the most part but bears some old corrosion at the bottom half up to the three quarter level. The scabbard gilt mounts are present but the leather has old rudimentary repairs. This is rare sword of it's form, and it is very inexpensive due to it's scabbard condition etc. However the leather could be repaired. A picture in the gallery of the very period of Life Guards officer who would have worn this sword.
A Rare Iron Medievil Hand Cannon Circa 1500 A most impressive yet fairly small peice of original, early ordnance. Made around the time of the Siege of Rhodes by Suleiman the Magnificent against the Knights of St John. It is thought that gunpowder was invented in China and found its way to Europe in the 13th Century. In the mid to late 13th Century gunpowder began to be used in cannons and handguns, and by the mid 14th Century they were in common use. By the end of the 14th Century both gunpowder, guns and cannon had greatly evolved and were an essential part of fortifications which were being modified to change arrow slits for gun loops.Hand cannon' date of origin ranges around 1350. Hand cannon were inexpensive to manufacture, but not accurate to fire. Nevertheless, they were employed for their shock value. In 1492 Columbus carried one on his discovery exploration to the Americas. Conquistadors Hernando Cortez and Francisco Pizzaro also used them, in 1519 and 1533, during their respective conquests and colonization of Mexico and Peru. Not primary arms of war, hand cannon were adequate tools of protection for fighting men. 4.5 inches x 4.5 inches x11,5 inches weight approx 20 Kilos
A Rare James Rodgers of Sheffield Knife-Pistol Circa 1838 Nickle barrel with a single bead sight, marked with a pair of Birmingham proofs on the upper left flat, and fitted with a central nipple and straight spur hammer. Equipped with a pair of folding blades, 3.25" and 1" in length, with "JAMES/ RODGERS/ SHEFFIELD" on both ricasso, mounted on either side of the folding trigger. Horn grips, with a storage compartment in the butt, flanked by a bullet scissor mould and tweezers held in the grips. The action main spring is at fault. A rare and most collectable gadget gun that is very inexpensively priced bearing in mind the condition. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Rare Namibian Ovambo [War Axe] 19th century.Good condition nice carving with iron axe blade.
A Rare Pair of Antique Ottoman Empire Iron Stirrups A pair of antique 17th to 18th century Turkish Ottoman Empire russet iron stirrups of characteristic form, with broad arch treads. All steel construction in the early style that goes back to the mediaeval period. One picture in the gallery shows Fatih Sultan Mehmet II [using his identical stirrups] entering Constantinople, after his conquest, in 1453
A Rare Prussian-British Experimental Sword of 1850. The Royal Engineers Driver's Sword Model 1850. This sword was a Prussian experimental cavalry sword that was once issued for testing to a limited number of Prussian Hussar regiments in 1850. It was in fact not actually approved by the Prussians, but it's form was continued and developed until it's successor sword eventually evolved to become the Prussian Model 1852 Cavalry Hussar Sabre. Those experimental swords were withdrawn by Prussia and they were placed in storage in Liege for disposal. There was an article published in the "Deutsches Waffen Journal" about a sword that is a pair to this sword. On that sword, on the guard, was the regimental marking of the 4th squadron, Prussian Garde-Husaren regiment and on the spine of blade a crowned FW 50 and german D mark. This confirms it was the Prussian Hussar experimental issue of 1850. On the ricasso was an S&K marking with Crowned L 8 and two British Ordnance broad arrows to show that sword was also re issued to the British army. So, these very rarely seen swords are recorded as the Royal Engineers 1850 Driver's pattern swords, but they were originally the Prussian experimental Hussar swords, that after disapproval were then removed to Liege and later sold to the British Ordnance through the Liege armourers. Our example is very worn indeed, in fact none of it's original markings are still visible at all unfortunately. However, it is a most rare and fascinating piece, that until our extensive research [lasting many days], we believed to be a simple, and un-interesting Prussian sabre of unknown parentage.To collectors of British and Prussian swords this would make a most fascinating addition, especially, that if particularly searched for, it may take many years to find another. All over russetted, no scabbard, damaged grip.
A Rare US Civil War Moore's Patent 32 Cal. 'Teat Fire' Revolver. A rare Moore's patent .32 cal. Teat Fire revolver. Finely engraved silver plated frame, birds head butt. Good action. Fine over lacquered grips. The Teat Fire system, patented by Moore, was a most unusual front loading cartridge action, and his .45 calibre version, of the same action gun, is one of the rarest and most collectable guns of that era. Designed and made in 1864, during the Civil War, this is a very fine pocket sized revolver that saw much good service as a back-up or defensive arm for officers, and was very popular with riverboat and saloon gamblers, such as Doc Holliday and George Devol. There is a picture of an antique 19th century poster advertising Devol's gambling book. For information only not included. It utilized a special .32 caliber teat-fire cartridge designed by Daniel Moore and David Williamson. It was loaded from the front with the "teat" to the rear. This 6 shot revolver has a 3¼" barrel. Overall it measures 7-1/8" It has a fine silver plated frame. The barrel has some remaining original deep blue finish. The bird's head butt has 2 piece walnut grips. This model has a small hinged swivel gate on the right side of the barrel lug in front of the cylinder that prevents the cartridges from falling out after they are inserted. The barrel markings are "MOORE'S PAT. FIREARMS CO. BROOKLYN, N.Y.", in a single line on the top
A Rare Zulu War 1879 Gaika [Assegai] Spear Brought back by a serving officer as a souvenir from the 1879 South Africa Zulu wars. A Gaika assegai in fabulous untouched for 130 years condition. Differing from regular Zulu assegai by it's bound steel band form at the head's haft and the base instead of being bound in metal wire or leather. No British campaign medal wasactually instituted exclusively for the Zulu War. Bloody and hard-fought as it was, the War was no doubt regarded in Britain as but a part of the general fighting that took place from 1877 to 1879 between the various African tribes in Southern Africa and their British and Colonial overlords. In 1854 royal sanction had been given for the award of a medal to the survivors of British regular troops who had served in any one of the three campaigns of 1835-36, 1846-47, or 1850-53, on the Eastern Frontier of the Cape Province. Designed by William and L.C. Wyon, this medal bears on the obverse a beautiful portrayal of Victoria as the young queen, wearing a coronet. The reverse shows a lion, half-crouching watchfully, behind a protea bush, with the date '1853' in the exergue. In 1880 it was ordained that the same medal should he awarded to all personnel - Colonial volunteers and native levies as well as British regulars - who had served in any of the campaigns in South Africa between September 1877 and December 1879, namely the Gaika / Galeka War, the Northern Border War, the lst and 2nd Sekukuni Wars, the Moirosi's Mountain campaign in Basutoland, and the Zulu War. A bar or clasp was to be attached to the suspender of the medal hearing the date or dates of the year or years in which the recipient had actually served in any of those campaigns. Military personnel who had been mobilized in Natal, but had not crossed the Tugela River into Zululand, were to receive the medal without any bar. 51 inches long overall.
A Regal, Royal Grade, Gold Inlaid English Regency Period Flintlock Pistol Circa 1811 a fine English flintlock pistol with superb engraving to the lock and barrel that is inlaid with pure gold. Rain proof pan, rolling frizzen, pure gold pan lining and vent, gold breech lines and muzzle line. False breech in steel with fine engraving. Plain walnut stock with microchequered grips and a plain rectangular gilt escutcheon at the wrist. Silver barrel slide escutcheons to the reverse, and gilt escutcheons to the obverse. The lockplate has a unique fitting rarely seen. Instead of side nails [screws] through the reverse, and into the lockplate, it a has a hidden front mounted buried screw, underneath the closed cock, affixing it'self through the lock plate and into the steel false breech. A most clever and technical arrangement of great ingenuity. Only pistols destined for the truly great or significant had their finest English pistols inlaid and highly embellisshed with purest gold. Pistols such as this were more often than not presented to such notables as Napoleon Bonaparte and the Prince of Wales, the Prince Regent himself. The barrel is finest damascus twist, of large carbine bore, and the trigger guard is engraved steel with a pineapple finial. It also has a captive ramrod, a cavalry design in order to avail the use of safe loading while on horseback, in order not to lose the rammer if it was dropped. The whole aspect of this pistol, it's style, calibre, and size leads one to believe this may have been made for one of the Prince's aristocratic officers, such as those that served in the Prince of Wales Own Light Dragoons, the 10th, the Prince of Wales personal cavalry regiment. Known as a dandy regiment, whose aristocratic officers of Earls and Lords, included Beau Brummel the one time closest friend and confident of the Prince. The man who it is said invented the modern day gentleman's trouser. All of the Prince's officers wore the most expensive uniforms embellished with pure silver and gold, and tenhanced with the finest, bespoke, swords and glorious English pistols. All were most extravagent, gloriously impressive, and exactly as this pistol would represent. During The period of Regency Britain, Prince George took an active interest in matters of style and taste, and his associates such as the dandy Beau Brummell and the architect John Nash created the Regency style. In London Nash designed the Regency terraces of Regent's Park and Regent Street. George took up the new idea of the seaside spa and had the Brighton Pavilion developed as a fantastical seaside palace, adapted by Nash in the "Indian Gothic" style inspired loosely by the Taj Mahal, with extravagant "Indian" and "Chinese" interiors. In the gallery is a portrait of the Prince Regent in uniform in 1809, it is evident to see his glorious dress and how this influenced all those around him and the officers that served in his Light Dragoons. The gold inlaid engraving is very much in the Regency taste, with military additions of stands of arms decorating the frizzen, lock plate and cock, and the barrel has typical Regency architectural motifs at the breech. This is not a pistol that has been made for display and never used. There are obvious signs of use, likely as an officer of dragoons pistol on horseback, and carried as such. 14 inches long overall 8 inch barrel [approximately].
A Regency-Georgian Cut Bright Steel Morning Sword With Fancy Engraved Blade A most beautiful and extravagant sword in cut steel to simulate gems and diamonds. The fashion for this work started in the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1st, and enjoyed a renaissance in the Georgian & Regency period. Not only was it revived in the décor of gentlemen's sword hilts, but also in jewellery, and gentlemen's apparel, such as shoe buckles and even buttons. This is a very fine example with particular extravagance. No scabbard.
A Regimental 1853 Pat. Trooper's 6th Dragoon's Sword Of the Crimean War A good regimentally marked sword from B troop the 6th Dragoons. It is a British 1853 pattern 'Heavy & Light Cavalry Sabre' in original steel battle scabbard. The 6th Dragoon's one of the great heavy cavalry regiments of the British Army. 'The Inniskillins', as the regiment was known, took part in the Charge of the Heavy Brigade at the Crimea. The lesser known, but much more successful charge of the Crimean War. The blade is overall russeted and the scabbard very good with natural age patina. The hilt is blackened with leather, riveted, slab sided plates. The British Cavalry were issued with the 1853 pattern just before many regiments, including, the 4th, 8th, 11th, 6th Dragoons the 6th Dragoon Guards, and the 13th Hussars, were sent to the Crimean War. In the Crimean War (1854-56), The Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava was as follows; The first assault line consisted of the Scots Greys and one squadron of the Inniskillings, a total of less than 250 sabres. Only when the RSMs declared themselves happy with the alignment did Scarlett order his bugler to sound the 'Charge'. The idea of a charge conjures up images of the Light Brigade dashing forward at speed but Dragoons were larger men with much heavier equipment so their charge was more of a trot. Floundering at obstacles such as ditches or coppices they headed towards the massed ranks of Russian cavalry, pressing on inexorably at a mere 8 miles an hour. Slow they may have been but the effect of these heavy cavalrymen slamming into the much lighter Russian cavalry stunned their enemy. A letter from a Captain of the Inniskillings illustrates the mellee which followed: "Forward - dash - bang - clank, and there we were in the midst of such smoke, cheer, and clatter, as never before stunned a mortal's ear. it was glorious! Down, one by one, aye, two by two fell the thick skulled and over-numerous Cossacks.....Down too alas! fell many a hero with a warm Celtic heart, and more than one fell screaming loud for victory. I could not pause. It was all push, wheel, frenzy, strike and down, down, down they went. Twice I was unhorsed, and more than once I had to grip my sword tighter, the blood of foes streaming down over the hilt, and running up my very sleeve....now we were lost in their ranks - now in little bands battling - now in good order together, now in and out." In the words of Colonel Paget of the Light Brigade "It was a mighty affair, and considering the difficulties under which the Heavy Brigade laboured, and the disparity of numbers, a feat of arms which, if it ever had its equal, was certainly never surpassed in the annals of cavalry warfare, and the importance of which in its results can never be known." In 1861 the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons like most cavalry regiments during the latter part of the 19th century did service in India, Egypt and in South Africa and the 6th Inniskillings was no exception. The regiment eventually returning to France from India in January 1915 to serve with great distinction during the Great War. Lawrence 'Titus' Oates of Scott's Antarctic Expedition was an officer in the regiment. The story of Captain Oates of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons, has become a legend. The member of Scott's ill-fated expedition to the South Pole in 1912, who, suffering badly from frost-bite and exhaustion, and in an extreme example of self-sacrifice walked out into the blizzard on the 16th March - sacrificing himself to save his fellow men. October 25, 1854 The Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaclava by Lord Alfred Tennyson [first verse] The charge of the gallant three hundred, the Heavy Brigade! Down the hill, down the hill, thousands of Russians, Thousands of horsemen, drew to the valley–and stay’d; For Scarlett and Scarlett’s three hundred were riding by When the points of the Russian lances arose in the sky; And he call’d, ‘Left wheel into line!’ and they wheel’d and obey’d. Then he look’d at the host that had halted he knew not why, And he turn’d half round, and he bade his trumpeter sound To the charge, and he rode on ahead, as he waved his blade To the gallant three hundred whose glory will never die– ‘Follow,’ and up the hill, up the hill, up the hill, Follow’d the Heavy Brigade. The photo in the gallery shows the 6th Dragoons regimental armourer's stamps on the hilt guard. They are 6, D, B, & 1. These represent the regiment's number, the type of regiment, the troop number and lastly the number of the sword in the regiment. They were often struck individually, making no or little effort to line them up, or to be orderly. It entirely depended on the orderliness of the armourer himself. We also made all suitable investigations to see if there was a G stamped next to the D, that would have indicated 6th Dragoon Guards as opposed to the 6th Dragoons, but there is no trace of a G ever being present.
A Remington 'Old Model' Navy Revolver .36 Cal. 1861, 17th Alabama A most interesting revolver from the early Remington Arms Co. stable. The action is worn, but still works, but Civil War revolvers from this era are prone to wear due to the length and time of continual service during the war and well into the Wild West era. During it's servicing our gunsmith noticed the grips are originally inscribed, possibly by it's second owner, in 1863. The 1861 Navy production of only 7,000 was nearly all taken up by a Union Government contract, however in the first years of the Civil War the North was losing and many thousands of Northern made arms were captured and then used by the Confederates. This gun is inscribed R.J.H. 1863 and on the reverse 17 ALA. This is a typical marking for the 17th Alabama. We would like to thank Mr Ken Jones of Stephenville, Texas, USA for his wonderful assistance in potentially identifying the owner of this revolver, using his invaluable work in regard to the Alabama muster rolls. We now believe it would likely be named to.. RAINER, Joel H., Co. “I”, Bvt. 2nd Lt.,Captain.. "I" company was called the 'Pike Rangers', of Pike County,17th Alabama Infantry. Officers and gentleman at this time [and many still do] traditionally write or inscribe their monogramme or name, surname first. The 17th Alabama regiment was organized at Montgomery in August 1861. In November it moved to Pensacola, and was present at the bombardment in that month, and in January after. In March 1862 the regiment was sent to west Tennessee. Brigaded under J.K. Jackson of Georgia - with the Eighteenth, Twenty-first, and Twenty-fourth Alabama regiments - the regiment fought at Shiloh, and lost 125 killed and wounded. A month after, it was in the fight at Farmington with few casualties. In the autumn, when Gen. Bragg moved into Kentucky, the Seventeenth, much depleted by sickness, was left at Mobile. It was there drilled as heavy artillery, and had charge of eight batteries on the shore of the bay. It remained at that post till March 1864, when it was ordered to Rome, Ga. The brigade consisted of the Seventeenth and Twenty-ninth Alabama, and the First and Twenty-sixth Alabama, and Thirty-seventh Mississippi, were soon after added, the command devolving at different times on Gen. Cantey of Russell, Col. Murphey of Montgomery, Col. O'Neal of Lauderdale, and Gen. Shelley of Talladega. It was engaged at the Oostenaula bridge, and in the three days' battle of Resaca, with severe loss. The Seventeenth had its full share of the trials and hardships of the campaign from Dalton to Jonesboro, fighting almost daily, especially at Cassville, New Hope, Kennesa, Lost Mountain, and Atlanta. In the battle of Peach-tree Creek it lost 130 killed and wounded, and on the 28th of July 180 killed and wounded. The entire loss from the Resaca to Lovejoy's Station was 586, but few of whom were captured. The regiment moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost at least two-thirds of its forces engaged at Franklin; and a number of the remainder were captured at Nashville. A remnant moved into North Carolina, and a part fought at Bentonville. It was then consolidated with the Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Alabama regiments, with E.P. Holcombe of Lowndes as colonel, J.F. Tate of Russell lieutenant colonel, and Willis J. Milner of Butler major. The regiment surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. April 1865.
A Remington Civil War & Wild West Revolver. 5-shot.32in Rimfire Conversion Remington Pocket Model single-action revolver, with name, address and patent dates, factory converted with detachable plate to rear of cylinder With plain walnut grips, good working order and generally good condition, worn overall with numerous small dents to cylinder and frame. 7.75in long o/a. Boot or pocket pistols that became a most necessary part of life in the Old West. Remington was one the most famous makers of these most interesting, historical and attractive pistols and practically every world renown gambler, and saloon character such as 'Doc' Holiday, 'Wild Bill' Hickock, Jack MacCall carried one such pistol or even several. There was one famous gunfight involving just two men, where over nine guns were drawn and used between them. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Richard Simkin Watercolour Of a Cavalryman. Painted by Richard Simkin. Born in Herne Bay, Kent, the son of a commercial traveler, also named Richard. He spent much of his time at Aldershot, Hampshire, after marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and may also have been a volunteer in the Artists Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters, and to illustrate the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette.; he obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. During his lifetime, he, along with Orlando Norie produced thousands of watercolors depicting the uniforms and campaigns of the British Army. Simkin also contributed illustrations to numerous publications including the Boy's Own Magazine, The Graphic and others; many were published by Raphael Tuck and sons. He died at his home a 7 Cavendish Street, Herne Bay on June 25, 1926, survived by his wife and two daughters. Today, his pictures can be seen in numerous regimental museums and his illustrations appear in regimental histories,
A Scarce 'Head-Hunting' Dao Sword of The Nagas of Assam An antique Dao Sword of The Nagas of Assam in Nagaland. The furthermost state of North East India. Little is known of the Nagas as most of their history is undocumented, until the British East India Co. took control of the country in 1826. The internecine tribal warfare involved head-hunting, which is the decapitation of captives for their religious ceremonies, but the British and the Christian missionaries did all that was possible to eradicate the head-hunting religious traditions, and converted a portion of the population to Baptist. The sword has a traditional straight rounded hilt [probably bamboo] with a central section tightly bound with most intricate geometric patterned cord that is over lacquered. The blade is flattened with two hand cut grooves and a stamped dot and semi circular decorative pattern design, the blade ends fairly wide. The scabbard is wood and open sided with a most attractive and skillfully executed floral pattern carved in relief at the bottom section. These swords were multi- functional, perfectly adaptable from decapitation to bamboo cutting.
A Scarce Antique Lombok High Born Warriors Kris [or Keris] From the Lombok island of Indonesia. The Dutch first visited Lombok in 1674 and settled the eastern part of the island, leaving the western half to be ruled by a Hindu dynasty from Bali. The Sasaks chafed under Balinese rule, and a revolt in 1891 ended in 1894 with the annexation of the entire island to the Netherlands East Indies. This is a beautiful and scarce Kris with a hair bound grip [typically indicative of Lombok Keris], typical hardwood scabbard and a fantastic Pamor, meteoric iron, and nickle inlaid blade. The design is a rare herringbone pattern executed with, quite simply, breathtaking skill. 24 inches long overall
A Scarce English Transitional Revolver Circa 1840 By Cook of London The stepping stone between the 1830's pepperbox revolver, and the later first double action revolver patented by London's Robert Adams in 1851. Some of the most ground breaking work in the early design and manufacture of revolvers was undertaken in England long before the world famous American revolver makers, such as Colt and Remington, became famous for their fine pistols. This most interesting piece is fully, and most finely engraved, on the frame and grip, with a highly detailed micro chequered walnut butt. Good operating action, several areas of old surface pitting intersperced with areas of no pitting at all. Trapdoor percussion cap container in the butt. Made by one of England's 19th century makers and innovators of fine revolver pistols, of London. A classic example of one of the earliest English cylinder revolvers that was favoured by gentleman wishing to arm themselves with the latest technology and improvement ever designed by English master gunsmiths. They were most popular with officers [that could afford them] in the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny. A picture in the gallery is of Robert Adams himself, loading his patent revolver for HRH Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's Consort. He was also manager for the London Armoury and he made many of the 19,000 pistols that were bought by the Confederate States for the Civil War. The US government also bought Adams revolvers from the London Armoury, at $18 each, which was $4.00 more than it was paying Colt for his, and $6.00 more than Remington.The action on this beautiful gun is good very nice, and tight, but the surface has areas of old corrosion. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Scarce King George IIIrd 'Light Infantry' Musket With Sword Bar. A light infantryman's musket with a sword-bayonet barrel bar, somewhat similar to the Baker rifle pattern. Very good walnut stock, fine brass mounts barrel and furniture. The 95th Regt and the 60th became what was known as light infantry 'rifle regiments' and experimentation with various arms was undertaken in order to come up with the best arm for the unique task required of them. The 'Baker Rifle' was the most famous result of these experiments, [ a gun that copied the Prussian Jager Rifle]. However, this gun is another of those very early Light Infantry variant long guns. British made, based around the Brown Bess but reduced in length as of the Baker rifle with sword bar. The same form of light infantry musket used by the 68th Foot. In 1808, the 68th was chosen to become one of the new light infantry regiments. These regiments were intended to be a fast-moving strike force. The soldiers were given extensive training and equipped with lighter muskets and new clothing. The soldiers now took their orders from the call of the bugle and not from the beat of the drum. From that time the Regiment adopted the bugle as its badge. In 1811 the new 68th Light Infantry was sent to Portugal to join the fight against Napoleon. As part of the Duke of Wellington's army, the 68th Light Infantry took part in the great battles of Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle and Orthes, as well as in numerous skirmishes with the French that proved the value of the new light infantry training. In these battles the Regiment won its first battle honours. They were also used by the British East India Co. army. In 1798, Tippu Sultan ruler of Mysore formed a vague alliance with the French, which gave the British governor-general Lord Wellesley a pretext to invade Mysore in alliance with the nizam of Hyderabad. Tippu was killed May, 1799 defending his capital at Shrirangapattana. This event against the 'Tiger of Mysore' was the subject of one of the later 'Sharpe of the 95th' books by Bernard Cornwall. His kingdom was divided among the victors. The East India Co. [for those who are unfamiliar with it] was one of the largest organisations ever to have existed, and it even had it's own Army and Navy, large and powerful enough to rival those any of any country in the world. It was run by British Officers and Gentleman, in India, to enable peaceful free trade throughout the British Empire. Founded by Royal Charter in 1600 it continued until 1858. It's successes were numerous and included the Victory of Sir Robert Clive [Clive of India] at the Battle of Plassey and the eradication of the infamous and fearful 'Thuggees' of the Cult of Kali. It created the greatest trading cities in the world Hong Kong and Singapore, it's Shipyards were the model for Peter the Great's city of St Petersberg. The barrel has a Jaipur Armoury storage mark so in it's working life it was at one time there. Possibly as part of the 2nd Bombay European Infantry [The second regiment of what was to be the 2nd Battalion the Durham Light Infantry] in India in 1839. It was not originally part of the British Army but part of the East India Company, which effectively ruled India as stated previously. There was no connection with Durham at this time and the Regiment recruited men from all over Britain and Ireland. The Regiment was reorganised as light infantry in 1840 and in 1856 took part in the invasion of Persia (Iran), winning its only battle honours. When the Regiment returned to India the country was in the grip of mutiny. After peace was restored in 1858, the India Act was passed ending the rule of the East India Company and transferring the Company's soldiers to the British Army. This is a very interesting light infantry musket indeed, that undoubtedly has amazing stories to tell if it could speak. It is in very good order and a fabulous piece for any collector of early Light Infantry weapons.
A Scarce Large Antique Lombok High Born Warriors Kris [or Keris] From the Lombok island of Indonesia. The Dutch first visited Lombok in 1674 and settled the eastern part of the island, leaving the western half to be ruled by a Hindu dynasty from Bali. The Sasaks chafed under Balinese rule, and a revolt in 1891 ended in 1894 with the annexation of the entire island to the Netherlands East Indies.This is a beautiful and scarce Kris with a hair bound grip [typically indicative of Lombok Keris], typical hardwood scabbard and a fantastic Pamor, meteoric iron, and nickle inlaid blade. This blade is an amazing form of Mahomets Ladder [Bendo Sedago] pattern more normally seen on rare Islamic Shamshir swords. 25 inches long overall
A Scarce Ngombe Doko Tribal Chiefs & Slave Execution Knife This huge execution knife became a symbol of power - and became a "ceremonial knife for tribal chiefs". With the indigenous names of a Ngulu, Ngol, Ngwolo, M'Bolo,& Gulu These drawings show ngulu execution swords at various executions. The back side of the blade was used as a machete for cutting. It was believed a person remained "aware" for some time after decapitation. As a result, the deceased final sensual experience was flying through the air to meet his or her ancestors. Executions were not judicial events meant for murders or criminals. They were events carried out for ceremonial purposes and the chosen were invariably slaves. Werner Fisher & Manfred A. Zirngibl wrote in their book Afrikanische Waffen: This design was selected for cult and execution knives. A knife was created which symbolized the inexorableness on the judgment and execution. This execution knife became a symbol of power and, in a few variations became a ceremonial knife for tribal chieftains. At executions, the condemned man was tied to the ground with ropes and poles. His head was fastened with leather straps to a bent tree branch. In this way it was ensured that the man’s neck would remain stretched. After the decapitation, the head would be automatically catapulted far away.”
A Scarce Swiss 1842 Briquet Man's Sword of The Guard Regt's A very rarely seen sword in the UK, The US and Europe, the Swiss briquet sidearm. It is based on the Franco-Prussian version, and similarly mostly made in Solingen Prussia, and imported to Switzerland in the early 19th century. Marked on the hilt J.P.Stacklj. No scabbard
A Scarce Victorian Yeomanry Cavalry Ammunition Belt Pouch A good example of these scarce and very disirable items of militaria from Queen Victoria's Yeomnary Cavalry regiments. Leather pouch with tin box interior and gilt brass regimental device to flap.
A Scottish, Beak-Nose, Ribbon Basket Hilted Broadsword. Very Good Blade From the times of King James Stuart VIth born 9 June 1566 at Edinburgh Castle, son of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley and Mary I, and King Charles Stuart Ist, born 19 November 1600 at Dunfermline Palace, Dunfermline, son of James VI and Anne of Denmark. With the early flat bars known as ribbons, with the beak nose front. Very good unmarked blade possibly German with three fullers down around one third of it's length. Original wooden grip in original black lacquer finish. The Stewarts of Lennox were a junior branch of the Stewart family; they were not, however, direct male line descendants of Robert II, the first Stewart who became King of Scots, but rather that of his ancestor Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. In the past, through the means of the Auld Alliance with France, they had adapted their surname to the French form, Stuart. Consequently, when the son of the Earl of Lennox, Henry, Lord Darnley, married the Queen of Scots, Mary I, their son, as the first King of the Lennox branch of the Stewart family, ruled as a Stuart. James VI also became King of England and Ireland as James I in 1603, when his cousin Elizabeth I died; thereafter, although the two crowns of England and Scotland remained separate, the monarchy was based chiefly in England. Charles I, James's son, found himself faced with Civil War; the resultant conflict lasted eight years, and ended in his execution. The English Parliament then decreed their monarchy to be at an end; the Scots Parliament, after some deliberation, broke their links with England, and declared that Charles II, son and heir of Charles I, would become King. He ruled until 1651; however, the armies of Oliver Cromwell occupied Scotland and drove him into exile. Sword length around 90 cm long. This sword has spent 52 hours in our specialist cleaning and conserving artisan's workshop. It is now just as it should be, after removing hundreds of years worth of ditritus and surface neglect etc.
A Signally Beautiful English Double Barrel Rifle Carbine, Back Action Lock Made to accompany the howdah pistol as the big game hunting rifle to be equally at home on foot, on horseback or while standing in a howdah on one's elephant. The brass mounts are superbly engraved throughout, including a Bengal tiger and lion below mount Kilimanjaro, and profuse, highly accomplished decorative scrolling. This is a finest gentleman's hand made double rifle, circa 1845, made by Griffiths of England, bearing Queen Victoria's crown mark to both locks, and was the inspiration for the Jacob's military rifle, as used by the East India Co. army cavalry regiment, Jacob's Horse, the Scinde Irregular Horse. By comparing the Jacob's Rifle by photograph, to this fine rifle alongside each other, one can easily see where the inspiration came from. This gun also bears influences from the design of the earlier British military Baker and [contemporary] Brunswick rifles, with a near identical patchbox arrangement. The Jacob's rifle was designed by General Jacobs of the Honourable East India Co. who was so admired and respected by all who knew him, for his intelligence and skill of command, he had a city named after him, in modern day Pakistan, called Jacobabad. He had spent 25 years improving rifled firearms, carrying on experiments unrivalled even by public bodies. A range of 200 yards sufficed in cantonments, but at Jacobabad he had to go into the desert to set up butts at a range of 2000 yards. He went for a four grooved rifle and had numerous experimental guns manufactured in London by the leading gunsmith George Daw and completely at his expense. Jacob, like Joseph Whitworth, was renowned not only as a soldier but as a mathematician, and his rifle was as unconventional as its designer. Rather than using a small .45 caliber bore Jacob stayed with more conventional .57-58 caliber (Bill Adams theorizes that this would allow use of standard service ammo in a pinch). In any case his rifle used four deep grooves and a conical bullet with corresponding lugs. Though unusual the Jacob’s rifle, precision made in London by master gunsmiths like George Daw, quickly gained a reputation for accuracy at extended ranges. They appealed in in particular to wealthy aristocratic scientists like Lord Kelvin, who swore by his. Jacob wanted to build a cannon on the same pattern, but died early at age 45. A few Jacob’s were used during the American Civil War, and those were privately owned, usually by men able to afford the best. There is one account of one of Berdan’s men using one (the chaplain, Lorenzo Barber), who kept one barrel of his double rifle loaded with buckshot and the other with ball. Jacob's Rifles was a regiment founded by Brigadier John Jacob CB in 1858. Better known as the commandant of the Sind Horse and Jacob's Horse, and the founder of Jacobabad, the regiment of rifles he founded soon gained an excellent reputation. It became after partition part of the Pakistani Army, whereas Jacob's Horse was assigned to the Indian Army. A number of his relatives and descendants served in the Regiment, notably Field Marshal Sir Claud Jacob, Lieutenant-Colonel John Jacob and Brigadier Arthur Legrand Jacob, Claud's brother. As commander of the Scinde Irregular Horse, Jacob had become increasingly frustrated with the inferior weapons issued to his Indian cavalrymen. Being a wealthy man, he spent many years and much money on developing the perfect weapon for his 'sowars'. He eventually produced the rifle that bears his name. It could be sighted to 2 000 yards (1 830m), and fire explosive bullets designed to destroy artillery limbers. It also sported a 30 inch (76,2cm) bayonet based on the Scottish claymore. Jacob was an opinionated man who chose to ignore changing trends in firearm development, and he adopted a pattern of rifling that was both obsolete and troublesome. Nevertheless, his influence was such that during the Mutiny he was permitted to arm a new regiment with his design of carbine. It was named Jacob's Rifles. Orders for the manufacture of the carbine and bayonet were placed in Britain, and all was set for its demonstration when Jacob died. In the hope the East India Company would honour the order, production continued for a little over a year. This gun is overall in nice condition with excellent action. A rare and highly desirable gun indeed, a super officer's example. We show in the gallery a photo of a most similar Jacob's military rifle [in it's case with accessories] to compare the two side by side, this is for comparison information only.
A Signally Beautiful Saw-Handle Duelling Pistol, Engraved Henry Nock This flintlock look's as if it has been in an airtight compartment for nigh on 200 years. It is so pristine as to be extraordinary. It has been re-finished and expertly restored to look as once did, if not better, than the day it was made, and the craftmanship of the work and expertise is simply breathtaking. With superb case hardening, plum browning steel mounts and re-varnished walnut. No duelling pistol made in 1800 could have looked any more beautiful or as crisp as this one does now. The Damascus browning does appear to original, and it bears the crispest proof marks and the maker's serial number underneath, with a gold line at the hook breech. The ramrod is a later perfectly matched replacement. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Signally Fine, 18th Century, Pierced Black Steel Small Sword The pierced steel guard is simply spectacular in it's minute detail. The blade is engraved with exceptional and unusula depth and the patterning and design are most attractive. The forte of the blade bears a Latin motto on both sides. A most beautiful sword made from the 7 years War, known as the French Indian Wars in Europe and America, and into the American War of Independence in the 1770's. The form of sword that was carried and used by gentleman and officers for almost 100 years. It is said they were particulaly popular with the infamous maritime Privateers, and Buccaneers, who, in the most part, became notorious around the world as the Pirates of the Spanish Maine, such as Captain's William Kidd, George Booth, Edward Teach [Blackbeard] & Henry Jennings, or Capt. Bartholomew Roberts, as he is to be seen, in a period engraving carrying the very same sword. Small hairline crack in one shellguard
A Simply Fabulous Victorian Very Heavy Grade Coachman's or Horseman's Knife One of the largest of it's kind we have seen. Used by horsemen for hunting or travelling when time distances between artisans to repair saddlery and harness was most great. Ideal for a military cavalry farrier as well. With many utility blades, including pick, tweezers, leather punch, corkscrew, scissors, saw, screw driver, can opener and knife blade. With staghorn plates. Superb and elaborate engraving to the frame. I knife blade damaged. A very large, and substantial high grade piece. Closed, 6 inches long, 10.25 inches long, blade opened, 1.85 inches at widest when closed, weight 16.3 ozs.
A Simply Fascinating Early 1870's Early Workers 'Benevolent Union' Sword From the Ancient Order of United Workmen [of America and Canada]. Gilt bronze hilt with ebonized wooden grip. Eagle helmet mounted pommel. Fully etched blade with owner's and maker's name. Owned and made for Fred Wedell, and made in Buffalo, New York. The A.O.U.W. was a fraternal workers association that was founded in 1868, just after the American Civil War. The order began when John Jordan Upchurch, a mechanic on the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad living in Meadville, Pennsylvania became dissatisfied with a group he had joined, the League of Friendship, Mechanical Order of the Sun. The latter society had established a lodge, called a subordinate League, in Meadville on April 20, 1868 and it membership was composed almost entirely of mechanics, engineers, firemen and day labourers working on the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad, and in the local shops. Upchurch joined the local lodge on June 16, on its eighth meeting, and soon rose to become its presiding officer. Another person who would go on to have an important role in the AOUW, William W. Walker, was a charter member. The League of Friendship, the Mechanical Order of the Suns avowed purpose was to advance and foster the interests of its members and provide financial assistance on an ad hoc basis. The local lodge was reported to have had a peak membership of about one hundred.
A Simply Stunning London Silver Hilted Sword of 1766, With Silver Scabbard Superbly crafted solid London silver hilt, hallmarked to 1766, with open pierced work shell guards, multiwire silver grip, pierced silver oviod pommel, single knuckle bow, single quillon and pas dans. The whole design of the relief décor is based around military stands of arms, classical helmets, cannon flags banners, spears, axes polearms and quivers of arrows. The blade is engraved with scrolls and decorative motifs. It still has most of it's original silver mounted scabbard, only the chape is missing. The guard has had in it's working life some soft metal repairs and one quillon is lacking. The blade, although in the main complete, does have old, extinct, rusted areas on the edges. The advantages of it's condition are that it is seriously underpriced, and if perfect would easily be valued by us at around three times it's current price. Thus, a normally expensive very fine quality, solid silver mounted sword is far more easily affordable than would be usual. General George Washington, who later became the first President of the United States of America, had an almost identical type of sword. One can see him wearing his sword, in the earliest known portrait of Washington, aged 40, in his position of colonel of the then British colonial Virginia Regiment. Painted by Charles Wilson Peale in 1772. Although George Washington is the first uniformly accepted President of the United States of America, there were 16 men who held the post of President before him. However, the so called 'Forgotten Presidents' were either Presidents of Congress or Presidents of the United States Under the Articles of Confederation. This sword is without doubt a sword of quality and status, from the time before and of the Revolutionary War, and absolutely the very kind carried by men of Washington's position
A Simply Super Medieval Knights 'Spiked' Battle Mace A most impressive but fearsome early weapon from the 1200's to 1300's, around 700 to 800 years old, and probably of German origin. An incredibly elaborate iron spiked head that would be extremely effective at the function it was designed for. In fact, in a small area, some of the spike tips have been broken off where it has made crushing contact, probably against a helmet. This is also the form of Mace that was mounted on a short chain with a haft and then used as a Flail Mace for extra reach on horseback. Unlike a sword or haft mounted Mace, it doesn't transfer vibrations from the impact to the wielder. This is a great advantage to a horseman, who can use his horse's speed to add momentum to and underarmed swing of the ball, but runs less of a risk of being unbalanced from his saddle. It is difficult to block with a shield or parry with a weapon because it can curve over and round impediments and still strike the target. It also provides defense whilst in motion. However the rigid haft does have the advantage as the flail needs space to swing and can easily endanger the wielder's comrades. Controlling the flail is much more difficult than rigid weapons. Mounted on a replaced old haft. One photo in the gallery is from a 13th century Manuscript that shows Knights in combat, and one at the rear is using a stylized and similar Mace [photo for information only and not included with Mace]. The head is around the size of a tennis ball.
A Singularly Beautiful 1803 Pattern British Senior Officer's Sabre The blade is superbly engraved with the royal crest and royal cypher of King George IIIrd, stands of arms, flags, standards and banners, and with a lot of it's original gilt highlighting the engraving. Used in the Peninsular War, Waterloo & The War of 1812 by a British senior officer of an infantry regiment. A singularly beautiful sword that was designed for battle but was superbly serviceable for full dress. It has a carved slotted hilt with the pierced cypher of King George IIIrd as the inner design within the knuckle bow and adorned with a wonderfully detailed lion's head pommel, with fine ivory grip. It has a fully engraved blade with all the devices of King George IIIrd. Making a sword several times more expensive to commission than a standard plain blade. This is the pattern of British Officer's sword carried by gentlemen who relished the idea of combat, but found the standard 1796 Infantry pattern sword too light for good combat. The light infantry regiments were made up of officers exactly of that mettle. The purpose of the rifles light infantry regiments was to work as skirmishers. The riflemen and officers were trained to work in open order and be able to think for themselves. They were to operate in pairs and make best use of natural cover from which to harass the enemy with accurately aimed shots as opposed to releasing a mass volley, which was the orthodoxy of the day. The riflemen of the 95th were dressed in distinctive dark green uniforms, as opposed to the bright red coats of the British Line Infantry regiments. This tradition lives on today in the regiment’s modern equivalent, The Royal Green Jackets. The standard British infantry and light infantry regiments fought in all campaigns during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing sea-service at the Battle of Copenhagen, engaging in most major battles during the Peninsular War in Spain, forming the rearguard for the British armies retreat to Corunna, serving as an expeditionary force to America in the War of 1812, and holding their positions against tremendous odds at the Battle of Waterloo. The 1803 Sabre has frequently described as one of the most beautiful swords ever carried, and it was used, in combat, in some of the greatest and most formidable battles ever fought by the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars in Europe the Peninsular Campaign and Waterloo. This is a very attractive sword indeed and highly desirable, especially for devotees of the earliest era of the British Rifle Regiments, such as the 95th and the 60th. As a footnote, in Bernard Cornwall's books of 'Sharpe of the 95th', this is the Sabre Major Sharpe would have carried if he hadn't used the Heavy Cavalry Pattern Troopers Sword, given to him in the story in the first novel. Overall this battle cum dress sword is in very good order and quite stunning.The blade cutting edge has a lot of original sword combat edge to edge impacts. Lieutenant General Sir Thomas Picton GCB (24 August 1758[1] – 18 June 1815) was a British Army officer who fought in a number of campaigns for Britain in the Napoleonic wars. According to the historian Alessandro Barbero, Picton was "respected for his courage and feared for his irascible temperament." The Duke of Wellington called him "a rough foul-mouthed devil", but very capable. Picton came to public attention initially for his alleged cruelty during his governorship of Trinidad, as a result of which he was put on trial in England for illegally torturing a woman. Though he was convicted, the conviction was later overturned. He is chiefly remembered for his exploits under Wellington in the Iberian Peninsular War, during which he fought in many engagements displaying great bravery and persistence. He was killed fighting at the Battle of Waterloo, during a crucial bayonet charge in which his division stopped d'Erlon's corps' attack against the allied centre left. He was the most senior officer to die at Waterloo.His portrait shown in the gallery shows him holding his identical ivory hilted sword.
A Singularly Beautiful Cased Pair Boxlock 'Derringer' Pistols & Tools With finest Damascus barrels and silver but traps. Set in a wonderful mahogany case, with original powder flask and mold. Unusual box lock action, with hammers set to one side. Early 19th century. As crisp and as fresh a pair of finely cased quality pistols as one could ever wish to see. Beautifully made and crafted by a master gunsmith, with superb engraving. One feature of their fine engraving, that incidentally has been executed with the lightest elegant touch, is their very unusual subject. Each side of each pistol's side plate is engraved with a different form of architecturally decorative flowering plant, or fruit, that was highly popular in the late Georgian era, such as the acanthus, pineapple, and pomegranate. Designs that were popularized by Robert Adam and the like. The barrels are the finest Damascus twist steel, and within the grip butts are hinged silver lidded percussion cap traps. They have turn-off breech loading barrels that bear good proof stamps, and flush folding concealed triggers. The condition of both is truly epic, and apart from a hairline [easily restorable] in the butt of one gun, they are as near mint as possible for a pair of pistols approaching one hundred and eighty years old. The fine mahogany case and tools compliments them beautifully. Box 25,5 cm x 16.5cm x 5,5cm high, pistols 16cm long overall, barrel 6cm As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Singularly Beautiful Large Ship's Captain's Blunderbuss Pistol By Grice 18th century, from the Revolutionary War in the Americas through the Anglo French War and the Napoleonic Wars. A long barrel flintlock pistol, with a most elegant cannon barrel, and microchequered slab sided butt. Good action. Very nicely patinated walnut stock, steel mounts with acorn finial. In it's working life it once had a bayonet mount and this has been removed. Grice tried to contest John Waters bayonet patent stating he had used it before 1781, but was unsuccessful. documented makers of [Captain's] 'Blunderbuss Pistoles with Cannone barrels, and some wythe Bayonettes'. This wonderful and delightfully large bore cannon barrel pistol was chosen by ship's Captains as they found such impressive guns desireable as they had two prime functions to clear the decks with one shot, and the knowledge to an assailant that the pistol hads the capability to achieve such a result. In the 18th and 19th century mutiny was a common fear for all commanders, and not a rare as one might imagine. The Capt. Could keep about his person or locked in his gun cabinet in his quarters a gun just as this. The barrel could be loaded with single ball or swan shot, ball twice as large as normal shot, that when discharged at close quarter could be devastating, and terrifyingly effective. Potentially taken out four or five assailants at once. The muzzle was swamped like a cannon for two reasons, the first for ease of rapid loading, the second for imtimidation. There is a very persuasive psychological point to the size of this gun's muzzle, as any person or persons facing it could not fail to fear the consequences of it's discharge, and the act of surrender or retreat in the face of an well armed blunderbuss could be a happy and desirable result for all parties concerned.
A Singularly Beautiful Toe Lock Flintlock,18th to Early 19th century long gun. A simply superb antique Eastern gun from the 18th to Early 19th century,. A miquelet gun with a very high quality toe-lock decorated with chiseled and silver inlaid foliate arabesques. The gun is richly inlaid with silver and ivory, with matching foliate arabesques throughout, silver barrel bands, and the original silver mounted ramrod. figured hardwood three-quarter stock profusely inlaid over its full length with numerous silver plaques pierced with openwork designs of scrolling foliage. A similar gun was the Imperial gift of Russian Tsar for Augustus II King of Poland and Elector of Saxony on his coronation in Krakow. That gun is published in the book “Prunkwaffen: Waffen und Rustungen aus dem Historischen Museum Dresden” by Johannes Schobel (Leipzig, 1973) p.249, pl. 178. Guns of this style were popular throughout the whole of Central, Eastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus, North Africa and The Ottoman Empire. However this is a much higher quality example than is more often seen, and certainly sets it well apart from the usual musket of it's type. The barrel has a monogrammed armourer's mark and date [A.G. 1814.] This may very likely indicate the barrel was imported from Europe. Signed lock, under the lock plate on the spring. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Singularly Fine 18th C. British Light Inf. Sword, Captured French Blade The blade is identical to a sword blade from a very fine French Oriental Du Consulat Officer's Sword illustrated in Armes Blanches, Symbolism, Inscriptions, Marquages, Forbisseurs by Jen Hoste and Jean-Jaques Buigne. Page 13../ The symbols engraved are the crescent moon with star constellation with Venus, and the resplendent sun. The moon was the symbol for the man, for death and for life, the sun a symbol for both royalty, revolution and empire. This blade would have been captured likely in the early 19th century French war period with England, and then mounted and used in the Napoleonic Wars period. The hilt is an early, custom made British Light Infantry hilt in steel and very fine indeed. It has it's original steel mounted leather scabbard. Overall in very good condition, the scabbard leather is complete but small tear at the midsection.
A Singularly Stunning Pair, of Silver Royal Armoury Double Barrel Pistols A pair of magnificent pistols, of sublime quality and supremely rare. Double barrelled pistol are decidedly uncommon, but silver mounted and an original pair, complete and still together is a remarkable rarity. Made circa 1770, at King Louis XV 's Armoury Royale at St Etienne in France, they are examples of superb French craftsmanship at it's zenith. All of the mounts are hallmarked solid silver including the ramrods which have whalebone hafts. They are decorated in the so-called Parisian taste. The locks are engraved for the Royale Manufactory, St Etienne. Used in the American War of Independence, and the French Revolutionary period, right through the Napoleonic Wars and then converted to the much advantageous, advanced and superior percussion system in around 1830. In the 18th century solid silver mounted pistols and swords were the sole prerogative of only the most wealthy and powerful. The weapons of generals and princes, and double barrels pistols were particularly costly, but created a profound and distinct advantage for the wearer over any opponent carrying a pair of single shot pistols. Pistols with side-by-side barrels became popular in England and France in the second half of the eighteenth century. There is a most similar French pair on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York, in gallery 375. Saint-Étienne was already a well-known place for production of swords and knives since the Middle Ages. In 1665, a Royal Arms Depot was created in Paris to store military weapons made in Saint-Étienne. The Royal Arms Manufacture was created in 1764 under the supervision of the General Inspector of the Royal Arms Manufacture of Charleville. In order to maintain the French army many standard arms were made as well as Royal grade weapons and in the Royal period 12,000 military weapons were being produced each year when French Revolution occurred. The city was renamed Armsville during the revolutionary period and production increased to meet demand of the revolutionary army fighting at the borders against the Royalists supported by European royal families. The French Empire saw the production increase threefold to meet the needs of the Napoleonic Army in its conquest of Europe. In 1764 a select of St Etienne gun makers united to form a company upon which Louis XV conferred the title of Manufactory Royale and granted social privileges to assist their craft. Barrels 8.5 inches long, overall length 14.5 inches long. Small contemporary stock crack on one pistol by the barrel. Easily repairable invisibly if required.
A Singularly Superb & Superior Grade English Pepperbox Pistol Circa 1830 Good, very tight and crisp action, and in great condition for it's age with some original blue remaining to the hammer. Six revolving barrels with a nipple shield. Bar hammer and fine scroll engraving on the whole frame, superb walnut with original varnish. The revolving barrels have pronounced chisseled steel ribbing, that are spectacularly crisp. Good pepperbox revolvers are fairly rarely seen in the UK these days, and pepperbox revolvers are always highly collectable, as they represent most interesting examples of the first rung on the evolutionary ladder of the modern age revolver. The pepperbox was probably the most sought after multi-shot handgun during the 1830-1850 decades, being as the more modern Adams and Deane revolvers only gained availability and popularity after their invention and development the early 1850's, thus the pepperbox was carried in substantial quantities during the early Seikh Wars in 1845-6, the first Opium War in China 1839-42, and Crimean War in Russia. Most likely many pepperboxes were being carried as personal defense weapons during the war by officers who were not affluent enough to afford a then more conventional revolver. The Pepper-box, known as the "Gun that won the East", was the most desirable repeating handgun prior to the invention of the revolving cylinder. Its name may have been coined by Samuel Clemens. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Small and Stout English Boxlock Percussion Pistol By Williamson of Hull Circa 1830. Boxlock pistols were pocket pistols popular in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s. The most unique feature of their design was the boxlock mechanism. Unlike most firearms which have the hammer located off to the side of the pistol, a boxlock pistol had the hammer located directly on top of the pistol. They were called a boxlocks because all of the working mechanisms for the hammer and the trigger was located in a “box” or receiver directly below the top mounted hammer. While the hammer obstructed the aim of the user, this system had the advantage of making the gun more compact and concealable than other pistols. The first boxlock pistols were flintlock and where later made in percussion lock. Unlike modern firearms, these pistols were not mass produced, but were hand made in gunsmith's workshops.
A Small Group Of Two Superb Victorian Boer War Souvenirs A silk tally of Durban High School and a Maxim Pom Pom machinegun shell. Both souvenirs from a soldier of The Seige of Ladysmith. The British government initially rejected the gun but other countries bought it, including the South African Republic (Transvaal) government. In the Second Boer War, the British found themselves being fired on with success by the Boers with their 37 mm Maxim-Nordenfelt versions with ammunition made in Germany.
A Spanish Armada Period, One Piece 'Pear Stalk' Cabasset Helmet From the time of the unsuccessful Spanish 'Armada' attempted invasion, during the Reign of Queen Elizabeth Ist. A fine Spanish-Italian style one piece high peak cabasset helmet made in the mid to late 16th century. Wonderfully hand forged with hammer marks and with patches of delamination and rosettes. This super helmet is nicely constructed with good edgework and lovely quality throughout, and it is a fine period piece in excellent condition for age. There is a picture in the gallery of the same form of helmet [heavily rusted] recovered from Jamestown, the early American colony fort. One other picture is a period engraving of an Elizabethan soldier with his pear stalk cabasset, another picture of The Battle of Gravelines, August 8, 1588, which is of the defeat of the Spanish Armada by Sir Francis Drake, Queen Elizabeth's Admiral. Pictures shown for information only.
A Spectacular 18th Century Russian Market Silver Pistol With Niello Mounts 18th century made for the Caucasian market with niello enamel silver mounts, that were predominantly made by Russian silversmiths, for all manner of decorative arts and objets d'art, from jewellery to sword and pistol fittings. Niello work was also made in the Caucasian region, into the Ottoman Empire, but often for high quality items destined for the Russian market. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Spectacular Peninsular War Rifles Officer's Battle & Dress Sword A stunning sword, a variant of the 1803 GR cypher hilted sword with lion pommel, but the most scarce pierced Light Infantry Bugle half basket. Fully engraved blade with royal cypher and coat of arms with motto. Blade with old edge cuts and edge losses. This sword has spent two full days being professionally cleaned and conserved as it had been left undisturbed for likely 150 years. During the Peninsular War officer's assigned to the Light companies often felt they required a better sword than the thin, straight bladed, standard 1796 infantry officer's sword prevalent at the time. The GR cypher 1803 slotted hilt sabre became, for many officer's, the sword of choice, but to those that had the funds, and the inclination, there was another option. Have a sword custom made, based on the blade of the hugely effective and popular 1796 light dragoon officer's sabre, but with a more suitable and stylish hilt. This is one of those very swords. It has a glorious copper gilt hilt with reeded ivory grip with great individual style and finesse of the highest quality. This is simply a stunning piece of architecture in the body of a sword. The Light Infantry were units were employed as an addition to the common practice of fielding skirmishers in advance of the main column, who were used to weaken and disrupt the waiting enemy lines (the British also had a light company in each battalion that was trained and employed as skirmishers but these were only issued with muskets). With the advantage of the greater range and accuracy provided by the Baker rifle, British skirmishers were able to defeat their French counterparts routinely and in turn disrupt the main French force by sniping non-commissioned and commissioned officers. The most famous regiments of Light Infantry of this era was the 60th Regiment (Royal American Rifles) that were deployed around the world, and the three battalions of the 95th Regiment that served under the Duke of Wellington between 1808 and 1814 in the Peninsular War and again in 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo. No scabbard.
A Standard 1840's Boxlock Percussion Pocket Pistol Good working action, Birmingham proofs to barrel. Walnut grips with diamond edge carving and hand cut monogram across the back of the grip. A sound and effective personal protection pistol that was highly popular during the late Georgian to early Victorian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most treacherous place at night, and every gentleman, or indeed lady, would carry a pocket pistol for close quarter personal protection or deterrence. The early London Police force recruits 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [name after Sir Robert Peel their founder] were initially poorly selected. Of the first 2,800 new policemen, only 600 kept their jobs, and the first policeman, given the number 1, was sacked after only four hours service! Eventually, however, the impact upon crime, particularly organised crime led to an acceptance, and approval, of the Bobbies. Meanwhile, as they were so initially unpopular, and as the public of London had little or no confidence in them, armed personal protection was considered essential. However, as a sobering thought, in the regards to the justification of being permitted to carry arms for protection, in 1810 the total number of recorded murders throughout the entire UK, and at that time it included all Ireland, was 15 people, for the entire year!. Although the population was much much smaller then, it is still barely a figure of 2% of today's currrent rate of around 650 murders per year [excluding Ireland].
A Standard French 'Gladius' Short Sword. Based on Ancient Roman Gladiator's Swords. Made and used from 1831, later in the 1850's, in the Crimean War, during the reign of Emperor Napoleon IIIrd, against Russia alongside their allies the British. Swords of this type were also sold by France, to the US Union, for use in the Civil War as a sword for artillerymen to protect the guns.
A Stunning 1796 British Infantry Officer's Sword. With single edged blade with very fine engraving of the Kings cypher and Royal Crest. 95% of the original mercurial fire gilt to the hilt and a silver wire bound grip. No scabbard, quillon lacking. The 1796 Pattern British Infantry Officers Sword was carried by officers of the line infantry in the British Army between 1796 and the time of its official replacement with the gothic hilted sword in 1822. This period encompassed the whole of the Napoleonic Wars, and the American War of 1812.
A Stunning 1840 Early 6 Shot Revolver, Resembling the Colt Navy A most remarkable example of a most scarce revolver. Serial number '2', this is only the second example made from a very small production run revolver, that is so similar to the later Colt Navy it's extraordinary. The back half of the revolver is evolved from the 1830's pepperbox revolver, and the combination has produced a remarkably advanced pistol that Colt may have seen and developed into his Colt Navy and Army pistol designs. This gun is almost certainly by Hoist of Belgium and this is only the second we have owned in around 35 years. During the Civil War both protagonists required huge quantities of arms, and frankly, neither side could fulfill the required manufactured quantity, especially the South. Contractors were sent by both sides to scour Europe for arms, and Britain and Belgium became the dominant suppliers. This pistol is from the latter country. A jolly interesting and intrigueng arm used in the most fascinating period of American 19th century history. Excellent fully operational action. There are few surviving in the US in private collections. 11.5 inches long. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Stunning 18th Century Indian Ivory Inlaid Damascus Barrel Matchlock With most elegant lines, a light musket with a finest Damascus steel twist barrel, chisseled steel lock and mounts, with carved ivory panels of décor. Circa 1770. This is a simply delightful long gun with fine lines and finest workmanship. 64 inches overall
A Stunning 19th Century Swept Hilt Long Saxon Rapier, With Gilt Bronze Hilt A beautiful sword in the manner of a Royal Rapier, after master sword maker Juan Martinez of Toledo, maker to the King of Spain. A similar style sword was made for the Elector of Saxony in 1606 and sold by the Saxon Royal Collection in 1970, and is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The hilt is of chisseled gilded bronze with a long elegant and beautifully crafted blade [95cm long] gilded bronze mounted scabbard over leather. The leather is now quite worn and areas of old repair. The design and form is typically in the stunning 17th century baroque style, in both extravagance and beauty. We believe it was made to be used by such as the world's greatest actors of the 18th or 19th Century, such as David Garrick. His portrayal of the great Shakespearian Kings, such as King Richard IIIrd, were dressed with magnificent extravagance with costumes, sets and weaponry that were recreated with skill, beauty and style with no expense spared. It may also have been made as a presentation piece or gift for a famous [albeit unknown today] individual. Around 90% of all the original gilt remains. Overall length 116cm long.
A Stunning Antique Indonesian Silver Mounted Kris Keris Melayu Semenanjong with a serpentine blade with 7 Luk [seven curves or waves]. A very good and rare example of a keris from the southern Malaysian peninsular region of Johor or Selangor. Handle in the jawa demam form. This form of hilt is common in central or southern Sumatra, as well as the Malay peninsular regions. The Minang variant is usually more upright with a more flaring top. The top sheath in the typical Malay tebeng form, are made from very well selected kemuning woods with flashing grains. Bottom stem is likely made from well selected angsana woods with tiger’s stripe grains. It has a beautifully tooled silver sheath and a plain silver pendoko or ferrule completes the wonderful fittings. Pamor patterns are arranged in the mlumah technique of the wos utah or scattered rice variations which is said to enhance the owner’s material well being. Condition: Very good condition. Krises are traditionally made without any date stampings or engravings of the makers' name. Although a kris smith or "empu" has his own styles configured together with the dapor and especially the ganjar (cross piece). Obvious age wear and tear, usage, familiarity with forms, motifs and designs, origin and history, mediums and materials used are our guidelines in determining an approximate age. This particular pieces blade, from our experience and knowledge, should go back to 18th century or even earlier.
A Stunning British Mid 19th British Hussars & Lancer's Marmaluke One of the most distinctive and beautiful swords ever worn by British cavalry officer's in the 19th century. Made by in 1850 by Lambert Brown and Co of London and Dublin, this is a stunning mamaluke sword, in excellent condition for It's age, and used by an Hussars or Lancer Officer in the Crimean War era. A most similar pattern to the British General's pattern mamaluke that has a gilt brass hilt. A simply stunning and beautifully etched blade with rolls of scrolling acanthus leaves and fine Stands-of-Arms, depicting Lances Cannon Drums Swords and Trumpets. Ivory hilt with fine facetted iron rivets. Steel cross quillons and steel combat scabbard. The British dress regulations of 1822 were specifically directed toward lancer officers, who had apparently already been wearing versions of these mameluke sabres since 1816. Robson ("Swords of the British Army" p.69) notes that officers of light dragoons (forerunners of lancer regiments) had been wearing these since as early as 1805. Also noted are comments by British general Mercer, "...generals and our field officers seemed to wear what they pleased and after the Egyptian campaign (1801) the mameluke sabre was quite the rage".
A Stunning Colonial Walking Stick of Carved and Turned Horn A heavy quality stick of most attractive form and fine quality.
A Stunning Crimean War Elite Household Cavalry Officer's Silver Pouch In absolute pristine condition. Quite simply a piece of beautiful object d'art from the most beautiful and finest quality military uniform ever worn. Hallmarked London silver, dated 1855. Rectangular curved box with silver lid, with cast silver supports and rings and lined with silver wire bullion bands. Box covered in tooled black leather lining with morocco red leather trim. The silver cover bears an engraved acanthus leaf border, bearing at it's centre the Household Cavalry badge, of a gilt, crowned garter star, emblazoned with royal motto "Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense", and the central relief VR cypher of Queen Victoria. The British Household Cavalry is classed as a corps in its own right, and now consists of two regiments: the Life Guards and the Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons combined). They are the senior regular regiments in the British Army, with traditions dating from 1660, and act as the Queen's personal bodyguard. The regiments are Guards regiments and form Britain's Household Division with the five Foot Guards regiments. For example, The Royal Dragoons (1st Dragoons) The Royal Dragoons (1st Dragoons) trace their origins back to a troop of horse raised by King Charles II in 1661 to form part of the garrison at Tangier, which was part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza. They became Dragoons on their return to England in 1683. The term dragoon derived from the 'dragon', a musket suitable for mounted infantry. They received the battle honour Tangier, the oldest battle honour carried on standards, guidons and colours in the British Army. The Royals, as they were known, then served in The War of the Spanish Succession, The War of the Austrian Succession and in the Spanish Peninsula before distinguishing itself at the Battle of Waterloo where they captured the French 105th Infantry Regiment's Colours. The eagle that topped the Colour, with the number 105, still forms part of the Regiment's crest today and is worn on our uniforms. The latter half of the nineteenth century saw them in action in the Crimea. This pouch is an absolute gem and from the highest order and rank of British cavalry, occasionally if one perseveres one can find the volunteer officers pouches, and now and again a nice Hussars example, but this Household Cavalry piece is very rare indeed and all the better as it was made in the early Victorian Crimean War period. The 1st Royal Dragoons took part in the Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava. ‘It was truly magnificent; and to me who could see the enormous numbers opposed to you, the whole valley being filled with Russian cavalry, the victory of the Heavy Brigade was the most glorious thing I ever saw.’ A French general addressing Colonel Beatson, 25 October. 7.5 inches x 3.5 inches x 1.75 inches deep at the curve. 8.75 ounces weight total.
A Stunning Early Yataghan Sword with Gold Onlaid and Ivory Hilt, Islamic Antique 18th -19th century Turkish Ottoman Sword Yatagan with a characteristic ear shaped hilt. The hilt is made of two large pieces of finely carved ivory mounted in gold overlaid metal, decorated with a typical Balkan raised flower head design which extends down the blade, with pyramidical knobs on the pommel area. The ivory is most likely walrus, but, it may also be mammoth, as several we have seen in the past 40 years have mammoth ivory hilt's, carved from tusks imported at the time from Eastern Russian traders. A very fine recurved single edged blade with a narrow fuller ornamented with Islamic silver maker's calligraphic panels, and likely an AH date. REFERENCES: 1) Janissary – "History Symbols Weapons" by G.E.Vvedensky. 2) "Zbirka Jatagana" by Dora Boskovic. 3) "Les Armes Blanches du Monde Islamic" by Alain Jacob. 4) "The Janissaries" by David Nicolle. The Yatagan was the favourite sword of the Janissaries and was also very popular in many Balkan states and some Eastern European countries such as Ukraine and Hungary. The ivory has some cracking
A Stunning George IIIrd Royal Naval Sword Of Admiral Buckle Acquired from his direct descendant family. Admiral Buckle served under the Admirals Graves and Howe at the Battle of the Glorious 1st Of June. This is the 'first' sword used by Admiral Mathew Buckle [we previously had, and sold his second sword], firstly used by him in his rank of Commander, then Captain, then Admiral, later it was further used by Admiral Claude Henry Buckle, his second son. It was originally made by Read & Co [Likely Read and Nephew] of Portsmouth, with a J.J.Runkel blade, and one from two of Admiral Buckle's swords that we were privileged to acquire directly from the Buckle family. The secondary sword of Admiral Buckle we had sold earlier this year, but this one, his primary sword, required a replacement leather for the scabbard, this necessity we have attended to expertly, and it is now ready for sale and shown here. This is simply a fabulous Royal Naval sword from the reign of King George IIIrd that has served two British Admiral Buckles. The exterior of this historical and beautiful sword is as close to mint for it's age as is ever possible, the original mercurial gilt is simply superb. The blade is blue and gilt with commensurate wear for age, but a good portion of blue and gilt is remaining and all it's engraving. It's initial 'Buckle' owner was the most distinguished naval officer who personally served, with much distinction and valour, under Admiral Howe, at the Battle of the Glorious 1st of June. The Glorious First of June of 1794 was the first and largest fleet action of the naval conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the First French Republic during the French Revolutionary Wars. The British Channel Fleet under Admiral Lord Howe attempted to prevent the passage of a vital French grain convoy from the United States, which was protected by the French Atlantic Fleet, commanded by Rear-Admiral Villaret-Joyeuse. The two forces clashed in the Atlantic Ocean, some 400 nautical miles west of the French island of Ushant on 1 June 1794. The action was the culmination of a campaign that had criss-crossed the Bay of Biscay over the previous month in which both sides had captured numerous merchant ships and minor warships and had engaged in two partial, but inconclusive, fleet actions. During the battle, Howe defied naval convention by ordering his fleet to turn towards the French and for each of his vessels to rake and engage their immediate opponent. This unexpected order was not understood by all of his captains, and as a result his attack was more piecemeal than he intended. Nevertheless, his ships inflicted a severe tactical defeat on the French fleet. In the aftermath of the battle both fleets were left shattered and in no condition for further combat, Howe and Villaret returning to their home ports. Despite losing seven of his ships of the line, Villaret had bought enough time for the French grain convoy to reach safety unimpeded by Howe's fleet, securing a strategic success. However, he was also forced to withdraw his battle fleet back to port, leaving the British free to conduct a campaign of blockade for the remainder of the war. In the immediate aftermath both sides claimed victory and the outcome of the battle was seized upon by the press of both nations as a demonstration of the prowess and bravery of their respective navies. Part of a collection of swords acquired by us from the Buckle family, of direct descent from the famed Admiral Mathew Buckle. This is the sword of the son of the first Admiral Mathew Buckle (1718-84), [also named Mathew] and subsequently, it was then passed down onto Claude Henry Mason Buckle, also a Royal Naval Admiral, and the senior Matthew Buckle's grandson. Claude Henry Mason Buckle, enjoyed a similarly successful naval career to both previous Mathews, and himself rose to the rank of Admiral. As commander of a new steam sloop, HMS Growler in the 1840's, he was employed in the suppression of the slave trade off the west coast of Africa, and the diaries that he wrote on board that ship record the capture of Spanish slave ships and the sacking of hostile native villages. In the Crimean War of 1854-56 he served as Captain of HMS Valorous, and saw action in several of the more important naval engagements against the Russians. However, it was as Captain of the paddle frigate Valorous that Claude Henry Mason Buckle most distinguished himself. He was appointed to her at the end of 1852, and at the outbreak of war with Russia proceeded to the Baltic. In May 1854 the Valorous took part in the destruction of 34 vessels at Uleaborg, in the Gulf of Bothnia, and later in the summer of that year she was involved in the bombardment of the fortress of Bomarsund in the Aland Islands. At the end of the year the Valorous went to the Black Sea, where she assisted in the defence of Eupatoria, in the blockade and forcing of the Strait of Kertch, and in the capture of Kinburn. Captain Buckle retained his command throughout the Crimean War, and had the honour of being three times gazetted. His grandfather, Admiral Mathew Buckle senior entered the navy in 1731 at the age of 13, and was one of five members of the Buckle family ultimately to rise to Flag Rank. Mathew Buckle was one of the most distinguished naval officers of the 18th century, and was in continuous command of fighting ships for nineteen years from 1744. His career is unfolded in a fine series of Log Books which survives for the period 1731-62 (excepting the years 1743-44), and in his Letter and Order Books for 1744-48. Mathew Buckle senior was made a Rear-Admiral on 18 October 1770, and was second-in-command at Spithead in 1770-71. He was promoted to Vice-Admiral of the Blue on 31 March 1775, and commanded the fleet in the Downs in 1778-79. On 19 March 1779 he was promoted to Admiral of the Blue, and in 1783 was offered the command of the Fleet, which he declined on account of ill health. This sword first belonged to his elder and only surviving son, also named Mathew, (1770-1855), who was apprenticed as Captain's servant with his first cousin Christopher Mason in 1777, but it is not thought that he went to sea until 17 April 1786, when he entered service as Able-Seaman on board HMS Salisbury, a 50 gun ship engaged on the Newfoundland station. Mathew was rated Midshipman in 1787, and for the next six years was chiefly employed on the Newfoundland and West India stations, receiving his first commission as Lieutenant on 21 January 1791. In February 1793 he joined the Royal Sovereign, flagship of Vice-Admiral Thomas Graves, second-in-command of the Channel Fleet under Admiral Earl Howe, and was aboard that ship during the celebrated actions against the French fleet under Villaret Joyeuse on 29 May and 1 June 1794. Despite having been deprived of the use of his limbs by rheumatic fever, Buckle remained at his post throughout those actions, and earned the favourable notice of his commanding officer. Captain Buckle married Henrietta Reevley in 1798. After his career became less active in the latter part of his career, this sword [with his other] passed to his son, Claude Henry Mason Buckle, in the 1840's. There is a small black and white photo in the gallery of him, it's last serving owner, Admiral Claude Henry Mason Buckle, in his later years, in his Admirals uniform [both pictures of the Admirals Buckles are for information only not included]. The Buckle archive, of the Buckle Admirals, is kept for posterity as part of the National Archive. The last photo in the gallery is a photograph of the portrait of this sword's first owner, Admiral Buckle [junior] who served under Howe in the Battle of the Glorious 1st of June [shown with thanks to the Buckle family]. There were two companies called Reads, bespoke Cutlers, in Portsmouth, but only one partnership known. Read, William and his Nephew, John, from the 1790's to 1805, then it became a single named business, John Read, Cutler, once more in 1805. Runkel was a very famous German importer of sword blades, based in London, who supplied sword blades to all the major cutlers in England. Admiral Buckle owned two swords, this is the first one he owned, the other that we had was the second he owned. He used them in rotation, as was normal for senior officers of the time. For example Admiral Nelson owned anything up to 8 swords in his day.
A Stunning Napoleonic British Presentation Grade Hussar Officer's Sabre This is without doubt the sword of an officer of great wealth, status and standing. A fabulous gilt bronze horse's head hilted sword with ivory grip and hussar sabre blade. We had a near identical sword once before recently, but closer to it's original state, with an engraved blade [with hussar on horseback], and it's scabbard. This sword has a plain blade and no scabbard or chain guard, but, wha is complete, is very fine indeed. We show, as example, photos of the other complete identical sword that we had earlier, and that was sold at almost three times this price. We also show in our gallery just such a sword as carried with typical joie de vivres as displayed by dandy officers and gentlemen at during the Napoleonic Wars. Hussars of the Napoleonic Wars The hussars played a prominent role as cavalry in the Napoleonic Wars (1796–1815). As light cavalrymen mounted on fast horses, they would be used to fight skirmish battles and for scouting. Most of the great European powers raised hussar regiments. The armies of France, Austria, Prussia, and Russia had included hussar regiments since the mid-18th century. In the case of Britain four light dragoon regiments were converted to hussars in 1806–1807. Hussars were notoriously impetuous, and Napoleon was quoted as stating that he would be surprised for a hussar to live beyond the age of 30 due to their tendency to become reckless in battle, exposing their weaknesses in frontal assaults. The hussars of Napoleon created the tradition of sabrage, the opening of a champagne bottle with a sabre. Moustaches were universally worn by Napoleonic period hussars, the British hussars were the only moustachioed troops in the British Army—leading to their being taunted as being "foreigners" at times. French hussars also wore cadenettes, braids of hair hanging either side of the face, until the practice was officially proscribed when shorter hair became universal. The uniform of the Napoleonic hussars included the pelisse: a short fur edged jacket which was often worn slung over one shoulder in the style of a cape, and was fastened with a cord. This garment was extensively adorned with braiding (often gold or silver for officers) and several rows of multiple buttons. Under it was worn the dolman or tunic which was also decorated in braid. The hussar's accoutrements included a Hungarian-style saddle covered by a shabraque, a decorated saddlecloth with long pointed corners surmounted by a sheepskin
A Stunning Silver Mounted Caucasian Flintlock Decorated With Coral Fine flintlock with superb engraving. The barrel has a fine Islamic maker's seal stamp. The spring is very good and the action now excellent after servicing. This is a fine 18th century piece, used by the Cossacks and horsemen of the Ottoman Empire. They were also popular thoroughout Europe during the Napoleonic Wars.
A Stunning Solid Silver Gilt George III Small Sword Circa 1770 Hallmarked Silver Dated 1763 by William Kinman of London. Colishmarde bladeblade etched with scrollwork over the forte (rubbed), silver hilt finely cast and chased with boldly writhen borders and scrollwork, comprising oval dish-guard struck twice with the maker`s mark (indistinct), a pair of quillons, arms, knuckle-guard with scrolling terminal, and spirally fluted oval pommel, the grip with chased silver collars and later wire binding. William Kinman was a leading member of the Founders Company of London was born in 1728 and is recorded as a prominent silver hilt maker. He is recorded at 8 Snow Hill for the last time circa 1781, is recorded circa 1728-1808, see L. Southwick 2001, pp. 159-160. The small sword or smallsword is a light one-handed sword designed for thrusting which evolved out of the longer and heavier rapier of the late Renaissance. The height of the small sword's popularity was between mid 17th and late 18th century. It is thought to have appeared in France and spread quickly across the rest of Europe. The small sword was the immediate predecessor of the French duelling sword (from which the épée developed) and its method of use—as typified in the works of such authors as Sieur de Liancour, Domenico Angelo, Monsieur J. Olivier, and Monsieur L'Abbat—developed into the techniques of the French classical school of fencing. Small swords were also used as status symbols and fashion accessories; for most of the 18th century anyone, civilian or military, with pretensions to gentlemanly status would have worn a small sword on a daily basis. The small sword could be a highly effective duelling weapon, and some systems for the use of the bayonet were developed using the method of the smallsword as their foundation, (including perhaps most notably, that of Alfred Hutton). Militarily, small swords continued to be used as a standard sidearm for infantry officers. In some branches with strong traditions, this practice continues to the modern day, albeit for ceremonial and formal dress only. The carrying of swords by officers in combat conditions was frequent in World War I and still saw some practice in World War II. The 1913 U.S. Army Manual of Bayonet Drill includes instructions for how to fight a man on foot with a small sword. Small swords are still featured on parade uniforms of some corps. As a rule, the blade of a small sword is comparatively short at around 0.6 to 0.85 metres (24 to 33 in), though some reach over 0.9 metres (35 in). It usually tapers to a sharp point but may lack a cutting edge. It is typically triangular in cross-section, although some of the early examples still have the rhombic and spindle-shaped cross-sections inherited from older weapons, like the rapier. This triangular cross-section may be hollow ground for additional lightness. Many small swords of the period between the 17th and 18th centuries were found with colichemarde blades. The colichemarde blade configuration is widely thought to have been an invention of Graf von Königsmark, due to the similarity in pronunciation of their names. However, the first blades of this type date from before the Count's lifetime. The colichemarde first appeared about 1680 and was popular during the next 40 years at the royal European courts. It was especially popular with the officers of the French and Indian War period. George Washington had one. This sword appeared at about the same time as the foil. However the foil was created for practicing fencing at court, while the colichemarde was created for dueling. A descendant of the colichemarde is the épée, a modern fencing weapon. With the appearance of the pocket pistol as a self-defence weapon, the colichemardes found an even more extensive use in dueling.[clarification needed] Popularity of the colichemarde declined when rapiers went out of fashion, the advantage of the colichemarde being that it was faster and more maneuverable than the rapier but with a wide forte to help parry the heavier rapier blade. As small swords evolved into even smaller, lighter weapons, the colichemarde was suddenly at the same disadvantage as the rapier had been when the colichemarde was introduced, and a wider forte was of no advantage against lighter small swords.
A Stunning Spanish 'Blue & Gilt' Light Inf. Sword of Peninsular War A very fine officer's sword, Circa 1800. A most rare and stunning beauty. With polished steel hilt and scabbard mounts over black leather The hilt has a wire bound sharkskin grip. The blade is superbly engraved with the crest of the Bourbon King Carlos IV and the Bourbon King's monogrammed CC back to back. Carlos was ousted by Napoleon, and made to abdicate in 1808. The blueing is in fabulous condition. With the blue and gilt crest of His Majesty King Charles IV of Spain. Under the terms of the Treaty of Fontainebleau, which divided the Kingdom of Portugal and all Portuguese dominions between France and Spain, Spain agreed to augment, by three Spanish columns (numbering 25,500 men), the 28,000 troops Junot was already leading through Spain to invade Portugal. Crossing into Spain on 12 October 1807, Junot started a difficult march through the country, finally entering Portugal on 19 November. The three columns were as follows: General Caraffa's 9,500 men were to assemble at Salamanca and Ciudad Rodrigo and cooperate with Junot's main force. General Francisco Solano's column of 9,500 soldiers, which was to advance from Badajoz to capture Elvas and its fortress, invaded Portugal on 2 December 1807. General Taranco's 6,500 troops occupied Porto on 13 December. The general died the following January, and on 6 June 1808, when news of the rebellion in Spain reached Porto, the new commander of the garrison, General Belestá, arrested the French governor, General Quesnel, and his 30-man dragoon escort and joined the armies fighting the French. The Army of Spain refers to the Spanish military units that fought against France's Grande Armée during the Peninsular War (2 May 1808 (sometimes 27 October 1807) – 17 April 1814) a period which coincided with what is also termed the Spanish War of Independence These regular troops were supplemented throughout the country by the guerrilla actions of local militias which, in the case of Catalonia, ran to thousands of well-organised "miquelets", or "somatenes", who had already proved their worth in the Catalan revolt of 1640 and in the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), while in Andalusia, they were more modest in number, and sometimes little more than brigands who were, in some cases, feared by French troops and the civilian population alike but which were nevertheless a constant source of harassment to the French army and its lines of communication, as were the numerous spontaneous popular uprisings. So much so, that by summer 1811, French commanders deployed 70,000 troops only to keep said lines open between Madrid and the border with France. A list drawn up in 1812 puts the figure of such irregular troops at 38,520 men, divided into 22 guerrilla bands. At some battles, such as the Battle of Salamanca, the Army of Spain fought side-by-side with their allies of the Anglo-Portuguese Army, led by General Wellesley (who would not become the Duke of Wellington until after the Peninsular War was over). The Light Companies were the skimishers, volitiguers and riflemen with officer's, either a separate part of a line Infantry Regt. Or, in dedicated line Light Infantry regts.
A Stunning, Early 18th Century, Ivory & Silver Hilted Talisman Symbol Sword A Perfectly Charming and Delightful 18th Century Hunting Sword. Ivory hilt set with three silver headed rivets. Silver scroll end quillons. Long wide blade with rare mystical talisman symbols engraved throughout, including the profile head of the turbaned Grand Sultan [in the same manner as Sir Francis Dashwood's portrait pose]. In the form of a fine nobleman's hunting sword, primarily used [or intended] for personal protection, or for the coup de grace while hunting Boar or Wolf, however this example has a mystical symbolic blade usually associated with secret societies and those that believe blades with such designs granted the user special power over their enemies. We recently examined a sword with an identically designed blade [and most similar luxurious hilt] that was supposedly once owned by a member of Sir Francis Dashwood's Hellfire Club. The most famous Hellfire Club was founded by Sir Francis Dashwood MP, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Postmaster General, and Treasurer to King George III. King George III had six sons, all Freemasons, one of which, Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex became the first Grand Master of the new United Grand Lodge of England (founded in 1813) In his younger days, Sir Francis had joined the Society of Gentlemen of Spalding, whose members included leading Freemasons, especially the antiquarian and Chief Druid, Dr Rev William Stukeley. A leading Freemason in the Grand Lodge of London (now known as the United Grand Lodge of England), Stukeley's diary and papers are amongst the earliest sources on the subject of the UGLE. It was Stukeley who, in 1721, famously wrote in his diary, "I was the first person made a Freemason in London for many years. We had difficulty to find members enough to perform the ceremony!" Dashwood was a Rosicrucian and a Freemason. He was initiated in a Lodge in Florence, the Grand Master of which was Lord Raynard, son of the Chief Justice of England. In 1751, Dashwood founded The Order of St Francis, The Hellfire Club at Medmenham, which met in a former church renovated by Dashwood to represent the Solar Temple at Palmyra. Dashwood and his merry monks, which included one Benjamin Franklin, were not Satanists, but they were followers of the Pagan Mysteries. However, it cannot be denied that they supposedly indulged in quasi-Satanic rites This all came to an end in 1766, 10 years prior to the founding of the Order of the Illuminati in Bavaria, May 1st, 1776. The blade has small areas of pitting. When first we acquired this sword we paid little heed to the significance of the engraving, in regards to the style of the hilt. However we are most grateful to Dr. Schroeder for placing his research into the Hellfire Club's curiosities at our disposal. Naturally the engraving's context is purely subjective, and no known authoritative connection can be made at this time, but none the less it is a most fascinating piece and none can argue against it's beauty, quality and fascinating and unusual décor, occasionally to be seen on swords from later periods during the Reign of King George IIIrd, for example many swords of 10th Hussars, the regiment of the Prince of Wales had talisman blades.
A Stunning, Spanish, Napoleonic Peninsular Wars Period 18th Century Pistol Fine walnut stock with micro chequered butt. Fine chiselled steel mounts, beautifully engraved, converted percussion miquelet lock. The barrel has excellent gold inlaid maker marks, and the cross of St John armourers' stamps. This is a truly beautiful pistol, likely carried by an officer of the highest rank and position during the Wars with France in Spain. The Peninsular War[a] (1807–1814) was a military conflict between France and the allied powers of Spain, the United Kingdom and Portugal for control of the Iberian Peninsula during the Napoleonic Wars. The war started when French and Spanish armies occupied Portugal in 1807, and escalated in 1808 when France turned on Spain, its ally until then. The war on the peninsula lasted until the Sixth Coalition defeated Napoleon in 1814, and is regarded as one of the first wars of national liberation, significant for the emergence of large-scale guerrilla warfare. The years of fighting in Spain was a heavy burden on France's Grande Armée. While the French were victorious in battle, their communications and supplies were severely tested and their units were frequently isolated, harassed, or overwhelmed by partisans. The Spanish armies were repeatedly beaten and driven to the peripheries but time and again they would regroup and hound the French. This drain on French resources led Napoleon, who had unwittingly provoked total war, to call the conflict the Spanish Ulcer The British force under Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington guarded Portugal and campaigned against the French in Spain alongside the reformed Portuguese army. Allied to the British, the demoralised Portuguese army was reorganised and refitted under the command of General William Carr Beresford,[6] who had been appointed commander-in-chief of the Portuguese forces by the exiled Portuguese royal family, and fought as part of a combined Anglo-Portuguese army under Wellesley. In 1812, as Napoleon embarked upon his disastrous invasion of Russia, a combined allied army under Wellesley pushed into Spain and took Madrid. Marshal Jean-de-Dieu Soult led the exhausted and demoralized French forces in a fighting withdrawal across the Pyrenees and into France during the winter of 1813-1814.
A Super Antique Gold Prospector-Miner's 'Shovel Pick and Nugget' Brooch An original gold prospectors brooch. In Australia and in America's Wild West and Alaska [the '49ers] the gold prospectors would, on occasion, have made by jewellers fancy brooches to represent their gold strikes, and this is one of those. Beautifully designed and executed it has a gold prospector-miner's pick axe, crossed with a shovel and set with a gold nugget at the centre. There is a similar example in a national museum in Australia and in a few in the great museum collections in the US. Stamped 9ct, safety chain with spring mount. 52mm long. Two photos of similar brooches in the gallery. One from the National Museum of Australia, another from Cowan's sale in Ohio.
A Super Back-Action Percussion Overcoat or Travelling Pistol King George IV Circa 1830. Fine all steel mounts and octagonal hook breech barrel. Fine juglans regia walnut stock with chequered grip. Back action percussion lock. The whole pistol has a lovely patina and is really a most handsome fine quality piece. Waisted barrel with multigroove rifling. 11.5inch long overall, barrel 6.5 inches
A Super British Military Surgeon's Set, In Nickle Plated Campaign Cylinder With numerous tools, scissors clamps etc., and cases for needles and blades. One instrument lacking. Superbly engineered. Maker marked.
A Super English Civil War Era Cavalryman's Cuirass From Warwick Castle This armour would very nicely companion, our original, English lobster pot helmet. Item number 17925 [sold seperately]. A fine original English Civil War New Model Army cavalry trooper's cuirass direct from the Armoury of Britain's [and perhaps Europe's] greatest medieval castle. With the Warwick castle armoury inventory metal tag still affixed. With fine armourer's marks of the London Armourers Company [*see below] of the 'A' mark [for the Commonwealth], and also the helmet mark to the back plate. During the Civil War the Castle was besieged by the Royalists, they failed in their endeavours and they were captured and incarcerated within the castle dungeons. It certainly possible this armour was used in this conflict or later. William the Conqueror ordered the start of the building of Warwick in the 11th century, and by the 14th century the great Towers were completed. We consider ourselves very fortunate to have the opportunity to acquire some wonderful arms and weaponry from a small disposal from the Castle Armoury, in order to benefit the restoration of the Castle. In the year 1264, the castle was seized by the forces of Simon de Montfort, who consequently imprisoned the then current Earl, William Mauduit, and his Countess at Kenilworth (who were supporters of the king and loyals to the barons) until a ransom was paid. After the death of William Mauduit, the title and castle were passed to William de Beauchamp. Following the death of William de Beauchamp, Warwick Castle subsequently passed through seven generations of the Beauchamp family, who over the next 180 years were responsible for the majority of the additions made to Warwick Castle. After the death of the last direct-line Beauchamp, Anne, the title of Earl of Warwick, as well as the castle, passed to Richard Neville ("the Kingmaker"), who married the sister of the last Earl (Warwick was unusual in that the earldom could be inherited through the female line). Warwick Castle then passed from Neville to his son-in-law (and brother of Edward IV of England), George Plantagenet, and shortly before the Duke's death, to his son, Edward. Several Kings owned Warwick including King Henry VIIth, and Henry VIIIth, James Ist, and also Queen Elizabeth.* In 1322, in the reign of King Edward II, the Guild of St George of the Armourers was instituted, by ordinance of the City of London, which laid down regulations for the control of the trade. King Henry VI presented the Armourers with their first Royal Charter in May 1453. The New Model Army's elite troops were its Regiments of Horse. They were armed and equipped in the style known at the time as harquebusiers, rather than as heavily armoured cuirassiers. They wore a back-and-front breastplate over a buff leather coat, which itself gave some protection against sword cuts, and normally a "lobster-tailed pot" helmet with a movable three-barred visor, and a bridle gauntlet on the left hand. The sleeves of the buff coats were often decorated with strips of braid, which may have been arranged in a regimental pattern. Leather "bucket-topped" riding boots gave some protection to the legs. Regiments were organised into six troops, of one hundred troopers plus officers, non-commissioned officers and specialists (drummers, farriers etc.). Each troop had its own standard, 2 feet (61 cm) square. On the battlefield, a regiment was normally formed as two "divisions" of three troops, one commanded by the regiment's Colonel (or the Major, if the Colonel was not present), the other by the Lieutenant Colonel. Their discipline was markedly superior to that of their Royalist counterparts. Cromwell specifically forbade his men to gallop after a fleeing enemy, but demanded they hold the battlefield. This meant that the New Model cavalry could charge, break an enemy force, regroup and charge again at another objective. On the other hand, when required to pursue, they did so relentlessly, not breaking ranks to loot abandoned enemy baggage as Royalist horse often did One picture in the gallery shows Warwick Castle today [for information only, not included]
A Super Original Civil War Sharps and Hankins 4 Barrel Derringer .32 cal, with steel barrels steel frame and walnut grips. A Wonderful, small multi barreled Derringer pistol, that is a typical representation of the ingeneous skill and inventiveness that was inspiring the creation of incredible feats of ingenuity in the design of arms in mid 19th century industrial America and Great Britain. It has four slim barrels and a rotating firing mechanism that fires one bullet at a time through a trigger action. Sliding loading action, clear makers name and barrel address, carved wood grips. A fabulous and scarce multi shot Derringer made and used from the early part of the American Civil War and into the Wild West frontier era. The Derringer pistol that we have here evolved from the name of a small calibre pistol used to assasinate Abraham Lincoln, from that time on, all small calibre concealable pistols have been called or utilised the name Derringer. In the century and a half since it happened, populist history has largely boiled down the assassination of Abraham Lincoln to the story of a single perpetrator: John Wilkes Booth. Four of the eight convicted for participating in the conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln in April of 1865 died on the gallows three months later. But in his appearance at the Camden County Historical Society, Lincoln scholar Hugh Boyle made clear that the real story is a sprawling epic. It involves a gang of Confederate operatives and sympathizers that first plotted to kidnap the President and, when that failed, decided to murder not only him, but the Vice President and Secretary of State as well. Their goal was to decapitate and destabilize the federal government in hopes of forcing a settlement to the war that would avoid the South's total defeat. In the end, they managed to kill Lincoln and seriously injure Secretary of State William Seward. By 1865, the South was a vast swath of utter destruction. It was a time of massive upheaval, great danger and high emotion for the South, so the idea that someone might be thinking about attacking the President or other high government officials was not a crazy one in the atmosphere of the times." The frustrations and angst of the Southern cause came to a boil in April of 1865. Its capital, Richmond, Va. -- now a burned out hulk of a city -- was captured and occupied by Ulysses S. Grant's forces on April 3. Six days later, Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia surrendered and was disarmed at Appomattox. Three days after that -- April 11 -- President Lincoln, standing in a second-story window of the White House, spoke to a huge crowd in a city gone wild in celebration of the Appomattox surrender. But among those listening in that crowd were John Wilkes Booth and 21-year-old Lewis Thornton Powell. John Wilkes Booth, one of America's most famous actors of the time, and Lewis Thornton Powell were enraged by the President's White House speech on April 11. Three days later, Booth killed Lincoln in Ford's Theater while Powell tried to kill Secretary of State William Seward in his home. Booth was one of the country's most famous actors and an ardent supporter of the Confederacy. His young companion, Powell, was a Confederate army veteran and a second cousin of Confederate general John B. Gordon The gang leader -- 27-year-old John Wilkes Booth -- was tracked down and shot to death by Union soldiers in Virginia. Eight others were convicted of being conspirators with Booth. Four were sentenced to death and hung, including the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Super, Antique Bronze ' Horse Racing' Collectable Ideal for the gentleman or lady with a passion for Horse Racing or simply Horses. In fine bronze, a super desk, mantle or sidetable ornament. With a finely detailed relief design of a Horse Race, showing two race horses side by side with jockeys. With rear finger loop for holding.
A Superb & Rare 1796 'Blue and Gilt' Royal Marines Officer's Sword A most scarce form of 1796 Marines Officer's pattern sword, that is distinctive due to it's grip of chequered ebony recognised as for use by the officers of Royal Marines. The 1796 Infantry sword will more usually have a silver wire grip, a silver foil wire pattern grip, or a plain or ribbed pale wood grip. The rarest of all are the chequered ebony and ivory grips, used by Marines officers [of middle and high rank respectively], and these swords are often likely made before 1796, when the sword was given it's pattern name. The hilt has much of it's original mercurial gilt remaining, and the blade is very beautifully engraved with much original blue and gilt still present. The scabbard is gilt metal and leather and the leather good for age but a couple of old contemporary strengthening in the leather. The Royal Marines were formed as part of the Naval Service in 1755. However, it can trace its origins back as far as 28 October 1664 when at the grounds of the Honourable Artillery Company "the Duke of York and Albanys maritime regiment of foot" was first formed up, when English soldiers first went to sea to fight the Spanish and prevent them from reaching the fortress of Gibraltar. The Royal Marines served throughout the Napoleonic Wars in every notable naval battle on-board the Royal Navy's ships and participated in multiple amphibious actions. One Royal Marine officer was killed on board the Victory at Trafalgar, Captain Charles Adair. Royal Marine Lieutenant Lewis Buckle Reeve was seriously wounded and lay next to Nelson after he [Nelson] was shot by a French matelot in the rigging. The Royal Marines have, for good reason, a proud history and unique traditions. Their colours (flags) do not carry individual battle honours in the manner of the regiments of the British Army but rather the "globe itself" as the symbol of the Corps. On 5 April 1755, His Majesty's Marine Forces, fifty Companies in three Divisions, headquartered at Chatham, Portsmouth, and Plymouth, were formed by Order of Council under Admiralty control. Initially all field officers were Royal Navy officers as the Royal Navy felt that the ranks of Marine field officers were largely honorary. This meant that the farthest a Marine officer could advance was to Lieutenant Colonel. It was not until 1771 that the first Marine was promoted to Colonel. This situation persisted well into the 1800s. During the rest of the 18th century, they served in numerous landings all over the world, the most famous being the landing at Bellisle on the Brittany coast in 1761. They also served in the American War of Independence, being particularly courageous in the Battle of Bunker Hill led by Major John Pitcairn. These Marines also often took to the ship's boats to repel attackers in small boats when RN ships on close blockade were becalmed. On February 14, 1779 Captain James Cook took with him the following Marines: Lt.Phillips; a Sgt; Corporal Thomas and seven Privates; besides Cook, four Marines-Corporal Thomas and three Privates Hinks; Allen, and Fatchett-were killed and 2-Lt Phillips and Private Jackson-wounded. In 1802, largely at the instigation of Admiral John Jervis, 1st Earl of St Vincent, they were titled the Royal Marines by King George IIIrd. This is the second time we have been most privileged to own this sword.
A Superb & Rare Colonial Era Anglo-American Shell Guard Naval Cutlass Circa 1740-1760 Period. Used in the Royal Navy and Pre-American Independence American Navy. Excellent condition in all respects. This is a truly rare, quite wonderful, original Anglo-American shell guard naval cutlass, with a 25" widely curved, unmarked, single fuller, single edge blade. The brass two bar Guard has a “shell” pattern guard with its thin knuckle bow, short downturned quillon and original octagon polished bone grip, with superb untouched natural age patination to both the brass and the carved grip. This historic cutlass measures 29.5” in overall length. It is near identical to examples found in “Swords & Blades of the American Revolution” by George C. Neumann, illustrated on pages 182 and 183. Swords of this form were used in both the British Royal Navy, by officers and men, and in the earliest American navy and their merchant ships, many decades before the regularised official patterns of swords and cutlasses were introduced in the early 19th century for both countries. An excellent and most highly collectible specimen.
A Superb 'Lovells Catch' Brown Bess Bayonet With Original Leather Scabbard Socket mount with Hanovarian or Lovells catch fitting. Original brass mounted leather scabbard. A very nice example of it's type.
A Superb 'Wild West' Smith and Wesson Revolver One of the greatest names in the world of American pistols. Smith and Wessons have been owned by all the greatest and infamous characters in Wild West history, such as Jesse James, Cole Younger, Bob Ford and Wyatt Earp. The Smith & Wesson Model No. 1 1/2. [Second issue] with birds head butt and top strap cylinder stop. The 'second type' intermediate manufacture model between the Old Model No. 1 and the No 2 Model Army. With a considerable amount of original blue remaining. Good tight action and fine and clear Smith and Wesson address to barrel top strap with patent dates. Overall length 7.5 inches. Barrel 3.5 inches 32 Rimfire calibre. Small marks to barrel top strap.
A Superb 1796 Blue and Gilt Infantry Officer's Sword With copper gilt hilt, silver wire grip and fully engraved blade with King George IIIrd cypher with good remaining amounts of the finest blue and gilt décor. Used during the Peninsular War in Spain, the American War in 1812, and the Battle of Waterloo era. Quite a few examples survive till today of this pattern of sword from this era, but, very few indeed survive in good condition, with a lot of it's deluxe mercurial fire gilt and blueing remaining. The sword was introduced by General Order in 1796, replacing the previous 1786 Pattern. It was similar to its prececesor in having a spadroon blade, i.e. one straight, flat backed and single edged with a single fuller on each side. The hilt gilt brass with a knucklebow, vestigial quillon and a twin-shell guard somewhat similar in appearance to that of the smallswords which had been common civilian wear until shortly before this period. The pommel was urn shaped and, in many examples, the inner guard was hinged to allow the sword to sit against the body more comfortably and reduce wear to the officer's uniform. Blades could be deluxe decorated with engraving, blue and pure gold decor, but less than 1% of those with finest blue and gilt blades survive today. The grip is silver but as yet completely unpolished to bright silver.
A Superb 17th to 18th Century, London, Ship or Fort Blunderbuss This blunderbuss is a true behemoth of a gun, not gentle or elegant [in fact with typical elements of 17th century crudity] but formidable, substantial and simply oozing power and presence. No man would fail to tremble at the sight of this gun's muzzle pointed his way. Made from around 1680 to 1710, it is probably the largest size of flintlock that a man could fire from the hip or shoulder without doing personal injury to the user. Any larger and it would have to have been mounted on a swivel and block. This gun has several distinctive features that determine it age. The lock has the early so-called 'banana' shape and the brass mounts are typically engraved with strawberry leaf influences typical of the late 17th century. The side plate is typical early pre military Land pattern type, in steel. Originally intended for military or maritime purposes, these arms can be traced to 1598, when Germany's Henrich Thielman applied for a patent for a shoulder arm designed for shipboard use to repel enemy boarders. The blunderbuss quickly became popular with the Dutch and English navies. England's growing maritime power seems to have fueled production of these short bell-barrel arms, which were useful during close-in engagements between warships by enabling marines clinging to ship's rigging to use them against the gun crews of opposing vessels. The barrels were of steel or brass and the furniture of the blunderbuss were typically made from brass, with stocks most commonly made from walnut. Other, less robust woods were sometimes used, but their tendency to shatter ensured that walnut would remain in widespread use as a stocking material. The blunderbuss played a role during the English Civil War of 1642-48, and these arms were widely used as a personal defense arm in England during the Commonwealth Period. The lack of an organized system of law enforcement at that time, coupled with the growing threat posed by highwaymen, placed the burden of protecting life and property in the hands of honest citizens. Although some blunderbusses bore the royal cipher of the Sovereign, they typically did not feature the Broad Arrow identifying government ownership or the markings of the Board of Ordnance. Several brass- and iron-barreled blunderbusses were captured from the forces of Lord Cornwallis upon the latter's surrender to the Continental Army at Yorktown, Virginia in the final land campaign of the American Revolution. This may well have been the very kind as used in that engagement. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. The stock on this gun, during the Georgian period, has been very slightly slimmed at the butt, possibly due to an armourer's field repair in it's working life, and surface wear to the finish. The specific history of this gun and it's makers are as follows; The Goves family also had a gunsmith who had a shop and traded in Ireland who died in 1767, and this specific gun was last recorded registered and used in Ireland, in County Tyrone, in 1843 and stamped on the gun twice accordingly. 32.5 inches long, 16.5 inch barrel
A Superb 1805 Second Pattern Baker Rifle Rifleman's Sword This sword is a jolly nice example of probably the most sought after, collectable, and most famous, issued rifle-sword of the British Army, made by Osborn and Gunby, ordnance marked with crown numbered inspection stamp for front line regimental issue. During the Napoleonic Wars the Baker rifle was made as the British Army replacement for the Jaeger Rifle, that had been purchased for the 60th Rifles, and used by the army's rifle regiment until a British version could be tried, tested, approved and issued. It was deemed and reported to be highly effective at long range, due to its accuracy and dependability under battlefield conditions. However, In spite of its advantages, the rifle did not replace the standard British musket of the day, the venerable Brown Bess, but was instead issued exclusively to elite rifle regiments, manned by 'chosen men', the best shots in the army. These units were employed as an addition to the common practice of fielding skirmishers in advance of the main column, who were used to weaken and disrupt the waiting enemy lines (the British also had a light company in each battalion that was trained and employed as skirmishers but these were only issued with muskets). With the advantage of the greater range and accuracy provided by the Baker rifle, British skirmishers were able to defeat their French counterparts routinely and in turn disrupt the main French force by sniping non-commissioned and commissioned officers. The rifle was fitted with this detachable, brass hilted sword, that was carried [when not fitted on the rifle's muzzle], on the rifleman's belt by means of a frog mount. These sword's of the Baker were used by what were considered elite units, such as the battalions of the 60th Regiment (Royal American Rifles) that were deployed around the world, and the three battalions of the 95th Regiment that served under the Duke of Wellington between 1808 and 1814 in the Peninsular War and again in 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo. Today the nobly deserved legend of 'King George's rifles' lives on in the British Army, with all due pride and distinction, in 'The Rifles' battalions of today, a merging of what was the Rifle Brigade and King's Royal Rifles, known as the 'Green Jackets'. They are serving with honour and valour, just as they always have, all around the world, and at present, with their usual incredible fortitude, in Afghanistan. A rifleman's edged weapon is, and must always must be referred to as a sword, despite fitting to the rifle as would a bayonet. This tradition continues to this very day, however dimunitive the rifleman's edged weapon is today [by comparison to the Baker sword], and woe betide anyone who refers to it as the, 'b' word. The Rifles will always have a special respect with us, as our former gunsmith and dearest friend of 50 summers, served with the KRR. The late and much lamented, 'Rifleman' Dennis Ottrey, of former WW2 D.Day service. Picture in the gallery of Major General Coote Manningham one of the founders of the Rifles regiments
A Superb 18th Century Carved Horn Pistol Flask In beautiful condition. With brass head rivets and wooden insert base. In superb condition. Powder flasks and powder horns were made to hold the gunpowder or shot used in antique firearms. A powder horn is lightweight, spark-proof, and should be waterproof if made well. The early examples were made of horn or wood; later ones were of copper or brass.
A Superb 18th Century Solid Silver Hilted Slotted Hilt EIC Cavalry Sabre Lion's head pommel, spiral turned ebony grip, with silver triple wire binding and two silver rivets. Slotted hilt with fretted, open diamond form insert. Long curved blade with clipped back tip. In overall superb condition. A typical sword as used by officers serving under Wellington in his EIC Army campaign against Tippu Sultan, and the fourth Mysore War. Fourth Anglo-Mysore War After Horatio Nelson had defeated François-Paul Brueys D'Aigalliers at the Battle of the Nile in Egypt in 1798, three armies, one from Bombay, and two British (one of which included Arthur Wellesley), marched into Mysore in 1799 and besieged the capital Srirangapatna in the Fourth Mysore War. There were over 26,000 soldiers of the British East India Company comprising about 4000 Europeans and the rest Indians. A column was supplied by the Nizam of Hyderabad consisting of ten battalions and over 16,000 cavalry, and many soldiers were sent by the Marathas. Thus the soldiers in the British force numbered over 50,000 soldiers whereas Tipu Sultan had only about 30,000 soldiers. The British broke through the city walls, french Military advisers advised Tipu Sultan to escape from secret passages and live to fight another day but to their astonishment Tipu replied "One day of life as a Tiger is far better than thousand years of living as a Jackal". Tipu Sultan died defending his capital on 4 May. When the fallen Tipu was identified, Wellesley felt his pulse and confirmed that he was dead. Next to him, underneath his palankeen, was one of his most confidential servants, Rajah Cawn. Rajah was able to identify Tipu for the soldiers. Tipu was buried the next afternoon, near the remains of his father. In the midst of his burial, a great storm struck, with massive winds and rains. As Lieutenant Richard Bayly of the British 12th regiment wrote, "I have experienced hurricanes, typhoons, and gales of wind at sea, but never in the whole course of my existence had I seen anything comparable to this desolating visitation".
A Superb 19th Century Britannia Metal and Brass Mounted Pistol Flask A lovely flask, perfect for a set of cased pistols or a cased revolver etc. lacking a good flask. Excellent condition, with very good original gold lacquer finish to the brass. 4 inches long 2 inches across. Very small dent at the bottom on one side about 10mm x 5mm
A Superb 19th Century Malacca Sword Cane With A Wonderful Lacquer Patina One of the most subtly concealed sword canes we have seen in a long while. A completely plain looking cane with secreted button to released a very finely made scalloped blade. There is no obvious indication this is indeed a concealed weapon at all. A superb quality piece. The last one we had , that was, most unusually,exactly like it, was made for a British intelligence officer in the 1850's. Officer's travelling around the Empire and Europe would always need to bear a secreted, concealed arm, for obviously armed civilians would attract the wrong kind of attention, and a concealed weapon would be absolutely essential for protection. British intelligence and spying operations were created, by the universally agreed upon founder of espionage and the English secret service, Elizabeth I’s spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham. He faced a predicament shared by many of his successors; the need to combat both external and internal threats and the collaboration of the two. In the case of the Protestant Walsingham and his Protestant Queen, the unifying factor among their enemies was devotion to Catholicism. Walsingham battled this menace by recruiting agents at home and abroad and waging an aggressive campaign of counter-subversion. The Spanish recalling the ill-fated Armada and the depredations of Sir Francis Drake, speak of Perfida Albion, the Italians of Perfida Albione, and the Germans of Perfides Albion. In any language, it boils down to the same thing: the English displayed a special knack for professional underhanded behaviour and more that they were damned good at it. The notion that England possessed a special talent for deceit and underhandedness may be valid or not, but it has proved an effective and enduring one. After all, though the Empire is gone, the most famous intelligence officer in the world, James Bond, remains steadfastly British. The long list of historical figures who often stand accused by some of being Albion’s tools (whether they knew it or not) includes Christopher Marlowe, Benjamin Franklin, Karl Marx and Leon Trotsky, and those that definitely were, include Aleister Crowley, Harry Houdini, Benito Mussolini, Gracie Fields and Noel Coward. In the 19th century British Intelligence officers were more often than not based in the Empire in India, combating the so called 'Great Game' against the Czar's agents, and in Europe against the Kaiser's. It was for that purpose our last cane of this type was commissioned for an officer of the intelligence service and it is too similar in our opinion not to be connected in some way.
A Superb 19th Century Meiji Period Carved Whale Bone Handled Walking Stick A wonderful Japanese walking stich with a handle of a carved figure of Fukurokuju, one of the Japanese seven deities, the tall headed god of happiness, wealth and long life one of the Shichi-fuku-jin (“Seven Gods of Luck”), particularly associated with longevity. He is supposed to have once lived on earth as a Chinese Taoist sage. He is often depicted as an old man with a white beard, wearing a scholar’s headdress and sometimes accompanied by a stag. He carries a large stick to which is attached a scroll containing the world’s wisdom. The seven are drawn from various sources but have been grouped together from at least the 16th century. They are Bishamon, Daikoku, Ebisu, Fukurokuju, Jurojin, Hotei, and the only female in the group, Benten. The carving is beautifully executed and the figure has an most charming jolly smile. The collar is silver coloured metal and the shaft is finest mallacca wood terminated with a turned horn tip. Excellent condition overall
A Superb 19th Century Wild West Cased Remington Smoot Revolver 1870's Beautiful mahogany case with a wonderous patina, internally set with sectional divisions, and contains a small old labeled Remington cartridge box. Remington-Smoot New Model No. 1 Revolver Serial Numbered 1###. .30 RF Calibre 2¾" Barrel. The revolver retains about 95% of the original nickel finish with excellent hard rubber grips and tight action. Cased American Wild West era pistols are both hugely desireable and iconic of a era long past. Remington was, and is, one of the greatest and most famous names in the world of American guns. Remington was founded in 1816. Eliphalet Remington II believed he could build a better gun than he could buy. Farming communities in the region were famous for their diverse skills and self-sufficiency, and the winter seasons were used for crafts that provided goods for self-use and also for sale. Eliphalet's father was a blacksmith, and wanted to expand his business into rifle barrel production. Local residents often built their own rifles to save on costs, but purchased the barrel. Eliphalet's father sent him to a well-known barrel maker in a major city to purchase a barrel, with the mission of observing the barrel-making technique. At the time, the method was to heat and wrap long flat bars of iron around a metal rod of the caliber desired. By heating and hammering the coiled bars around the central rod, the barrel metal became fused into a solid cylinder, at which point the rod was pressed out. After the young man returned home, his family added a successful barrel making operation to his father's forge, in Ilion Gorge, New York. He began designing and building a flintlock rifle for himself. In the fall of that year, he entered a shooting match; though he only finished second, his well-made gun impressed other shooters. Before Eliphalet left the field that day, he had received so many orders from other competitors that he was now officially in the gunsmithing business. By 1828, the operation moved to nearby Ilion, New York, at the same site which is used by the modern Remington firearms plant. In 1865, Remington incorporated into a stock company, and in 1873 began a new venture, producing Remington brand typewriters. Remington sold the typewriter business in 1886. The typewriter company eventually became Remington Rand, and the firearms business became Remington Arms Company. In 1888, Remington was purchased by Marcus Hartley and Partners, a major sporting goods chain who also owned the Union Metallic Cartridge Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The Bridgeport site became the home of Remington's ammunition plant. Only a few thousand of these were made. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb 19th Century, 'City Of London' Sword With Ivory Grip & Royal Crown With gilt and silvered hilt, bearing the ancient crest of the City of London, and the Royal Crown pommel. The blade is fully etched, though rather dark patinated. Maker marked from Chancery Lane. The form of sword as was worn by the former Lord Mayor's of London in the 19th century. A sword very rarely seen today, and what an absolute beauty.
A Superb and Beautiful King George IVth Sword of Major General David Walker An officer of much combat service and of considerable distinction. Before a General he was a young officer in the 60th Foot, then, on his majority, serving in the 20th Foot, the Royal Corsican Rangers, and then Lt Col. Of the 58th Foot. He served at the taking of Port au Prince, with distinction in the war with France, in the Expedition to Egypt in 1801 and the Siege of Alexandria, he further served in Italy, In Naples in Sicily, at Capri, Minorca and commanded at Scylla, in the Battle at Maida, and the Peninsular War on the coast. A beautiful combat quality sword for a British Major General, David Walker. A beautiful sabre. All gilt brass mounts and steel scabbard with etched 'pipe-back' blade in near mint condition with much of the original mirror bright polish. The Gothic hilt has a pierced design of a crossed General's baton and sabre within a crown wreath of oak leaves and acorns, the symbol of General's rank in the British armed forces. The grip is triple wire bound fish skin. Blackened steel combat scabbard with surface pitting. Major General Walker, David (17** - 1840) Ensign 20th Foot 1787, Lieutenant 20th Foot 1791, Captain-Lieutenant 20th Foot 1794, Captain 20th Foot 1795, Major 20th Foot 1800, Lieutenant Colonel Royal Corsican Rangers 1807, Lieutenant Colonel 58th Foot 1809, Brevet Colonel 1814, Major General 1821. Retired with stationary rank 1827. Early Service: Ireland 1787-1788, British North America 1789-1791, West Indies 1792-1795, Helder 1799, Minorca 1800 and Egypt 1801, Malta 1802-1804, Sicily 1805-1811 and Maida 1806. Peninsular War: on East Coast of Spain 1812-1814 and a brigade at Castalla 1813. He temporarily commanded the 15th Brigade in France 1815. 15th British Brigade: Formed 7 September and commanded, temporarily, by Brevet Colonel David Walker, 58th Foot. In July 1805, the Royal Corsican Rangers took part in a British expedition to Sicily and Naples. On 4 July 1806, three companies of the regiment took part in the Battle of Maida, which ended with a British victory. From the end of 1806 to 1808, the Rangers were stationed on Capri, where Hudson Lowe was appointed commander of the garrison. In 1808, French and Neapolitan forces under Joachim Murat, the King of Naples imposed by the French, attacked the island and conquered it after a severe fight. Some of the Rangers deserted rather than fight Corsicans in French service, but others distinguished themselves. Lowe was forced to capitulate, but his forces were allowed to depart with full military honours. The next year, the regiment took part in an expedition to the Ionian Islands under General Sir John Stuart. By this time, the regiment was commanded by its former second in command, Lieutenant Colonel John McCombe. On 30 September, 600 troops from the regiment, led by Colonel Lowe (who was appointed second in command to Major General John Oswald, the commander of the division), captured Zakynthos from its outnumbered French garrison without fighting. Detachments participated in the capture of other islands of Kefalonia, Ithaca and Kythira. Our researcher has spent considerable time researching the history of the most fascinating early 19th century British General officer who commissioned this sword to be made.
A Superb Antique Barong. An Indonesian Warriors Short Sword. Leaf shaped watered blade, showing superb tempered grain and structure. The hilt has a “cockatoo beak” (kakatua) handle. Silver band with mother of pearl decoration. Rattan bound scabbard with mother of pearl bottom mount.During it's life some of the rattan has been lost and the bottom mount reaffixed.
A Superb Antique Keris With Singularly Beautiful Blade of Meteorite Steel An old Bali keris or Kris with a superbly sculpted serpentine seven wave blade bearing pamor wos wutah. The old wrongko is the batun form in the South Bali style, it is made from an outstanding piece of timoho. The old bondolan hilt is from well patterned timoho wood and is fitted with an old wewer set with pastes. This keris displays impeccable blade quality in a scabbard of beautifully marked timoho wood and is an outstanding example of the Balinese keris. Pamor is the pattern of white lines appearing on the blade. Kris blades are forged by a technique known as pattern welding, one in which layers of different metals are pounded and fused together while red hot, folded or twisted, adding more different metals, pounded more and folded more until the desired number of layers are obtained. The rough blade is then shaped, filed and sometimes polished smooth before finally acid etched to bring out the contrasting colors of the low and high carbon metals. The traditional Indonesian weapon allegedly endowed with religious and mystical powers. With probably a traditional Meteorite laminated iron blade with hammered nickle for the contrasting pattern.
A Superb Boxer Rebellion Chinese Dao Short Sword, Ching Dynasty A very artistically designed but immensely effective and powerful sword whose origins go way back into the Ming Dynasty, and it's similar ancester [but a longer sword] known as the Huya Dao, the 'Tiger Tooth Sword'. A photo in the gallery shows a contemporary group of Boxers in Peking during the seige of the legations, and the Boxer in the fore front is carrying the very same kind of sword, with it's highly distinctive ring handle. The Boxer Rebellion, more properly called the Boxer Uprising, or the Righteous Harmony Society Movement was a violent anti-foreign, anti-Christian movement called the "Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists" in China, but known as the "Boxers" in English. The main 'Boxer' era occurred between 1898 and 1901. This fascinating era was fairly well described in the Hollywood movie classic ' 55 Days in Peking' Starring Charlton Heston and David Niven. The film gives a little background of Ching Dynasty's humiliating military defeats suffered during the Opium Wars, Sino-French War and Sino-Japanese war or the effect of the Taiping Rebellion in weakening the Ching [Qing] Dynasty. However, situations in which the various colonial powers exerted influence over China (a great source of outrage that drove many Chinese to violence) are alluded to in the scene in which Sir Arthur Robinson and Major Lewis visit the Empress after the assassination of the German minister. * Dowager Empress - "….the Boxer bandits will be dealt with, but the anger of the Chinese people cannot be quieted so easily. The Germans have seized Kiaochow, the Russians have seized Port Arthur, the French have obtained concessions in Yunnan, Kwan See and Kwantang. In all, 13 of the 18 provinces of China are under foreign control. Foreign warships occupy our harbours, foreign armies occupy our forts, foreign merchants administer our banks, foreign gods disturb the spirit of our ancestors. Is it surprising that our people are aroused?" * Sir Arthur Robinson - "Your Majesty if you permit me to observe, the violence of the Boxers will not redress the grievences of China" * Dowager Empress - "China is a prostrate cow, the powers are not content milking her, but must also butcher her." * Sir Arthur Robinson - "If China is a cow your majesty, she is indeed a marvelous animal. She gives meat as well as milk…." Pictures in the gallery of a watercolour of the Boxers [1900] and the combat in the siege. For information only not included. 33.5 inches long overall. Blade 20.75 inches
A Superb Case Hardened Steel Gun Lock Of a Greene Carbine 1856 Scarce British-Type Greene Carbine by Massachusetts Arms Company Case-hardened swivel breech action with Maynard tape primer system. Lock marked: [Queen's crown] /VR/Mass.Arms Co./U.S.A./1856. James Durell Greene was a prolific firearms inventor and determined to make his mark This carbine lock was manufactured by the Massachusetts Arms Company and exported to Great Britain after being inspected and stamped with the Queen's Crown by British inspectors in the USA. These were used by the British Cavalry in the Crimean War but re-exported to the USA after the Crimea War. These fine guns were deemed to be very accurate but the paper and linen cartridges of the time were criticised as being prone to swell in the damp and consequently the carbine did not find favour with the British Government. The carbine features an unusual "floating thimble" to obdurate the breech and an internal "pricker" that punctured the cartridge. It also featured Maynard Tape priming which was in the forefront of priming technology at the time and the mechanism for this is in perfect condition. The quality of workmanship is exceptional and it actions as crisply today as it did when it was made 158 years ago. An exceptional item in outstanding condition. Only 2000 were manufactured and a complete carbine would be around £3,000.
A Superb Case Hardened Steel Gun Lock Of a Greene Carbine 1856 Scarce British-Type Greene Carbine by Massachusetts Arms Company Case-hardened swivel breech action with Maynard tape primer system. Lock marked: [Queen's crown] /VR/Mass.Arms Co./U.S.A./1856. James Durell Greene was a prolific firearms inventor and determined to make his mark This carbine lock was manufactured by the Massachusetts Arms Company and exported to Great Britain after being inspected and stamped with the Queen's Crown by British inspectors in the USA. These were used by the British Cavalry in the Crimean War but re-exported to the USA after the Crimea War. These fine guns were deemed to be very accurate but the paper and linen cartridges of the time were criticised as being prone to swell in the damp and consequently the carbine did not find favour with the British Government. The carbine features an unusual "floating thimble" to obdurate the breech and an internal "pricker" that punctured the cartridge. It also featured Maynard Tape priming which was in the forefront of priming technology at the time and the mechanism for this is in perfect condition. The quality of workmanship is exceptional and it actions as crisply today as it did when it was made 158 years ago. An exceptional item in outstanding condition. Only 2000 were manufactured and a complete carbine would be around £3,000.
A Superb Double Barrel Wogdon Flintlock Of The Marquess Of Lothian Probably made for General William John Kerr, 5th Marquess of Lothian (1737 – 1815) who was a British soldier and peer, styled Lord Newbattle until 1767, Earl of Ancram from 1767 to 1775, and Colonel of the Scot's Greys from 1813 to 1815. One of two [or possibly three] pistols, made for the Earl by Robert Wogdon. Another pistol by Wogdon made for the earl, we were most fortunate to offer and sell just a few weeks ago, came from the same family, and bore the Earl's crest in an escutcheon, of the sun in splendour beneath an earl's crown [see photo in the gallery] but this pistol bears no escutcheon to display a crest. There were very few earl's that had the sun in splendour beneath their crown as their part crest. Robert Wogdon 1733-1813 is one of England's most noted makers. He is listed as being from Lincolnshire and working as a gun maker at Locksport St. Charring Cross, London, in 1764 and at Hay market 1774-1802. He later was active with John Barton at 19 Haymarket from 1795-1803. The pistol has a pair of left and right stepped lock plates with sliding safeties in the 1/2 cock position. The name "Wogdon" scroll engraved on each flintlock plate. The octagon barrels are wedge fastened. The vents are gold. The sights are a silver X blade front, and a "V" notch rear. The top flats shows the name "Wogdon of London" very finely engraved in script. The stock is of walnut with flat sided grips, as was much favoured in the period and matching the dueller we had, and it has a silver fore-end cap nailed in place with silver nails, the same as the silver escutcheon was on the other Wogdon pistol. Removal of the barrel shows a crown over "CP" London proof over "RW" over the crown over "V" London "View" mark on the underside of both barrels. The engraving is very fine throughout. All furniture is of iron and has a nice smooth brown patina with a pineapple finial to the trigger guard. The barrel is beautifully browned with a two gold touch holes. A very fine example of a classic English double barrel pistol as built by the very best maker. It was indeed a pistol made by the Robert Wogdon of London gunsmith company that killed the US Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton in 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey, by Aaron Burr. Usually the goal of the honourable duel was often not so much to kill the opponent as to restore one’s honour by demonstrating a willingness to risk one’s life for it. Even though it was illegal after the 17th century, one was rarely prosecuted. Robert Wogdon of London – was by far the most synonymous manufacturer of finest duelling pistols, Such was Wodgon’s fame as a maker of fine pistols that an anonymous Irish Volunteer penned a ‘Stanzas On Duelling’ inscribed to Wogdon the celebrated Pistol-maker (1782) which reads in part: ‘Hail Wogdon! Patron of that leaden death Which waits alike the bully and the brave; As well might art recall departed breath, As any artifice your victims save…………… Duelling has its origins in ancient history. Trial by Battle, introduced at the Norman Conquest, was a forerunner of this method of settling disputes or matters of honour by fighting with appropriate weapons. Death to one of the participants was the usual result although a fatal outcome was not always inevitable. In Prussian duels a wound to the face was sufficient to discharge the cause of the duel. Throughout much of history the small sword was the favoured weapon but in the eighteenth century the use of pistols became more common. Even with such a deadly weapon, satisfaction could be obtained by “winging” the opponent, necessitating the presence of a doctor at the duel as well as the supporters of both duellists. In most societies up to the seventeenth century, the winner of a fatal duel was not tried for murder but in 1679, a royal proclamation denied pardon to anyone who killed another in a duel. By 1820, guidance to justices of the peace stated that in the case of a sudden falling out between two people who agree to each fetch a weapon and fight there and then, should one be killed, the other would not be charged with murder. However, should there be deliberation and they then fought later that day, or perhaps the next day, it would be murder. Then the seconds, or supporters, of the killer would also be guilty of murder and the seconds of the slain man would be guilty as accessories. In the 18th century every officer and gentleman of status sought to own fine English duelling pistols, and if it could be afforded, a matching double barrel pistol would be a much desired additional weapon to use in combat. Affording the officer as it does, twice the firepower of one's opponant. Because of their status, quality, and desireability, a finest English double barrel pistol was often the weapon of choice, for several generations of the English royal family, to gift for presentation to officers and nobles in the favour of the King, or the Prince of Wales. King George IIIrd was noted for doing so, as was his son the Prince Of Wales, [later King George IVth ] right up to Queen Victoria's son, Edward, Prince of Wales, in the 19th century. The Earls of Lothian were advanced to the rank of Marquess at the beginning of the 18th Century. At the beginning of the 17th century King James of Scotland was also made King of England in the Union of the Crowns in 1603, after Queen Elizabeth I of England died without heir. A century later in 1707 the Treaty of Union was declared officially uniting England and Scotland. This was supported by the Kerrs. Lord Mark Kerr son of the Chief Marquess of Lothian, was a distinguished professional soldier and is reputed to have had a high sense of personal honour and a quick temper. He fought several duels throughout his military career but rose ultimately to the rank of general, and was appointed governor of Edinburgh Castle in 1745. During the Jacobite Uprisings Clan Kerr supported the British government. At the Battle of Culloden in 1746 Lord Mark Kerr’s younger brother, Lord Robert Kerr, who was captain of the grenadiers in Barrel’s regiment, received the first charging Cameron on the point of his Spontoon, but then a second cut him through the head to chin. He has the dubious distinction of being the only person of high rank killed on the Government side. The eldest of the brothers, Lord Mark Kerr, later the fourth Marquess of Lothian, commanded three squadrons of Government cavalry at the Battle of Culloden and survived to serve under the Duke of Cumberland in France in 1758. In 2012 a most similar double barrel Wogdon flintlock pistol, made for a British General, sold in auction in the USA for 20,000 USD. 26cm barrels, 37cm long overall. There is a very small piece of stock lacking on the inside rear of the lockplate edge, but this is easily repairable. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb English 1850's Transitional Revolver With Original Blue 6 shot .36 cal. Probably by Robert Adams. Some of the most ground breaking work in the early design and manufacture of revolvers was undertaken in England long before the world famous American revolver makers, such as Colt and Remington, became famous for their fine pistols. This most attractive piece is fully, and most finely engraved, on the frame and grip, with a highly detailed micro chequered walnut butt. Circa 1850. A classic example of one of the earliest English cylinder revolvers that was favoured by gentleman wishing to arm themselves with the latest technology and improvement ever designed by English master gunsmiths. They were most popular with officers [that could afford them] in the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny. A picture in the gallery is of Robert Adams himself, loading his patent revolver for HRH Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's Consort. He was also manager for the London Armoury and he made many of the 19,000 pistols that were bought by the Confederate States for the Civil War. The US government also bought Adams revolvers from the London Armoury, at $18 each, which was $4.00 more than it was paying Colt for his, and $6.00 more than Remington.The action on this beautiful gun is perfect, very nice, and tight, but the trigger return spring is weak. In good blue finish with some original 'mirror' blue finish remaining. Revolving cylinder operates sporadically. As with all our antique guns they must be considered as inoperable with no license required and they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb English Civil War 'Mortuary Hilted' Sword for Cavalry Officer Straight slender and elegant blade, single-edged towards the tip, then double edged on the back return for 6 inches, cut with several slender fullers along the back-edge on each side, with small armourers marks of four equally spaced darts. A symmetrical steel basket hilt chiseled with foliage and a portrait busts of two bewigged figures most likely King Charles 1st., on the underside of the guard, drawn-up to form the knuckle-guard, fitted with vertical bar and two side bars with bifurcated scrolling bases front and back, each joined to the knuckle-guard by a pair of moulded bars, a pair of short domed langets, vestigial quillon, and chiseled pommel (later plain grip), In the Civil War, the opening of the battle usually involved groups of cavalry, with the officers carrying these very form of swords. The main objective was to make the opposing cavalry run away. When that happened, the victorious cavalry turned on the enemy infantry. Well-disciplined pike men, brave enough to hold their ground, could do tremendous damage to a cavalry charging straight at them. There are several examples of cavalry men having three or four horses killed under them in one battle. At the start of the war the king's nephew, Prince Rupert, was put in charge of the cavalry. Although Rupert was only twenty-three he already had a lot of experience fighting in the Dutch army. Prince Rupert introduced a new cavalry tactic that he had learnt fighting in Sweden. This involved charging full speed at the enemy. The horses were kept close together and just before impact the men fired their pistols, then arming themselves with their swords for the all too fearsome hand to hand combat During the early stages of the Civil War the parliamentary army was at a great disadvantage. Most of the soldiers had never used a sword or musket before. When faced with Prince Rupert's cavalry charging at full speed, they often turned and ran. One of the Roundhead officers who saw Prince Rupert's cavalry in action was a man called Oliver Cromwell. Although Cromwell had no military training, his experience as a large landowner gave him a good knowledge of horses. Cromwell became convinced that if he could produce a well-disciplined army he could defeat Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers. He knew that pike men, armed with sixteen-foot-long pikes, who stood their ground during a cavalry attack, could do a tremendous amount of damage. Oliver Cromwell also noticed that Prince Rupert's cavalry were not very well disciplined. After they charged the enemy they went in pursuit of individual targets. At the first major battle of the civil war at Edge hill, most of Prince Rupert's cavalrymen did not return to the battlefield until over an hour after the initial charge. By this time the horses were so tired they were unable to mount another attack against the Roundheads. Cromwell trained his cavalry to keep together after a charge. In this way his men could repeatedly charge the Cavaliers. Cromwell's new cavalry took part in its first major battle at Marston Moor in Yorkshire in July 1644. The king's soldiers were heavily defeated in the battle. Cromwell's soldiers became known as the Ironsides' because of the way they cut through the Cavaliers on the battlefield. The Mortuary hilted swords actually gained their unusual name some considerable time after the Civil War. For, as they bore representational portraits of King Charles Ist, it was believed in Victorian times that they were to symbolize the death of the King, however, as these swords were actually made from 1640, long before he was executed, it was an obviously erroneous naming, that curiously remains to this day. This example is a beautiful, fine and singularly handsome piece and would certainly be a fine addition to any collection of rare English swords. There are a few examples near identical to this sword in the Royal Collection and the Tower of London Collection. 82cm blade As the sword is black steel we have emphasized the design of the basket hilt using a red velvet insert within the guard, this is for display purposes only.
A Superb English George IVth Boxlock Derringer In excellent condition with stunning patina. With steel barrel and frame and slab sided walnut grips with box lock action. A very fine, sound and effective small personal protection pistol that was highly popular during the late Georgian to early Victorian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most treacherous place at night, and every gentleman, or indeed lady, would carry a pocket pistol for close quarter personal protection or deterrence. The early London Police force recruits 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [name after Sir Robert Peel their founder] were initially poorly selected. Of the first 2,800 new policemen, only 600 kept their jobs, and the first policeman, given the number 1, was sacked after only four hours service! Eventually, however, the impact upon crime, particularly organized crime led to an acceptance, and approval, of the Bobbies. Meanwhile, as they were so initially unpopular, and as the public of London had little or no confidence in them, armed personal protection was considered essential. However, as a sobering thought, in the regards to the justification of being permitted to carry arms for protection, in 1810 the total number of recorded murders throughout the entire UK, and at that time it included all Ireland, was 15 people, for the entire year!. Although the population was much smaller then, it is still barely a figure of 2% of today's current rate of around 650 murders per year [excluding Ireland]. Overall 16cm long, barrel 5cm. Excellent tight action. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb First Empire French General Officer's Silver Epee Dated 1815. From the end of Napoleon's First Empire & the Restoration Period. Superb silver casting, showing great detail and quality within the design. Lion masks set in the knuckle bow, and lion head profiles in the shell guard. The stand-of-arms panel within the guard contain's mortars, howitzers and standards, set with a crown upper centre. Chequered ebony grips. A very superior blade, armourer marked, stamped and dated 1815. The overall condition is superb with just small hairline cracks in the ebony. The rise of Napoleon troubled the other European powers as much as the earlier revolutionary regime had. Despite the formation of new coalitions against him, Napoleon’s forces continued to conquer much of Europe. The Peninsular War in Spain was a hard lost conflict , covering many years and dozens of battles against his nemesis, the Duke of Wellington. Eventually, the tide of war began to turn against Napoleon, after the disastrous French invasion of Russia in 1812, that caused Napoleon to lose much of his Grand Armee. The following year, during the War of the Sixth Coalition, Coalition forces defeated the French in the Battle of Leipzig. Following its victory at Leipzig, the Coalition vowed to press on to Paris and depose Napoleon. In the last week of February 1814, Prussian Field Marshal Blücher advanced on Paris. After multiple attacks, maneuvering, and reinforcements on both sides, Blücher won the Battle of Laon in early March 1814; this victory prevented the Allied army from being pushed north out of France. The Battle of Reims went to Napoleon, but this victory was followed by successive defeats from increasingly overwhelming odds. Coalition forces entered Paris after the Battle of Montmartre on 30 March 1814. On 6 April 1814, Napoleon abdicated his throne, leading to the accession of Louis XVIII and the first Bourbon Restoration a month later. The defeated Napoleon was exiled to the island of Elba, while the victorious British Prussian, Austrian and Russian Coalition sought to redraw the map of Europe at the Congress of Vienna. The Hundred Days, sometimes known as the Hundred Days of Napoleon or Napoleon's Hundred Days , marked the period between Emperor Napoleon I of France's return from exile on Elba to Paris on 20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815 (a period of 111 days later). This period saw the War of the Seventh Coalition, and includes the Waterloo Campaign and the Neapolitan War. The Battle of Waterloo was Napoleon's last great throw of the dice to retain his country as Emperor, but thanks to skillful tactics and a fair portion of good fortune, Wellington prevailed. The phrase les Cent Jours was first used by the prefect of Paris, Gaspard, comte de Chabrol, in his speech welcoming the King. Napoleon returned while the Congress of Vienna was sitting. On 13 March, seven days before Napoleon reached Paris, the powers at the Congress of Vienna declared him an outlaw, and on 25 March, five days after his arrival in Paris, Austria, Prussia, Russia and the United Kingdom, members of the Seventh Coalition, bound themselves to put 150,000 men each into the field to end his rule. This set the stage for the last conflict in the Napoleonic Wars, the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo, by Wellington assisted by Blucher, the restoration of the French monarchy for the second time and the permanent exile of Napoleon to the distant island of Saint Helena, where he died in May 1821.
A Superb Indo Persian 17th Century Firangi Sword The name ‘Firangi’ (Foreigner) was given to these swords in the 17th Century, as they were mounted with European (Foreign) blades, which were highly valued. Some blades were locally made in the European style. The blades were mounted on the ‘Khanda’ style hilt and with the long spike extending from the pommel which enabled them to be used as two handed swords. 29 inch blade to hilt, 35 inches overall
A Superb Medieval 13th Century 'Crusades' Iron 'Flanged' Battle Mace A rare example of mace, and it is known that just a few remaining examples of it's type are in existence. An offensive Battle Mace that would be an amazingly effective piece against Armour or shield. In almost spherical form with multi layered protruding flanges in hollow-cast iron. Affixed to a replacement haft. They were also carried as a symbol of power and rank, as it is so now, the Parliamentary Mace and the Queen's great Mace of State being just two examples. In the Crusades era this was, on occasion, also an ecclesiastic symbol [used by Bishops or even Popes], but more usually by Knights in noble combat. The last photo in the gallery is from a 13th century Manuscript that shows Kinghts in combat and one at the rear is using a stylised mace. The mace head is approximately the size of a tennis ball. Set on an old replacement wooden haft.
A Superb Pyrite Nodule, Millennia Old, In Superb Condition A fabulous display piece, incredibly old and resembling a cannon ball or meteorite. A signally interesting conversation piece. Iron Pyrites was made into jewellery by the classical Greeks, as it was by the Inca peoples. It can, like Specular Hematite, be ground and polished to make a highly reflective surface, a technique used in ancient Mexico, where natives used their expertise in stonecraft to create mirrors with one side completely flat, and the other strongly convex; this side was often also decorated with symbols to assist divination. American Indian Medicine Men frequently included Pyrites among their portfolio of treasures, and they were in regular currency as amulets. The ancient Chinese held them to have protective properties and even used them to ward off crocodiles. It is likely that their raditional earth symbol, a golden cube, was inspired by Pyrite. Even today, in some circles, the cube is deemed to represent the element of Earth, and employed as a means of "grounding" or "centring" magical or spiritual energy - in the form of an altar, for example. Pyrites have been used as a source of sparks, hence fire, since prehistoric times: the name itself is derived from the Greek word for fire. They were even employed instead of flint in early firearms. Pyrite nodules, when broken, reveal a solid sunburst of needle-like crystals radiating from the centre. Their shape and colour make them strongly symbolic of the Sun, and they can be employed as decorations to bring a sunlike warmth and brightness into the home. It weighs around 1.5 kilo, 8cm across.
A Superb Queen Anne, Early 18th Century Ivory Topped Walking Cane A wonderful carved ivory top with intermittent baleen inserts. With a small repair at the replaced brass ferrule.
A Superb Regimental Sword of the 20th Hussars, With Battle Honour Blade A fine regimental, bespoke Victorian officers cavalry hussars sword made for an officer of the 20th Hussars. used in Egypt, The Boer War in Africa, and in WWI, as part of the world renown and heroic 'Contemptible Little Army'. This sword was carried in service in the very first cavalry charge of WW1, and then, used in Turkey, during the nationalist uprising, when it was used in the last 'official' cavalry charge of the British Army under General Ironsides' command in 1920. The story of this sword and the regiment; North Africa in 1884, two officers and 43 other ranks volunteered to form part of the Light Camel Regiment raised for service in Egypt against the forces of the Mahdi in the Nile Campaign. In February 1885 two squadrons left Portsmouth to take part in the Suakin Expedition, landing at Suakin in March. Here they were occupied in patrol work and escorting convoys and fought a number of small actions as well as taking part in the battles of Hasheen on 20 March 1885 and Tofrek, two days later. One squadron distinguished itself by saving many of the baggage animals and their drivers, who had been stampeded and were in danger of being wiped out by Dervishes. The remainder of the regiment arrived at Aswan in August, 1885 and three squadrons were present at the Battle of Ginnis on 30 December in that year. During 1887 the 20th left Aswan and returned home in batches leaving in Egypt one squadron which, under Lieutenant Colonel Fraser, took part in the Battle of Gemaizah on 20 December 1888 where they made three charges against the Dervishes. In August, 1889 the same squadron went up the Nile and took part in the decisive Battle of Toski on 3 August, in which they carried out a charge and pursuit of the fleeing enemy. This squadron then left for home and arrived back in Aldershot in 1890. For their services in Egypt the regiment received the battle honour "Suakin 1885" and also that of "Vimiera" in respect of the earlier services of its predecessor, the old 20th Light Dragoons. [edit] The Boer WarThe 20th remained in England until 1896, being garrisoned successively at Woolwich, Norwich, Aldershot and Colchester, and then returned to India where they served uneventfully for the next six years, being stationed throughout this time at Mhow, until they were sent to South Africa to take part in the closing stages of the Boer War. Here they took part in Kitchener's operations against the Boer "commandos" of Transvaal and Orange Free State, participating in the fighting of the early months of 1902. The 20th was at Heilbron in the Orange Free State when peace was declared in May, 1902. Owing to their late arrival in the theatre of operations their casualties were light in the extreme; just eight other ranks lost. They crossed to France on 17 August 1914 with a strength of 24 officers and 519 rank and file to join the rest of the "contemptible little army". The 20th Hussars formed part of the British cavalry that covered the gap between the British Expeditionary Force and the French 5th Army. The regiment They arguably took part in the first cavalry action of the First World War, and became involved in actions that were typical of the role played by cavalry in the great war, the retreat from Mons, the battles of Marne and Aisne and the First battle of Ypres all saw the regiment involved and infantry fighting from the trenches in the Messines area. A battle at Bourlon Wood was complemented with 5 officers and 218 other ranks from the 20th and the regiment saw more dismounted action at Gouzeaucourt in 1917. Foot actions to stem the enemy advance followed the German Spring Offensive of 1918. A return to horses saw the regiment in support of infantry actions as the allied tide turned and the Germans started the return to Germany. A nationalist uprising in Turkey caused the allies to send troops to Constantinople, now Istanbul, and the 20th Hussars found themselves on the Izmit peninsula in 1920 as part of General Ironside's command. The regiment charged Turkish positions near the village of Gebze and successfully routed the enemy. Vimiera, Peninsula, Suakin 1885, South Africa 1901-02 The Great War: Mons, Retreat from Mons, Marne 1914, Aisne 1914, Messines 1914, Ypres 1914 1915, Neuve Chapelle, St. Julien, Bellewaarde, Arras 1917, Scarpe 1917, Cambrai 1917, 1918, Somme 1918, St. Quentin, Lys, Hazebrouck, Amiens, Albert 1918, Bapaume 1918, Hindenburg Line, St. Quentin Canal, Beaurevoir, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18
A Superb Slotted Hilt Hangar Sword 1770 Silver Tape Bound Horn Grip Very elaborate and unusual pieced slotting with two rows of demi lune crescents in cut steel. A sword used from the Revolution to the early 1800's by British officer's in the Infantry. This sword is most similar to a sword used by an officer under Cornwallis's command. General Lord Cornwallis' who surrendered the British forces to General Washington at Yorktown in 1781. Cornwallis refused to surrender personally, so sent his second-in-command, General Charles O'Hara, who carried Cornwallis' sword to the American and French commanders. Washington's second in command, General Lincoln [as a matter or protocol], accepted the surrender on Washington's behalf. Battle of and Surrender at Yorktown, [the latter taking place on October 19, 1781], was a decisive victory by a combined force of American Continental Army troops led by General George Washington and French Army troops led by the Comte de Rochambeau over a British Army commanded by British lord and Lieutenant General Lord Cornwallis. The culmination of the Yorktown campaign, the siege proved to be the last major land battle of the American Revolutionary War, as the surrender by Cornwallis, and the capture of both him and his army, prompted the British government to negotiate an end to the conflict. In 1780, 5,500 French soldiers landed in Rhode Island to assist their American allies in operations against British-controlled New York City. Following the arrival of dispatches from France that included the possibility of support from the French West Indies fleet of the Comte de Grasse, Washington and Rochambeau decided to ask de Grasse for assistance either in besieging New York, or in military operations against a British army operating in Virginia. On the advice of Rochambeau, de Grasse informed them of his intent to sail to the Chesapeake Bay, where Cornwallis had taken command of the army. Cornwallis, at first given confusing orders by his superior officer, Henry Clinton, was eventually ordered to make a defensible deep-water port, which he began to do at Yorktown, Virginia. Cornwallis' movements in Virginia were shadowed by a Continental Army force led by the Marquis de Lafayette. The French and American armies united north of New York City during the summer of 1781. When word of de Grasse's decision arrived, the combined armies began moving south toward Virginia, engaging in tactics of deception to lead the British to believe a siege of New York was planned. De Grasse sailed from the West Indies and arrived at the Chesapeake Bay at the end of August, bringing additional troops and providing a naval blockade of Yorktown. He was transporting 500,000 silver pesos collected from the citizens of Havana, Cuba, to fund supplies for the siege and payroll for the Continental Army. While in Santo Domingo, de Grasse met with Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis, an agent of Carlos III of Spain. De Grasse had planned to leave several of his warships in Santo Domingo. Saavedra promised the assistance of the Spanish navy to protect the French merchant fleet, enabling de Grasse to sail north with all of his warships. In the beginning of September, he defeated a British fleet led by Sir Thomas Graves that came to relieve Cornwallis at the Battle of the Chesapeake. As a result of this victory, de Grasse blocked any escape by sea for Cornwallis. By late September Washington and Rochambeau arrived, and the army and naval forces completely surrounded Cornwallis. After initial preparations, the Americans and French built their first parallel and began the bombardment. With the British defence weakened, Washington on October 14, 1781 sent two columns to attack the last major remaining British outer defences. A French column took redoubt 9 and an American column redoubt 10. With these defences taken, the allies were able to finish their second parallel. With the American artillery closer and more intense than ever, the British situation began to deteriorate rapidly and Cornwallis asked for capitulation terms on the 17th. After two days of negotiation, the surrender ceremony took place on the 19th; Lord Cornwallis, claiming to be ill, was absent from the ceremony. With the capture of over 7,000 British soldiers, negotiations between the United States and Great Britain began, resulting in the Treaty of Paris in 1783.
A Superb Solid Silver Hilted American War Of Independence Era Sword Made by one of the great 18th century London silversmiths, in 1782. London was the premier centre for silver in Europe and some of it's finest makers made swords the great and the good of all nations, especially America. This whole sword is made entirely in the manner of one of the greatest British Georgian architects and designers, Robert Adam. With it's typical, gracious, 'Adam' urn pommel, single knucklebow, oval guard, engraved with Adam's swags and tails, and multi wire bound grip, also in solid silver. The entire hilt is detail engraved throughout. The trefoil blade is similarly delightfully elegant yet plain. A fabulous sword of immense beauty and quality in superb overall condition. In 1754 The young student Robert Adam left for Rome, spending nearly five years on the continent studying architecture under Charles-Louis Clérisseau and Giovanni Battista Piranesi. On his return to Britain he established a practice in London, where he was joined by his younger brother James. Here he developed the "Adam Style", and his theory of "movement" in architecture, based on his studies of antiquity and became one of the most successful and fashionable architects in the country. Adam held the post of Architect of the King's Works from 1761 to 1769. His Adam style influenced everything from great building works to furniture silver and jewellery. He created one of the great neo classical styles that was the personification of timeless elegance. At home as much in the 18th century as it is today. A painting in the gallery of Admiral Sir Thomas Graves with his identical 'Adam style' solid silver sword
A Superb Turkish Ottoman Flintlock Pistol A beautiful long barreled horse pistol with fine brass mounts, and a stunning butt cap intricately inlaid with fine silver in superb detail of scrolls and figurative designs. Used from the 18th century, in the Caucasus, and throughout the Ottoman Empire, this fine pistol would have been a highly prized piece, carried on horseback, either in a saddle holster or pushed through the sash belt. The silver inlay reflects the styles and is distinctly inspired by the great English gunsmiths who pioneered such fine silver work in the 18th century, such as Richard Wilson of London. The stock is made from the finest hand carved Turkish walnut [even today Turkey is still the source of the finest walnut for bespoke gunstocks]. This is a very impressive Turkish pistol, and of imposing size. The "golden age" of the Ottoman Empire was during the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent in the 16th Century. In different fields, this can be seen both in the architecture of Koca Mimar Sinan Aga, and in the domination of the Mediterranean by the Ottoman navy, led by Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha. The Ottoman Empire reached its territorial peak in the 17th century. From a diverse system of Millets, to a multi-ethnic state (Ottomanism), it developed its own distinctive culture, influential both in the European and Islamic worlds.With Istanbul (or Constantinople) as its capital, the Ottoman Empire was in some respects an Islamic successor to earlier Mediterranean empires — the Roman and Byzantine empires. The Empire was the only Islamic power to seriously challenge the rising power of Western Europe between the 15th and 19th centuries. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb Victorian 17th Lancers Duke of Cambridge's Own Chapka Plate Other ranks issue. A Chapska plate showing a Royal Coat of Arms on a rayed backing. The Royal Coat of Arms sit above a skull and cross bones devise with the motto Or Glory below, on either side are battle honours for Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman, Sevastopol, Central india and South Africa 1879. Below this is a ribbon with Seventeenth Lancers. Two screw posts to the rear. In December 1857 the 17th arrived in India to reinforce the effort to suppress the Indian rebellion against British rule. By the time the regiment was prepared for service, the rebellion was effectively over, though it did pursue Tantia Topi. During the course of the pursuit, Lieutenant Evelyn Wood earned the Victoria Cross for gallantry on two separate occasions. Tantia Topi was ultimately captured and hanged by the British. The 17th Lancers remained in India until 1863, when it returned to Britain. In India, the 17th became the 17th Regiment of Lancers. When, in 1876, it gained Prince George, Duke of Cambridge as its Colonel-in-Chief, the regiment adopted the title of the 17th (The Duke of Cambridge's Own) Lancers. The 17th was sent to Natal Colony for the Zulu War. On 4 July 1879, the 17th fought at the Battle of Ulundi under Sir Drury Curzon Drury-Lowe. The 17th was posted inside a large British infantry square during the attack by the Zulu Army, which had surrounded the British. When the attack appeared to be wavering, the 17th Lancers were ordered to advance. Their charge routed the warriors with heavy loss. The battle proved to be decisive. The 17th returned to India the same year, remaining there until about 1890 when they returned home. They missed the large pitched battles, but would still see substantial action during the war. In 1900, Sergeant Brian Lawrence won the regiment's fifth and final VC at Essenbosch Farm. The 17th's most significant action was at the Battle of Elands River (Modderfontein) in September 1901. C Squadron of the 17th was attacked by Boers under Jan Smuts whom they mistook for British troops. The Boers took advantage of a mist to encircle the British camp. When Smuts' vanguard ran head on into a Lancer patrol, the British hesitated to fire because many of the Boers wore captured British uniforms. The Boers immediately opened fire and attacked in front while Smuts led the remainder of his force to attack the British camp from the rear. The British party suffered further casualties at a closed gate that slowed them down. All six British officers sustained wounds and four were killed. Only Captain Sandeman, the commanding officer, and Lieutenant Lord Vivian survived. The 17th Lancers had suffered 29 killed and 41 wounded before surrendering, while Boer losses were one killed and six wounded. The 17th returned home in 1902 with the conclusion of the war. The regiment left for India in 1905, where it remained until the First World War. 7.5 inches wide measured straight across.
A Superb Zulu War Chief's Club Iwisa Very large head approx 3.8 inches across. Approx .65 kilo. A very large root ball club head in great colour, the size especially used in Zulu executions. Since the world record prices achieved by the sale of the David Smith Zulu War Collection in 2014 original Zulu war artifacts are now even more fashionable and desirable than ever, and this is a real beauty. A club or cudgel fashioned from dense hardwood known in Zulu as the iwisa, usually called the knobkerrie in English, for beating an enemy in the manner of a mace. During the 1879 Zulu War, two of most famous pair of engagements in the British army's history, during the last quarter of the 19th century, happened over two consecutive days. Curiously, it is fair to say that these two engagements, by the 24th Foot, against the mighty Zulu Impi, are iconic examples of how successful or unsuccessful leadership can result, in either the very best conclusion, or the very worst. And amazingly, within only one day of each other. The 1879 Zulu War, for the 24th Foot, will, for many, only mean two significant events, Isandlhwana and Rorke's Drift. This is the brief story of the 24th Foot in South Africa; In 1875 the 1st Battalion arrived in Southern Africa and subsequently saw service, along with the 2nd Battalion, in the 9th Xhosa War in 1878. In 1879 both battalions took part in the Zulu War, begun after a British invasion of Zululand, ruled by Cetshwayo. The 24th Foot took part in the crossing of the Buffalo River on 11 January, entering Zululand. The first engagement (and the most disastrous for the British) came at Isandhlwana. The British had pitched camp at Isandhlwana and not established any fortifications due to the sheer size of the force, the hard ground and a shortage of entrenching tools. The 24th Foot provided most of the British force and when the overall commander, Lord Chelmsford, split his forces on 22 January to search for the Zulus, the 1st Battalion (5 companies) and a company of the 2nd Battalion were left behind to guard the camp, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pulleine (CO of the 1/24th Foot). The Zulus, 22,000 strong, attacked the camp and their sheer numbers overwhelmed the British. As the officers paced their men far too far apart to face the coming onslaught. During the battle Lieutenant-Colonel Pulleine ordered Lieutenants Coghill and Melvill to save the Queen's Colour—the Regimental Colour was located at Helpmakaar with G Company. The two Lieutenants attempted to escape by crossing the Buffalo River where the Colour fell and was lost downstream, later being recovered. Both officers were killed. At this time the Victoria Cross (VC) was not awarded posthumously. This changed in the early 1900s when both Lieutenants were awarded posthumous Victoria Crosses for their bravery. The 2nd Battalion lost both its Colours at Isandhlwana though parts of the Colours—the crown, the pike and a colour case—were retrieved and trooped when the battalion was presented with new Colours in 1880.
A Superb, Cased, Gold Plated 7mm Pinfire Revolver of the US Civil War era Circa 1860's. A most beautiful fully engraved and gold plated single action revolver in a case. The fourth most popular gun of the American Civil War. Fine walnut case with oil bottle and original Lefrauchaux 7mm pinfire cartridge case. Lidded box and partitions for extras. Some surface wear to the plating. Spur cocking action. Only the best revolvers were ever gold plated, and they were more usually hand made and commissioned for presentation. Cased personal protector pistols, such as this high quality example, were very popular for presentation, and some have survived the war, and are presently in great gun collections, in America and Europe. They were frequently given to generals and senior officers [most usually by fellow comrade officers] in both the armies of the North and South. Case lacks shield escutcheon. •The Union army purchased around 13,000 model 1854 Lefaucheux pinfire revolvers from France and Belgium. •167 of the previously mentioned revolvers have their serial numbers recorded and were issued to Co. D, 2nd Kansas Calvary and Co. B, 9th Missouri Calvary. •3 American companies made pinfire cartridges for Civil War use; Christian Sharps & Co, C. D. Leet, and Allen & Wheelock. •The Union bought at least 200,000 pinfire cartridges from France. •Identified pictures exist showing Union soldiers wielding Lefaucheux pinfire revolvers from 5th Kansas Volunteer Calvary, Company E; 11th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry; 2nd Kansas Calvary, Company A; 1st NY Light Artillery, Battery D; and many other non-identified units. •Confederate Soldiers used Lefaucheux revolvers. •There were official Confederate purchases of the revolvers •Selma Arsenal reloaded pinfire cartridges and issued a pouch to collect the spent casings to some soldiers •Selma Arsenal at one point had some 80,000 pinfire cartridges on hand. As with all our antique guns no license is required and they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Superb, Original, 1756 Pattern British Royal Naval Sea Service Pistol One of the best original examples we have seen. From the Tower of London armoury, an original Royal Navy 1756 pattern short 'Sea Service' pistol, used from the American Revolutionary War, through to the entire French Revolutionary Wars, and the Napoleonic Wars, including the Glorious First of June, Battles of Copenhagen, Camperdown, The Nile, and Trafalgar, then in the War of 1812 in America, and the battles of St. Jerome Creek, of St. Leonard's Creek, & of Bladensburg. From the birth of the Royal Navy's dominance of the world's seas and oceans for around 200 years, this was the first Sea Service flintlock specifically designed for combat in our magnificent Man O'War, ships-of-the-line. This pistol has the much desired B.O. broad arrow mark still clearly present and all the fittings are exceptionally crisp and bright. Superb lock, stock, and barrel markings overall, and the original belt hook is still remaining and tightly affixed. It has it's original 12 inch barrel that was subsequently ordered by the ordnance [in the early 19th century] to be reduced to a more manageable 9 inches long, from it's original length of 12 inches was considered too unweidly in close combat situations. This shortening further confirms it's long and continued service in His Majesty's Navy, right through the entire Napoleonic Wars and until it's complete replacement, by the Navy Board, for an even shorter designed pistol in the early 1830's. The Glorious First of June of 1794 was the firstand largest fleet action of the naval conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the First French Republic during the French Revolutionary Wars. The British Channel Fleet under Admiral Lord Howe attempted to prevent the passage of a vital French grain convoy from the United States, which was protected by the French Atlantic Fleet, commanded by Rear-Admiral Villaret-Joyeuse. The two forces clashed in the Atlantic Ocean, some 400 nautical miles (741 km) west of the French island of Ushant on 1 June 1794.The Battle of Camperdown was a major naval action fought on 11 October 1797, between a Royal Navy fleet under Admiral Adam Duncan and a Dutch Navy fleet under Vice-Admiral Jan de Winter. The battle was the most significant action between British and Dutch forces during the French Revolutionary Wars and resulted in a complete victory for the British, who captured eleven Dutch ships without losing any of their own. The Battle of the Nile was a major naval battle fought between the British Royal Navy and the Navy of the French Republic at Aboukir Bay on the Mediterranean coast off Egypt from 1 to 3 August 1798. The battle was the climax of a naval campaign that had ranged across the Mediterranean during the previous three months, as a large French convoy sailed from Toulon to Alexandria carrying an expeditionary force under then General Napoleon Bonaparte. In the battle, the British forces, led by Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson (later Lord Nelson), defeated the French. The Battle of Copenhagen was an engagement which saw a British fleet under the command of Admiral Sir Hyde Parker fight and strategically defeat a Danish-Norwegian fleet anchored just off Copenhagen on 2 April 1801. Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson led the main attack. He famously is reputed to have disobeyed Sir Hyde Parker's order to withdraw by holding the telescope to his blind eye to look at the signals from Parker. But Parker's signals had given him permission to withdraw at his discretion, and Nelson declined. His action in proceeding resulted in the destruction of many of the Dano-Norwegian ships before a truce was agreed. Copenhagen is often considered to be Nelson's hardest-fought battle. The Battle of Trafalgar (21 October 1805) was a naval engagement fought by the Royal Navy against the combined fleets of the French and Spanish Navies, during the War of the Third Coalition (August–December 1805) of the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815). The battle was the most decisive naval victory of the war. Twenty-seven British ships of the line led by Admiral Lord Nelson aboard HMS Victory defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships of the line under French Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve off the southwest coast of Spain, just west of Cape Trafalgar. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships, without a single British vessel being lost.
A Superb, Original, Victorian Merriwether Pattern Fireman's Helmet. The desirable standard pattern of Fire Service helmet used by all British county and city Fire Services in the Victorian era and past WW1. In superb condition, with original chain curb strap, with just a few small surface dents. With all original liner. The first Roman fire brigade of which we have any substantial history was created by Marcus Licinius Crassus. Marcus Licinius Crassus was born into a wealthy Roman family around the year 115 BC, and acquired an enormous fortune through (in the words of Plutarch) "fire and rapine." One of his most lucrative schemes took advantage of the fact that Rome had no fire department. Crassus filled this void by creating his own brigade—500 men strong—which rushed to burning buildings at the first cry of alarm. Upon arriving at the scene, however, the fire fighters did nothing while their employer bargained over the price of their services with the distressed property owner. If Crassus could not negotiate a satisfactory price, his men simply let the structure burn to the ground, after which he offered to purchase it for a fraction of its value. Emperor Nero took the basic idea from Crassus and then built on it to form the Vigiles in AD 60 to combat fires using bucket brigades and pumps, as well as poles, hooks and even ballistae to tear down buildings in advance of the flames. The Vigiles patrolled the streets of Rome to watch for fires and served as a police force. The later brigades consisted of hundreds of men, all ready for action. When there was a fire, the men would line up to the nearest water source and pass buckets hand in hand to the fire. Rome suffered a number of serious fires, most notably the fire on 19 July AD 64 and eventually destroyed two thirds of Rome. In the UK, the Great Fire of London in 1666 set in motion changes which laid the foundations for organised firefighting in the future. In the wake of the Great Fire, the City Council established the first fire insurance company, "The Fire Office", in 1667, which employed small teams of Thames watermen as firefighters and provided them with uniforms and arm badges showing the company to which they belonged. However, the first organised municipal fire brigade in the world was established in Edinburgh, Scotland, when the Edinburgh Fire Engine Establishment was formed in 1824, led by James Braidwood. London followed in 1832 with the London Fire Engine Establishment.
A US Civil War and Wild West Era Starr Army 'Switchable' Revolver Self cocking Double Action variant. A stunning, big and powerful revolver of the Civil War and early Wild West. This is the amazing 'switchable' model that could be switched [by the use of a sliding lever on the back of the main trigger] from single to double action, utilizing the Starr twin trigger system, but this example also has the action that should be half cocked first. Alongside the Colt Army and Dragoon this was one of the biggest pistol of the Civil War, and it has amazing presence. The big Starr Army Revolver is the pistol that was chosen by the hero in Clint Eastwood's Academy Award winning movie 'The Unforgiven' [played by Clint Eastwood], and the pistol was in fact featured as the main promotional part of the film in the 'Unforgiven' poster, see picture of the Starr Revolver, in the poster, in our gallery [copyright Warner Bros]. A Starr revolver (Starr DA) is a double-action revolver which was used in the western theatre of the American Civil War until the U.S. Ordnance Department persuaded the Starr Arms Co. to create a single-action variant after discontinuation of the Colt. The company eventually complied, and the Union acquired 25,000 of the single-action revolvers for $12 each . However, the price paid by the government for the DA army revolver was $25
A Very Attractive 1860's Colt Navy Pocket 5 Shot 'Brevette' .35 Cal Blued steel barrel frame and service replacement cylinder, plated blackstrap and trigger guard. Marked Colt's Patent, and Colt's New York barrel address. A large bore Colt revolver made under licence. A licence that was originally issued by the Colt Manufacturing Co., but often abused by the licenced manufacturers during the 1860's. Manufactured around 1862, A large bore Colt pattern pocket revolver, that was a secondary military weapon, used as an effective backup by men of both sides in the Civil War. A super looking pistol, and the type and pattern of revolver well renown as a highly popular pistol used in the American Civil War by the Confederate States. Guns and revolvers such as this were acquired in great numbers by arms dealers [such as the London Arms Co., et al] to serve the unquenchable thirst the South had for arms, due to it's chronic lack of industrial arms works. However, the pocket Navy type were rarer than most, due to their pocket size but large calibre round. This composite revolver actions well for it's age, and the cylinder has two small cracks on one chamber, so sold as a most attractive piece of historical weaponry as opposed to a perfectly working revolver for an American black powder shooter. S.n. 12311. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Attractive Bamboo, King George IIIrd Blue & Gilt Bladed Sword Stick The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms. The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane.
A Very Attractive British Double Barrel Sporting Gun Of Carbine Length Double Damascus barrels with fully engraved steel mounts and finest walnut stock. Good tight actions. English Damascus barrel is prepared from three rods, twisted as described and put together as shown in the twisted riband, and is known technicallyas three-iron Damascus ; the silver-steel Damascus is similarly made, but of different metal piled in a different order.The rods having been twisted, and the required number welded together, they are sent to the iron-mill and rolled at a red heat into ribands, which have both edges bevelled the same way. There are usually two ribands required for each barrel, one riband or strip to form the breech-end, and another, slightly thinner, to form the fore, or muzzle, part of the barrel. Silver-steel Damascus Barrel. Upon receiving the ribands of twisted iron, the welder first proceeds to twist them into a spiral form. This is done upon a machine of simple construction, consisting simply of two iron bars, one fixed and the other loose ; in the latter there is a notch or slot to receive one end of the riband. When inserted, the bar is turned round by a winch-handle. The fixed bar prevents the riband from going round, so that it is bent and twisted over the movable rod like the pieces of leather round a whip-stock. The loose bar is removed, the spiral taken fromit, and the same process repeated with another riband. The ribands are usually twisted cold, but the breech-ends, if heavy, have to be brought to a red heat before it is possible to twist them, no cogs being used.When very heavy barrels are required, three ribands are used;one for the breech-end, one for the centre, and one for the muzzle-piece. The ends of the ribands, after being twisted into spirals, are drawn out taper and coiled round with the spiral until the extremity is lost, as shown in the representation of a coiled breech-piece of Damascus iron. The coiled riband is next heated, a steel mandrel inserted in the muzzle end, and the coil is welded by hammering. Three men are required one to hold and turn the coil upon the grooved anvil, and two to strike. The foreman, or the one who holds the coil, has also a small hammer with which he strikes the coil, to show the others in which place to strike. When taken from the fire the coil is first beaten upon an iron plate fixed in the floor, and the end opened upon a swage, or the pene of the anvil, to admit of the mandrel being inserted. When the muzzle or fore-coil has been heated, jumped up, and hammered until thoroughly welded, the breech-end or coil, usually about six inches long, is joined to it. The breech-coil is first welded in the same manner, and a piece is cut out of each coil; the two ribands are welded together and the two coils are joined into one, and form a barrel. The two coils being joined, and all the welds made perfect, the barrels are heated, and the surplus metal removed with a float; the barrels are then hammered until they are black or nearly cold, which finishes the process. This hammering greatly increases the density and tenacity of the metal, and the wear of the barrel depends in a great measure upon its being properly performed. When the barrels are for breech-loaders, the flats are formed on the undersides of the breech-ends. If an octagon barrel is required, it is forged in this form upon Portion of Gun-barrel Coil. A properly shaped anvil; in rifles the barrels are welded from thicker ribands and welded upon smaller mandrels. 24 inch barrels
A Very Attractive, Large, Victorian Cavalry Sabretach Plate In white metal and in fabulous condition. Fine quality detailing, and with three threaded bolt affixing stems [one with nut] to the rear. In the early 18th century, hussar cavalry became popular amongst the European powers, and a tarsoly was often a part of the accoutrements. The German name sabretache was adopted, tache meaning "pocket". It fulfilled the function of a pocket, which were absent from the tight fitting uniform of the hussar style. Part of the wartime function of the light cavalry was to deliver orders and dispatches; the sabertache was well suited to hold these. The large front flap was usually heavily embroidered with a royal cypher or regimental crest, and could be used as a firm surface for writing. By the 19th century, other types of cavalry, such as lancers, also wore them. In the British Army, sabretaches were first adopted at the end of the 18th century by light dragoon regiments, four of which acquired "hussar" status in 1805. They were still being worn in combat by British cavalry during the Crimean War; "undress" versions in plain black patent leather were used on active duty. The Prussian Guard Hussars wore theirs in the Franco-Prussian War. In most European armies, sabretaches were gradually abandoned for use in the field before the turn of the 20th century, but were retained by some regiments for ceremonial occasions. Approx 4 x 4 inches
A Very Beautiful 18th Century French Flintlock Circa 1740 With a very fine and fabulous looking tiger stripe maple wood stock, bearing a superb patina. Signed lock and all steel mounts. Long eared buttcap typical of the 1740's period flintlocks that saw service in the Anglo French Seven Years War in Europe and America. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Fine 16th Century Italian Field Armour Breast Plate Circa 1520 For field combat and with mountings for use in the tilt. A very fine and original piece of finest Italian armour. Medially ridged breast plate with moveable gusset and roped arm and neck-openings. With two alligned holes for resting a lance for the tilt. The plate also has a key slot for an addition of reinforcing plate also for the tilt or joust. Jousting is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen and using lances, often as part of a tournament. The primary aim is to strike the opponent with the lance while riding towards him at high speed, if possible breaking the lance on the opponent's shield or armour, or by unhorsing him. Jousting emerged in the High Middle Ages based on the military use of the lance by heavy cavalry. It transformed into a specialised sport during the Late Middle Ages, and remained popular with the nobility both in England and Germany throughout the whole of the 16th century (while in France, it was discontinued after the death of king Henry II in an accident in 1559). In England, jousting was the highlight of the Accession Day tilts of Elizabeth I and James I, and also was part of the festivities at the marriage of Charles I. The medieval joust took place on an open field. Indeed the term joust meant "a meeting" and referred to arranged combat in general, not just the jousting with lances. At some point in the 14th century, a cloth barrier was introduced as an option to separate the contestants. This barrier was presumably known as tilt in Middle English (a term with an original meaning of "a cloth covering"). It became a wooden barrier or fence in the 15th century, now known as "tilt barrier", and "tilt" came to be used as a term for the joust itself by ca. 1510. The purpose of the tilt barrier was to prevent collisions and to keep the combatants at an optimal angle for breaking the lance. This greatly facilitated the control of the horse and allowed the rider to concentrate on aiming the lance. The introduction of the barrier seems to have originated in the south, as it only became a standard feature of jousting in Germany in the 16th century, and was there called the Italian or "welsch" mode. Dedicated tilt-yards with such barriers were built in England from the time of Henry VIII. Specialized jousting armour was produced in the late 15th to 16th century. It was heavier than suits of plate armour intended for combat, and could weigh as much as 50 kg (100 lb), compared to some 25 kg (50 lb) for field armour; as it did not need to permit free movement of the wearer, the only limiting factor was the maximum weight that could be carried by a warhorse of the period
A Very Fine 1743 British Regimental Dragoon Pistol Of The 1st Dragoons With Memoirs of The Rebellion In 1745 and 1746 by The Chevalier De Johnstone, Aid de Camp to Lord George Murray General of the Rebel Army [IInd Edit]. This fabulous pistol is regimentally marked for the 1st and numbered 37. A fine historical pistol made by Vaughn for the regiment in 1743. It has it's original Crown GR Lock, with ordnance broad arrow mark . Excellent furniture and very fine crisp action, iron flared rammer. The early long dragoon pistol used by all the great and historical Dragoon regiments, and the heavy dragoons alone after 1756. The 1st or Royals are now part of the Blues And Royals, that survive today, of Her Majesty's personal mounted guard of the Household Cavalry. Used by the oldest cavalry regiment of the line, and part of the cavalry used at the Battle of Culloden. The cavalry commanded in the Jacobite rebellion by Hawley. Becoming lieutenant-general, he was second-in-command of the cavalry at Fontenoy, and on 20 December 1745 became commander-in-chief in Scotland. Less than a month later Hawley suffered a severe defeat at Falkirk at the hands of the Jacobite insurgents. This, however, did not cost him his command, for the Duke of Cumberland, who was soon afterwards sent north, was captain-general. Under Cumberland's orders Hawley led the cavalry in the campaign of Culloden, and at that battle his dragoons became infamous for their brutality to fugitive rebels, while he gained the nickname of Hangman Hawley. After the end of the "Forty-Five" he accompanied Cumberland to the Low Countries and led the allied cavalry at Lauffeld (Val). James Wolfe, his brigade-major, wrote of General Hawley in no flattering terms. "The troops dread his severity, hate the man and hold his military knowledge in contempt," he wrote. But, whether it be true or false that he was the natural son of George II, Hawley was always treated with the greatest favour by that king and by his son the Duke of Cumberland. It is more than likely his cavalry were the most effective in the army despite Hawley's command and likely learnt their great tenacity and skills under previous commanders such as Churchill. The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden decisively halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. Charles Stuart's Jacobite army consisted largely of Scottish Highlanders, as well as a number of Lowland Scots and a small detachment of Englishmen from the Manchester Regiment. The Jacobites were supported and supplied by the Kingdom of France from Irish and Scots units in the French service. A composite battalion of infantry ("Irish Picquets") comprising detachments from each of the regiments of the Irish Brigade plus one squadron of Irish cavalry in the French army served at the battle alongside the regiment of Royal Scots raised the previous year to support the Stuart claim. The British Government (Hanoverian loyalist) forces were English, along with a significant number of Scottish Lowlanders and Highlanders, a battalion of Ulstermen and some Hessians from Germany and Austrians. The battle on Culloden Moor was both quick and bloody, taking place within an hour. Following an unsuccessful Highland charge against the government lines, the Jacobites were routed and driven from the field. Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle, while government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded, although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300. The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet "Butcher". Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain.
A Very Fine 1796 Light Dragoon Sabre By Gill, & Monogrammed I. C. A British Battle of Waterloo & Peninsular War Period Dragoon Combat Sabre. Bearing the owners initials I.C.. A mighty swash buckling sabre from the era of the great Napoleonic Wars, The Peninsular War and Waterloo. With good traditional form blade, steel P hilt with ribbed grip. General signs of combat use and age wear, excellent blade with makers name, Gill and Warranted. Combat sword cuts to the edge. No scabbard. A traditional sabre of the British Cavalry Light Dragoons. An amazingly effective sword of good stout quality. British Light dragoons were first raised in the 18th century. Initially they formed part of a cavalry regiment (scouting, reconnaissance etc), but due to their successes in this role, (and also in charging and harassing the enemy), they soon acquired a reputation for courage and skill. Whole regiments dedicated to this role were soon raised; the 15th Light Dragoons 1759 were the first, followed by the 18th Light Dragoons and the 19th Light Dragoons. The 13th Light Dragoons were initially heavy dragoons known as Richard Munden’s Regiment of Dragoons 1715. By 1751 the regiment title was simplified to the 13th Regiment of Dragoons and by 1783 had been converted to the light role. In 1796 a new form of sabre was designed by a brave and serving officer, Le Marchant. Le Marchant commanded the cavalry squadron during the Flanders campaign against the French (1793-94). Taking notice of comments made to him by an Austrian Officer describing British Troopers swordplay as "reminiscent of a farmer chopping wood", he designed a new light cavalry sword to improve the British cavalryman's success. It was adopted by the Army in 1797 and was used for 20 years. Le Marchant was highly praised by many for his superb design and he further developed special training and exercise regimes. King George IIIrd was especially impressed and learnt them all by heart and encouraged their use throughout the cavalry corps. For a reward Le Marchant was promoted to Lt Colonel and given command of the 7th Light Dragoons. He soon realized that the course for educating the officers in his own regiment would spread no further in the Army without suitably trained instructors. His vision was to educate officers at a central military college and train them in the art of warfare. Despite many objections and prejudices by existing powerful members of the establishment, he gained the support of the Duke of York in establishing the Royal Military College, later to become the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and the Army Staff College. In 1804 Le Marchant received the personal thanks of King George who said "The country is greatly indebted to you." In 1811, when nearing completion of this task, he was removed from his post as Lieutenant Governor of the College by Lord Wellington to command the heavy cavalry in the Peninsula. Appointed as Major General, he arrived in Lisbon fifteen days after leaving Portsmouth. On 22nd July 1812, Lord Wellington and the Allied Army of 48,500 men and 60 cannon were situated at Salamanca, Spain, against the French Commander Marshal Marmont. Wellington had ordered his baggage trains westwards to provide a covering force in the event of a full scale retreat, however Marmont mistakenly took the movement to be the retreat of the Army itself and ordered eight divisions of Infantry and a cavalry division westwards in an attempt to outflank the retreat. Wellington on seeing the enemy's army now spread out over four miles and therefore losing it's positional advantage, ordered the full attack. Le Marchant, at the head of one thousand British cavalry rode at a gallop towards the surprised French infantrymen, who had no time to form squares, and reduced their numbers greatly. The Heavy Brigade had received thorough training under Le Marchant and on reforming their lines charged repeatedly, until five battalions of the French left wing had been destroyed. After twenty minutes, in the final charge, Le Marchant fell from his horse having received a fatal musket shot and General Packenham who watched the attack later remarked " the fellow died sabre in hand...giving the most princely example". Two days later, he was buried, in his military cloak, near an olive grove where he had fallen. Aged forty-six John Le Marchant was buried on the field of battle, however, a monument to him was erected in St Paul's Cathedral, London. The survival today of this sword is a testament to the now little known British hero, who, in many ways transformed the way that cavalry sword combat, and many military tactics were conducted for many decades after his valorous death. His fearsome sabre was, it is said, so feared by the French that protests were submitted to the British government stating that it was simply too gruesome for use in civilized warfare. Photo in the gallery of a Peninsular period 7th Light Dragoon [later known as Hussars] wearing his 'Le Marchant' designed Sabre identical to this example. We are at present doing research on the initials to try to find it's possible owner during the Napoleonic Wars.
A Very Fine 1830's William IVth Royal Naval Midshipman's Sword Midshipman's swords are very scarce indeed as, in our experience, as over 99% of all midshipman weaponry that survives from the 19th century are much smaller naval dirks. A sword used in the days when 100 gunner warships-of-the-line still sailed the seven seas, masters of all the oceans and respected by all navy's around the world. This little beauty has nearly all the original fire gilt still remaining to the hilt. It has a deluxe etched pipe back blade with royal crown and naval anchor and script banners stating Warranted London Made. A most elegant and charming light, small grade sword, ideal for the young Royal Navy midshipmen that fought in combat, alongside his bother officers and crew, from as young 11 years old. With a fully etched pipe-back blade, from long before the era of the Crimean War. In the 1790's midshipmen were as young as 9, in 1812 the age was increased to 13 but officer's son's could be two years younger. Once a boy reached 15 he became what was known as an 'Oldster' and officially rated. A picture in the gallery of a young Midshipman, Augustus Brine, 1782 by John Singleton Copley (1738-1815) 32 inches long overall, 27 inch long blade,.75 inch wide at the forte No scabbard. A midshipman is an officer cadet, or a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the Royal Navy, United States Navy, and many Commonwealth navies. Commonwealth countries which use the rank include Australia, New Zealand, South Africa. The rank was also used, prior to 1968, by the Royal Canadian Navy, but upon the creation of the Canadian Forces the rank of midshipman was replaced with the rank of naval cadet. In the 17th century, a midshipman was a rating for an experienced seaman, and the word derives from the area aboard a ship, amidships, either where the original rating worked on the ship, or where he was berthed. Beginning in the 18th century, a commissioned officer candidate was rated as a midshipman, and the seaman rating began to slowly die out. By the Napoleonic era (1793–1815), a midshipman was an apprentice officer who had previously served at least three years as a volunteer, officer's servant or able seaman, and was roughly equivalent to a present day petty officer in rank and responsibilities. After serving at least three years as a midshipman or master's mate, he was eligible to take the examination for lieutenant. Promotion to lieutenant was not automatic and many midshipmen took positions as master's mates for an increase in pay and responsibility aboard ship. Midshipmen in the United States Navy were trained and served similarly to midshipman in the Royal Navy, although unlike their counterparts in the Royal Navy, a midshipman was a warrant officer rank until 1912.
A Very Fine 18th Century Silver Inlaid and Niello Caucasian Cossack Pistol With a very fine Persian barrel, bearing two islamic script seal marks. The top and bottom of the stock are mounted with two niello silver straps covering the barrel tang and the trigger, and the sideplate is in matching niello. The body of the stock is profusely inlaid with silver. It has a miquelet action with a very tight and strong spring. Steel long eared butt and steel trigger. This is a truly wondrous piece and it's quality is most fine.
A Very Fine 19TH Century Miniature Butt Stock Pistol Powder Flask An absolute gem for serious pistol flask collectors. The butt stock type are very scarce and the smaller type like this are the most desirable of all. Small denting at the base and spout. Overall very nice indeed with fine patina. Highly sought for casing with rare Colts and fine British pistols. 5 inches long 2.25inches wide at widest.
A Very Fine Carved Horn Walking Cane With Gold Plated Ferrule Ebonized cane. Victorian to Edwardian period.
A Very Fine Ching Dynasty Chinese Silver Mounted Dragon Trousse A multi funtioning trousse of eating instruments. Mounted in silver over fine polished wood. Plain chopsticks, and silver mounted cutting knife. The Ching Dynasty [spelt Qing] also known as the Manchu Dynasty, was the last ruling dynasty of China from 1644 to 1911. This piece was from around the late 18th to mid 19th century. It is a thoroughly charming piece of super quality, and a fine example. For both general and travelling use. As travelling, was at that time of course, incalculably slower than is now taken for granted. The simplest of distances, say 10 miles, could take days, and of course the higher ranks, [i.e. Mandarins etc] had no restrictions for travel that the peasantry had. Some were not permitted to travel more than 1/2 mile from their birth for all their lives without an official pass from their master. All fitted together in it's case it is 12.5 inches long. The knife is 11.5 inches long . Silver coloured metal, not hallmarked English silver. 12.5 inches long overall.
A Very Fine Cut Steel 1780 King George IIIrd Short Sabre This is a simply beautiful and elegant sword in superb condition. The blade has the mystical talisman symbols of faced suns, crescent faced moons, and stars, combined with stands of arms. Cut steel scroll half basket guard with a ribbed carved horn grip, bound with twisted copper wire.
A Very Fine French 18th Century Officer's Pistol By Foulon Of Paris maker to the King, of Rue St,Honore. Barrel inlaid with gold maker's name and Paris address. Fine walnut stock in the Boutet style. Brass furniture.
A Very Fine Ivory Hilted Hunting Sword As Used By Senior Naval Officers in the 17th and 18th centuries. Spiral carved ivory hilt and, traditionally of the time, stained green. The mounts are solid hallmarked silver and the blade very finely engraved. An almost identical sword was once the property of the famous explorer of the seas Captain Cook, and another was once carried by General Wolfe of Quebec. The picture in the gallery is of those two officer's swords. Captain Cook's sword is in Glenbow Museum. Another painting is of Capt Cook's death.
A Very Fine Long Holster Pistol With Pierced Steel Furniture Fine Quality Superbly patinated walnut stock and fine mounts. Italianate style 18th century. This is exactly the type of pistol one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A sprauncy, long barrel pistol, with a large, pierced steel butt cap and complete with it's elongated extra long 'ears' [side straps] typical of the period of early gunmaking. It is finely embellished all over The action is fully operational and the spring is very strong. This is an original, honest and impressive antique pistol piece that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This Pistol may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. This pistol is essentially a Turko-Ottoman example of the highly attractive type that were efficient, effective, most sought after and much prized, and thus an essential part of the pirate's trade. They didn't conform to a regular pattern, varying in quality, but they all had the 'form follows function' ethos. A style of pistol that first surfaced around 1665, and saw the peak of it's popularity in Western Europe during the mid to third quarter of the 18th century. The design was overtaken, but only in much of Western Europe, by a simpler, plainer form of pistol design, but it continued to be very popular, no doubt due to it's extravagance and style, in middle and eastern Europe, especially around the Mediterranean, until the early 19th century. A good slender curvature, and a medium weight long pistol that suits a comfortable grip. It was written that after Queen Anne's War, which ended in 1713, it cast vast numbers of naval seamen into unemployment and caused a huge slump in wages. Around 40,000 men found themselves without work at the end of the war - roaming the streets of ports like Bristol, Portsmouth and New York. In wartime privateering provided the opportunity for a relative degree of freedom and a chance at wealth. The end of war meant the end of privateering too, and these unemployed ex-privateers only added to the huge labour surplus. Queen Anne's War had lasted 11 years and in 1713 many sailors must have known little else but warfare and the plundering of ships. It was commonly observed that on the cessation of war privateers turned pirate. The combination of thousands of men trained and experienced in the capture and plundering of ships suddenly finding themselves unemployed and having to compete harder and harder for less and less wages was explosive - for many piracy must have been one of the few alternatives to starvation. Euro-American pirate crews really formed one community, with a common set of customs shared across the various ships. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity thrived at sea over a hundred years before the French Revolution, and continued for many years after. The authorities were often shocked by their libertarian tendencies; the Dutch Governor of Mauritius met a pirate crew and commented: "Every man had as much say as the captain and each man carried his own weapons in his blanket". A 18th century pistol of Mediterranean origin, and is still working highly effectively, and was likely used right into the mid 19th century. It looks most attractive, it is completely original, an antique flintlock of days long gone past yet not forgotten. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Fine Mid 19th Century Silver Plated Shell Dish, Set on 3 Feet. In superb condition, probably made by Elkington and Co. Beautifully crafted and of sublime quality. 5 x 5 x1,5 inches
A Very Fine Turkish Ottoman Ivory Hilted Sword of Constantinople Fancy cast brass hilt with wire bound carved ivory grip, steel blade with highly decorative fancy etching including stands of arms and the Turkish Crescent and Star. The blade also has the maker or suppliers mark of Vahram Tagirian of Costantinople. The Germanic style of the sword hilt falls into place in the latter part of the Ottoman Empire with it's alliance with the Kaiser. Beginning in the 1880s, the Ottoman Empire entered into diplomatic relationships, and later military alliance, with Imperial Germany. The Turks wanted to modernize their ramshackle, obsolescent army and build up their navy. The Germans wanted, among other things, a rail link between themselves and the Levant, for strategic and economic reasons. The equipment of the Turkish Army became Germanized. In 1887, the Ottomans adopted the first of four models of Mauser repeating rifles (total number of variations was seven including carbines) to replace the British and American-made single shots previously used. During this period, regulation swords on the German style were adopted, and the kilij became a thing of the past except in irregular militia formations. The same pattern could be seen in the Ottomans' choice of artillery, saddlery and harness, ships, and even band instruments. German officers, such as Limon von Sanders, went to Istanbul to supervise the re-training of the Turkish officer corps. The effort was not entirely successful, due to cultural inertia, and personality clashes between the two peoples. When war between Turkey and Bulgaria broke out in 1911-12, the Ottoman forces took a terrible drubbing from the Russian-backed Bulgarians. During World War I, the Ottomans made the ill-advised decision to ally with Germany, and suffered the consequences of ending up on the losing side. By the early 1920's, the Ottoman Empire, the "Devlet Aliyeh" or Exalted Dynasty, was no more.
A Very Fine Victorian Long Service Good Conduct Medal Awarded to a Battery Quarter Master Sergeant in the Royal Field Artillery, the 1873 issue Medal.
A Very Fine Victorian Royal Naval Officer's Combat Sword With all it's original gilt remaining to the hilt and it's original scabbard leather. Plain, fighting weight combat blade, with proof stamp.In overall very nice condition and used from the period of the 1840's up to the 1900's. Used in the era when the Royal Navy still used the magnificent 100 gunner 'Man O' War' galleons, and the from before the start of when the great 'Iron Clads' were being produced for the new form of naval warfare. It was from this era that the world was to see the end of the great sailing ships that coursed the seven seas for the greatest navy the world has ever known. One picture in the gallery is a British Man O' War HMS Marlborough, and another the Bombardment, by the Royal Navy ship, HMS Bulldog, of Bomarsund, during the Crimean War. Traditional hilt with fine traditional detailing of a Royal Navy crowned fouled anchor, with shagreen wire bound grip, and copper gilt and leather mounted scabbard. Used in the incredible days of the Crimean War against Russia, and in the Baltic Sea, in Royal Naval service in the days of the beginning of the great steam driven Ships-of-the-Line. A Victorian officer used this sword for both dress and in combat on the new great warships, that at first glance appear to be ships of Trafalgar vintage, but were fitted with the first massive steam engines. This sword would have been used from then, and into the incredible very beginnings of the Ironclad Battleships. Iron reinforced and armoured ships that developed into the mighty Dreadnoughts of the 20th century that were the mainstay of the most powerful Navy that the world had ever seen. British Naval Officer's swords are traditionally the finest quality swords ever worn by any serving officer of the world's navies. It has an unusually straight blade, and it's gilt condition is so good that so it may well be serviceable for current naval use. The current Royal Naval service sword is the 1827 pattern /02 In overall excellent condition with just the fold down guard scabbard throat pin lacking.
A Very Fine, Victorian, British Ambassador's Court Sword & Bullion Knot A superb sword in fine order for age with it's original pure gold plated over solid silver woven wire bullion sword knot. Residence of Britain's ambassador to the US. Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens An ambassador is an official envoy, especially a highest ranking diplomat who represents a state and is usually accredited to another sovereign state, or to an international organization as the resident representative of their own government or sovereign or appointed for a special and often temporary diplomatic assignment. The word is also often used more liberally for persons who are known, without national appointment, to represent certain professions, activities and fields of endeavor. In its most common use, the term usually applies to the ranking government representative stationed in a foreign capital. The host country typically allows the ambassador control of specific territory called an embassy, whose territory, staff, and vehicles are generally afforded diplomatic immunity in the host country. The equivalent to an Ambassador exchanged among members of the Commonwealth of Nations are known as High Commissioners. The "ambassadors" of the Holy See are known as Papal or Apostolic Nuncios. As formally defined and recognized at the Congress of Vienna (1815), ambassadors were originally regarded as personal representatives of their country's chief executive rather than of the whole country, and their rank entitled them to meet personally with the head of state of the host country. Since 1945, all nations have been recognized as equals, and ambassadors or their equivalents are sent to all countries with which diplomatic relations are maintained. Before the development of modern communications, ambassadors were entrusted with extensive powers; they have since been reduced to spokespeople for their foreign offices.
A Very Fine. 19th Century Shaped Copper Powder Flask With good adjustable spout measure and tight spring.
A Very Good & Beautiful British 1796 Infantry Sword Named To The Officer Named to Lieutenant Edgecombe, with his regiment, the West Kent. This is a superb sword with an ancestral back sword blade from a Highland regimental sword of the 1750's, made by Drury. The gilt on this sword is very good indeed, and the blade is GR Drury stamped on both blade faces. One may assume it was carried by his father and/or grandfather in his military service in a Highland regiment. There may be a connection the 2nd son of the Earl of Edgecombe who served in the 1st Foot Guards [the Grenadier Guards] at Waterloo.
A Very Good 'Sleeper' Napoleonic Wars, Elite French Cuirassier's Sword The term 'sleeper' is an antique collector's term to signify an item that has remained untouched by restoration or polishing for decades or even hundreds of years. This sword, most likely a souvenir of the Peninsular and Waterloo campaign, has remained unpolished and unmolested for likely 150 years or more. The blade has the good Imperial French inspector's marks of Lobstein, Bick and Borson. Superb original leather grip and a very fine double fullered blade with much original polish. Renown throughout the world of historic sword collectors as probably the biggest and most impressive cavalry sword ever designed. Made in circa 1812-14 this would have seen service in the Elite Cuirassiers of Napoleon's great heavy cavalry regiments. The Cuirassiers Heavy Cavalry Regiments used the largest men in France, recruited to serve in the greatest and noblest cavalry France has ever had. They fought with distinction at their last great conflict at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, and most of the Cuirassiers swords in England very likely came from that field of conflict, after the battle, as trophies of war. Every warrior that has ever entered service for his country sought trophies. The Mycenae from a fallen Trojan, the Roman from a fallen Gaul, the GI from a fallen Japanese, the tradition stretches back thousands of years, and will continue as long as man serves his country in battle. In the 1st century AD the Roman Poet Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis [Juvenal] wrote; "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions". A truly magnificent Napoleonic sword in superb condition for it's age, with only old russeting to the scabbrd. The largest sword of it's kind that was ever made or used by the world's greatest cavalry regiments. The cuirassiers were the greatest of all France's cavalry, allowing only the strongest men of over 6 feet in height into it's ranks. The French Cuirassiers were at their very peak in 1815, and never again regained the wonder and glory that they truly deserved at that time. To face a regiment of, say, 600 charging steeds bearing down upon you mounted with armoured giants, brandishing the mightiest of swords that could pierce the strongest breast armour, much have been, quite simply, terrifying. The brass basket guard on this sword is first class, the grip is only shows light wear and superb colour and is fully original, the blade is double fullered and absolutely as crisp as one could hope for. Made in the early Napoleonic War period. A souvenir of Waterloo brought back after the battle. All Napoleon's heavy Cavalry Regiments fought at Waterloo, there were no reserve regiments, and all the Cuirassiers, without exception fought with their extraordinary resolve, bravery and determination. The Hundred Days started after Napoleon, separated from his wife and son, who had come under Austrian control, was cut off from the allowance guaranteed to him by the Treaty of Fontainebleau, and aware of rumours he was about to be banished to a remote island in the Atlantic Ocean, Napoleon escaped from Elba on 26 February 1815. He landed at Golfe-Juan on the French mainland, two days later. The French 5th Regiment was sent to intercept him and made contact just south of Grenoble on 7 March 1815. Napoleon approached the regiment alone, dismounted his horse and, when he was within gunshot range, shouted, "Here I am. Kill your Emperor, if you wish." The soldiers responded with, "Vive L'Empereur!" and marched with Napoleon to Paris; Louis XVIII fled. On 13 March, the powers at the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw and four days later Great Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, Austria and Prussia bound themselves to put 150,000 men into the field to end his rule. Napoleon arrived in Paris on 20 March and governed for a period now called the Hundred Days. By the start of June the armed forces available to him had reached 200,000 and he decided to go on the offensive to attempt to drive a wedge between the oncoming British and Prussian armies. The French Army of the North crossed the frontier into the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, in modern-day Belgium. Napoleon's forces fought the allies, led by Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. Wellington's army withstood repeated attacks by the French and drove them from the field while the Prussians arrived in force and broke through Napoleon's right flank. The French army left the battlefield in disorder, which allowed Coalition forces to enter France and restore Louis XVIII to the French throne. Off the port of Rochefort, Charente-Maritime, after consideration of an escape to the United States, Napoleon formally demanded political asylum from the British Captain Frederick Maitland on HMS Bellerophon on 15 July 1815. The last picture in the gallery is of the Cuirassiers charging a Scottish square at Waterloo. Just a basic few of the battles the cuirassiers were used were; in 1809: Eckmuhl, Ratisbonne, Essling, Wagram, Hollabrunn, and Znaim. 1812: Borodino and Moscow, Ostrowno, and Winkowo 1813: Reichenbach and Dresden, Leipzig and Hanau 1814: La Rothiere, Rosnay, Champaubert, Vauchamps, Athies, La Fere-Champenoise and Paris 1815: Quatre-Bras and Waterloo.
A Very Good 1790's Steel Hilted British Rifles Officer's Sword. All steel hilt, original deeply exaggerated curved flat sided blade, steel 'P' hilt with original wire bound leather grip. A beautifual sword in lovely condition for age. Prior to the 1803 pattern sword, the British Light Infantry regiment's officers of the 95th, 60th & 52nd etc. had the option to purchase and carry the standard 1796 Infantry sword, but many felt it's blade was to narrow, straight and ineffective. Another design was quickly created based on the highly popular 1796 Light Dragoon officers sword, but with a slightly shorter and more curved blade. Used by Officer's of the 95th and 60th Rifles, during the Iberian Peninsular War, the American War of 1812 and The Battle of Waterloo. This is the pattern of British Officer's sword carried by gentlemen who relished the idea of combat, but found the standard 1796 Infantry pattern sword too light for good combat. The light infantry regiments were made up of officers exactly of that mettle. The purpose of the rifles light infantry regiments was to work as skirmishers. The riflemen and officers were trained to work in open order and be able to think for themselves. They were to operate in pairs and make best use of natural cover from which to harass the enemy with accurately aimed shots as opposed to releasing a mass volley, which was the orthodoxy of the day. The riflemen of the 95th were dressed in distinctive dark green uniforms, as opposed to the bright red coats of the British Line Infantry regiments. This tradition lives on today in the regiment’s modern equivalent, The Royal Green Jackets. The standard British infantry and light infantry regiments fought in all campaigns during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing sea-service at the Battle of Copenhagen, engaging in most major battles during the Peninsular War in Spain, forming the rear-guard for the British armies retreat to Corunna, serving as an expeditionary force to America in the War of 1812, and holding their positions against tremendous odds at the Battle of Waterloo. .The sword was used, in combat, in some of the greatest and most formidable battles ever fought by the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars in Europe the Peninsular Campaign and Waterloo. This is a very attractive sword indeed and highly desirable, especially for devotees of the earliest era of the British Rifle Regiments, such as the 95th and the 60th. As a footnote, in Bernard Cornwall's books of 'Sharpe of the 95th', this is the Sabre Major Sharpe would have carried if he hadn't used the Heavy Cavalry Pattern Troopers Sword, given to him in the story in the first novel. Overall this battle cum dress sword is in very good order and quite stunning. Overall in very nice condition indeed. Overall length, some small wire losses to binding on grip.
A Very Good 1899 Pattern Cavalry Troopers Sword 5th Dragoon Guards A Great 'Siege of Ladysmith' Sword. Issued in 1899 with '99 date. Regimentally marked for C troop the 5th Dragoon Guards, sword number 6. A great example with it's natural, brown, aged patinated finish, superb bright steel blade, with very good markings and inspection stamps. Made by Enfield. Very good original scabbard with only minor denting. In rough outline the situation at the outbreak of the Second Boer War in South Africa was that there were very few British troops in that country—only two cavalry regiments, about a brigade of infantry with ancillary arms and services, and some Irregular auxiliary units, all in Natal, totalling about seven thousand fighting men, under the command of General Penn-Symonds. This handful of troops could not be reinforced by an expedition from England until mid-November at the earliest, but it was hoped to get the Indian Contingent—approximately equal in strength to Penn-Symonds' force—to Africa by mid-October. For the first two months of war, therefore, the Boers, who were thought to have a potential strength of from forty to fifty thousand, were in theory able to concentrate in superior force to the British: in fact, the lack of any effective system of organization and administration in the enemy's forces prevented them from undertaking, any large-scale strategic enterprise. Nevertheless, by the time the Indian Contingent had arrived and a small British Expedition under command of General Sir George White had reached Ladysmith to join hands with Penn-Symonds at Dundee, the Boers had been able to stage an invasion of Natal. Some forty thousand strong, the commandos crossed the border in two main columns the Transvaalers via Laing's Nek, the Orange Free Staters via Van Reenan's Pass. By mid-October the Boers had seized Talana Hill and were commanding Dundee. Attacking Talana on 10th October, Penn-Symonds had some initial success—at heavy cost in the face of heavy rifle fire of surprising range and accuracy—but in the end the attack failed; Penn-Symonds was killed and his troops fell back towards Ladysmith, where Sir George White placed himself so as to block the main line of the enemy's supply, though by so doing he ran the risk of being pinned down by greatly superior numbers. Next day a small force of all arms organized under the command of General French,advancing to join hands with the troops falling back on Ladysmith, had a brisk engagement at Elandslaagte, in the course of which "D" Squadron, 5th Dragoon Guards,and one squadron of the 5th Lancers, both squadrons under command of Lieutenant-Colonel St. John Gore, 5th Dragoon Guards, got an opportunity to make a charge. Because of the rough, broken ground and because the Boers were in a very scattered formation, the charge went in not knee-to-knee but in extended files: nevertheless, it was completely successful and went through the enemy to a depth of some two miles. The squadrons then rallied, wheeled, and charged back through the scattered remnants, killing large numbers of Boers with lance, sword and revolver. The enemy could not face cold steel—that was not their style of fighting—and fled in all directions; only the onset of darkness saved their forces from complete destruction. As the result of this very successful engagement (which at the time was quoted as a model of tactical co-operation between all arms) the British forces were enabled concentrate at Ladysmith, where, on 26th October, all three squadrons of the 5th Dragoon Guards were once more united. After a long, trying spell of reconnaissance and outpost duty the regiment took part in an action which aimed at destroying the left flank of the Boer position overlooking Ladysmith. The attack was a failure and the chief role of the cavalry was to cover the infantry retirement. During the course of the action an officer of the regiment, Lieutenant Norwood, earned the award of the Victoria Cross for rescuing a wounded man under fire. Lieutenant Norwood galloped back about 300 yards through heavy fire, dismounted, and, picking up the fallen trooper, carried him out of fire on his back, at the same time leading his horse with one hand. The enemy kept up an incessant fire during the whole time that Lieutenant Norwood was carrying the man until he was quite out of range. A few days later there was a similar incident when Lieutenant the Honourable R. L. Pomeroy remained behind with a dismounted trooper and under heavy fire took him up on his horse and brought him back. General Brocklehurst, who was in command of the cavalry after the withdrawal of General French to Cape Colony to direct the cavalry of the main army, saw the incident and wished to recommend it for recognition; however, the matter went no farther—"quite rightly," as Pomeroy himself wrote in the regimental history, "for any other officer in the regiment would have acted just as I did." The British attempts to control the situation in the Ladysmith area failed. On 12th October twelve hundred British infantry were surrounded and compelled to surrender at Nicholson's Nek. White withdrew his remaining forces to the town and by the beginning of November he was completely hemmed in, unable to move back to join hands with the main body which was arriving at Cape Town, and left with no option but to endure siege as best he might. The cavalry camp within the perimeter at Ladysmith was in full view of the Boer gunners, so each morning the regiments saddled up and exercised in the dark and afterwards, about first light, moved stealthily out to positions of concealment. The 5th Dragoon Guards found themselves some dead ground which they named Green Horse Valley, and here breakfasts used to be eaten and the normal routine of stables, orderly room and so on carried out under cover until dark, when the march back to camp was made. Shelters and splinter-proofs were improvised and field kitchens built, and in time the accommodation became fairly comfortable: but the supply situation was far from good. By Christmas, food and drink were running short, and tobacco had been replaced by dried twigs and juniper leaves. By now the situation in Ladysmith was becoming extremely serious, and in January the rations were still further cut, and all save seventy-five of the regiment's horses were turned out to grass to save forage. As a compensation for their loss of mobility the squadrons were given rifles and bayonets and allotted a permanent sector of the defences. On the arrival of Lord Roberts to take over the chief command, the whole campaign was reorganized, and on 28th February, 1900, Buller, with strong reinforcements, was at last successful in effecting the relief of Ladysmith. An attempt to pursue the retreating Boers was made next day by the one squadron which was all that the regiment could mount, but the horses were so weak from under-feeding that they could not sustain the effort: the leading troop did succeed in getting sufficiently close to their enemy for the troop leader, Lieutenant Dunbar, to have his horse shot under him before the attempt had to be abandoned. Thus ended the siege of Ladysmith, which cost the 5th Dragoon Guards two officers and thirty-six men killed or died of sickness (enteric fever and dysentery were rife during the siege); four officers wounded and eight invalided home. Between May and November the 5th Dragoon Guards operated in many areas—in the Magaliesberg; Ventersdorp; Klerksdorp; Potchefstroom; in Natal on the Zululand frontier about Volksnist, then back to Standerton to make a forced march of sixty miles in a vain attempt to help a column which had got into trouble at Trigardsfontein. At the beginning of December they were back in Pretoria, refitting for an expedition to the southern Transvaal. It was an active life. : Major-General Roger Evans,
A Very Good 19th Century Masai Warrior's Lion Hunter's Long Spear Head With superb patina. The spear has long been the weapon of choice of the Maasai. It is used to defend cattle, community and the warrior himself against wild animals and invaders. Constructed from wood and iron, it is deemed to be the single most valued personal possession after livestock. There are countless romanticized tales that center around these tall, imposing Maasai giants, fighting courageously against man and beast. They are the mighty lion hunters of Africa, brave of heart and the able assassins of any human attacker. In fact, it is the dream of every Maasai warrior to kill an enemy by dispatching a deadly spear wound to the front torso. In doing so he would gain the highest honor from his kinsmen. The lengthened long lion hunting spear offered here is a classic Maasai favorite. The 42 inch long heavy iron spear head was designed specially to bring down lions. The weapon has a three piece configuration. The spear heads are attached by hardened wax to the wooden grip
A Very Good American Allen and Thurber Pepperbox Revolver Circa 1840 Nicely engraved multi barreled revolver made by a good American maker, Allen and Thurber in Norwich Connecticut. Good tight action and in great condition for it's age. Six revolving barrels with a nipple shield. Bar hammer and fine scroll engraving on the frame. Maker marked on the hammer bar, and 1837 patent and cast steel stamped on the barrel rib. American pepperbox revolvers of that era are rarely seen in the UK these days, and pepperbox revolvers are always highly collectable, as they represent most interesting examples of the first rung on the evolutionary ladder of the modern age revolver. The pepperbox was probably the most sought after multi-shot handgun during the 1840-1850 decade, being as the Colt revolver was just gaining popularity and gearing up for serious production …and the pepperbox was carried in substantial quantities in California during the Gold Rush era. Most likely many pepperboxes were also still being carried as personal defense weapons during the Civil War by soldiers who were not affluent enough to afford a then more conventional revolver. The Pepper-box, known as the "Gun that won the East", was the most desirable repeating handgun prior to the invention of the revolving cylinder. Its name may have been coined by Samuel Clemens. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good British 1742 Infantry Hanger, With Very Rare Original Scabbard This is a truly exceptional example of these rare, and well sought after early swords of the renown British Infantry. With an very good ordnance crown marked blade, and also, a crown TG stamp makers stamp, and it's original crown stamped scabbard, also, most probably a crown TG mark. This is a rare regulation pattern 1742 sword, used in the battle of Culloden and the French & Indian, 7 Years War period. Although they had only officially been of regulation issue for three years, they were used extensively used by the British infantry at the battle of Culloden, in the Jacobite Rebellion, in 1746. An almost identical sword is pictured in George Neumann's famous book "Swords And Blades of the American Revolution". This was the main sidearm of the British Army in the Mid 18th Century. A sword of the ‘Hanger’ type, the short 28” blade is slightly curved, single-edged blade. The heart shaped hilt is entirely cast in brass with the grip in pitch covered, canvas strip binding. We have seen this kind of binding a few times before on early 18th century naval cutlass, that have needed repair or rebinding to their grips. A thin cotton cavas sheet was stripped and wound around the grip, then a thin layer of black pitch covering the canvas strip repair. This type of weapon was used extensively by private soldiers and sergeants during the wars with France in the early 18th century and during the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion including the battle of Culloden. This model is sometimes referred to as the ‘American Sword’ as it was supplied in large quantities to the American colonies by the British Government. Due to this many of them stayed in American hands and it became widely used by the American Revolutionaries. There is a most similar though relic example, in Dean Castle, that was found in Auchinleck , Scotland, near Cumnock and may have belonged to one of the local militia or even to a soldier from the Earl of Loudoun's Regiment who formed part of the Government forces which faced the Jacobites at Culloden. Little more than the brass hilt survived of that particular weapon and their steel blade had fared less well over it's time spent in the ground.
A Very Good British 1796 British Infantry Officer's Sword With almost all the original gilt present on the hilt. Silver wire bound grip. Fully engraved blade with royal cyphers of King George IIIrd. Used during the Peninsular War in Spain, the American War in 1812, and the Battle of Waterloo era. Quite a few examples survive till today of this pattern of sword from this era, but, very few indeed survive in good condition, with a lot of it's deluxe mercurial fire gilt and blueing remaining. The sword was introduced by General Order in 1796, replacing the previous 1786 Pattern. It was similar to its prececesor in having a spadroon blade, i.e. one straight, flat backed and single edged with a single fuller on each side. The hilt gilt brass with a knucklebow, vestigial quillon and a twin-shell guard somewhat similar in appearance to that of the smallswords which had been common civilian wear until shortly before this period. The pommel was urn shaped and, in many examples, the inner guard was hinged to allow the sword to sit against the body more comfortably and reduce wear to the officer's uniform. Blades could be deluxe decorated with engraving, blue and pure gold décor, but less than 1% of those with finest blue and gilt blades survive today.
A Very Good British 1853 Pat. Trooper's Battle Sword Of the Crimean War A very good British 1853 pattern 'Heavy & Light Cavalry Sabre' in original steel battle scabbard. The blade is good with a small hole at the mid section near which is the shape of an opponent's blade tip penetration, the scabbard very good with natural age patina. The British Cavalry were issued with the 1853 pattern just before many regiments, including, the 4th, 8th, 11th, and the 13th Hussars, were sent to the Crimean War. In the Crimean War (1854-56), the 13th Light Dragoons were in the forefront of the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized by Tennyson's poem of that name ("Into the valley of death rode the six hundred"). The regiments adopted the title hussars at this time, and the uniform became very stylish, aping the hussars of the Austro-Hungarian army. But soon the blues and yellows and golds gave way to khaki as the British army found itself in skirmishes throughout the far-flung Empire, in India and South Africa especially. In 1854 the regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of Cardigan) were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera. On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route. On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry in reserve. During the 25 October the regiment, as part of the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade. The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line along with the on the left. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the 4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed, they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavouring to surround them by closing in on either flank. However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. The sword has very good regimental troop markings, a good stout combat blade, pitted and a superbly patinated scabbard. Leather 5 rivet grip, triple bar guard. Also as an interesting twist in the 1853 sword's history, shipments of them were sold to the Confederate states during the American Civil War and saw extensive service in that struggle.
A Very Good British, Napoleonic Wars Officer's-Duelling Flintlock Pistol. Napoleonic Wars Era fine English flintlock, made by Dunderdale, Mabson and Labron. With original ivory tipped ramrod. Lock signed and with rolling frizzen. Good action and finely engraved brass mounts with pineapple finial trigger guard. Fine juglans regia walnut stock. Used by an officer in the Peninsular campaign and the Battle of Waterloo era. Good working action15 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Early 19th Century 'Blue and Gilt' Bladed Sword Stick In most innocent looking bamboo, of very nice quality, with a stunning short rapier blade of trefoil shape, with superb blue and gilt engraved décor that is in excellent condition. In the King George IIIrd period 'blue and gilt' engraved blade decor was reserved only for the very highest levels of society, for officer's and gentlemen of status, due, mainly, to it's great cost.
A Very Good Early 19th Century Cossack Kindjal Sword Signed Blade With a very rare feature of quality, a very fine carved one piece carved horn grip with two steel rivets, [99% of them have two thin panel grips rivetted either side of the tang]. Very good two fullered blade off set from centre, with signed script cartouche. Original leather covered iron mounted scabbard. As worn by all the Cossacks, such as, for example the Kuban Cossacks (Russian Kubanskiye Kazaki). They were Cossacks who lived in the Kuban region of Russia. Although numerous Cossack groups came to inhabit the Western Northern Caucasus most of the Kuban Cossacks are descendants of the Black Sea Cossack Host, (originally the Zaporozhian Cossacks) and the Caucasus Line Cossack Host. The Kuban Cossack Host was the administrative and military unit from 1860-1918. The native land of the Cossacks is defined by a line of Russian/Ruthenian town-fortresses located on the border with the steppe and stretching from the middle Volga to Ryazan and Tula, then breaking abruptly to the south and extending to the Dnieper via Pereyaslavl. This area was settled by a population of free people practicing various trades and crafts. These people, constantly facing the Tatar warriors on the steppe frontier, received the Turkic name Cossacks (Kazaks), which was then extended to other free people in northern Russia. The oldest reference in the annals mentions Cossacks of the Russian city of Ryazan serving the city in the battle against the Tatars in 1444. In the 16th century, the Cossacks (primarily those of Ryazan) were grouped in military and trading communities on the open steppe and started to migrate into the area of the Don (source Vasily Klyuchevsky, The course of the Russian History, vol.2). Cossacks served as border guards and protectors of towns, forts, settlements and trading posts, performed policing functions on the frontiers and also came to represent an integral part of the Russian army. In the 16th century, to protect the borderland area from Tatar invasions, Cossacks carried out sentry and patrol duties, observing Crimean Tatars and nomads of the Nogai Horde in the steppe region. The most popular weapons used by Cossack cavalrymen were usually sabres, or shashka, and long spears, but all Cossacks traditionally carried a Kindjal Russian Cossacks played a key role in the expansion of the Russian Empire into Siberia (particularly by Yermak Timofeyevich), the Caucasus and Central Asia in the period from the 16th to 19th centuries. Cossacks also served as guides to most Russian expeditions formed by civil and military geographers and surveyors, traders and explorers. In 1648 the Russian Cossack Semyon Dezhnyov discovered a passage between North America and Asia. Cossack units played a role in many wars in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries (such as the Russo-Turkish Wars, the Russo-Persian Wars, and the annexation of Central Asia). During Napoleon's Invasion of Russia, Cossacks were the Russian soldiers most feared by the French troops. Napoleon himself stated "Cossacks are the best light troops among all that exist. If I had them in my army, I would go through all the world with them." Cossacks also took part in the partisan war deep inside French-occupied Russian territory, attacking communications and supply lines. These attacks, carried out by Cossacks along with Russian light cavalry and other units, were one of the first developments of guerrilla warfare tactics and, to some extent, special operations as we know them today. Western Europeans had had few contacts with Cossacks before the Allies occupied Paris in 1814. As the most exotic of the Russian troops seen in France, Cossacks drew a great deal of attention and notoriety for their alleged excesses during Napoleon's 1812 campaign.
A Very Good Edward VIIth Boer War Royal Engineers Busby Plume Holder A very fine gilt officers type in fabulous condition. A Heavy and fine quality piece. It would be difficult to conceive of a campaign in which the work of the Engineers would be more arduous than it was in South Africa, or in which the difference between middling and excellent service on their part would be more acutely felt by those in command or by the body of the fighting troops. The corps is fortunate in that in no quarter, official or unofficial, has there been the slightest attempt to bestow on them anything but the heartiest commendations. The difficulties they had to contend with and overcame were appreciated by all the generals. It has often been remarked that the natural courage required to prevent men running away from a shower of shrapnel or a hail of rifle-bullets, where the men have the power of returning the storm even in diminished force, is a totally different quality from the trained, inculcated heroism which enables men to go out in the face of certain extreme danger to repair a telegraph line, examine a bit of railway, or build a bridge without the excitement afforded by the opportunity of returning fire. The Engineers had to do all these things and a hundred others. The splendid conduct of Major Irvine's pontoon company in "constructing well and rapidly, under fire", the bridges required on the Tugela, was said by General Buller "to deserve much praise"; and unofficial writers were wonder-struck at the cool, methodical work, flurry, haste, or anything slipshod being unseen. Every plank set in its place, every knot tied as if at a drill. Any detailed account of the work of the Royal Engineers it is impossible to give, but it must not be forgotten that they were constantly in the thick of the fighting, as when half of the 37th company were on the shell-riven and bullet-swept summit of Spion Kop on 24th January, or as when the 7th company, with the Canadian Regiment, made the last grand advance at Paardeberg on the night of the 26th February. It weighs 62 grams, 3.25 inches high, 2 inches wide, 1.3 inches deep.
A Very Good Japanese Shikome-zue Sword Stick, Edo Period Shinto Blade With a long and most elegant traditional smith made blade. This is one of the nicest of it's types we have ever seen. The blade is ken, very straight with a crow's beak elongated tip. Very nice gunome hamon with yakideshi with long return down the return edge in very nice polish. The stick is overlaid in cherry bark. This piece absolutely reminds us of the world reknown fictional blind samurai Zatoichi. He does not carry a traditional katana, instead using a very well-made shikomi-zue (cane sword) just as this sword is. Shikomi-zue were often straight-edged, lower-quality blades which could not compare with regular katana, but this fabulous qaulity examplelike Zatoichi's cane sword, whose weapon was forged by a master bladesmith, it is of superior quality, as a fine traditional made samurai bladed example. This fine piece was brought over in it's cherry bark cane to England as an antique collectors piece, and then mounted with Chester hallmarked silver repouse mounts, with a nickel repouse top, and used as an English gentleman's sword stick.
A Very Good King George IIIrd 1756 Pat.Dragoon Flintlock of The EIC Cavalry With fine walnut stock with traditional brass furniture and two British EIC heart marks Siege of Seringapatam period use, by such as the the British 19th or 25th Light Dragoons with the East India Company. The 19th played a major role in the Anglo-Mysore Wars and Anglo-Maratha Wars. Their first campaign was against Tipu Sultan of Mysore from 1790 to 1792. After defeating Tipu, the 19th were on garrison duty until 1799 when war broke out with Tipu again. This time, the Sultan was killed during the Battle of Seringapatam. In 1800, the 19th fought Dhoondia Wao's rebel army and in 1803, led by Major-General Arthur Wellesley (who later became the Duke of Wellington), they participated in the Battle of Assaye. In this battle, the outnumbered British troops defeated a Maratha army and the regiment was subsequently awarded the battle honour of "Assaye" and presented with an honorary colour. They were stationed at Cheyloor in 1802, at Arcot in 1803, in Bombay in 1804, and at Arcot again from 1805 to 1806. The regiment was summoned to Vellore on the night of 10 July 1806 to rescue the 69th Regiment of Foot who had been the victims of a revolt by Indian sepoys. The 25th Dragoons (raised for service in India by F E Gwyn on 9 March 1794) was renumbered 22nd (Light) Dragoons in that year. This 22nd (Light) Dragoons regiment served throughout the Napoleonic Wars, which began in 1805, and was disbanded in 1820. Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan, the rulers of the Kingdom of Mysore, offered much resistance to the British forces. Having sided with the French during the Revolutionary war, the rulers of Mysore continued their struggle against the Company with the four Anglo-Mysore Wars. Mysore finally fell to the Company forces in 1799, with the death of Tipu Sultan. .As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. Very good and tight action. A horn tipped ramrod. As with all our antique guns they must be considered as inoperable with no license required and they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Late 18th to 19th Century Horn Powder Flask With wooden butt and spout plug. A good size flask, 12 inches long overall A powder flask was a small container for gunpowder which was an essential part of shooting equipment before the arrival of pre-made bullets or cartridges in the 19th century. They range from very elaborately decorated examples to early forms of simple effective design, and are most collectable. Many were standardized military issue, but the most decorative were generally used for sporting shooting. Although the term powder horn is sometimes used for any kind of powder flask, strictly it is a sub-category of flask, meaning one made from a hollowed bovid horn. Powder flasks were made in a great variety of materials and shapes, though ferrous metals that were prone to give sparks when hit were usually avoided. Stag antler was an especially common material, which could be carved or engraved, but wood and copper were common, and in India ivory. Apart from the horns, common shapes were the Y formed by the base of an antler (inverted), a usually flattened pear shape with a straight spout (poire-poudre or "powder pear" is a French term for these), a round flattened shape, and for larger flasks a triangle with concave rounded sides, which unlike the smaller flasks could be stood up on a surface. Many designs (such as horn and antler types) have a wide sealed opening for filling, and a thin spout for dispensing. Various devices were used to load a precise amount of powder to dispense, as it was important not to load too much or too little powder, or the powder was dispensed into a powder measure or "charger" (these survive much less often).
A Very Good Late Georgian Press-Gang Persuader Cosh With a beautifully patinated turned walnut handle, rope linkage and turned walnut knob top. These scarce clubs are most attractive and extremely effective. The type used on press gangs and boarding raids by the boatswain. They continued to be useful in all manner of areas right through the Victorian era, both on land and sea.
A Very Good Lefraucheaux Brevette 9mm Revolver Good tight action, and a superior grade quality pistol. The Lefraucheaux was an extremely popular pistol in the US Civil war due to it's advanced cartridge taking abilty, which naturally aided quick reloading and firing. A large calibre holster pistol of good quality and age. A most effective medium large sized pistol, but not to be confused with the much more commonly seen, and much smaller, 7mm type. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good London Made Back Action Sporting Musket Circa 1840 Damascus barrel with hook breech and barrel retaining slides. Finest walnut stock in very good order. Back action lock finely engraved. All steel mounts with old russet traces. A most attractive and well made hand made gun of the second quarter of the 19th century. Would make a fine compliment to any collection of antiques and fine art. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good M.1822 French Imperial, Crimean War Period Cuirassier's Pistol Manufactured at the Imperial arsenal at St Etienne. Fully inspector marked throughout, with regimental markings and stock roundel stamp, and dated for the Crimean War. Good tight action, rifled barrel. Many pistols of this type were also imported to the USA during the Civil War. At the time of the Crimean War, the army of the Second Empire was a subscripted army, but was also the most proficient army in Europe. One of the more famous groups were the Zouaves. According to Captain George Brinton McClellan, an American Military Observer, the Zouaves were the "…most reckless, self-reliant, and complete infantry that Europe can produce. With his graceful dress, soldierly bearing, and vigilant attitude, the Zouave at an outpost is the beau ideal of a soldier." The French army consisted of the Imperial Guard infantry, the line infantry including the Foreign Legion, cavalry, artillery, and engineer troops. Sources suggest that between 45,000 and 100,000 French forces were involved at one time or the other in the Crimea. Service in the French army was for seven years, with re-enlistments in increments of seven years. The Battle of Eupatoria was the most important military engagement of the Crimean War on the Crimean theatre in 1855 outside Sevastopol. Ottoman forces were being transferred from the Danube front to the Crimean port of Eupatoria and the town was being fortified. Upon direct orders from the Czar who feared a wide-scale Ottoman offensive on the Russian flank, a Russian expeditionary force was formed under General Stepan Khrulev aiming to storm the base with a force variously estimated between 20,000 to 30,000. Khrulev hoped to take the Ottoman garrison by surprise on February 17, 1855. His intention failed to materialise, as both the Ottoman garrison and the Allied fleet anticipated the attack. The Russian artillery and infantry attacks were countered by heavy Allied artillery fire. Failing to make progress after three hours and suffering mounting casualties, Khrulev ordered a retreat. This reverse led to the dismissal of the Russian Commander-in-Chief Aleksandr Sergeyevich Menshikov and probably hastened the death of Nicholas I of Russia, who died several weeks after the battle. As for the battle's strategic importance, it confirmed that allied total command of the sea would ensure that the threat to the Russian flank would remain for the duration of hostilities. For the allies, possession of Eupatoria meant that the total investment of Sevastopol remained a viable option. For the Russians, they could not afford to commit unlimited resources from their vast army to the Crimea, for fear of a lightning allied thrust from Eupatoria closing the neck of the peninsula at Perekop. For the Ottomans, their Army had regained its self-esteem and to some extent its reputation; most French and British realised this, although others including the high command would stubbornly refuse to make further use of their fighting abilities in the Crimean theatre. A very nice example of French cavalry percussion pistol (Ref. "French Military Weapons 1717-1938", by James E. Hicks, pp. 81 and 94).
A Very Good Original Antique 12 Bore Barrel Cleaner With Cover A superb 19th century gun tool. With removable screw threaded carved horn handle. Made by W.Richards of Liverpool. Marked 12.
A Very Good Original English Civil War Cavalry Trooper's Munition Helmet This helmet would very nicely companion, our original, English Civil War New Model Army breast and back plate armour. Item number 17928. Three bar face guard pattern. A most rare, true English made, circa 1640, tri-bar example, with traditional simulated non-articulated lobster tail. Most helmets seen today of this type are late copies or reproductions, the ones that are real, and they are very few, are usually the single bar types, that were imported from the continent, especially the Netherlands, during and after the war. We must emphasise this is a 100% original Civil War made example, in overall russeted condition, with small holing in the skull, and with good blacking. The New Model Army of England was formed in 1645 by the Parliamentarians in the English Civil War, and was disbanded in 1660 after the Restoration. It differed from other armies in the series of civil wars referred to as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms in that it was intended as an army liable for service anywhere in the country (including in Scotland and Ireland), rather than being tied to a single area or garrison. Its soldiers became full-time professionals, rather than part-time militia. To establish a professional officer corps, the army's leaders were prohibited from having seats in either the House of Lords or House of Commons. This was to encourage their separation from the political or religious factions among the Parliamentarians. The New Model Army was raised partly from among veteran soldiers who already had deeply held Puritan religious convictions, and partly from conscripts who brought with them many commonly held beliefs about religion or society. Many of its common soldiers therefore held Dissenting or radical views unique among English armies. Although the Army's senior officers did not share many of their soldiers' political opinions, their independence from Parliament led to the Army's willingness to contribute to the overthrow of both the Crown and Parliament's authority, and to establish a short-lived Commonwealth, which included a period of direct military rule. Ultimately, the Army's Generals (particularly Oliver Cromwell) could rely both on the Army's internal discipline and its religious zeal and innate support for the "Good Old Cause" to maintain an essentially dictatorial rule.The New Model Army's elite troops were its Regiments of Horse. They were armed and equipped in the style known at the time as harquebusiers, rather than as heavily armoured cuirassiers. They wore a back-and-front breastplate over a buff leather coat, which itself gave some protection against sword cuts, and normally a "lobster-tailed pot" helmet with a movable three-barred visor, and a bridle gauntlet on the left hand. The sleeves of the buff coats were often decorated with strips of braid, which may have been arranged in a regimental pattern. Leather "bucket-topped" riding boots gave some protection to the legs. Regiments were organised into six troops, of one hundred troopers plus officers, non-commissioned officers and specialists (drummers, farriers etc.). Each troop had its own standard, 2 feet (61 cm) square. On the battlefield, a regiment was normally formed as two "divisions" of three troops, one commanded by the regiment's Colonel (or the Major, if the Colonel was not present), the other by the Lieutenant Colonel. Their discipline was markedly superior to that of their Royalist counterparts. Cromwell specifically forbade his men to gallop after a fleeing enemy, but demanded they hold the battlefield. This meant that the New Model cavalry could charge, break an enemy force, regroup and charge again at another objective. On the other hand, when required to pursue, they did so relentlessly, not breaking ranks to loot abandoned enemy baggage as Royalist horse often did
A Very Good Pocket Flintlock 'Derringer ' type Pistol By London maker Walklate of London. Beautifully crafted and in excellent condition. With a superbly tight and crisp almost as new action. Slab sided walnut grips, breech loading turn off barrel. A sound and highly effective personal protection pistol that was highly popular during the late Georgian era. London, like many cities around the world at that time, could be a most treacherous place at night, and every gentleman, or indeed lady, would carry a pocket pistol for close quarter personal protection or deterrence.
A Very Good Royal Marine Officer's Sword of Capt Morrieson' 1822 Pattern Named on the blade, with a presentation type etched panel, for a RM officer, John Charles Downie Morrieson, who served as a capt and then major in the Royal Marines. Very good gothic hilt with pieced VR cypher, wooden spiral ribbed grip, pipe backed blade and brass field service scabbard. As a Royal Marine officer he served in the naval Battle of Vuelta de Obligado, which took place on the waters of the Paraná River on November 20, 1845, between the Argentine Confederation, under the leadership of Juan Manuel de Rosas, and an Anglo-French fleet, and later, in the the China Expedition, the 2nd Opium War of 1857-58. Including the blockade of the Canton River, the landing before, and the storm and capture of the City. He served as Provost Marshal and D.A.A.General to the Army in garrison at Canton. The Second Opium War, the Second Anglo-Chinese War, the Second China War, the Arrow War, or the Anglo-French expedition to China, was a war pitting the British Empire and the Second French Empire against the Qing Dynasty of China, lasting from 1856 to 1860. It was fought over similar issues as the First Opium War.Chinese authorities were reluctant to keep to the terms of the 1842 Treaty of Nanking. They had tried to keep out as many foreign merchants as possible and had victimized Chinese merchants who traded with the British at the treaty ports. To protect those Chinese merchants who were friendly to them in Hong Kong, the British granted their ships British registration in the hope that the Chinese authorities would not interfere with vessels carrying the British flag. In October 1856, Chinese authorities in Canton seized a vessel called the Arrow, which had been engaged in piracy. The Arrow had formerly been registered as a British ship, and still flew the British flag. The British consul in Canton demanded the immediate release of the crew and an apology for the insult to the British flag. The crew were released, but an apology was not given. In reprisal, the British governor in Hong Kong ordered warships to bombard Canton. The Chinese issue figured prominently in the British general election of March 1857, which Palmerston won with an increased majority. He now felt able to press British claims more vigorously. The French were also eager to be involved after their envoy, Baron Jean-Baptiste Louis Gros, seemingly had his demands ignored (French complaints involved a murdered missionary and French rights in Canton). A strong Anglo-French force under Admiral Sir Michael Seymour occupied Canton (December 1857), then cruised north to capture briefly the Taku forts near Tientsin (May 1858).Negotiations among China, Britain, France, the USA and Russia led to the Tientsin Treaties of June 26–29, 1858, which theoretically brought peace. China agreed to open more treaty ports, to legalize opium importation, to establish a maritime customs service with foreign inspection and to allow foreign legations at Peking and missionaries in the interior. China soon abrogated the Anglo-French treaties and refused to allow foreign diplomats into Peking. On June 25, 1859 British Admiral Sir James Hope bombarded the forts guarding the mouth of the Hai River, below Tientsin. However, landing parties were repulsed and the British squadron was severely damaged by a surprisingly efficient Chinese garrison. Anglo-French forces gathered at Hong Kong in May 1860. A joint amphibious expedition moved north to the Gulf of Po Hai. It consisted of 11,000 British under General Sir James Hope Grant and 7,000 French under Lieutenant General Cousin-Montauban. Unopposed landings were made at Pei-Tang (August 1, 1860). The Taku forts were taken by assault with the assistance of the naval forces (August 21). The expedition then advanced up-river from Tientsin. As it approached Peking, the Chinese asked for talks and an armistice. An allied delegation under Sir Harry Smith Parkes was sent to parley, but they were seized and imprisoned (September 18). It was later learned that half of them died under diablocal torture [the notorious so-called Death of a Thousand Cuts]. The expedition pressed ahead, defeating some 30,000 Chinese in two engagements, before reaching the walls of Peking on September 26. Preparations for an assault commenced and the Old Summer Palace (Yuan Ming Yuan) was occupied and looted. Another Chinese request for peace was accepted and China agreed to all demands. The survivors of the Parkes delegation were returned, though General Grant burned and destroyed the Old Summer Palace in reprisal for the mistreatment of the Parkes party. Ten new treaty ports, including Tientsin, were opened to trade with the western powers, foreign diplomats were to be allowed at Peking, and the opium trade was to be regulated by the Chinese authorities. Kowloon, on the mainland opposite Hong Kong Island, was surrendered to the British. Permission was granted for foreigners (including Protestant and Catholic missionaries) to travel throughout the country. An indemnity of three million ounces of silver was paid to Great Britain and two million to France. The hilt is good with fold down guard the grip is a service replacement [possibly in Chinese service]. The scabbard is good with minor denting, the blade has a good etched panels of Royal cyphers and the name of this officer. Spelling in the Scottish manner with 'ie', his recorded British armed service manner is without the 'e' as usual.
A Very Good Royal Naval Early to Mid 19th Century Issue Cutlass Used in the Royal Navy in time when it ruled the oceans and patroled the Empire around the globe, in full masted sailing ships and the earliest Iron Clad battleships. Used in the Crimean War period and the Indian Mutiny. The P1845 cutlass ended the long 100 year tradition and era of the figure 8 hilt and flat straight blade. The P1845 had a 50+ year service life with only a slight modification to shorten the blade in 1889. The cutlass has been the sailor's weapon for many years in western navies before its demise in the mid 20th century. It is a fairly heavy naval sword with a single-edged blade of medium length which is generally given a very slight curve, but may often be straight. A chequered leather handgrip. The blade's weight is concentrated to provide a shattering blow delivered with the edge of the blade. There is little in the design to facilitate the use of the point, nor is it easy to parry another's blow. This is a sword designed for simplistic use by a user who has had little training in fencing. Therefore the cutlass-wielding sailor would have usually been out-fought by a swordsman who kept his cool and used the point to break up a sailor's line of attack. Nevertheless, the weight of a cutlass blade would often be enough to sweep a lighter blade out of the way. It would indeed be an interesting match between a cutlass-wielding British sailor versus a French officer. The term "cutlass" seems to have come into use by default as it was not an official term in the early days of the British Navy. Indeed, the word cutlass comes from the French coutelas. Swords can be seen on ordnance lists from 1645. They were habitually carried on land by some men, both as a defence and to signify the status of the wearer - the peasant's weapon being a more clumsy bill, or spear. The sword required some expense in its purchase and indeed could be decorated to its owner's wish. The term cutlass seems to have been applied to sea swords and then stuck. In the early 1700s the most famous of cutlass designs was taken up by the Royal Navy. This was the "double disk" cutlass, perhaps invented by Thomas Hollier, which featured two disks of steel as a guard joined by a broad strip of metal to complete protection for the hand. Thousands of these weapons were turned out by a variety of manufacturers and the weapon was used by a variety of navies. Sailors received little training in sword technique and indeed these weapons were often snatched up at the last minute from chests kept on deck, either to repel boarders or to take on a boarding made against another ship. Scabbards were not needed because a sailor would need his cutlass for immediate use in battle. However one in ten were made with scabbards for shore parties. Boarding over the side of another ship in the days of sail was often a difficult affair. Sometimes the enemy's vessel could be much bigger than your own, or indeed much smaller, necessitating either a climb up the gunports and through the anti-boarding nettings of the other ship or a plunge down, probably on a rope's end, onto the deck of the smaller vessel. At the encounter between the 14-gun Speedy and the 32-gun Gamo in 1801 a British boarding party led by Captain Thomas Cochrane took the Spanish frigate by boarding in a fierce action. The small British ship was manoeuvred to come close alongside the enemy and eventually under the Spanish guns' maximum depression. Then Cochrane led the entire 40 crew - except for eight casualties and the surgeon who was left at the wheel. Armed with cutlasses, axes and pikes the British sailors fought ferociously in hand-to-hand combat with Cochrane calling loudly for another 50 fictitious reinforcements to follow. The Spanish flung down their weapons and surrendered. The RN retained cutlasses officially until 1936 although there are reports of personnel carrying such weapons in WWII. The cutlass was last officially used in the Altmark incident where the British Naval Ship, HMS Cossack, liberated the prisoners captured by the Battleship Graf Spee that were being transported illegally through Norwegian waters by the German ship Altmark.
A Very Good Sawback Sword Regimentally Marked 1st Connaught Rangers Stamped on the quilllon 1.C.T 7 [ordnance identification ofor the 1st Battallion Connaught Rangers, sword number 7]. The 88th and 94th Foot were both involved in the Zulu War in 1879. The 94th Foot fought at the Battle of Ulundi, the final battle of the war. In 1881, the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) (which formed the 1st Battalion) and the 94th Regiment of Foot (which formed the 2nd Battalion) were amalgamated. The amalgamation of the two regiments into one with the title The Connaught Rangers, was part of the United Kingdom government's reorganization of the British army under the Childers Reforms, a continuation of the Cardwell Reforms implemented in 1879. The sword also bears later ordnance re-stamps for '9, '99 likely the re-issue date either into the Royal Navy, but further research reveals it more likely for issue to the battalion that was sent to the Boer War and The 1st Battalion deployed to South Africa as part of 5th (Irish) Brigade which was commanded by Major-General Fitzroy Hart. The Rangers took part in numerous engagements during the Second Boer War. The regiment took part in the Battle of Colenso on 15 December, part of the attempt to relieve the town of Ladysmith, besieged by Boer forces. The Rangers and the rest of the 5th (Hart's) Brigade, who were on the left flank, had been forced to perform over 20 minutes of drill before the advance. The Brigade suffered heavily during their participation in the battle, the Boers inflicting heavy casualties. The advance was met with a fire from three sides that forced them to withdraw. The battle ended in defeat for the British. That battle and two previous defeats at Magersfontein and Stormberg became known as 'Black Week'. Brass hilt and ribbed grip, good steel sawbacked blade, excellent brass bound leather scabbard. Invented for use in the Crimean War, issued as a regimental sapper's weapon for defences and siege construction, and then many were recalled [in the late Victorian era and early 20th century] and re-issued to the Royal Navy for Naval Brigades, for use as a cutlass as well as a sapper's sword.Some were recorded as being used by the British Navy in the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. Made by Robert Mole.
A Very Good Scarce 1867 Remington Rolling Block Rifle Sword-Bayonet A scarce made bayonet for the Remington Rifle, usually made in Germany for the foreign contracts. In excellent condition, brass hilt and all steel scabbard, yataghan blade with maker's mark. Remington rolling block rifles were produced as military muskets and carbines as well as for civilian use, and were adopted by many countries. These included the U.S. (first by the Navy in 1867 and later in limited numbers in .45-70 by the Army), Argentina, Denmark, Guatemala, Holland, Puerto Rico (Voluntarios), Spain, Sweden/Norway, Uruguay, and others. They were also purchased by state militias, most notably the New York Militia. Remington rolling block rifles were produced under license in Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Spain, and perhaps other places.
A Very Good Smith and Wesson No2 Army Revolver Very nice tight action, brown finish with stunning carved ivory grips. One of the first cartridge taking revolvers of the Civil War. George Armstrong Custer owned a pair presented to him by J.B.Sutherland. A very smart example in nice order. Superbly crisp action. One of the few cartridge revolvers made that are allowable to own in the UK without licence or restriction. It was in fact the gun that made Smith and Wesson into the mighty arms company that it became, the No2 Army being so advanced for it's time that it rocketed the makers into the popular conciousness of America and indeed the world. It is from this revolver that the S&W 44 Russian, the 44 Single Action Army, and the Schofield evolved, probably the best revolvers ever made in the 19th century. A Smith and Wesson No 2 Army was carried by Wild Bill Hickok on the day he died holding Aces and Eights, called for ever more "the dead man's hand! in his memory, in the infamous card game in Deadwood. The larger caliber of the two tip-up revolver models that Smith & Wesson manufactured during the American Civil War, the No. 2 Army was a six-shot, single-action design. slightly fewer than 40,000 No. 2 .32-caliber rimfire revolvers were made before the surrender at Appomattox in 1865, and many Union enlisted men and officers, including future President Rutherford B. Hayes and General George Armstrong Custer, elected to carry his No. 2 Army model for personal protection. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Smith and Wesson No2 Army Revolver of The Civil War. Very nice tight action, brown finish early four figure serial number. One of the first cartridge taking revolvers of the Civil War. George Armstrong Custer owned a pair presented to him by J.B.Sutherland. A very smart example in nice order, original varnish to the walnut grips. Superbly crisp action. One of the few cartridge revolvers made that are allowable to own in the UK without licence or restriction. It was in fact the gun that made Smith and Wesson into the mighty arms company that it became, the No2 Army being so advanced for it's time that it rocketed the makers into the popular conciousness of America and indeed the world. It is from this revolver that the S&W 44 Russian, the 44 Single Action Army, and the Schofield evolved, probably the best revolvers ever made in the 19th century. A Smith and Wesson No 2 Army was carried by Wild Bill Hickok on the day he died holding Aces and Eights, called for ever more "the dead man's hand! in his memory, in the infamous card game in Deadwood. The larger caliber of the two tip-up revolver models that Smith & Wesson manufactured during the American Civil War, the No. 2 Army was a six-shot, single-action design. slightly fewer than 40,000 No. 2 .32-caliber rimfire revolvers were made before the surrender at Appomattox in 1865, and many Union enlisted men and officers, including future President Rutherford B. Hayes and General George Armstrong Custer, elected to carry his No. 2 Army model for personal protection. Desirable 6 inch barrel model. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Spanish Flintlock Cannon Barrel Miquelet Pistol Circa 1790 An officers military style pistol, of good strong and robust quality, but with expensive features of decoration to set it apart from a more martial piece. A very nice condition large calibre belt pistol, with walnut stock, chequered butt, steel butt cap and fore end, and nicely chiselled lock. Steel belt hook. A pistol used in the Peninsular Campaign in the war with Napoleonic France. Peninsular War, Spanish Guerra de la Independencia (“War of Independence”), (1808–14), that part of the Napoleonic Wars fought in the Iberian Peninsula, where the French were opposed by British, Spanish, and Portuguese forces. Napoleon’s peninsula struggle contributed considerably to his eventual downfall; but until 1813 the conflict in Spain and Portugal, though costly, exercised only an indirect effect upon the progress of French affairs in central and eastern Europe. The war in the Peninsula did interest the British, because their army made no other important contribution to the war on the continent between 1793 and 1814; the war, too, made the fortunes of the British commander Arthur Wellesley, afterward duke of Wellington. Napoleon ordered General Andoche Junot, with a force of 30,000, to march through Spain to Portugal (October–November 1807). The Portuguese royal family fled, sailing to Brazil, and Junot arrived in Lisbon on November 30. The French army that conquered Portugal, however, also occupied parts of northern Spain; and Napoleon, whose intentions were now becoming clear, claimed all of Portugal and certain provinces of northern Spain. Unable to organize government resistance, the Spanish minister Godoy persuaded his king, Charles IV, to imitate the Portuguese royal family and escape to South America. The journey from Madrid was halted at Aranjuez, where a revolt organized by the “Fernandista” faction (March 17, 1808) procured the dismissal of Godoy and the abdication of Charles IV in favour of his son Ferdinand VII. Napoleon, taking advantage of the situation, sent in General Joachim Murat to occupy Madrid and, by a mixture of threats and promises, induced both Charles and Ferdinand to proceed to Bayonne for conferences. There, on May 5, 1808, Napoleon forced Ferdinand to abdicate in favour of Charles and Charles in favour of himself. In exchange, Napoleon promised that Spain should remain Roman Catholic and independent, under a ruler whom he would name. He chose his brother Joseph Bonaparte. On May 2, however, the people of Madrid had already risen against the invader, and the war for Spanish independence had begun. A brief history of the Spanish Miquelet; After the disastrous campaign of Algiers (1541) where "wind and rain" prevented the firing of arquebuses, Charles I of Spain might have expressed to his gunmakers the urgent need to devise an ignition mechanism less prone to failure in bad weather. Problems were caused on both wheellocks and matchlocks, firstly by wind blowing away the gunpowder when the pan cover was opened during priming, and secondly, by rain wetting matches and gunpowder. In less than three decades, a lock did appear that is known today as the Miquelet Lock The fully developed lock was known by various names, depending on region or variation of design. In Spain, it was known as the "llave Española"; or simply the "patilla". The patilla is the classic Spanish miquelet and the designation of patilla is often used nowadays in lieu of miquelet. The term patilla derives from the fact that the front foot of the cock resembled a rooster foot. In Catalonia, it was "clau de miquelet." In Portugal, it was known as the "fecho de patilha de invenção."
A Very Good Steel 'Belted Bullet' Mould Marked 14 and WD (William Davies) A rare collectable for a 19th century 'grooved' British rifle. Cavity measures .750" at the bottom of the grooves. This mould casts a spherical ball with bands for groove rifling. This mould is in excellent plus condition. Overall length 7.5"
A Very Good Victorian 16th Lancer's Other Ranks Tchapka Helmet Plate In very good condition, with the battle honours up to Aliwal 1846. The 16th Lancer's is one of the great and most decorated cavalry regiments of the British Army. And of all the Battle Honours the regiment earned in it's distingushed history The Sikh War's Charge at Aliwal of 1846 is the regiment's dearest. The 16th Lancers was part of a British force fighting the Sikhs of the Punjab in 1846 when the armies met at Aliwal on 28th January. Major Rowland Smyth, commanding the 16th, was ordered to take the Sikh artillery, and led a headlong charge against guns that kept up a continuous fire. Behind the guns stood squares of Sikh infantry. He spurred his horse and led the 16th through them. Sergeant Gould wrote: ' At them we went, bullets flying like a hailstorm. Despite a bayonet wound, Smyth reformed his men and charged back, and the enemy withdrew. 40,000 Sikh infantry massed against Major General Harry Smith's 10,000 men at Aliwal covering a frontage of about two miles connecting the villages of Aliwal and Bundri. They were supported by 37 pieces of artillery and flanked by cavalry. In the initial stages of the battle Smith's forces advanced and took Aliwal. The capture of Aliwal meant the loss of the Sikhs' best ford across the Sutlej, they therefore had to recapture it and attempted to do so with a body of 1000 cavalry. Smith saw this threat and immediately dispatched a squadron of 16th Lancers and a squadron of the 3rd Bengal Light Cavalry. The 3rd failed to charge while the squadron of the 16th under Captain Bere did so, and routed 1000 Sikh cavalry (over ten times their number). Aliwal was not lost but the cost to the 16th was the loss of 42 of the 100 who charged. Smith's main body continued to be harried by the Sikh guns; he therefore ordered the main body of the 16th under their Commanding Officer, Major Rowland Smyth, to take the guns. Smyth led his two squadrons in a headlong charge against the guns that continued to fire until the moment they were overrun. The momentum of the Regiment was so great that they charged past the guns and were faced by the massed squares of the Sikh infantry. Smyth realised that to pull up and retire would enable the Sikh infantry to lay a withering fire in his rear, he therefore spurred his horse, jumping into the centre of the first square and charging on through. Naturally the 16th followed their Commanding Officer and charged head on into the square. "We had to charge a square of infantry - at them we went, the bullets flying round like a hailstorm." (Sergeant Gould). Many were injured including Smyth who received a bayonet wound to his abdomen. However he still managed to reform his Regiment and charge back through the broken Sikh squares. This proved to be the decisive action with the Sikhs breaking contact and attempting to withdraw back across the Sutlej under heavy British artillery fire; they left 3,000 dead and all their guns on the British side of the river. Of all the Battle Honours gained by the 16th Lancers it was the battle of Aliwal that they chose to commemorate each year. A regimental tradition deriving from this is that lance pennons are starched and crimped 16 times; this commemorates the fact that after the battle they were so encrusted in blood that they stood upright and stiff. Today Aliwal is still celebrated by A Squadron and The Queen's Royal Lancers still crimp their lance pennons. Like most cavalry regiments, the 16th Lancers deployed to the Boer War serving there from 1900 until their eventual return to England in 1904. During the campaign they took part in the Battles of Paardeberg and Diamond Hill, as well as playing a leading role in the Relief of Kimberley. One of the most satisfactory cavalry actions occurred at Klipt Drift on 15th February 1900, when two squadrons of the 16th and one of the 9th Lancers charged to clear the 'knek' between two hills, which were occupied by the Boers. The enemy attempted to mount as the Lancers approached, but were swept away and fled in all directions. The Boers left some twenty dead; the Lancers continued their advance for some five miles on towards Kimberley. By 1909 the 16th had amassed no less than eighteen battle honours, more than any other cavalry regiment in the Army.a painting in the gallery shows the 16th charging at Aliwal
A Very Good Victorian 92nd Gordon Highlanders Silver Cross Belt Badge 92nd Regiment (Gordon) officer's crossbelt badge, silver plated 4 pointed star with St Andrew cross with battle honours, Sphinx below XCII Highlanders, with three threaded screw mounts.
A Very Good Victorian British Army Drummer's Sword With cast brass VR langet gothic style hilt. Straight etched blade and brass mounted leather scabbard. Good ordnance inspectors stamp. In the 19th century the Army marched to the band into battle and the bandsman although not required to fight initially was certainly prepared to defend himself. Hence his issued combat sword. A smaller sword than an officer would use, but it's size belied it's power and effectiveness in battle in the hands of the well trained. Drums were used by all regiments at the time for a variety of important battlefield roles such as marching in time as a unit. Different drum beats would be used to communicate commands in the smoke filled and noisy battlefield where visual and verbal communication would have been impossible. At the time, muskets were often very inaccurate and took a long time to reload, and so soldiers would often fire their weapons in mass volleys. The beat of a drum would enable soldiers to be more cohesive and disciplined in their firing drill. Drummer boys in the Regiment would often be no older than 15 years of age, and would often be the orphans or sons of soldiers.
A Very Good Victorian British Army Helmet Plate A very good example of the helmet plate used on the Home Service and tropical sun helmets used by all the foot regiments of the British Army in the 19th century. Part of a small collection of original rare Victorian badges we have just been most pleased to acquire.
A Very Good Year 13 French Cavalry Pistol Of The Napoleonic Wars Made at the Imperial Arsenal at Tulle. Used as a regimental issue sidearm, by and the very best French Napoleonic frontline cavalry, the carabineers, cuirassiers, chasseurs, dragoons and lancers, serving in Napoleon Bonaparte's army during the Napoleonic Wars. It bears superb stock markings and all fully marked steel and brass parts. Lock engraved Manufacture Imperial Tulle. This is the pattern called the AN 13 [year 13] which represents the 13th year of French Ist Republic of 1792. The French Republican Calendar or French Revolutionary Calendar was a calendar proposed during the French Revolution, and used by the French government for about 12 years from late 1793. This would have seen service in the Elite Imperial Guard Cuirassiers of Napoleon's great heavy cavalry regiments. The Cuirassiers Heavy Cavalry Regiments used the largest men in France, recruited to serve in the greatest and noblest cavalry France has ever had. They fought with distinction at their last great conflict at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, and most of the Cuirassiers pistols now in England very likely came from that field of conflict, after the battle, as trophies of war. This pistol may well have been taken from a vanquished Cuirassier [as his pistol was drawn for combat] on the field of battle. One can imagine this pistol lying freely, or, maybe, even still clasped in his cold desperate hand, or even under his fallen steed, at the field of conflict at Waterloo. Every warrior that has ever entered service for his country sought trophies. The Mycenae from a fallen Trojan, the Roman from a fallen Gaul, the GI from a fallen Japanese, the tradition stretches back thousands of years, and will continue as long as man serves his country in battle. In the 1st century AD the Roman Poet Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis [Juvenal] wrote; "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions". A truly super Napoleonic pistol. The cuirassiers were the greatest of all France's cavalry, allowing only the strongest men of over 6 feet in height into it's ranks. The French Cuirassiers were at their very peak in 1815, and never again regained the wonder and glory that they truly deserved at that time. To face a regiment of, say, 600 charging steeds bearing down upon you mounted with armoured giants, brandishing the mightiest of swords that could pierce the strongest breast armour, much have been, quite simply, terrifying. Made in the period that Napoleon was Emperor and ruling most of Europe, it was used through the Royal restoration period, when Napoleon was imprisoned at Elba, and then during the War of the 100 days, culminating at Waterloo . All Napoleon's heavy Cavalry Regiments fought at Waterloo, there were no reserve regiments, and all the Cuirassiers, without exception fought with their extraordinary resolve, bravery and determination. The Hundred Days started after Napoleon, separated from his wife and son, who had come under Austrian control, was cut off from the allowance guaranteed to him by the Treaty of Fontainebleau, and aware of rumours he was about to be banished to a remote island in the Atlantic Ocean, Napoleon escaped from Elba on 26 February 1815. He landed at Golfe-Juan on the French mainland, two days later. The French 5th Regiment was sent to intercept him and made contact just south of Grenoble on 7 March 1815. Napoleon approached the regiment alone, dismounted his horse and, when he was within gunshot range, shouted, "Here I am. Kill your Emperor, if you wish." The soldiers responded with, "Vive L'Empereur!" and marched with Napoleon to Paris; Louis XVIII fled. On 13 March, the powers at the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw and four days later Great Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, Austria and Prussia bound themselves to put 150,000 men into the field to end his rule. Napoleon arrived in Paris on 20 March and governed for a period now called the Hundred Days. By the start of June the armed forces available to him had reached 200,000 and he decided to go on the offensive to attempt to drive a wedge between the oncoming British and Prussian armies. The French Army of the North crossed the frontier into the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, in modern-day Belgium. Napoleon's forces fought the allies, led by Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. Wellington's army withstood repeated attacks by the French and drove them from the field while the Prussians arrived in force and broke through Napoleon's right flank. The French army left the battlefield in disorder, which allowed Coalition forces to enter France and restore Louis XVIII to the French throne. Off the port of Rochefort, Charente-Maritime, after consideration of an escape to the United States, Napoleon formally demanded political asylum from the British Captain Frederick Maitland on HMS Bellerophon on 15 July 1815. The pistol is in very nice condition overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Year 13 French Cavalry Pistol Of The Napoleonic Wars Dated 1813 Made at the Imperial Arsenal at Mauberg. Apparently a souvenir of Waterloo, but certainly used as a regimental issue sidearm, by and the very best French Napoleonic frontline cavalry, the carabineers, cuirassiers, chasseurs, dragoons and lancers, serving in Napoleon Bonaparte's army during the Napoleonic Wars. It bears superb stock markings and all fully marked steel and brass parts. Lock engraved Manufacture Mauburg Imperial. This is the pattern called the AN 13 [year 13] which represents the 13th year of French Ist Republic of 1792. The French Republican Calendar or French Revolutionary Calendar was a calendar proposed during the French Revolution, and used by the French government for about 12 years from late 1793 to 1805 and at this point it was then abolished by Napoleon. Made in 1813 this would have seen service in the Elite Imperial Guard Cuirassiers of Napoleon's great heavy cavalry regiments. The Cuirassiers Heavy Cavalry Regiments used the largest men in France, recruited to serve in the greatest and noblest cavalry France has ever had. They fought with distinction at their last great conflict at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, and most of the Cuirassiers pistols now in England very likely came from that field of conflict, after the battle, as trophies of war. This pistol has at present no ramrod [but we can replace it], and it has a contemporary replaced swan necked cock. This pistol may well have been taken from a vanquished Cuirassier [as his pistol was drawn for combat] on the field of battle. One can imagine this pistol lying freely, or, maybe, even still clasped in his cold desperate hand, or even under his fallen steed, at the field of conflict at Waterloo. Every warrior that has ever entered service for his country sought trophies. The Mycenae from a fallen Trojan, the Roman from a fallen Gaul, the GI from a fallen Japanese, the tradition stretches back thousands of years, and will continue as long as man serves his country in battle. In the 1st century AD the Roman Poet Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis [Juvenal] wrote; "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions". A truly super Napoleonic pistol. The cuirassiers were the greatest of all France's cavalry, allowing only the strongest men of over 6 feet in height into it's ranks. The French Cuirassiers were at their very peak in 1815, and never again regained the wonder and glory that they truly deserved at that time. To face a regiment of, say, 600 charging steeds bearing down upon you mounted with armoured giants, brandishing the mightiest of swords that could pierce the strongest breast armour, much have been, quite simply, terrifying. Made in the period that Napoleon was Emperor and ruling most of Europe, it was used through the Royal restoration period, when Napoleon was imprisoned at Elba, and then during the War of the 100 days, culminating at Waterloo . All Napoleon's heavy Cavalry Regiments fought at Waterloo, there were no reserve regiments, and all the Cuirassiers, without exception fought with their extraordinary resolve, bravery and determination. The Hundred Days started after Napoleon, separated from his wife and son, who had come under Austrian control, was cut off from the allowance guaranteed to him by the Treaty of Fontainebleau, and aware of rumours he was about to be banished to a remote island in the Atlantic Ocean, Napoleon escaped from Elba on 26 February 1815. He landed at Golfe-Juan on the French mainland, two days later. The French 5th Regiment was sent to intercept him and made contact just south of Grenoble on 7 March 1815. Napoleon approached the regiment alone, dismounted his horse and, when he was within gunshot range, shouted, "Here I am. Kill your Emperor, if you wish." The soldiers responded with, "Vive L'Empereur!" and marched with Napoleon to Paris; Louis XVIII fled. On 13 March, the powers at the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw and four days later Great Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, Austria and Prussia bound themselves to put 150,000 men into the field to end his rule. Napoleon arrived in Paris on 20 March and governed for a period now called the Hundred Days. By the start of June the armed forces available to him had reached 200,000 and he decided to go on the offensive to attempt to drive a wedge between the oncoming British and Prussian armies. The French Army of the North crossed the frontier into the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, in modern-day Belgium. Napoleon's forces fought the allies, led by Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. Wellington's army withstood repeated attacks by the French and drove them from the field while the Prussians arrived in force and broke through Napoleon's right flank. The French army left the battlefield in disorder, which allowed Coalition forces to enter France and restore Louis XVIII to the French throne. Off the port of Rochefort, Charente-Maritime, after consideration of an escape to the United States, Napoleon formally demanded political asylum from the British Captain Frederick Maitland on HMS Bellerophon on 15 July 1815. The pistol is in very nice condition overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Good Zulu War Impi's Knopkerrie War Club 1879. A Zulu War souvenir. A very fine and strong knopkerrie club in superb condition and fabulous age patina. In one to one combat, the Zulu Impi [warrior] was expertly trained to aim his club blow at an opponents head, which often gave a more catastrophic and urgently needed instant and debilitating result, whereas a spear stab, which may indeed give a mortal wound, might leave an opponant that could still effectively fight back for some considerable time. The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. Following Lord Carnarvon's successful introduction of federation in Canada, it was thought that similar political effort, coupled with military campaigns, might succeed with the African kingdoms, tribal areas and Boer republics in South Africa. In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was sent to South Africa as High Commissioner for the British Empire to bring such plans into being. Among the obstacles were the presence of the independent states of the South African Republic and the Kingdom of Zululand and its army.Frere, on his own initiative, without the approval of the British government and with the intent of instigating a war with the Zulu, had presented an ultimatum on 11 December 1878, to the Zulu king Cetshwayo with which the Zulu king could not comply. Bartle Frere then sent Lord Chelmsford to invade Zululand. The war is notable for several particularly bloody battles, including a stunning opening victory by the Zulu at the Battle of Isandlwana, as well as for being a landmark in the timeline of imperialism in the region. The war eventually resulted in a British victory and the end of the Zulu nation's independence.
A Very Good, 'Garibaldi' Period, 1860, Italian Cavalry 'Battle' Sword A Very Good, 'Garibaldi' Period, 1860, Italian Cavalry 'Battle' Sword The revolutionary general Giuseppe Garibaldi has been dubbed the "Hero of the Two Worlds" in tribute to his military expeditions in both South America and Europe, and he is considered an Italian national hero. The Expedition of the Thousand (Italian Spedizione dei Mille) was a military campaign led by the revolutionary general in 1860, in which a force of volunteers defeated the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, leading to its dissolution and annexation by the Kingdom of Sardinia. A large impressive and imposing sword. All steel hilt with leather grip. All steel scabbard, single fullered combat weight blade. A Photo in the gallery is a remarkable statue of Garibaldi in Washington Square, New York, drawing his sword, that looks extremely similar to this one.The scabbard has some bottom section dented ares.
A Very Good, 'King's Order of 1786' British Officer's Spadroon Sword The Spadroon is a light sword with a straight blade of the cut and thrust type. The style became popular among military and naval officers in the 1790s, spreading from England to the United States and to France, where it was known as the épée anglaise. A spadroon blade usually had a broad, central fuller and a single edge, often with a false edge near the tip In the age of sail, officers were expected to fight right alongside common deckhands. An officer never made his choice of weapon recklessly when he knew he to had to fight hand to hand to repel boarders. The clear choice was a Spadroon as his primary edged weapon. It was lighter than a cutlass, offered a long, stiff blade, was imminently suitable for thrusting, and had a sharp edge The King's order of 1786 only made official what was already an on-going change in the active service as the spontoon proved itself to be more and more unsuited for the modern battlefield: We precis the King's Order of 1786. His Majesty having been pleas'd to order, that the Esponton shall be laid aside, and that, in lieu thereof the Battalion Officers are, for the future, to make use of Swords, it is His Majesty's Pleasure, that the Officers of Infantry Corps, shall be provided with a strong, substantial, uniform-sword, the blade of which is to be straight, and made to cut and thrust; the hilt, if not of steel, is to be either gilt or silver, according to the Colour of the Buttons on the Uniforms and the Sword Knot, to be Crimson and Gold in the strips, as required by the present Regulation.
A Very Nice 18th Century Gentleman's Sporting Gun by Bond of London Finest walnut stock, converted from flintlock to percussion action at the Bond workshop. Octagonal barrel. Half stock for end, fine steel mounts with acorn finial trigger guard. A most charming hand made long gun by one of London's pre eminent makers of the 18th century in the King George IIIrd period. 18th century painting of gentlemen in a hunting scene, using the same sporting gun, for illustration only As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Nice 19th Century Dixon & Son Pistol Powder Flask In nice order with working spring spout with three adjustable gram measures. 4.75 inches long overall. A delightful piece with pressed shell pattern in copper with gilt spout. Super patina.
A Very Nice 19th Century Zulu War Period Dagger, a Shona Bakatwa Made with the traditional leaf shaped blade, carved wood hilt and scabbard. The scabbard and hilt had been decorated in typical form of Zulu wire-work, a decorative fashion that originated utilising cut down British telegraph copper wire. Bound in it's highly distinctive spiral pattern also seen on Zulu knopkerie and assegai [war club and spear] in the period of the latter part of 19th century. Shona tribe Bakatwa were and are passed down from generation to generation in a lineage, and were used in religious rituals to symbolise the presence of the owner’s ancestors, the dagger or sword’s previous owners. In these rituals, the owner addressed the bakatwa as if it was the physical embodiment of his ancestors. This link between the spirits and these edged weapons also meant that n’angas (diviner-healers) and svikiros (spirit-mediums) carried them as the insignia of their profession. Certain Shona hunters were traditionally believed to be under the spiritual influence and guidance of deceased hunters, known as shave spirits, so they also carried bakatwa as a symbol of their spirit ally. In historical times, all Shona men carried a knife or sword of some kind, for use in self-defence and hunting. The ceremonial bakatwa can be distinguished from everyday Shona blades (known as banga) because of its double-edged form and the intricate woven brass wire decoration on the hilt. This weapon was accorded a high level of prestige and status in traditional Shona religious practice.13 inches long overall. Similar examples can be viewed at the Pitt Rivers Museum Oxford. The Pitt Rivers Museum cares for the University of Oxford's collection of anthropology and world archaeology. Not a valuable piece, so easily affordable, yet very interesting
A Very Nice And Rustic Victorian Dagger Cane Large bamboo cane with bramble wood handle and diamond shaped dagger blade. This is a cane intended for close quarter action, ideal for use in a crowd or a conflict in most confined quarters. As a collectable it is simply awesome. A startling and most collectable conversation piece, worthy of the legendary Sherlock Holmes himself, in fact, more likely a tool of the diabolical genius, and arch nemeses of Holmes, Professor Moriarty . One can only imagine what perils and heinous adversities that it's original owner, who had this awesome cane commissioned, must have feared, dreaded or even faced. The name “Bartitsu” might well have been completely forgotten if not for a chance mention by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in one of his Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. In the Adventure of the Empty House (1903), Holmes explained that he had escaped the clutches of his enemy Professor Moriarty through his knowledge of “baritsu, or Japanese wrestling”.
A Very Nice British 1803 Pattern Rifle Regt Officer's Sabre With fine mercurial fire gilt hilt. Used in the Peninsular War, Waterloo & The War of 1812 by an Officer in the 95th Rifles or The 60th Rifles. A beautiful sword, with carved slotted hilt with pierced cypher of the King George IIIrd, with Rifle Regiment Bugle above, as the knuckle bow and a Lion's Head pommel. Old service repair at the knuckle bow. In the book's of Bernard Cornwell his hero Major Sharpe of the 95th [if he had existed] would have used such a fine sword [although in the fictional books he uses a cavalry trooper's sword]. Contemporary, small, old hilt knuckle bow repair. The purpose of the regiments was to work as skirmishers. The riflemen were trained to work in open order and be able to think for themselves. They were to operate in pairs and make best use of natural cover from which to harass the enemy with accurately aimed shots as opposed to releasing a mass volley, which was the orthodoxy of the day. The riflemen of the 95th were dressed in distinctive dark green uniforms, as opposed to the bright red coats of the British Line Infantry regiments. This tradition lives on today in the regiment’s modern equivalent, The Royal Green Jackets. The regiments fought in all campaigns during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing sea-service at the Battle of Copenhagen, engaging in most major battles during the Peninsular War in Spain, forming the rear-guard for the British armies retreat to Corunna, serving as an expeditionary force to America in the War of 1812, and holding their positions against tremendous odds at the Battle of Waterloo. Colonel Coote Manningham (c.1765 - 26 August 1809) was a British army officer who played a significant role in the creation and early development of the 95th Rifles. Born the second son of Charles Manningham of Surrey, Manningham began his career as a subaltern in the 39th Foot serving under his uncle, Sir Robert Boyd, at the Siege of Gibraltar. On the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars in 1793, he was appointed as Major to the light infantry battalion where he fought in the Caribbean. He became Lieutenant-Colonel of the 81st Foot and then adjutant-general in Santo Domingo, under the command of Lieutenant-General Forbes. In early 1800, Colonel Manningham and Lieutenant-Colonel William Stewart proposed, and were given the assignment, to use what they had learned while leading light infantry to train the Experimental Corps of Riflemen, later to become the 95th Rifles and then the Rifle Brigade. That summer the new corps was trained in exercises developed by Manningham and were quickly deployed to provide covering fire to the amphibious landings at Ferrol. Manningham died 26 August, 1809 in Maidstone from illness contracted during the Retreat to Corunna in the opening stage of the Peninsular War in which the 95th Rifles were to demonstrate the tactical value of the approach developed by Manningham and Stewart. An inscription under a monument honouring Manningham in Westminster Abbey conveys the esteem in which he was held by his contemporaries. No scabbard.
A Very Rare Civil War P.58/9 Enfield Naval Cutlass 'Lightened' Bayonet Serial numbered 87. This bayonet has a heavy unfullered cutlass shaped blade. The rare Victorian Naval Cutlass Bayonet type with the official 'removed bowl' lightened hilt. German contract made Paul Weyersberg blade. Good condition for age, some surface pitting. Chequered leather grip. Originally developed for service in the British navy, the 1858 Enfield rifle musket (also called the Pattern 58 or P58 Enfield) with 5 groove rifling was imported during the Civil War and saw action on both sides during the conflict. Great Britain exported nearly one million of the guns to America during the conflict, and it saw widespread use on both sides in every major battle from Shiloh in 1862 through the end of the war. during the summer of 1861, Commander James D Bullock of the Confederate Navy placed a separate order for 1,000 Pattern 1858 Naval Rifles, complete with Cutlass Bayonets. These short rifles with their cutlass bayonets (and 1,000 rounds of ammunition for each gun) were noted to have arrived in the Confederate port city of Savannah, GA on November 14, 1861, aboard the blockade runner Fingal (some sources note the arrival as 17th, but Bullock himself notes the 14th). Researchers believe that these Confederate purchased Naval rifles and their accompanying bayonets were numbered in their own series from 1-1000. To date a total of 19 extant examples of Confederate marked and numbered P-1858 Naval Rifles are known, along with a total of 34 Confederate numbered cutlass bayonets. 100 naval Enfields with cutlass bayonets were among the cargo of the Fingal, these weapons were issued to a company of Alabama infantry. The Enfield Rifle Pattern 1859 Cutlass Bayonet was imported during the Civil War by both the North and South for the both their Navy and Coastal Artillery units. These rifles had thicker barrels than the standard Pattern 1856 rifle and were rifled with 5 grooves instead of the normal 3 grooves. The British military wanted to create a dual-purpose bayonet for the rifle (much like Admiral Dahlgren did with his Bowie Knife/Bayonet for the US M-1861 Naval Rifle), and settled on a combination naval cutlass & bayonet as the most practical design. The length and weight of the bayonet must have made its use on the end of a rifle very awkward. In fact the bayonet had a massive 27.25 ” long blade and an overall length of around 33”, which was the same length as the barrel of the rifle that it was intended to be attached to. A few had the bowl officially removed to lighten the bayonet and make it far more manageable both on the rifle and in it's scabbard. This is one of those rare, officially altered bayonets
A Very Rare Early Royal Navy Sea Service Flintlock Pistol 1742 The very rare pre-regulation model, made before the standard, later, 1756 Sea Service regulation pattern. Crown GR lock, made by Willits, dated 1742, [a recorded London maker ] with the crowned ordnance inspector's/receiving mark, swan necked cock. All brass furniture, sea service butt cap with traditional short ears. Brass side plate with covered brass hole for the contemporaneously removed, long, belt hook screw. In 1756 the Royal Navy was issued with the official, regulation Long Sea Service Pistol, which over the next century was changed adapted and remodeled to encompass modern advances in technology. Prior to the 1756 pattern the Navy used pistols that were based around the standard regulation Dragoon Pistols, used by the British cavalry regiments, but it took almost two decades to regularize the pattern for the Royal Navy in 1756. This highly scarce piece is one of those rarely seen pre-regularized pistols that were made in the years before the official pattern was determined. On first viewing it appears almost identical, but on closer inspection, and once it's date is revealed, one can see the subtle differences that set it apart from it's 1756 successor. A near identical example in wreck recovered condition is in the National Maritime Collection, Their pistol was allegedly recovered from the wreck of the St Mathias in St Mary's Creek Chatham, that was sunk by fire during the assault by the Dutch on Chatham in 1667. This pistol has a further highly interesting feature. In the stock, at the grip, there are two purposefully cut notches. It has long been a tradition of both legend and fact that some would 'notch-up' a victory in combat on the hilt or handle his weapon. Some of the most infamous of these were outlaws and gunmen of the American Wild West, but the tradition is said to go back thousands of years. These notches are so deliberate, and without any other easily explained purpose, that it is very reasonable to assume these were executed for one and the same purpose, as a symbol or memory of victory by the sailor, maybe a ship sunk or captured, or an enemy cut down by gunfire in close quarter action. The barrel has an old service repair. The wreck recovered pistol can be viewed on the national maritime museum website. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Rare Original Page From William Shakespeare's Second Folio of 1632 Almost 400 years old, and printed 10 years before the outbreak of the English Civil War. A rare opportunity to own a piece of Shakespearian publishing history, and remarkably affordable too!. Whereas a complete Second Folio can fetch around $300,000, and a complete Second Folio is at present on the market for $650,000, not all of us can afford that, however, to own a single double sided page from the Second Folio, and from the play 'A Winter's Tale' is now another possibility altogether, and a most rare opportunity we are thrilled to offer. The Second Folio is actually the second edition in the same format of Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. In fact the Second Folio was basically a page-by-page reprint of the First Folio and was published in 1632, nine years after the first was published. It was printed and published by people closely connected to the people in the first folio publishing syndicate. The names of the printer and publishers involved can be identified by the colophon of the Second Folio The printer, Thomas Cotes, took over the printing house of his master and his son, William and Isaac Jaggard, after they had deceased in 1623 and 1627 respectively. John Smethwick and William Aspley were also members of the First Folio publishing syndicate. Richard Hawkins and Richard Meighen were included as the current rights holder for Othello and The Merry Wives of Windsor. Robert Allot is thought to have taken over the role of Edward Blount, the principal publisher. Edward Blount died in 1632 leaving his shop, The Black Bear, St. Paul's Churchyard to be taken over by Allot. While the First Folio syndicate needed one and the same title page for all the copies in that edition, the Second Folio syndicate seemed to have found it convenient for each member to have a separate title page with different imprint telling the purchasers the location of each bookshop. Of the 750 first folios produced in 1623, around 230 survive. A copy set a world record for Shakespeare's work when it was sold to Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen for $6.1m in 2001. A third folio from 1663 sold for $374,500 in May. The Winter's Tale was originally published in the First Folio of 1623. Although it was grouped among the comedies, some modern editors have relabelled the play as one of Shakespeare's late romances. Some critics consider it to be one of Shakespeare's "problem plays", because the first three acts are filled with intense psychological drama, while the last two acts are comedic and supply a happy ending. The play has been intermittently popular, revived in productions in various forms and adaptations by some of the leading theatre practitioners in Shakespearean performance history, beginning after a long interval with David Garrick in his adaptation called Florizel and Perdita (first performed in 1754 and published in 1756). The Winter's Tale was revived again in the 19th century, when the third "pastoral" act was widely popular. In the second half of the 20th century The Winter's Tale in its entirety, and drawn largely from the First Folio text, was often performed, with varying degrees of success. The Shakespeare Folios are considered to be the most important published English works in book form after the Bible. They are without question normally within the domain of only museums or billionaires. The Shakepeare's Folio in the Royal Collection belonged originally to King Charles 1st, and that is a Second Folio edition.
A Very Rare, Royal Navy Open Half-Basket Hilted Sword, with Pierced Anchor This is a super Royal Naval sword from the early to mid 19th century, and a most rarely seen type. The guard has a fully carved and open half-basket pierced hilt, inset with a royal, crowned anchor. The grip is carved ribbed horn with fine and original multi wire binding. Plain steel, Wilkinson post 1827 pattern blade. Swords of this rare form are described, in the pre-eminent standard work 'Swords for Sea Service' by May and Annis, Volume 1, page 43. Very few of this sword type exist, and they describe them as, possibly, being made around the 1827-28 period, at the very cusp when the new regulations for naval officer's pattern swords were being set, and the swordmakers were pre-empting the regulations before being fully aware of their officially designated patterns. It certainly resembles the later Master-at-Arms sword's pattern, but, although that pattern was set in regulations with a plain or stepped pommel and black grip, as this one has, it was also set as having a solid half basket, the same as was deemed for the standard officer's sword. There is also conjecture that it was a sword made for midshipmen, but no full determination or firm conclusion has been made. In the National Maritime Museum collection there are only two similar, but with pipe back blades, and one has a lion pommel, with mane back strap, and an ivory grip. According to May and Annis it is concluded that they were anonomolous variants, and although used in service, very little of them is actually known, and very rarely are two quite the same ever seen. An absolute must for the collector of the various patterns of British Naval swords, and for the collector of rare British service swords. In forty years we have never seen quite it's like before, in comparison to the thousands of standard naval officers swords that we have had and sold. It comes with two brass scabbard mounts, one monogrammed E M. 32.25 inch long blade.
A Very Rare, Original, "Pirate Captain's" Combination Sword-Pistol C. 1740 A most superior example of a rare piece. From the Queen Anne to King George 1st period, a most fine hunting sword, with an armourer's marked blade, with a brass knuckle bow, embossed shell guard and robbed horn grip, and beautifully and most adeptly custom set with a Queen Anne flintlock cannon barrel pistol by Diemer of Berlin, within the hilt. In the late 17th and early 18th century Royal Navy ship's captains used hunting swords, both as their primary edged weapon arm, and as a signal of rank. On very rare occasions, swordsmiths would be charged by a Captain or officer to create a fiendishly devious combination weapon, comprising a sword with a flintlock pistol inset into the hilt. It is said they were particularly popular with the infamous maritime Privateers, and Buccaneers, who, in the most part, became notorious around the world as the Pirates of the Spanish Maine, such as Captain's William Kidd, George Booth, Edward Teach [Blackbeard] & Henry Jennings, to name but a few. Very few of these wonderful historical curios still exist outside of museums. They were also the use of a noble when hunting wild boar in the German forests to doubly ensure a successful the coup de grace, there are two most similar examples in Wawel Castle at Krakow, Poland and at the Jagdmuseum in Munich Germany This is a most superior quality example, completely operational, and in very sound order indeed. A rare opportunity to acquire one of these incredible early weapons that are only normally to be seen in world class national collections, or as modern replica facsimiles. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Scarce British Boer War Sam Browne & .455 Service Holster Used in the Boer War and into WW1. A very interesting example and black, with two crossover straps for the Cameronian Rifle regiment. A nice early British army officers Sam Browne, this is Victorian issue as can be told by the fact that it has large fully round brass attachment loops hanging down these were replaced by the common D ring type around 1900.
A Very Scarce British Colonial Flank Company Officer's Sword Circa 1795 Swords of the EIC British officers were often quite distinctive in their extravagant design. This rare style is typically shown in this fine sword's copper gilt hilt. With gilt rivetted wooden grip and extremely curved, flattened side, steel blade. In 1798, Tippu Sultan ruler of Mysore formed a vague alliance with the French, which gave the British governor-general Lord Wellesley a pretext to invade Mysore in alliance with the nizam of Hyderabad. Tippu was killed May, 1799 defending his capital at Shrirangapattana. This event against the 'Tiger of Mysore' was the subject of one of the later 'Sharpe of the 95th' books by Bernard Cornwall. His kingdom was divided among the victors. The East India Co. [for those who are unfamiliar with it] was one of the largest organisations ever to have existed, and it even had it's own Army and Navy, large and powerful enough to rival those any of any country in the world. It was run by British Officers and Gentleman, in India, to enable peaceful free trade throughout the British Empire. Founded by Royal Charter in 1600 it continued until 1858. It's successes were numerous and included the Victory of Sir Robert Clive [Clive of India] at the Battle of Plassey and the eradication of the infamous and fearful 'Thuggees' of the Cult of Kali. It created the greatest trading cities in the world Hong Kong and Singapore, it's Shipyards were the model for Peter the Great's city of St Petersberg.
A Very Scarce French Chassepot Rifle Artillery Musketoon Modele 1866 The scarce Artillery Musketoon model, St Etienne. Converted to the Gras system in 1874. Renamed the 1866-74. At some time this gun has been used by the French colonial troops, the famous Spahi, and over decorated with flamboyant inlays at the butt, possibly when the gun was retired from military service . 11mm calibre, .20+ inch barrel. no licence required.Its inventor was, Antoine Alphonse Chassepot, and it became the French service weapon in 1866. It was first used at the battlefield at Mentana, November 1867, where it inflicted severe losses on Garibaldi's troops. The event was reported at the French Parliament: "Les Chassepots ont fait merveille!", {The Chassepots did marvelous execution !} In the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) it proved greatly superior to the German Dreyse needle gun, outranging it by 2 to 1. Although it was a smaller caliber but the chassepot ammunition had more gunpowder and thus faster muzzle velocity. The Chassepots were responsible for most of the Prussian and other German casualties during the conflict. Small Gras cartridge adaption bolt head lacking As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Very Scarce Scottish Basket Hilted 18th Century Fencible Regiment Sword With distinctive two part centrally welded basket, in sheet iron, with scrolls and thistles there over. Interesting original regimental swords of the 18th century, from Scottish regiments are very much sought after throughout the entire world. Scottish Fencible Regiment's swords are now jolly rare indeed, yet they bare highly distinctive in their unique form. Fancy carved replacement grip. Some ironwork separation on the basket by the forte of the blade, but overall in good sound condition. Overall natural age surface pitting.
A Very Unusual Civil War 'C.Howard' Rimfire Long Gun with Underlever Action This is undoubtedly one of the scarce patent action guns made in the 1860's to 1870 that didn't make it into greater production. There are elements of similarity in this rifle to the profile of Jean Baptiste Revol's [of New Orleans] patent breech loading rifle of 1853. In America around this time all manner of new gun actions and mechanisms were being created, in order to utilize the latest breech loading cartridges that had been designed to replace the outdated percussion muzzle loading system. This rifle, although not in pristine condition, is a must for collectors of unusual and patented actions from this incredible era. For it was this very time, when no one new for certain which way the new cartridges could be made to function to their best advantage, that probably the most significant weapons were being created, and those systems and actions were to mould the whole industry of arms production even until today. Great and legendary gunsmiths, such as Henry [who sold out to Winchester], were striving to create the best, most efficient, and indeed most marketable methods to evolve the rifle into the next level of development and progress, and this is likely one of those that simply failed to make the grade. This gun is one of only 2000 Mr. C. Howard's patent guns ever made, including the examples made under contract by Whitney Arms of Conn. USA. Made from the 1862 patent by Howard from the Civil War and by Whitney from 1866 to 1870. Most examples are marked by Whitney but just a few were completely unmarked, and this is one of those few. Just a very few came to England in the late 19th century so although a very rare gun relatively speaking, it is far rarer here in the UK. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
A Victorian 4th Btn South Wales Borderers Volunteers Glengarry Badge This badge, from the fourth quarter of the 19th century. From likely one of the most famous regiments of all time. The South Wales Borders, the 24th Foot [formerly the Warwickshire Regt.] was the Victorian regiment of the Zulu War Rourke's Drift Victoria Cross engagement fame, and the regiment that was near wiped out at the Isandhlwana massacre just the day before. Immortalised in Micheal Caine's epic film ZULU in the 1960's. This is the brief story of the 24th Foot in South Africa at the Isandhlwana massacre ; In 1875 the 1st Battalion arrived in Southern Africa and subsequently saw service, along with the 2nd Battalion, in the 9th Xhosa War in 1878. In 1879 both battalions took part in the Zulu War, begun after a British invasion of Zululand, ruled by Cetshwayo. The 24th Foot took part in the crossing of the Buffalo River on 11 January, entering Zululand. The first engagement (and the most disastrous for the British) came at Isandhlwana. The British had pitched camp at Isandhlwana and not established any fortifications due to the sheer size of the force, the hard ground and a shortage of entrenching tools. The 24th Foot provided most of the British force and when the overall commander, Lord Chelmsford, split his forces on 22 January to search for the Zulus, the 1st Battalion (5 companies) and a company of the 2nd Battalion were left behind to guard the camp, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pulleine (CO of the 1/24th Foot). The Zulus, 22,000 strong, attacked the camp and their sheer numbers overwhelmed the British. As the officers paced their men far too far apart to face the coming onslaught. During the battle Lieutenant-Colonel Pulleine ordered Lieutenants Coghill and Melvill to save the Queen's Colour—the Regimental Colour was located at Helpmakaar with G Company. The two Lieutenants attempted to escape by crossing the Buffalo River where the Colour fell and was lost downstream, later being recovered. Both officers were killed. At this time the Victoria Cross (VC) was not awarded posthumously. This changed in the early 1900s when both Lieutenants were awarded posthumous Victoria Crosses for their bravery. The 2nd Battalion lost both its Colours at Isandhlwana though parts of the Colours—the crown, the pike and a colour case—were retrieved and trooped when the battalion was presented with new Colours in 1880. Interestingly, in the film Zulu's voice over, the regiment is referred to as the South Wales Borderers but, officially, it was known [in 1879] as it's old name, the Warwickshire regiment
A Victorian British Connaught Rangers Officer's Helmet Tin the case which is emblazoned with the makers name Hawkes and a brass plaque with the officer's name and regiment engraved, Addis Delacombe Esq Connaught Rangers. The 1st Battalion deployed to South Africa as part of 5th (Irish) Brigade which was commanded by Major-General Fitzroy Hart. The Rangers took part in numerous engagements during the Boer War. The regiment took part in the Battle of Colenso on 15 December, part of the attempt to relieve the town of Ladysmith, besieged by Boer forces. The Rangers and the rest of the 5th (Hart's) Brigade, who were on the left flank, had been forced to perform over 20 minutes of drill before the advance. The Brigade suffered heavily during their participation in the battle, the Boers inflicting heavy casualties. The advance was met with a fire from three sides that forced them to withdraw. The battle ended in defeat for the British. That battle and two previous defeats at Magersfontein and Stormberg became known as 'Black Week'. The Rangers fought at Spion Kop and the Tugela Heights during further attempts by General Sir Redvers Buller to relieve the besieged town of Ladysmith. In late February the siege of Ladysmith finally came to an end after it was relieved by British forces. The regiment was awarded the battle honour Relief of Ladysmith in addition to South Africa 1899–1902. The 5th Brigade subsequently deployed to Kimberley and took part in further operations against the Boer guerillas. The Rangers finally departed South Africa for Ireland after the Boer War ended in 1902, and were also awarded the theatre honour. In 1908 the 1st Battalion arrived in India while the 2nd Battalion returned home to Ireland. The 1st and 2nd battalions of the regiment were given new Colours by HM King George V in 1911. The 2nd Battalion had left Ireland and was in England when the "war to end all wars", the First World War, began in August 1914. This tin is in untouched condition and could be much improved with simple cleaning but we have left 'as is' for those that prefer it as such.
A Victorian British Yataghan Bladed Bayonet For The Enfield Rifle Used on the Indian Mutiny Enfield 2 Band Rifles. With a good recurved Yataghan blade, three rivet chequered leather grip, steel mounted leather scabbard. These Bayonets were also very popular and used by both the North and South in the American Civil War. Locking button lacking.
A Victorian Durham Light Infantry Helmet Plate Ist Volunteer Battalion In white metal with black centre. The 1st Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps was formed at Stockton-on-Tees in 1860, and in 1880 was amalgamated with other Durham corps, from Darlington, Castle Eden and Middlesbrough, to form a battalion of eight companies. The 1st Durhams later became the 1st Volunteer Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry and as such gained the battle honour `South Africa 1900-02' for the services of its members during the Boer War.
A Victorian Horseguard's Officer's Sword of The Boer War The sword of the elite Royal Horse Guards, the monarch's mounted bodyguard. A sabre of the Boer War vintage, fully ordnance marked and dated. Good wirebound fishskin grip. Blackened finish. Overall surface pitting. No scabbard. Made by Robert Mole. The Royal Horse Guards (RHG) is a cavalry regiment of the British Army, part of the Household Cavalry. Founded August 1650 in Newcastle Upon Tyne by Sir Arthur Haselrig on the orders of Oliver Cromwell as the Regiment of Cuirassiers, the regiment became the Earl of Oxford's Regiment during the reign of King Charles II. As the regiment's uniform was blue in colour at the time, it was nicknamed "the Oxford Blues", from which was derived the nickname the "Blues." In 1750 the regiment became the Royal Horse Guards Blue and eventually, in 1877, the Royal Horse Guards (The Blues). The RHG gaoned Battle Honours in the Boer War at the Relief of Kimberley & Paardeberg, South Africa 1899-1900 The Battle of Paardeberg or Perdeberg ("Horse Mountain") was a major battle during the Second Anglo-Boer War. It was fought near Paardeberg Drift on the banks of the Modder River in the Orange Free State near Kimberley. Lord Methuen advanced up the railway line in November 1899 with the objective of relieving the besieged city of Kimberley (and the town of Mafeking, also under siege). Battles were fought on this front at Graspan, Colenso, Modder River before the advance was halted for two months after the British defeat at the Battle of Magersfontein. In February 1900, Field Marshal Lord Roberts assumed personal command of a significantly reinforced British offensive. The army of Boer General Piet Cronjé was retreating from its entrenched position at Magersfontein towards Bloemfontein after its lines of communication were cut by Major General John French, whose cavalry had recently outflanked the Boer position to relieve Kimberley. Cronje's slow-moving column was intercepted by French at Paardeberg, where the Boer general eventually surrendered after a prolonged siege, having fought off an attempted direct assault by Lieutenant General Horatio Kitchener.
A Victorian Lancashire Artillery Officer's Sword With steel hilt, sharkskin grip with original part wire binding, steel combat scabbard, fully etched blade with regimental name of the Lancashire Artillery, etched with the traditional artillery lightning flashes, flaming grenade and cannon. Used in the Crimean War to Boer War period.
A Victorian Other Ranks Helmet Plate For 'The Buffs' East Kent Regt. A superb helmet plate for one of the great frontline regiments of the British Army. The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment), formerly the 3rd Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army until 1961. It had a history dating back to 1572 and was one of the oldest regiments in the British Army being third in order of precedence (ranked as the 3rd Regiment of the line). It provided distinguished service over a period of almost four hundred years accumulating one hundred and sixteen battle honours
A Victorian Police Constable's Decorated Truncheon Painted finish but considerably worn. Traditional form with ribbed grip long shaft and decorated with Queen Victoria's cypher and Crown. The 18th century had been a rough and disorderly age, with mob violence, violent crimes, highwaymen, smugglers and the new temptations to disorder brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Clearly something had to be done. In 1829 the Metropolitan Police Force, organised by Sir Robert Peel, was established to keep the order in London. The force, under a Commissioner of the Police with headquarters at Scotland Yard, was essentially a civilian one: its members were armed only with wooden truncheons and at first wore top-hats and blue frock-coats. The "Peelers" or "Bobbies" were greeted largely with derision by Londoners, but they did become accepted fairly quickly. Thier primary purpose was to prevent crime, and some London criminals left their haunting grounds of London for the larger provincial towns, which in turn established their own forces on the Metropolitan model. The pattern followed through to the small villages and countryside. To secure co-operation between the spreading network and establish further forces, Parliament passed an act in 1856 to co-ordinate the work of the various forces and gave the Home Secretary the power to inspect them. In the counties, under the Police Act of 1890, the police became the combined responsibility of the local authorities - the County Councils - and the Justice of the Peace, while in London, the Metropolitan Police at Scotland Yard remained under the Commissioner appointed by the Home Office. At the turn of the century, the British police force established a reputation for humane and kindly efficiency. Their mere existence undoubtedly did a lot to prevent crime, and they built up what was on the whole a highly effective system of investigation and arrest.
A Victorian Policeman's Set, Handcuffs, Belt, Whistle, Armband & Truncheon This is a wonderful Victorian London police officer's set from the era of Jack The Ripper, and used into the early Edwardian London. All original set, a fabulous pair of 'Derby's' serial numbered with matching original key, marked by Hiatt, key with coat chain and bar, the Metropolitan Police officer's whistle, marked Metropolitan Police, by J Hudson & Co. of Barr St. with it's original chain and hook, a fine walnut truncheon in excellent condition, a superb constables leather 'snake buckle' belt with Crown M.P stamp to the inner part, and the Policeman's "Duty" band/armlet pre 1880 type. From the mid 1800's the Police wore a band on the lower left sleeve to show when they were on duty. This earliest version is a white backing with two narrow dark blue stripes running horizontally around it. In the 1880's these usually changed to equal width stripes of blue and white running vertically around it. J Hudson & Co. founded in the 1870s in Birmingham by Joseph Hudson (1848- 1930) and his brother James Hudson (1850 - 1888) .
A Victorian Queen's South Africa Medal Awarded to Private Hogg 14th Company Imperial Yeomanry. On 13 December 1899, the decision to allow volunteer forces serve in the Second Boer War was made. Due to the string of defeats during Black Week in December, 1899, the British government realized they were going to need more troops than just the regular army, thus issuing a Royal Warrant on 24 December 1899. This warrant officially created the Imperial Yeomanry. In February 1900 the Yeomanry's commander was Major-General J. P. Brabazon, being in South Africa at the time, followed shortly by Lord Chesham who was appointed as its brigadier-general. The Royal Warrant asked standing Yeomanry regiments to provide service companies of approximately 115 men each. In addition to this, many British citizens (usually mid-upper class) volunteered to join the new regiment. Although there were strict requirements, many volunteers were accepted with substandard horsemanship/marksmanship; however, they had significant time to train while awaiting transport. The first contingent of recruits contained 550 officers, 10,371 men in 20 battalions of four companies each, which arrived in South Africa between February and April, 1900. Upon arrival, the regiment was sent throughout the zone of operations.
A Victorian Royal Artillery Undress Pouch and Bullion Cross Belt Gold bullion crossbelt with gilt bronze fitting of traditional finest quality. A leather undress pouch with gilt brass swivel mounts. Reverse of leather pouch with old score marks. The undress pouch is in patent leather with gilt Royal Artillery badge and motto. The belt has superb original bullion with gilt bronze mounts, embellished finely cast acanthus leaves and the flaming canon ball. The design of the full dress pouch followed that of the full dress sabretache in that the royal arms were central over the battle honour, UBIQUE, latin for 'everywhere'. Laurel leaves are on the left and oak leaves on the right. Below UBIQUE is a metal gun badge, and below that is a three part scroll with the regimental motto QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT - Where Right and Glory Lead. This pouch was worn for special occasions. Mostly the full dress pouch belt was worn with the undress black leather pouch. A vintage photo in the gallery show a Royal Artillery officer wearing his cross belt and pouches [however, the pouches are worn across the back and not visible from the front in this photo].
A Victorian Stafford shire Cavalry Albert Pattern Helmet The Stafford shire Yeomanry (Queen's Own Royal Regiment) was a unit of the British Army. Raised in 1794 following Prime Minister William Pitt's order to raise volunteer bodies of men to defend Great Britain from foreign invasion, the Staffordshire Yeomanry began as volunteer cavalry regiment. It first served overseas at the time of the Boer War. Following distinguished action in Egypt and Palestine in the First World War, it developed with the deployment of artillery and tanks. The Imperial Yeomanry’s first action was on 5 April 1900, when members of 3rd and 10th battalions fought Boer volunteers led by Frenchman Count de Villebois-Mareuil at Boshof. After a series of tactical errors, the Boers were subsequently surrounded. The Count was killed, and the Imperial Yeomanry was victorious, suffering only three casualties. The next action took place in Lindley, a Boer held town. On 27 May 1900, due to a miscommunication, the 13th battalion (under Lieutenant Colonel Basil Spragge) arrived at Lindley where they were ambushed by a group of Boers. Rather than retreat, Spragge decided to fight until aid arrived. Although a message for help did arrive, it did not describe the urgency of the situation, and no help came until it was too late. One officer and 16 men were killed (with another officer and three more men later dying of wounds), and 400 were captured. Following the disaster at Lindley, the Yeoman rode hundreds of miles over the Veldt, but rarely encountered any Boers. With the rate of disease and death rising, morale was falling. During the later part of 1900 they had a few small victories, but still nothing major. Finally, in September, 1900, the City Imperial Volunteers were returning to England, instead of the Imperial Yeoman. This plummeted the morale, and a high number of Yeoman volunteered to join police forces to escape the monotony of regular duty. Due to this, only one-third of the original force was still serving. Eventually, in June or July 1901, all of the first recruits returned to England, except the ones who re-enlisted. The second contingent Due to the lack of numbers for the Imperial Yeomanry, the War Office went on a recruiting spree, which occurred in the early months of 1901. The recruits for the second contingent were usually working class, as opposed to the first contingent. They received extremely poor training and were shipped to South Africa (over 700 were shipped back to England because they were "medically unsuitable or unlikely to become efficient soldiers"). In total, 16,597 men were recruited, including 655 who re-enlisted. The second contingent's first battle was at Vlakfontein in May 1901. Brigadier General Dixon led a force of 230 men from the 7th battalion, as well as artillery, some Scottish Horse, and some men of the Derbyshires. Around 500 Boers attacked the rear party, and the Yeomen fled after suffering 70 casualties. Because of the hasty retreat of the Yeomen, the unsupported Derbyshires and artillerymen were subsequently gunned down. Only a counter-attack by the Scottish Horse and some King's Own Scottish Borderers saved the artillery pieces. Due to the humiliating defeat, the Imperial Yeomanry’s reputation was destroyed and their suitability was questioned in Parliament. By September 1901, the second contingent had improved immensely, as demonstrated by a skirmish near Rustenburg. The men of the 5th and 9th battalions fought off an attack on a column, receiving only 12 dead. As the war progressed, the British government planned to reduce the number of Imperial Yeomen. However, recruits were being raised as early as December to have time for adequate training (although they arrived right before the war ended, and had little impact). The worst disaster for the second contingent was at the Battle of Groenkop (also known as Tweefontein) on 25 December 1901. The 11th battalion was caught off guard by Boers led by General De Wet. The Boers, from a higher position, fired into the tents of sleeping Yeomen. Casualties were 68 were killed, 121 wounded, and 600 taken prisoner. On 25 February 1902 a small skirmish occurred when Boer General De la Rey attacked and captured a convoy at Yzerspruit. The 5th battalion of Imperial Yeomanry was left with 28 dead and 34 wounded. The last major battle was the Battle of Tweebosch on 7 March 1902, when a column under the control of Methuen was attacked by 2000 Boers with artillery. The colonial mounted troops fled, taking most of the Imperial Yeomanry with them. The regular troops left with the convoy had no chance, and ended up with 68 dead, 121 wounded and 600 taken prisoner.
A Victorian, 1860's Queens Westminster Volunteers Silver Buckle A super silver buckle, with excellent detail and quality. 6cm
A Vintage Carved Aboriginal Shield With Kangaroo and Emu. very nice quality & stands as a piece of art as well as an Aboriginal implement. It is a good size (22" long x 4" at the widest) & handcarved from a heavy solid grain timber, possibly West Australian Mulga It is in very nice condition Best of all is the quality of the decoration, it has one kangaroo and two emu on the back (handle side) & a wonderful scene with three kangaroos & two emu on the front. Even the background has been carved with a fine textured look which must have taken some time, no doubt the artist really had talent & took pride in the quality of their work.
A Watercolour By Orlando Norie Of Infantry Officer With a little staining. One of England's foremost military watercolourists. Framed. circa 1875. Orlando Norie was one of the most desirable painters of the British army in the 19th century.His pictures are highly sought after and command high prices. He was a descendant of the celebrated Edinburgh family of artists and designers, son of Sir Robert Norie and a descendant of James Norie the Elder. Orlando Norie painted over 5,300 paintings, mostly water colours. He was born in Belgium in Bruges on January 15, 1832 to Scottish parents and Norie spent most of his life painting in Dunkirk, painting mostly for the British firm of Rudolf Ackermann. Orlando Norie's military paintings were first recognised in 1854 when his print of the Battle of the Alma (Crimean War) published by Ackermann was advertised. This military print edition was quickly followed by the prints of the Battle of Inkerman and the Battle of Balaclava. Many future paintings were made into prints by Ackermann and many of his paintings were exhibited in major exhibitions, one of which was staged in 1873 featuring paintings of the Military Autumn Manoeuvres in Aldershot held in September and October 1871. Orlando Norie died in 1901 and is buried in the old cemetery in Aldershot adjacent to the Commonwealth War Cemetery.He has illustrated military books and his art works are held in many private collections, as well as the Victoria and Albert Royal Collection, the National Army Museum, the India Office library and many regimental museums. In 1887 he completed a commission for Queen Victoria. Painting 6 inches x 7.5 inches,
A Winchester Model of 1866 'Yellow Boy' Saddle Ring Carbine .44 Henry Rim. A stunning Winchester Rifle '1866', 4th model, serial numbered to 1878. The steel has been completely and thoroughly 'no expense spared' re-finished throughout around 30 years ago. Apparently, this rifle was part of an old gun store's permanent window display for more than two decades, whereupon it was sent to be completely re-finished, to return it to as close as possible to it's once 'as new' condition. A lot of the original markings of..Winchester Repeating Arms New Haven Ct. King's Improvement Patented March 29th 1866, Oct 16 1860 are still present to the barrel, but worn away in parts between Winchester.. &.. New Haven. The serial number is good, in the typical and distinctive scrolling script of the fourth model [behind the lever]. The internal inside tang, toe of the butt plate, and stock channel, each has the number 924 stamped. The rifling is present, clear, but as to be expected, worn. Winchester rifle refers to any of the lever-action rifles manufactured by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, though the company has also manufactured many rifles of other action types. Winchester rifles were among the earliest repeating rifles; the Winchester repeater is colloquially known as "The Gun that Won the West" for its predominant role in the hands of Western settlers. The original Winchester rifle - the Winchester Model 1866 - was famous for its rugged construction and lever-action mechanism that allowed the rifleman to fire a number of shots before having to reload: hence the term "repeating rifle." Nelson King's new improved patent remedied flaws in the Henry rifle [ the original model of lever repeating rifle] by incorporating a loading gate on the side of the frame and integrating a round sealed magazine which was covered by a fore stock. Originally chambered in the rim fire .44 Henry, the Model 1866 was nicknamed the "Yellow Boy" because of its brass receiver. Small stock repair to the outside butt stock, and small bruise to the outside gun frame. The small, lever locking lug has been replaced with a plain screw. The action is very crisp and tight. The rarest Winchester's that look as this one, but are in a completely 'original' state, condition and finish, can now approach and pass six figure dollar sums. Collectors in the UK can own this gun without license and without deactivation, as it's cartridge was declared obsolete under section 58,2 of the UK firearms legislation.
A Wonderful Georgian Miniature Foldaway Corkscrew and Hook In delightfully blued steel and only 3.25cm long when folded. Made to be used with very small, corked, poison and cologne glass bottles. And as a button hook for shoe buckles. Circa 1820-30
A Wonderful Late Georgian to Victorian Flamboyant Bladed Belt Dirk A most beautiful dagger with steel ball ended quillons, ebonised hilt with carved pineapple pommel. The flamboyant bladed dagger was more often than not associated with the secret societies as the blade represented the snake. Dirks of this size were also extremely popular with Georgian officer's of the navy as a close quarter protection piece and for midshipman to carry while on duty.
A Wonderful, Very, Very Rare European Medeavil Hauberk Chain Mail Shirt European early mail is really rare and only ever seen in such a near complete state in the best museum or castle armoury collections, such as in the Tower of London, Nuremburg Castle or the British Museum. This mail would be ideal for the connoisseur of medieval European history or the collector of rare armour. It must be said it has little cosmetic beauty at present, but it has a near unlimited abundance of the intellectual beauty of ancient history, and a surviving example of the pageantry from the days of early, European, chivalric knighthood. This is a medieval Hauberk from the late Crusades era up to the 14th - 15th century, and at one time it was housed in the keep of Burleigh Castle. The mail coat or hauberk formed a flexible metal mesh that was often worn over a padded tunic. The traditional image of the knight encased in a full suit of plate armor did not come about until the 1400s. It is relatively complete with some separated areas that could be reconnected with a little patience and skill. The word hauberk is derived from an old German word Halsberge, which originally described a small piece of mail that protects the throat and the neck (the 'Hals'). The Roman author Varro attributes the invention of mail to the Celts. The earliest extant example was found in Ciumesti in modern Romania and is dated to the 4th-5th centuries BC. Roman armies adopted similar technology after encountering it. Mail armour spread throughout the Mediterranean Basin with the expansion of the Romans. It was quickly adopted by virtually every iron-using culture in the world, with the exception of the Chinese. The Chinese used it rarely, despite being heavily exposed to it from other cultures. The short-hemmed, short-sleeved hauberk may have originated from the medieval Islamic world. The Bayeux Tapestry illustrates Norman soldiers wearing a knee-length version of the hauberk, with three-quarter length sleeves and a split from hem to crotch. Such armor was quite expensive — both in materials (iron wire) and time/skill required to manufacture it — Only the wealthy — the nobles — could afford to purchase mail shirts, and so a hauberk became a symbol of rank for the warrior class of society. The first step involves the smelting of iron, and after that, one must make the wire. Making the wire requires the use of small, thin sheets of iron and then shearing thin strips off the sides of this sheet in order to form square wires, or using another method, one can repeatedly beat and shape small iron pieces into narrow rods in order to form the raw material needed for wire. After making the rods, the armorer must reheat and draw the strips through conical holes in a metal block to form round wire, and if thinner wire is needed, he can repeat this step several times using narrower holes. Once the wire is reduced to the desired diameter, it is then wrapped around a metal rod to create long, spring-like coils. The armorer then cuts along the length of the coil, down one side with shears or hammer or cutting chisel, and this causes the coils to separate into individual rings. Each ring is then flattened with a tool called a die, or something similar, and while flattening, the die also punches holes in each end of the ring. The armorer then overlaps the ends of each ring and rivets them shut. This process of flattening, punching with a die, joining the rings together, and then riveting them might have to be repeated thousands of times in order to make a single shirt of mail. The hauberk stored in the Prague Cathedral, dating from the 12th century, is one of the earliest surviving examples from Central Europe and was supposedly owned by Saint Wenceslaus. In Europe, use of mail hauberks continued up through the 14th century, when plate armor began to supplant it. The hauberk is typically a type of mail armour which is constructed of interlocking loops of metal woven into a tunic or shirt. The sleeves sometimes only went to the elbow, but often were full arm length, with some covering the hands with a supple glove leather face on the palm of the hand, or even full mail gloves. It was usually thigh or knee length, with a split in the front and back to the crotch so the wearer could ride a horse. It sometimes incorporated a hood, or coif. The iron links of the mail shirt provided a strong layer of protection and flexibility for the wearer. The overlapping rings allowed a slashing or cutting blow from a sword to glance off without penetrating into the skin; though a smashing blow from a club could still shatter or break or crush bones. For this reason — to prevent the breakage of bones — a knight would wear a layer of padded armor, or an aketon, underneath the mail. So the combined layers of padded tunic and mail gave the knight a suit of armor that was nearly impervious to cutting and slashing and also protective against the heavy, smashing blows often delivered on the medieval battlefield. 2 Illistrations in the gallery of the Bayeaux tapestry [embroidery] show hauberk's being carried for battle, on long poles, by the squires, and a hauberk, in the second picture section, being taken from a fallen knight's body [lower section under Harold Rex].
A Zeppelin Landing Medal Of 31st July 1909 A scarce and collectable medal from the earliest days of airship travel. In good condition with replacement ribbon. Graf Zeppelin landed for the first time in Frankfurt with his airship "LZ II" on July 31, 1909. Thousands of spectators cheered so loudly that Graf Zeppelin could not hear the words of greeting from Mayor Adickes. To this day, the Graf Zeppelin memorial near the future Rebstockpark serves as a reminder of his pioneering work. The Rebstock became the home of the flight pioneers. Pilots gathered for the first international flying competition during the "Flyer week" as a part of the "International Airship Exposition" (ILA) in October 1909. The German Airship Transportation company (DELAG) opened the "Airship Harbor Frankfurt" on the Rebstock grounds on March 4, 1912, using the remodeled manor house as headquarters. The festive event was celebrated with the arrival of the dirigible "Viktoria Louise". The "Frankfurt Airport" was opened on the grounds of the Rebstock in August 1926. By 1928, this was the second largest airport in Germany, after Berlin.
Allen and Thurber American Pepperbox Revolver "The Gun That Won The East" Initially Allen's firm manufactured single shot pistols and rifles, but eventually moved on to early revolvers. The Allen & Thurber Pepper-box, known as the "Gun that won the East", was the most popular repeating handgun of its day. In 1843 he and Thurber relocated to Norwich, Connecticut and in addition to armsmaking, built prototypes of Thurber's typewriter designed for the blind, disabled and those “nervous” about writing by hand. Though patented, the typewriter was never manufactured for commercial sale. In 1847, the company moved to Worcester, Massachusetts, and in 1854 Wheelock became an equal partner with the firm's name changing to Allen Thurber & Co. In 1856, following Thurber's death, they reorganized as Allen & Wheelock and developed a single-action revolver bearing their names. After the death of Wheelock in 1865, his 2 sons-in-law, Sullivan Forehand and H. C. Wadsworth, began working for him and the company changed names to Allen & Company. Upon Allen's death in 1871 the two operated the company under their own names: Forehand & Wadsworth, until Forehand reorganized the company in 1890 as the Forehand Arms Company after Wadsworth's retirement. 8.3 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An 16th-17th Century Italian Left Handed Dagger Long single edged blade with false edge, triple section grip in horn and ivory, bronze pommel cap. Pierced steel shell guard with scalloped edge. The parrying dagger is a category of small hand-held weapons from the European late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. These weapons were used as off-hand weapons in conjunction with a single-handed sword. As the name implies they were designed to parry, or defend, more effectively than a simple dagger form, typically incorporating a wider guard, and often some other defensive features to better protect the hand, as well. The main-gauche is used mainly to assist in parrying incoming thrusts, while the dominant hand wields a rapier or similar longer weapon intended for one-handed use. It may also be used for attack if an opportunity arises. The general category includes two more specific kinds of weapon: sword breakers and trident daggers. The use of an off-hand weapon gradually fell out of favor as sword fighting evolved into the modern sport of fencing. The use of progressively lighter primary weapons such as the small sword, épée, and foil allowed for greater speed. Under these circumstances the use of just a primary weapon offered improvements in balance as well as a stance that offered a smaller target.
An 17th-18th Century Indo-Persian Combination War Hammer-Axe & Gun This Tabar Zin shows characteristics of both, functional and battle weapon. A well made weapon with heavy half-moon shaped axe on one side of the steel shaft, and a hammer on the other side, for the crushing of armour and helmets, and a steel gun using the barrel as the haft. The touch hole is in within the hammer section. The triple function use of this amazing piece makes it not only a scarce collectable but a superb conversational piece
An 1805 Royal Naval Officer's Sword With Intriguing Very Rare Features On first inspection one can see this fine historical sword appears to be a naval officer's sword, from the era of Admiral Lord Nelson, of most regular form. However, once closer examined one can see the deluxe grip is not fish skin or ivory, but carved black ebony with multi-wire binding, and with careful visual handling [not visible by photograph unfortunately] one can see, within the now very faint Georgian etching, a regular GR crown, a large anchor, but also, a distinct marines globe. The Royal Marines were awarded the globe as their official symbol in the later era of King George Ivth, however, it was indeed used for two decades before, unofficially. In the past we have seen etched or engraved on 1803 pattern infantry swords, and once before on a 1796 pattern infantry sword, but this is our first ever, in over 45 years, that we have seen on an 1805 pattern Royal Naval officer's sword. The early marines officer's swords, from 1796 on, were also identified by the use of a carved black ebony grip, which was solely for their use [the regular infantry officer's swords had silver grips on 1796's and fish skin or ivory on the 1803's]. However, the unifying thing for marines officers, was that they generally used [and still do] the regular infantry pattern officers sword, not the naval pattern sword, despite serving mainly at sea. So, thus we come to this sword, and it's anomalies, a typical, Royal Naval officers sword, used in the era of the Battle of Trafalgar and the wars with Napoleonic France, but, with distinct Royal Marines features. It may indeed be thus unique, or at least the last surviving example, and therefore thoroughly intriguing as to it's history. We can only presume that it was used by a Royal Marines officer who considered himself more akin to the navy than the army, or , possibly as it was made in the era before King's or Queen's regulations dictated the use and patterns on swords service use, and thus it was simply chosen out of preference. Either way, it is a mighty rare, and beautiful piece, from the very centre of the greatest period of the Royal Navy's history under sail, that straddles both distinguished and heroic services of the greatest maritime force that history has ever seen. “…we tykes a blood-brother, or matelot. . . A matelot, ‘e fights along side o’ yer, nurses yer if yer falls sick. Wots ‘is is yours and what's yours is ‘is. . .” Francis van Wyck Mason, [Boston, Mass.]
An 1850'S British Pioneer and Royal Navy Cutlass Brass hilt, steel sawbacked blade, with brass and leather mounted scabbard. Invented for use in the Crimean War, issued as a regimental sapper's weapon for defences and siege construction, and then many were recalled [in the late Victorian era and early 20th century] and re-issued to the Royal Navy for Naval Brigades, for use as a cutlass as well as a sapper's sword. Some were recorded as being used by the British Navy in the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. Made by Robert Mole.
An 1853 Spanish Percussion Miquelet Lock Sporting Gun With fine walnut stock, percussion miquelet lock, and a wolfs head motif set onto the inside stock butt. Barrell dated 1853 with proof marks. Miquelet (Catalan "Little Michael") is a late term, largely used by and for the benefit of the English speaking world, widely applied to a distinctive form of gunlock mechanism (lock), originally as a flint-against-steel ignition form, with the main spring on the external face, prevalent in the Mediterranean lands and Spanish America, in the late 16th to early 19th centuries. Sometime in the middle 1570s, Madrid gunsmiths introduced a prototype miquelet lock, possibly based on a lock developed in Brescia. The prototype was further developed by Madrid gunmakers, almost certainly including the Marquart family of Royal gunmakers, into the Spanish patilla style now most associated with the miquelet. The miquelet lock, with its combined battery and pan cover was the final innovative link that made the true flintlock mechanism possible. It proved to be both the precursor and companion to the true flintlock. Two major variants of the miquelet were produced. The Spanish lock where the mainspring pushed up on the heel of the cock foot and the two sears engaged the toe of the cock foot. The other variant was the Italian type where the mainspring pushed down on the toe of the cock foot and the sears engaged the cock on the heel of the foot The origin of the term as it applies to this lock mechanism is a matter of opinion, one commonly held opinion being that the term was originated by British troops in the Peninsular War ascribing the term to the particular style of musket or fusil used by the Miquelet (militia) assigned to the Peninsular Army of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An 1856 Pattern Royal Marines Drummer's Sword, Rare Curved Blade Pattern. Sword in good condition, with Royal Marines markings, but the scabbard is very poor but we are having it carefuuly restored. An unusual version of the Victorian bandsman sword as the straight bladed version is far more standard. The price includes the repair but the photos don't show it yet
An 18th Cent. Flintlock 'Spring Gun', As Used At Williamsburg Va.in 1775 It was this very type of gun that was part of the cause of the American War of Independence in Virginia in June 1775 [more of that to follow later]. An intriguing man-trap curiosa in the form of a flintlock gun trap, bed into a mount of harmless looking wooden log. It would be set, seeming innocent, upon a pile of old logs, but wired up to a set of trip wires. When a non too innocent trespasser, vagabond, thief or poacher tripped the wire the gun would both at once, spin around to face them, and then to discharge it's volley, shooting the victim with shot or single ball. Historically spring traps were mechanical firearm devices for catching or wounding poachers and trespassers. The gun would not only punish the victim but alert the landowner, gamekeeper or guard to their presence if in earshot. Landowners or officers at this time had no compunctions about setting lethal traps to keep out those they legally defined as trespassers from estates or restricted areas of important defence. A historic use of a spring-gun occurred during the night of June 3 or early morning of June 4, 1775 when a spring-gun set by the British to protect the military stores in the Magazine in Williamsburg, Virginia wounded two young men who had broken in. The subsequent outrage by the local population proved to be the final act of the Gunpowder Incident, leading Governor Lord Dunmore to flee the city to a British warship and declare the Commonwealth of Virginia in a state of rebellion. Rumours that the royal marines were returning brought out the militia. On June 8, after Dunmore fled to H.M.S. Fowey. British rule in Virginia was at an end. American history is littered with heroes and villains. The American founding fathers—Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, and Franklin, however, John Murray, the Fourth Earl of Dunmore, garners the distinction of America’s first villain. Lord Dunmore was the British Royal Governor of Virginia at the time of the American Revolution and a foremost adversary of the colonists. As a colonial governor in the mid-1770’s, Lord Dunmore would have been a controversial man due to his title alone. Lord Dunmore’s lack of diplomatic skills and drastic crisis control made him a convenient target for colonial hatred during the build up to the American Revolution, compelling Thomas Jefferson to cite his actions in the list of grievances against the British Empire in the Declaration of Independence. In November 1775 Lord Dunmore, royal governor of Virginia, issued a proclamation promising freedom for any enslaved black in Virginia who joined the British army. Within a month, nearly three hundred slaves had joined what would be known as “Lord Dunmore’s Ethiopian Regiment.” Later, thousands of slaves fled plantations for British promises of emancipation. At the end of the war, the British kept their word, to some at least, and evacuated as many as fourteen thousand “Black Loyalists” to Nova Scotia, Jamaica, and England Another recorded victim of the spring gun was in England, in late in 1815, a poacher named Thomas Till had actually been killed by a tripwire-activated spring gun, to the outrage of his compatriots. In 1827, their use was made illegal in England, except within a house itself, between sunset and sunrise, as a defence against burglars and ne'er do wells.
An 18th Century Anglo-American Small sword Circa 1775 Very likely English made and used in the Americas by both English and American officers of the Army or Navy. In blackened cut steel, single knuckle bow and an ovoid neo classical pommel with a fine diamond cut pattern. Plain wooden grip oval guard with small pas dan. Hollow trefoil blade with central fuller. Original blackened finish. One pas dans and the quillon have been shortened See the standard work "Swords and Blades of the American Revolution" by George C. Neumann Published 1973. Sword 216s. Page 136 for two very similar swords. Due to the original blackened hilt, one could dub this a "mourning" sword. A mourning sword was one that would generally have blackened fittings (hilt and grip) and was worn at funerals, but they were also worn as an everyday item of informal dress, which would rule out the idea that they were only worn for somber occasions, and worn by officers, with a gilt or parcel-gilt knot for embellishment. A particular painting showing a very good example of this is in the National Maritime Museum and it is most similar. The painting is of British Naval Captain Hugh Palliser, who wears the same form of sword with a blackened hilt , but with a gold sword knot which gave it a sleek overall appearance. A full-length portrait of Sir Hugh Palliser, Admiral of the White, turning slightly to the right in captain's uniform (over three years seniority), 1767-1774. He stands cross-legged, leaning on the plinth of a column, holding his hat in his right hand. The background includes a ship at sea. From 1764 to 1766, when he was a Captain, Palliser was Governor of Newfoundland, where James Cook, who had served under him earlier, was employed charting the coast. He was subsequently Comptroller of the Navy and then second-in-command to Augustus Keppel at the Battle of Ushant in 1778. Good condition overall, Blade 27.5 inches long
An 18th Century Hallmarked Solid Silver Butt Cap For A Gentleman's Musket Heavy guage, cast, King George IIIrd London silver, dated either 1769 or 1789 [difficult to tell exactly]. This would enhance a musket or fowling piece up to a whole new level, either as a replacement for a plain brass type, or to replace a missing example. 147.5 grams weight, butt 50mm x 124mm, butt tang 105mm
An 18th Century Miquelet Lock Pistol Likely North African with a Spanish lock. A typical Spanish lock pistol from the region, with simple stock and furniture and a plain steel barrel. Extremely popular at the time as their cost was much more competive compared to their European counterparts, and many saw service in the old Ottoman Empire and throughout Portugal, Italy and Spain, by lesser equiped irregulars who fought in the Napoleonic Wars, against the French occupiers of the Iberian Peninsular. We have had to have the lock completely refurbished in order to restore all the original parts to the mechanism [that had been wrongly replaced with composite parts]. It now works perfectly and has all it's now correct type original period parts. Pistols of this form often came into England in the 19th century from the earliest steamship tourists that travelled with such companies as the White Star Line or the Cunard Steamship Line.Victorian travellers of the time may often pick up these old pistols from the souks and bazaars in North Africa, Zanzibar and the Ottoman port of Constantinople. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An 18th Century Small Sword Rapier. A Long, Boot or Cloak Sword Cast brass hilt with relief figural decoration, and hawthorn wood grip. Steel rapier blade with engraving and deep fuller. No knuckle bow or guard. No scabbard. Circa 1750. The knuckle bow and guard have been purposefully removed and the hilt re-attached. We had one quite similar, around 20 years ago, which came with an old article from a Connoisseur journal, It described, what was called, a boot or cloak sword. In the days of the threat by highwaymen, when a gentleman may have the need to consistently travel from town to town on horseback, but not by mail coach, a constant traveler might adapt a sword that could be easily slotted into knee high riding boots, or slipped into an especially constructed sleeve inside a riding cloak. For in wet and inclement weather a gentleman's flintlock pistol could not function, so without a sword for protection he was dangerously defenseless. Naturally a standard rapier short sword would be more normal, but on occasion, a gentleman that traveled constantly, or journeyed on perilous pursuits [such as a revenue man] might require a more concealable sword that would be far more easily manageable on both horseback or on foot. It also has the unique advantage of being eminently useable as a short distance spear type weapon, as it's weight balance is now very effective for that alternate purpose. 29.75 inches long overall
An 18th Century Turkish, Bone Hilted Kindjal Short Sword The blade has traces of a complex etched design that may include Islamic script. Carved bone hilt with single silver leaf and nail stud.
An 18th-19th Century Indo Persian Tulwar Lord of Cleaving Bifurcated Blade A rare, original, and glorious18th to 19th century Zulfikar [Zulfiqar] Tulwar, with a most scarce bifurcated blade, covered in it's full length with Islamic script. Inlaid with silver circlets on the hilt. A very similar sword is shown in W. Egerton's book, Handbook of Indian Arms… Plate XV, item 658. According to the tradition of the Islam, the prophet Muhammad had two swords. The first was a straight bladed sword, common to the period, which is now shown in the Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul. The second sword is believed to have had a split blade. This sword was given to Ali, the prophet's son in law, who fought with it in many great battles and saw great victories. That sword was nicknamed Zulfikar (Lord of cleaving). This sword was lost, and no one exactly knows it's form other than by legend. Many attempts to describe the Zulfikar have been made during the development of Islamic swords. Certainly that there is a possibility that this sword is one of those attempts to create a version of the legendary sword of Ali. By most accounts, Muhammad presented the Zulfiqar to a young ‘Ali at the Battle of Uhud. During the battle, ‘Ali struck one of the fiercest adversaries, breaking both his helmet and his shield. Seeing this, Muhammad was reported to have said " There is no hero but ‘Ali and no sword except Dhu l-Fiqar". Blade cutting edge 78cm, width of blade at the ricasso 4.5cm, bifurcated points 23 cms long. Overall in superb condition for age.
An Absolute Beauty! A Mid 19th Century Ivory Handled Swordstick Engraved blade with a Latin motto Defensio non Provocatio [In Defense not Provocation] and the name of the gentleman to whom it was supposedly given, Philip Cook, who was a former US Congressman. The handle is in the sign-post form carved to somewhat resemble bamboo with a waisted carved belt . The collar and ferrule are silvered copper and the mallacca haft stunningly lacquered. The blade is single edged and inches long. The motto is hand script engraved followed by the General's name. Apparently when General Cook was badly wounded in the leg he required a cane to enable his walking, and it was at this juncture that this sword stick was given to him, in around 1865. It bears the highly pertinent inscription, engraved [in Latin], due to his profession as a lawyer "In Defence not Provocation" This sword was not used by him during his service as a Lt Col and General of the Confederate States, but later, during his years in politics and the law. Philip Cook was born in Twiggs County, Georgia. His parents had moved from Virginia to Georgia. He served with the United States Army in the Seminole Wars, serving in Florida. After studying at Oglethorpe University, he graduated from the law school of the University of Virginia in 1841. He subsequently lived in Macon County, Georgia, where he maintained a law practice. Once the American Civil War started, Cook sided with the Confederate States of America and enlisted as a private in the 4th Georgia Volunteer Infantry. By the end of the Seven Days Campaign on the Virginia Peninsula, Cook had advanced to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He also fought in the battles of Second Manassas, Antietam and Chancellorsville, where he was wounded in the leg. As a result, he missed the Gettysburg Campaign while he recovered. For a short time, Cook took a leave of absence to serve in the Georgia Legislature before returning to the army. At the Battle of Cold Harbor in 1864 he took command of the brigade when Brig. Gen. George P. Doles was killed. Cook was wounded again during the Siege of Petersburg. After recovering, he fought under Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Ramseur at the Battle of Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah Valley before returning with his men to the trenches around Petersburg, Virginia. He was wounded a third time during the 1865 attack on Fort Stedman. After the war ended in early 1865, Cook moved to Americus, Georgia, where he set up a law practice and was active in local and state politics. From 1873 to 1883, Cook was a member of the United States House of Representatives, serving a district comprising part of southwest Georgia. He became Georgia's Secretary of State in 1890 and was part of the commission that built Georgia's state capitol building in Atlanta. Phillip Cook died in Atlanta on May 21, 1894. Cook County, Georgia, is named in his honor. There is no documentary provenence in regards to this very fine swordstick, but it bears it's engraving, in precisely the correct style for the period in the US at that time but applied later, and it is without doubt the fine quality swordstick of a statesman, with the motto of once military man who was in the service of his country. Another famous American statesman who once carried a most similar swordstick was President George Washington. This swordstick came through an owner who was given it as a souvenir some many decades ago, and we have added no value to this fine sword in regards to it's supposed ownership, we include these details above for interest and posterity alone. It's price is purely based on it's beauty, age, condition and quality
An Albanian- Balkan 'Rat Tail' Flintlock Pistol Albania and Macedonia, used in the Ottoman Army, these beautiful weapons saw service around the entire region throughout the Empire where there were irregulars, recruited from the Balkans involved, such as in Egypt during the Napoleonic wars. They were used not just by Ottoman troops, but also by various outlawed bands and by Christian freedom fighters. Ottoman Empire encompassed notably fractious regions, each of which had a long history of making guns their own particular, unique way, be that the Albanian rat-tail, the Ottoman tufek or the Bosnian boyliya. Their influence, moreover, spread across regions which also had a very strong tradition of doing things in their own manner. Albania was a part of the Ottoman Empire at the time. The region was famous for a large number of gun makers, who manufactured this kind of pistol in big quantities for the Ottoman army. The entire stock is covered with engraved brass plates, which is a characteristic feature of Albanian pistols. The pistol is decorated with ornamental motifs, parts of the lock are nicely engraved. Part-octagonal, part-round barrel. One brass barrel band. Good tight action. The pistols of this pattern were used extensively in many wars in Balkans, including the Greek uprisings. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Amazing, Superb, Heavy Quality & Powerful, 18th Century 'Battle' Katar With crows beak tip to enable heavy penetrating power for piercing of chain mail armour. The katar originated in Tamil Nadu where its Dravidian name was kattari before being altered to katar in the north. The earliest forms occur in the medieval Deccan kingdom of Vijayanagara. Katar dating back to this period often had a leaf- or shell-like knuckle-guard to protect the back of the hand, but this was discarded by the latter half of the 17th century. The Maratha gauntlet sword or pata is thought to have been developed from the katar. As the weapon spread throughout India it became something of a status symbol, much like the Southeast Asian kris or the Japanese katana. Among the Rajputs, Sikhs and Mughals, princes and nobles were often portrayed wearing a katara at their side. This was not only a precaution for self-defense, but it was also meant to show their wealth and position. Upper-class Mughals would even hunt tigers with katar. For a hunter to kill a tiger with such a short-range weapon was considered the surest sign of bravery and martial skill. The heat and moisture of India's climate made steel an unsuitable material for a dagger sheath, so they were covered in fabric such as velvet or silk. Because the katara's blade is in line with the user's arm, the basic attack is a direct thrust identical to a punch, although it could also be used for slashing. This design allows the fighter to put their whole weight into a thrust. Typical targets include the head and upper body, similar to boxing. The sides of the handle could be used for blocking but it otherwise has little defensive capability. As such, the wielder must be agile enough to dodge the opponent's attacks and strike quickly, made possible because of the weapon's light weight and small size. Indian martial arts in general make extensive use of agility and acrobatic maneuvers. As far back as the 16th century, there was at least one fighting style which focused on fighting with a pair of katara, one in each hand. This Katar is 14.75 inches long, weighs 535 grams
An Amercian Wild West 32 Cal Rimfire Revolver Red Jacket No3 Birds head butt boot or pocket pistol. Good action. Boot or pocket pistols that became a most necessary part of life in the Old West. Remington was one the most famous makers of these most interesting, historical and attractive pistols and practically every world renown gambler, and saloon character such as 'Doc' Holiday, 'Wild Bill' Hickock, Jack MacCall carried one such pistol or even several. There was one famous gunfight involving just two men, where over nine guns were drawn and used between them.
An American 'Wild West' Period Nickel Plated Revolver With engraving on the nickel frame and mother o'pearl grips. A very fancy little pistol the type used by the more flamboyant gamblers or even ladies as an ideal revolver for protection. The action is tight and revolves well but the hammer won't catch. ,32 cal rimfire. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An American 1790 Eagle Head Pommel Spadroon Sword With a gilt brass and ivory hilt. Very good hilt condition with much original gilt remaining. Single fullered blade, sharp point shortened at the tip. Used in the War of 1812. Straight blade, inches long.The War of 1812 was fought between the United States of America, on one side, and on the other side Great Britain and its colonies, especially Upper Canada (Ontario), Lower Canada (Quebec), Nova Scotia and Bermuda. The war was fought from 1812 to 1815 and involved both land and naval engagements. The Americans declared war on Britain on June 18, 1812, for a combination of reasons— outrage at the impressment (seizure) of thousands of American sailors into the British navy, frustration at British restraints on neutral trade while Britain warred with France, and anger at British military support for hostile Indians blocking American settlement of the Old Northwest, which by treaty with Britain belonged to the U.S. The war started badly for the Americans as their attempts to invade Canada were repeatedly repulsed by General Isaac Brock commanding a small British force. The American strategy depended on use of militias, but they either resisted service or were incompetently led. Military and civilian leadership was lacking and remained a critical American weakness until 1814. New England opposed the war and refused to provide troops or financing. Financial and logistical problems plagued the American war effort. Britain possessed excellent finance and logistics but the ongoing war with France had a higher priority, so in 1812-13 they adopted a defensive strategy. After the defeat of Napoleon in 1814 they were able to send veteran armies to invade the U.S., but by then the Americans had learned how to mobilize and fight as well. 29 inches long overall
An American Civil War & Wild West Era Smith and Wesson This is an early mid-1860's production Smith & Wesson Model 1 1/2, 1st Issue revolver in .32 rimfire. Barrel address reads, " Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Mass. Pat'd Apr.3, July 5. 1859 . Manufactured from 1865 to 1868. German silver half moon sight on the barrel rib with the two line address and patent markings. Casehardened hammer, ejector rod and spur trigger. Blue barrel frame and cylinder and varnished square butt rosewood grips. Very good action, nice and crisp.
An American War of independence Era 1773-1788 British Light Dragoon Sword. Brass stirrup hilt now finely heavily patinated, a very long clipped back blade 35.5 inch long. Fishskin bound grip. This sword is so rarely seen, with little known of it's origins, and as very few remain in existance it rarely appears photographed in any reference books on British swords. Little or no documentation on it's order and manufacture exists. What is known, is that it is estimated it was made from 1773, but possibly earlier, and it was replaced by the more abundant 1788 version. That sword is far more well recorded, and fair number survive. A very few examples of this sword are kept in a few, select American museums, that contain the miltary collections of captured British weapons from the American Revolutionary War. Swords such as this were made for and used by the British Light Dragoon Regiments, including the infamous 'Tarleton's Green Dragoons'. We detail here, in order for our readers to gain a flavour of that influencial war, and it's events connected to these particular Light Dragoons. Banastre Tarleton was originally a young British officer of the 1st Dragoon Guards, who purchased his rank of cornet. He proved to be such a gifted horseman and leader of troops, due to his outstanding ability alone, he worked his way up through the ranks to Lieutenant Colonel without having to purchase any further commissions. In December 1775, he sailed from Cork as a volunteer to North America where rebellion had recently broken out triggering the American War of Independence. Tarleton sailed with Lord Cornwallis as part of an expedition to capture the southern city of Charleston. After this failed, he joined the main British Army in New York under General Howe. His service during 1776 gained him the position of a brigade major of cavalry. After becoming the commander of the British Legion, a mixed force of cavalry and light infantry also called Tarleton's Raiders, he proceeded at the beginning of 1780 to South Carolina, rendering valuable services to Sir Henry Clinton in the operations which culminated in the capture of Charleston. This was part of the 'southern strategy' by which the British directed most of their efforts to that theater hoping to restore authority over the southern colonies where they believed there was more support for the crown. On 29 May 1780, Tarleton, with a force of 150 mounted soldiers, overtook a detachment of 350 to 380 Virginia Continentals led by Abraham Buford. Buford refused to surrender or even to stop his march. Only after sustaining heavy casualties did Buford order the surrender. What happened next is cause of heated debate. According to American accounts, Tarleton ignored the white flag and mercilessly massacred Buford's men. In the end, 113 Americans were killed and another 203 captured, 150 of whom were so badly wounded that they had to be left behind. Tarleton's casualties were 5 killed and 12 wounded.[6] The British called the affair the Battle of Waxhaw Creek, while the Americans called it the "Buford Massacre" or the "Waxhaw Massacre." In recounting Tarleton's action at the scene, an American field surgeon named Robert Brownfield wrote that Col. Buford raised a white flag of surrender, "expecting the usual treatment sanctioned by civilized warfare". While Buford was calling for quarter, Tarleton's horse was struck by a musket ball and fell. This gave the loyalist cavalrymen the impression that the rebels had shot at their commander while asking for mercy. Enraged, the loyalist troops charged at the Virginians. According to Brownfield, the loyalists attacked, carrying out "indiscriminate carnage never surpassed by the most ruthless atrocities of the most barbarous savages." Tarleton's men stabbed the wounded where they lay. In Tarleton's own account, he virtually admits the massacre, stating that his horse had been shot from under him during the initial charge and his men, thinking him dead, engaged in "a vindictive asperity not easily restrained." However there are strange contraditions as to Tarleton's behaviour, for, contrary to his nature, as described by his conduct at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson himself later noted, "I did not suffer by him. On the contrary he behaved very genteely with me. ... He gave strict orders to Capt. Mcleod to suffer nothing to be injured." Tarleton materially helped Cornwallis to win the Battle of Camden in August 1780. He was completely victorious in an engagement with Thomas Sumter at Fishing Creek, aka "Catawba Fords", but was less successful when he encountered the same general at Blackstock's Farm in November 1780. Then in January 1781, Tarleton's forces were virtually destroyed by American Brigadier General Daniel Morgan at the Battle of Cowpens. Tarleton however managed to flee the battlefield with perhaps 250 men. Although Tarleton had a deservedly dastardly reputation, many other Light Dragoon forces were commanded by far more respected and gentlemanly officers, and the troops under their command fought in the most formative conflicts of both American and British history. A war that shaped the whole world that followed it, arguably more than any other war before it. Although in terms of casualties, fewer men perished in the whole war of Independence, that covered several years, than in a single day during the Battle of Gettysberg, less than 100 years later in the Civil War. This sword has a 35.5 inch blade. This sword has been superbly conserved in our workshop
An Ancient Chinese Bronze Battle 'Ge' Polearm around 2700 Years Old A rare Pole Arm Halberd of the Zhou or Tang Dynasty. The word 'Ge' means dagger axe. The whole form of this beautiful example is based around a bird of prey, in relief. Beautifully modeled with hieroglyphics, an elongated main blade and a shorter back blade. Around 700 B.C.Socket mount for a wooden haft. Good patina with feint signs of cuprite that forms beneath the encrustation. This item is, in many ways, most interesting as it is so reminiscent of Ancient Egypt. The whole form and design appears, on first inspection, to be based around Horus god of Edfu [ the Hawk, god of the sky, protector of Kingship and son of Osiris and Isis]. A replacement short haft for illustration purposes has been fitted. National Geographic made a superb documentary on the uses of the 'Ge' in warfare with a near identical original example shown.
An Ancient Late Viking Period Throwing or Belt Axe A bearded Viking short bearded battle axe [that could double as a throwing axe] from around the time of the last Viking, English King, Eric Bloodaxe, King of Northumbria. Probably the eldest son of King Harald Finehair [The first King of all Norway]. Eric's name probably derives from the legend that he murdered at least four and possibly most of his 20 brothers, excepting Hakon. This was an unfortunate error as, upon Haralds death, Hakon returned to Norway from Britain to claim Harald's throne, and removed Eric from his Kingship. His elder brother Eric then fled Norway to Britain and to King Athelstan, an old friend of his father's, whereupon he took the Kingdom of Northumbria in around 947 a.d. While the sagas call him 'Bloodaxe', one of the Latin texts calls him fratris interfector (brother-killer), but, for whatever reason his name was derived, it was certainly a fine example of the descriptive titles the Viking warriors had, and that we are told of in the Viking sagas. The sagas paint Bloodaxe – a name they gave to Eric – as a barbarian, a murderous tyrant whose savagery was shocking even by Viking standards. Contemporary evidence, mainly from the Anglo-Saxon chronicles, is less vivid. This has the Northumbrians selecting Eric Bloodaxe as their king in 947. The English king Eadred responded by invading and ravaging Northumbria, burning down St Wilfrid’s minster at Ripon. As the English army headed south, Eric Bloodaxe’s army caught up with its rearguard and ‘made a great slaughter’ at Castleford. Eadred threatened to destroy Northumbria in revenge, and the Northumbrians turned their back on Eric and made reparations to the English king. After another change of mind they accepted Olaf Sihtricsson as their ruler, only for Eric to drive him out and take over again. Finally in 954 Eric Bloodaxe was expelled for the second and final time and King Eadred of Wessex and England gained control. In battlefield excavated condition but in a remarkably good and even usable state for it's age. Axe head 7 inches deep x 4 inches high. Open socket haft mount. A similar example is in York museum. Like his near contemporary, Thorfinn Skullsplitter of Orkney, the name Eric Bloodaxe conjures up an immediate image of the archetypal Viking warrior; huge, hairy, heroic, and the proud owner of a powerful axe. All axes at that time also doubled as working tools, when appropriate, for iron was a hugely valuable commodity before the Industrial Revolution and extremely costly to make.
An Antique African Tribal Mask Carved Wood and Metal Decoration Possibly Dogon of Mali. Ritual and ceremonial masks are an essential feature of the traditional culture and art of the peoples of Subsaharan and West Africa. While the specific implications associated to ritual masks widely vary in different cultures, some traits are common to most African cultures: e.g., masks usually have a spiritual and religious meaning and they are used in ritual dances and social and religious events, and a special status is attributed to the artists that create masks and to those that wear them in ceremonies. In most cases, mask-making is an art that is passed on from father to son, along with the knowledge of the symbolic meanings conveyed by such masks. In most traditional African cultures, the person who wears a ritual mask conceptually loses his or her human identity and turns into the spirit represented by the mask itself. This transformation of the mask wearer into a spirit usually relies on other practices, such as specific types of music and dance, or ritual costumes that contribute to conceal the mask-wearer's human identity. The mask wearer thus becomes a sort of medium that allows for a dialogue between the community and the spirits (usually those of the dead or nature-related spirits). Masked dances are a part of most traditional African ceremonies related to weddings, funerals, initiation rites, and so on. Some of the most complex rituals that have been studied by scholars are found in Nigerian cultures such as those of the Yoruba and Edo peoples, that bear some resemblances to the Western notion of theatre. Since every mask has a specific spiritual meaning, most traditions comprise several different traditional masks. The traditional religion of the Dogon people of Mali, for example, comprises three main cults (the Awa or cult of the dead, the Bini or cult of the communication with the spirits, and the Lebe or cult of nature); each of these has its pantheon of spirits, corresponding to 78 different types of masks overall. It is often the case that the artistic quality and complexity of a mask reflects the relative importance of the portrayed spirit in the systems of beliefs of a particular people; for example, simpler masks such as the kple kple of the Baoulé people of Côte d'Ivoire (essentially a circle with minimal eyes, mouth and horns) are associated to minor spirits. A special class of ancestor masks are those related to notable, historical or legendary people. The mwaash ambooy mask of the Kuba people (DR Congo), for example, represents the legendary founder of the Kuba Kingdom, Woot, while the mgady amwaash mask represents his wife Mweel. 14 inches x 5.25 inches
An Antique Australian Aborigine Boomerang Stone carved and with beautiful chip-carved and patinated surface. Decorated with a snake design.
An Antique Dinka Tribal Spear From The Upper Nile The Spear Masters of the Dinka Tribe of the upper Nile are a hereditary priesthood, and according to mythology, their presence is reinforced by political and religious ideals. There are several legends of the origins of these spear using masters, one in which includes a lion and a man dancing. The lion demands a bracelet that the man is wearing and he refuses. In return, the lion bits off his thumb in order to claim what he thinks belongs to him and the man dies during the confrontation. The man leaves behind a wife and daughter with no son.
An Antique Koummya Jambiya Dagger of North Africa Tradition double edged blade with brass and silver metal coloured mounted scabbard. Dark hardwood hilt rimmed in arab silver with black cord belt.Silver coloured metal, not hallmarked English silver.
An Antique Maine Gauche Left Handed Dagger, For Combat Use With A Rapier A most charming antique left handed parrying dagger with remains of gentle scroll engraving thoughout the crossguard and pommel. The double edged blade has pitting, from around a third down the blade right to the tip. We feel that the brass grip has been replaced, probably in the 19th century. Likely when the dagger may have been recovered from it's abandonment or loss, after the original wooden grip had rotted away. The parrying dagger is a category of small hand-held weapons from the European late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. These weapons were used as off-hand weapons in conjunction with a single-handed sword. As the name implies they were designed to parry, or defend, more effectively than a simple dagger form, typically incorporating a wider guard, and often some other defensive features to better protect the hand, as well. It may also be used for attack if an opportunity arises. The general category includes two more specific kinds of weapon: sword breakers and trident daggers. The use of an off-hand weapon gradually fell out of favour as sword fighting evolved into the modern sport of fencing. The use of progressively lighter primary weapons such as the small sword, épée, and foil allowed for greater speed. Under these circumstances the use of just a primary weapon offered improvements in balance as well as a stance that offered a smaller target.
An Antique Miniature Keris or Keris, With Meteoric Steel Blade Circa 1900. Keris Melayu Semenanjong with a serpentine blade with 7 Luk [seven curves or waves]. A good and scarce example of a keris from the southern Malaysian peninsular region of Johor or Selangor. Handle in the jawa demam form. This form of hilt is common in central or southern Sumatra, as well as the Malay peninsular regions. The Minang variant is usually more upright with a more flaring top. The top sheath in the typical Malay tebeng form, are made from very well selected kemuning woods with flashing grains. Bottom stem is likely made from well selected angsana woods with tiger’s stripe grains. Pamor patterns are arranged in the mlumah technique of the wos utah or scattered rice variations which is said to enhance the owner’s material well being. 9 inches long overall
An Antique Original Flintlock Holster Pistol Much Favoured by Pirates A most attractive 18th century pistol, designed to fit in a wide belt sash, or, in a flintlock pistol bucket. A pistol with superb charm and most elegant lines. With a silver cartouch on the grip, fully floriate engraved over the lock and a stunningly floriate chisseled and engraved flared barrel. It has fairly plain steel mounts, a brass tipped ramrod, and a walnut stock. This is exactly the type of pistol one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A sprauncy, long barrel pistol, with a large, cast brass, butt cap and complete with it's elongated extra long 'ears' [side straps] typical of the period of early gunmaking. It is finely embellished all over with stands of arms, as are all the mounts, decorated with cannon, drums, halbeards, and flags. The action is fully operational and the spring is extraordinarily strong. This is an original, honest and impressive antique pistol piece that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This Pistol may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. This pistol is essentially a Turko-Ottoman example of the highly attractive type that were efficient, effective, most sought after and much prized, and thus an essential part of the pirate's trade. They didn't conform to a regular pattern, varying in quality, but they all had the 'form follows function' ethos. A style of pistol that first surfaced around 1665, and saw the peak of it's popularity in Western Europe during the mid to third quarter of the 18th century. The design was overtaken, but only in much of Western Europe, by a simpler, plainer form of pistol design, but it continued to be very popular, no doubt due to it's extravagance and style, in middle and eastern Europe, especially around the Mediterranean, until the early 19th century. A good slender curvature, and a medium weight long pistol that suits a comfortable grip. It was written that after Queen Anne's War, which ended in 1713, it cast vast numbers of naval seamen into unemployment and caused a huge slump in wages. Around 40,000 men found themselves without work at the end of the war - roaming the streets of ports like Bristol, Portsmouth and New York. In wartime privateering provided the opportunity for a relative degree of freedom and a chance at wealth. The end of war meant the end of privateering too, and these unemployed ex-privateers only added to the huge labour surplus. Queen Anne's War had lasted 11 years and in 1713 many sailors must have known little else but warfare and the plundering of ships. It was commonly observed that on the cessation of war privateers turned pirate. The combination of thousands of men trained and experienced in the capture and plundering of ships suddenly finding themselves unemployed and having to compete harder and harder for less and less wages was explosive - for many piracy must have been one of the few alternatives to starvation. Euro-American pirate crews really formed one community, with a common set of customs shared across the various ships. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity thrived at sea over a hundred years before the French Revolution, and continued for many years after. The authorities were often shocked by their libertarian tendencies; the Dutch Governor of Mauritius met a pirate crew and commented: "Every man had as much say as the captain and each man carried his own weapons in his blanket". A 18th century pistol of eastern Mediterranean origin, and although it has signs of combat wear is still working highly effectively, and was likely used right into the mid 19th century. It looks most attractive, it is completely original, an antique flintlock of days long gone past yet not forgotten.
An Antique South Seas Islands Carved Paddle-Spear In carved native wood with geometric carving covering one paddle side, the other side is plain. Oceanic art is often infused with ancestral spirits, as well as spirits of water, air and land. These spirits are contacted in ceremonies to ensure fertility, or invoke protection from famine, disease or enemies. Sometimes these invocations serve extremely practical purposes. There was a ceremony in Papua New Guinea where ancestral spirits were activated in a carved wooden crocodile. Men carrying the crocodile were then led, like people holding a divining rod are led, to the home of a local murderer. Authentic Oceanic art is not made for decoration. It is made to be used as a tool in the culture. Traditionally, the people of Oceania did not make pictures of people or paint landscapes to make money. But since they realized that tourists would pay money for their art, this has changed. In the 20th century, Cubist painters, and especially Surrealists, were moved by the power of Oceanic abstractions, as they were by traditional African art
An Antique South Seas Islands Carved Paddle-Spear In carved native wood with geometric carving covering both paddle sides, the other side is carved with a different pattern. Oceanic art is often infused with ancestral spirits, as well as spirits of water, air and land. These spirits are contacted in ceremonies to ensure fertility, or invoke protection from famine, disease or enemies. Sometimes these invocations serve extremely practical purposes. There was a ceremony in Papua New Guinea where ancestral spirits were activated in a carved wooden crocodile. Men carrying the crocodile were then led, like people holding a divining rod are led, to the home of a local murderer. Authentic Oceanic art is not made for decoration. It is made to be used as a tool in the culture. Traditionally, the people of Oceania did not make pictures of people or paint landscapes to make money. But since they realized that tourists would pay money for their art, this has changed. In the 20th century, Cubist painters, and especially Surrealists, were moved by the power of Oceanic abstractions, as they were by traditional African art
An Antique Tibetan Gus Knife With Finely Decorated Scabbard and pierced hilt pommel. Complete with belt loop. When knives such as this were collected, by explorers of the time of Queen Victoria, and King Edward VIIth it came from the mystical Himalayas, the legendary home of Shangri La, the mythical Himalayan utopia, as was beautifully set for the basis of James Hilton's novel, Lost Horizon. A knife from a higher ranking Tibetan that itself evokes the very wonders of Tibet and Shangri La, a word that conjures up the imagery of exoticism of the Orient. In the ancient Tibetan scriptures, and the existence of seven such places is mentioned as Nghe-Beyul Khimpalung. The use of the term Shangri-La is frequently cited as a modern reference to Shambhala, a mythical kingdom in Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which was sought by Eastern and Western explorers; Hilton was also inspired by then-current National Geographic articles on Tibet, which referenced the legend. And it was wonderful knives such as this very one that symbolised that wonderful culture, and never before seen by the average Victorian in England Known in Tibet as a Gus knives, they appeared during the period of Tubo King Zhigung Tsampo. According to Historical Records of the Hans and the Tibetans, Gus knives were made by nine brothers with small eyes in an environmentally fierce place called Sidor. The eldest made a knife sharp enough to cut a rope ladder leading up to the heaven. His eight brothers all made knives with sharp blades as well. One of the Gus knives was the Guda knife, made by the legendary master of the nine brothers together with his offspring.
An Antique Tibetan Gus Knife With Finely Decorated Scabbard and pierced hilt pommel. Complete with belt loop, and string bound grip. When knives such as this were collected, by explorers of the time of Queen Victoria, and King Edward VIIth it came from the mystical Himalayas, the legendary home of Shangri La, the mythical Himalayan utopia, as was beautifully set for the basis of James Hilton's novel, Lost Horizon. A knife from a higher ranking Tibetan that itself evokes the very wonders of Tibet and Shangri La, a word that conjures up the imagery of exoticism of the Orient. In the ancient Tibetan scriptures, and the existence of seven such places is mentioned as Nghe-Beyul Khimpalung. The use of the term Shangri-La is frequently cited as a modern reference to Shambhala, a mythical kingdom in Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which was sought by Eastern and Western explorers; Hilton was also inspired by then-current National Geographic articles on Tibet, which referenced the legend. And it was wonderful knives such as this very one that symbolised that wonderful culture, and never before seen by the average Victorian in England Known in Tibet as a Gus knives, they appeared during the period of Tubo King Zhigung Tsampo. According to Historical Records of the Hans and the Tibetans, Gus knives were made by nine brothers with small eyes in an environmentally fierce place called Sidor. The eldest made a knife sharp enough to cut a rope ladder leading up to the heaven. His eight brothers all made knives with sharp blades as well. One of the Gus knives was the Guda knife, made by the legendary master of the nine brothers together with his offspring.
An Antique Zulu Throwing Club, A Scarce Version Of The Zulu Knopkerrie Ovoid pointed head Knobkierrie, also spelled knobkerrie, knopkierie or knobkerry, are African clubs used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head. This knobkierrie is carved from a branch thick enough for the knob, the rest being whittled down to create the shaft. The name derives from the Afrikaans word knop, meaning knot or ball and the word kierie, meaning cane or walking stick. The name has been extended to similar weapons used by the natives of Australia, the Pacific islands and other places. Knobkierries were an indispensable weapon of war, particularly among southern Nguni tribes such as the Zulu (as the iwisa) and the Xhosa. During the Great War the knobkierrie was occasionally used. The weapon is reported carried by British soldiers in Siegfried Sassoon's fictionalised autobiography of his service in France during World War One, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer.
An Antique, Very Attractive, Ching, Chinese Dragon Decorated Small Sword In silver coloured metal, possibly made from what in old Manchu Chinese they would call coin silver. Such as a high grade silver, mixed with a lesser grade. It has it's very fine, rayskin part bound, silver scabbard with it's steel, formed blade. Still with small old cloth cordings attached. Probably taken as a souvenir by a British officer in the late Ching dynasty, Regency Manchu period, of the Empress Dowager Tzu Hsi. Apparently a souvenir from an early Boxer Rebellion period expedition into China.The Boxer Rebellion, more properly called the Boxer Uprising, or the Righteous Harmony Society Movement was a violent anti-foreign, anti-Christian movement called the "Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists" in China, but known as the "Boxers" in English. The main 'Boxer' era occured between 1898 and 1901. This fascinating era was fairly well described in the Hollywood movie classic ' 55 Days in Peking' Starring Charlton Heston and David Niven. The film gives a little background of Ching Dynasty's humiliating military defeats suffered during the Opium Wars, Sino-French War and Sino-Japanese war or the effect of the Taiping Rebellion in weakening the Ching [Qing] Dynasty. However, situations in which the various colonial powers exerted influence over China (a great source of outrage that drove many Chinese to violence) are alluded to in the scene in which Sir Arthur Robinson and Major Lewis visit the Empress after the assassination of the German minister. * Dowager Empress - "....the Boxer bandits will be dealt with, but the anger of the Chinese people cannot be quieted so easily. The Germans have seized Kiaochow, the Russians have seized Port Arthur, the French have obtained concessions in Yunnan, Kwan See and Kwantang. In all, 13 of the 18 provinces of China are under foreign control. Foreign warships occupy our harbours, foreign armies occupy our forts, foreign merchants administer our banks, foreign gods disturb the spirit of our ancestors. Is it surprising that our people are aroused?" * Sir Arthur Robinson - "Your Majesty if you permit me to observe, the violence of the Boxers will not redress the grievences of China" * Dowager Empress - "China is a prostrate cow, the powers are not content milking her, but must also butcher her." * Sir Arthur Robinson - "If China is a cow your majesty, she is indeed a marvelous animal. She gives meat as well as milk.... A previous Ching emperor put the Himalayan region of Amdo under their rule in 1724, and incorporated their neighbouring region of eastern Kham into neighbouring Chinese provinces in 1728. The Ching government ruled these areas indirectly through the Tibetan noblemen. Swords, such as this very fine one, were made with strong influences of both the Tibetans and the Chinese, and this beautiful example, bearing the typical Chinese dragon within it's mounting, is disctinctly more influenced by the Imperial Chinese Ching style than their Western dominion of Tibet. Tibetans claimed that Tibetan control of the Batang region of Kham in eastern Tibet appears to have continued uncontested from the time of an agreement made in 1726 until soon after the British invasion, which alarmed the Qing rulers in China. They sent the imperial official Fengchuan to the region to begin reasserting Qing control, but the locals revolted and killed him and two French Catholic priests and burned the church. The Qing government in Beijing then appointed Zhao Erfeng, the Governor of Xining, "Army Commander of Tibet" to reintegrate Tibet into China. He was sent in 1905 (though other sources say this occurred in 1908) on a punitive expedition. His troops destroyed a number of monasteries in Kham and Amdo, and a process of Sinification of the region was begun. Overall 20.5 inches long.
An Early 17th Century Indian Steel Katar With Armour Piercing Tip. A fine and elegant style of katar. Weapons are among the finest examples of Mughal period decorative arts and this katar is an elegantly formed example of traditional Indian weaponry. Both armourers and jewellers collaborated to produce weapons. They were also received as gifts at the imperial court, used in traditional Indian warfare and formed an integral part of royal attire. This is illustrated in a fine Moghul paintings. The Imperial Mughal painting, 'Jahangir as Prince Salim returning from a hunt' shows the prince with a similar formed punch-dagger tucked into his waistband.The katar originated in Tamil Nadu where its Dravidian name was kattari before being altered to katar in the north. The earliest forms occur in the medieval Deccan kingdom of Vijayanagara. Katar dating back to this period often had a leaf- or shell-like knuckle-guard to protect the back of the hand, but this was discarded by the latter half of the 17th century. The Maratha gauntlet sword or pata is thought to have been developed from the katar. As the weapon spread throughout India it became something of a status symbol, much like the Southeast Asian kris or the Japanese katana. Among the Rajputs, Sikhs and Mughals, princes and nobles were often portrayed wearing a katara at their side. This was not only a precaution for self-defense, but it was also meant to show their wealth and position. Upper-class Mughals would even hunt tigers with katar. For a hunter to kill a tiger with such a short-range weapon was considered the surest sign of bravery and martial skill. The heat and moisture of India's climate made steel an unsuitable material for a dagger sheath, so they were covered in fabric such as velvet or silk. Because the katara's blade is in line with the user's arm, the basic attack is a direct thrust identical to a punch, although it could also be used for slashing. This design allows the fighter to put their whole weight into a thrust. Typical targets include the head and upper body, similar to boxing. The sides of the handle could be used for blocking but it otherwise has little defensive capability. As such, the wielder must be agile enough to dodge the opponent's attacks and strike quickly, made possible because of the weapon's light weight and small size. Indian martial arts in general make extensive use of agility and acrobatic maneuvers. As far back as the 16th century, there was at least one fighting style which focused on fighting with a pair of katara, one in each hand. Picture in the gallery of the Emperor Jehangir returning from a hunt with his katar at his waist..Another two paintings, 18th century Moghul, also in the gallery showing the katar worn with formal courting dress.
An Early 18th Century Scottish Basket Hilted Broadsword Possibly by John Simpson of Glasgow. Certainly in his manner but no initials remain on the guard to identify it. With a wide broadsword blade that stills bears the remains of some decorative engraving. A Good Original early Scottish Basket Hilted Broad Sword, a typical sword as used in the Dundee Rising, the first Jacobite Rebellion of 1715 and the second rebellion in 1745. Although each Jacobite Rising had unique features, they were part of a larger series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of Scotland and England. After the House of Hanover succeeded to the British throne in 1714, the risings continued, and intensified. They continued until the last Jacobite Rebellion ("the Forty-Five"), led by Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender), who was soundly defeated at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. This ended any realistic hope of a Stuart restoration. The "First Jacobite Rebellion" and "Second Jacobite Rebellion" were known respectively as "The Fifteen" and "The Forty-Five", after the years in which they occurred (1715 and 1745). Interestingly the basket hilt broadsword was used by all of the main combatants during that time, by the some English [mostly on horseback] the Lowland Scots and the Highlanders, but only the Scots continued it's use as a battle weapon and dress sword. Good Iron basket of traditional early 18th century form. At some time, likely 100 years past, some old battle damage at the rear of the basket has been repaired. The sections have been 'museum repaired' in a deliberate, different coloured metal, in order to blend but not obscure. The obverse side rear has been replaced, and the reverse mid rear panel has been replaced, and the grip wood replaced.
An Early 18th Century Scottish Highlander's Basket Hilted Sword Possibly even late 17th century. The fine back sword blade is marked with the running wolf or fox. While very similar to the running wolf mark of the German Solingen smiths it was often used by the makers at Hounslow and Shotley Bridge. A Good Original early Scottish Basket Hilted Broad Sword, a typical sword as used in the Dundee Rising, the first Jacobite Rebellion of 1715 and the second rebellion in 1745. See "British Basket Hilted Swords" by Cyril Mazansky, page 101, sword F5b for a most similar sword. Similar examples can be found on Marischal Museum, University of Aberdeen Hilts, [1675-1700]. The basket is in very good order one plate is lacking. The original wooden grip is present, part of the original leather is there, and the now deeply patinated copper spiral binding is loose but all correct and present. The blade is single fullered and very good. All the steel is well surfaced with no detrimental pitting at all. A very nice early Scottish sword with signs of use but not abuse. Although each Jacobite Rising had unique features, they were part of a larger series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of Scotland and England (and after 1707, Great Britain). James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones were claimed by his daughter Mary II jointly with her husband, the Dutch-born William of Orange. After the House of Hanover succeeded to the British throne in 1714, the risings continued, and intensified. They continued until the last Jacobite Rebellion ("the Forty-Five"), led by Charles Edward Stuart (the Young Pretender), who was soundly defeated at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. This ended any realistic hope of a Stuart restoration. Dundee's rising in Scotland On 16 April 1689; John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee, raised James' standard on the hilltop of Dundee Law with fewer than 50 men in support. Although Presbyterian historians later labelled him "Bluidy Clavers" for his vicious persecution of Covenanters, he has also been called "Bonnie Dundee". This was from a song written by Sir Walter Scott in 1830. James had already arrived in Ireland and his letter was on the way promising Irish troops to assist the rising in Scotland. At first Viscount Dundee had difficulty in raising many supporters. The ineffectiveness of the Williamite commander Major-General Hugh Mackay of Scourie encouraged support. Two hundred Irish troops successfully landed at Kintyre to add to Dundee's forces. Dundee also received support in the western Scottish Highlands from both Roman Catholic and Church of Scotland clans. By July the Jacobites had eight battalions and two companies, almost all Highlanders. Dundee gained the confidence of the clans by cultivating the allegiance of each Highlander and respecting the precedence of the clans. He realized that to them, the cause of Jacobitism was secondary. At a time when infantry were trained to fight in formation, the Highlanders' method was more informal. They set aside their plaids and other encumbrances before the battle, and dropped to the ground to avoid enemy volleys. After quickly returning fire, they pursued their foes, screaming in the Highland charge. They used heavy broadswords and targe (shield), or whatever weapons they had, including pitchforks or Lochaber axes (a combined axe and spear on a long pole). Such a charge was devastating to troops struggling to reform their lines, or fix the recently introduced 'plug' bayonets.The Highland charge (and troop strength) defeated a larger lowland Scots force at the Battle of Killiecrankie on 27 July 1689. About one-third of the Highlanders were killed in the fighting, and Dundee died in the battle. At the street fighting of the Battle of Dunkeld on 21 August, the Jacobite Highlanders were decisively defeated by the Cameronians. Much of the North remained hostile to the English government. Expeditions to subdue the highlands were met with a series of skirmishes. Jacobite forces suffered a heavy defeat at the Haughs of Cromdale on 1 May 1690. Later that month Mackay constructed Fort William on the site of an old fort built by Cromwell. News in July of William's victory over James at the Battle of the Boyne caused Jacobite hopes to fall. On 17 August 1691 William offered all Highland clans a pardon for their part in the Jacobite Uprising, provided that they took an oath of allegiance before 1 January 1692 in front of a magistrate. The Highland chiefs sent word to James, now in exile in France, asking for his permission to take this oath. James eventually authorised the chiefs to take the oath, but it was mid-December before his message arrived. Despite difficult winter conditions, a few took the oath in time. The brutality of the Massacre of Glencoe sped acceptance by the clans. By the spring of 1692 the Jacobite chiefs had all sworn allegiance to King William. The uprisings were aimed at returning James VII of Scotland and II of England, and later his descendants of the House of Stuart. The "First Jacobite Rebellion" and "Second Jacobite Rebellion" were known respectively as "The Fifteen" and "The Forty-Five", after the years in which they occurred (1715 and 1745). Good Iron basket of traditional 17th century form. Interestingly the basket hilt broadsword was used by all of the main combatants during that time, by the some English [mostly on horseback] the Lowland Scots and the Highlanders, but only the Scots continued it's use as a battle weapon and dress sword. It fell out of favour and it's practical use by the English by around the 1790's. Blade length 32.5inch, blade width at the ricasso 1.3 inches, basket width 5.25 inches [widest]
An Early 19th Century, British, Georgian Period Naval Cutlass. An early variant Ship's cutlass with a Royal Navy cutlass 1804 pattern cast steel ribbed grip. Blackened steel half bowl guard and curved single fuller blade. A great, stout and formidable matelot's cutlass, from the days of sailing around the seven seas. In the time when the Royal Navy was the most formidable and successful in the world. In the early 1700s the most famous of cutlass designs was taken up by the Royal Navy. This was the "double disk" cutlass, perhaps invented by Thomas Hollier, which featured two disks of steel as a guard joined by a broad strip of metal to complete protection for the hand. Thousands of these weapons were turned out by a variety of manufacturers and the weapon was used by a variety of navies. Sailors received little training in sword technique and indeed these weapons were often snatched up at the last minute from chests kept on deck, either to repel boarders or to take on a boarding made against another ship. Scabbards were not needed because a sailor would need his cutlass for immediate use in battle. However one in ten were made with scabbards for shore parties. Boarding over the side of another ship in the days of sail was often a difficult affair. Sometimes the enemy's vessel could be much bigger than your own, or indeed much smaller, necessitating either a climb up the gunports and through the anti-boarding nettings of the other ship or a plunge down, probably on a rope's end, onto the deck of the smaller vessel. At the encounter between the 14-gun Speedy and the 32-gun Gamo in 1801 a British boarding party led by Captain Thomas Cochrane took the Spanish frigate by boarding in a fierce action. The small British ship was manoeuvred to come close alongside the enemy and eventually under the Spanish guns' maximum depression. Then Cochrane led the entire 40 crew - except for eight casualties and the surgeon who was left at the wheel. Armed with cutlasses, axes and pikes the British sailors fought ferociously in hand-to-hand combat with Cochrane calling loudly for another 50 fictitious reinforcements to follow. The Spanish flung down their weapons and surrendered.
An Early 19th Century, Long Blunderbuss Barrel Pistol Elongated musket length flintlock, with walnut stock, decorated throughout with geometric patterned nails. Long engraved barrel with flared muzzle. A most interesting looking piece, made to emulate the fine and more expensive pistols of the time, that were made in England and Europe for personal protection in close quarter actions. It has elements of naïve construction, not to be seen in the comparable fine English pistols of this era and form, but it certainly has a most decorative charm all of it's own. They were most popular with the Corsairs of the region, that armed themselves with decorative and impressive pistols for use in boarding actions. The Barbary pirates operated off the coast of North Africa as far back as the time of the Crusades. According to legend, the Barbary pirates sailed as far as Iceland, attacking ports, seizing captives as slaves, and plundering merchant ships. As most seafaring nations found it easier, and cheaper, to bribe the pirates rather than fight them in a war, a tradition developed of paying tribute for passage through the Mediterranean. European nations often worked out treaties with the Barbary pirates. By the early 19th century the pirates were essentially sponsored by the Arab rulers of Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. We have had to have the lock completely refurbished in order to restore all the original parts to the mechanism [that had been wrongly replaced with composite parts]. It now works perfectly and has all it's now correct type original period parts. The stock has an old contemporary forend repair. 18 inches long overall, barrell 11 inches long. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Early Belgian 25 Year Service Medal Issued to Police Chief. In gilt bronze and excellent condition. For service in the Belgian state and the Belgian Congo.
An Early to Mid 19th Century Elite 1st Regiment, French Cuirassier's Helmet This is a 'sleeper' [ a collectable artifact likely untouched for well over 100 years] of the 1st Regiment of the French Cuirassiers. The heavy cavalry regiments that attracted the largest men in France, recruited to serve in the greatest and noblest cavalry France has ever had. They fought with distinction and admired particularly for that magnificent conflict at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This may well be a soldier's trophy, war booty, brought back by a British soldier who may have served alongside the French. Every warrior that has ever entered service for his country sought trophies. The Mycenae from a fallen Trojan, the Roman from a fallen Gaul, the GI from a fallen Japanese, the tradition stretches back thousands of years, and will continue as long as man serves his country in battle. In the 1st century AD the Roman Poet Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis [Juvenal] wrote; "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions". A truly magnificent, elite French heavy cavalry helmet, that started, in this design and form, in the Napoleonic era, and continued with minor alterations into the French second Empire period of Napoeon IIIrd. In good robust condition for it's age, but uncleaned or polished in any way. Absolutely ripe for gentle cleaning and commensurate conservation. It's lining is excellent and complete, but it is lacking a plume and horse hair, and chin scales. It could restore magnificently, and one day, with fine attention look truly fantastic. The Cuirassiers corps, a heavy cavalry component, began in the Middle Ages, when lords, dressed in armour and coats of mail, riding armoured mettlesome horses, used to fight with spears and swords. In the XVII century, King Louis XIV created the 1st Cuirassiers regiment, the King’s Cuirassiers which a century later, under Louis XVI, became known as the grosse cavalerie regiment. Under the 1st Empire, Napoleon created 13 other regiments. Cuirassiers then became an arm, and fought in various battles such as the Waterloo , where both their sacrifice and efficiency brought them glory and honour. Cuirassier helmets were worn by the officers and men of Europe's greatest cavalry regiments, and they were the eminent rivals of the world renown British Heavy Cavalry. Made by . The cuirassiers were the greatest of all France's cavalry, allowing only the strongest men of over 6 feet in height into it's ranks. The French Cuirassiers were at their very peak in 1815 at Waterloo in the War of the 100 days. To face a regiment of say, 600 charging steeds, bearing down upon one mounted with armoured giants, brandishing their mighty of swords that could pierce the strongest breast armour, much have been, quite simply, terrifying. All Napoleon's heavy Cavalry Regiments fought at Waterloo, there were no reserve regiments, and all the Cuirassiers, without exception fought with their extraordinary resolve, bravery and determination. The Hundred Days started after Napoleon, separated from his wife and son, who had come under Austrian control, was cut off from the allowance guaranteed to him by the Treaty of Fontainebleau, and aware of rumours he was about to be banished to a remote island in the Atlantic Ocean, Napoleon escaped from Elba on 26 February 1815. He landed at Golfe-Juan on the French mainland, two days later. The French 5th Regiment was sent to intercept him and made contact just south of Grenoble on 7 March 1815. Napoleon approached the regiment alone, dismounted his horse and, when he was within gunshot range, shouted, "Here I am. Kill your Emperor, if you wish." The soldiers responded with, "Vive L'Empereur!" and marched with Napoleon to Paris; Louis XVIII fled. On 13 March, the powers at the Congress of Vienna declared Napoleon an outlaw and four days later Great Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, Austria and Prussia bound themselves to put 150,000 men into the field to end his rule. Napoleon arrived in Paris on 20 March and governed for a period now called the Hundred Days. By the start of June the armed forces available to him had reached 200,000 and he decided to go on the offensive to attempt to drive a wedge between the oncoming British and Prussian armies. The French Army of the North crossed the frontier into the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, in modern-day Belgium. Napoleon's forces fought the allies, led by Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. Wellington's army withstood repeated attacks by the French and drove them from the field while the Prussians arrived in force and broke through Napoleon's right flank. The French army left the battlefield in disorder, which allowed Coalition forces to enter France and restore Louis XVIII to the French throne. The last picture in the gallery is of the Cuirassiers charging a Scottish square at Waterloo. [For information and historical context only, not included
An Eastern European Miquelet Lock Rat-Tail Pistol Late 18th century with traditional brass covered stock and shortened steel barrel. Named after the so-called "rat-tail" butt, prevalent in the Balkan Islamic pistols of that time period. Used by horsemen of the Ottoman Empire, alongside various edged weapons, the kilij, shamshir or yataghan. The "golden age" of the Ottoman Empire was during the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent in the 16th Century. In different fields, this can be seen both in the architecture of Koca Mimar Sinan Aga, and in the domination of the Mediterranean by the Ottoman navy, led by Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha. The Ottoman Empire reached its territorial peak in the 17th century. From a diverse system of Millets, to a multi-ethnic state (Ottomanism), it developed its own distinctive culture, influential both in the European and Islamic worlds.With Istanbul (or Constantinople) as its capital, the Ottoman Empire was in some respects an Islamic successor to earlier Mediterranean empires — the Roman and Byzantine empires. The Empire was the only Islamic power to seriously challenge the rising power of Western Europe between the 15th and 19th centuries. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Edwardian Colonel's Scarlet Cloth Sidecap, of 15th [The Kings] Hussars. Good condition overall. With two Lion and Crown buttons for the rank of Colonel and Brigadier .
An English Double Barrel Percussion Sporting Gun With Damascus Barrel Circa 1840. Fine walnut stock and nicely engraved lock and steel mounts. The true English Damascus barrel is prepared from three rods, twisted as described and put together as shown in the twisted riband, and is known technically as three-iron Damascus ; the silver-steel Damascus is similarly made, but of different metal piled in a different order. The rods having been twisted, and the required number welded together, they are sent to the iron-mill and rolled at a red heat into ribands, which have both edges bevelled the same way. There are usually two ribands required for each barrel, one riband or strip to form the breech-end, and another, slightly thinner, to form the fore, or muzzle, part of the barrel. Silver-steel Damascus Barrel. Upon receiving the ribands of twisted iron, the welder first proceeds to twist them into a spiral form. This is done upon a machine of simple construction, consisting simply of two iron bars, one fixed and the other loose ; in the latter there is a notch or slot to receive one end of the riband. When inserted, the bar is turned round by a winch-handle. The fixed bar prevents the riband from going round, so that it is bent and twisted over the movable rod like the pieces of leather round a whip-stock. The loose bar is removed, the spiral taken from it, and the same process repeated with another riband. The ribands are usually twisted cold, but the breech-ends, if heavy, have to be brought to a red heat before it is possible to twist them, no cogs being used. When very heavy barrels are required, three ribands are used; one for the breech-end, one for the centre, and one for the muzzle-piece. The ends of the ribands, after being twisted into spirals, are drawn out taper and coiled round with the spiral until the extremity is lost, as shown in the representation of a coiled breech-piece of Damascus iron. The coiled riband is next heated, a steel mandrel inserted in the muzzle end, and the coil is welded by hammering. Three men are required one to hold and turn the coil upon the grooved anvil, and two to strike. The foreman, or the one who holds the coil, has also a small hammer with which he strikes the coil, to show the others in which place to strike. When taken from the fire the coil is first beaten upon an iron plate fixed in the floor, and the end opened upon a swage, or the pene of the anvil, to admit of the mandrel being inserted. When the muzzle or fore-coil has been heated, jumped up, and hammered until thoroughly welded, the breech-end or coil, usually about six inches long, is joined to it. The breech-coil is first welded in the same manner, and a piece is cut out of each coil; the two ribands are welded together and the two coils are joined into one, and form a barrel. The two coils being joined, and all the welds made perfect, the barrels are heated, and the surplus metal removed with a float; the barrels are then hammered until they are black or nearly cold, which finishes the process. This hammering greatly increases the density and tenacity of the metal, and the wear of the barrel depends in a great measure upon its being properly performed. When the barrels are for breech-loaders, the flats are formed on the undersides of the breech-ends. If an octagon barrel is required, it is forged in this form upon Portion of Gun-barrel Coil. A properly shaped anvil; in rifles the barrels are welded from thicker ribands and welded upon smaller mandrels. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables 29.5 inch barrels
An English Transitional Sword Circa 1640 with blade of flattened hexagonal section stamped 'Sabastian' and 'Hernandez' between a series of decorative marks on the respective faces within a short fuller, steel hilt, single sidebar with moulded quillon, knuckleguard interrupted by a moulding en suite with the quillon, fluted pommel, and the grip with multi wire binding. 32in blade There are swordsmiths called Sebastian Hernandez recorded in Toledo and Seville in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Allowing for fast reactions, and with a long reach, the rapier was well suited to civilian combat in the 16th–17th centuries. As military-style cutting and thrusting swords continued to evolve to meet needs on the battlefield, so did the rapier continue to evolve to meet the needs of civilian combat and decorum, eventually becoming lighter, shorter and less cumbersome to wear. This is when the rapier began to give way, first to the transitional rapier and then to the small sword. The transitional swords evolving from around the 1630's, eventually to the small sword from around the 1670's. In England the use of this sword for defence and duelling would have been instructed by such as Joseph Sweetnam.In his 1617 fencing treatise, "The Schoole of the Noble and Worthy Science of Defence", Joseph Swetnam represents himself as the fencing instructor for the then-deceased Prince Henry, who, after having read the treatise, urged Swetnam to print it—according to Swetnam. There is no record of his employment in Henry's service. The treatise itself is a manual detailing the use of the rapier, rapier and dagger, backsword, sword and dagger, and quarterstaff, prefaced with eleven chapters of moral and social advice relating to fencing, self-defense, and honor. Swetnam claims that his is the first complete fencing treatise authored by an Englishman. Swetnam is known for teaching a unique series of special guards (such as the fore-hand guard, broadwarde, lazie guard, and crosse guard), though his primary position is a "true guard", which varies slightly for each weapon. He advocates the use of thrusts over cuts and makes heavy use of feints. Swetnam favored fencing from a long distance, using the lunge, and not engaging weapons. His defenses are mostly simple parries, together with slips (evasive movements backward). Swetnam's fencing system has been linked both to contemporary Italian systems as well as the traditional sword arts of England; his guard positions resemble those of contemporary Italian instructors, but his fencing system appears structurally different, and more closely related to a lineage of English fencing. He is also distinctive in his advice to wound rather than kill an opponent
An Excellent 'Year XI' Pattern Russian Made Light Cavalry Sword A scarce Russian, French Napoleonic Model AN XI light cavalry trooper's sword, slightly curved blade 34.5 in, marked Zlatovst? 1826 Goda (faint) on the backstrap, regulation brass hilt with langets and 2 sidebars, ribbed leather grip with brass olive lozenge. Steel twin ringed scabbard. The Napoleonic 'An XI' sabre was captured by the Imperial Russian forces from Napoleon's Grande Armee, that fled in the great retreat from Moscow, subsequent to their ill fated invasion of Russia in 1812. Russia then adopted the sword for their light cavalry regiments. They created their own near identical version, called the M1826/7 pattern, and used it right up to and including the Crimean War in the 1850's, where very likely this sword was captured as a war trophy. The steel scabbard has been hit by two pistol balls. The whole sword is in superb condition, with excellent markings, and with one langet combat damaged.
An Excellent Khedive Star With Original Bar Mount and Ribbon Five pointed star with a central raised circle bearing an image of the Sphinx with the Pyramids behind, the word ‘EGYPT’ above followed by a year 1882 (for the first three issues and undated for the fourth) with the same written in Arabic below. The reverse has the monogram of the Khedive under a crown within a raised circle. The Khedive of Egypt presented a bronze star to all Officers and men of the Navy and Army who were engaged in the suppression of the rebellion of Egypt in 1882. The suspender was straight with a crescent and five pointed star in the centre which is attached to the star with a small metal loop passing through a small ring between the two top points of the star. Ist issue dated 1882. Good Very Fine condition. Unnamed as issued.
An Exception Adams Pattern Antique 120 Bore Double Bullet Mould A singularly fine piece in stunning original patina and it's original bluing to the steel sprue-cutter. This would be absolutely perfect for a cased 120 bore Adams revolver lacking it's mould. Also superb piece for collectors of fine English antique revolver accessories. You simply couldn't find a better example.
An Exceptional Antique Kaskara Sword From The Sudan Campaign Brought back as a souvenir of the Relief of Khartoum by Kitchener's forces after the siege by the infamous so-called mad Mahdi. This is a rather spectacular example complete with it's straps. The scabbard is decorated in metal and silver panels and the leather is very nicely tooled. The Battle of Khartoum, Siege of Khartoum or Fall of Khartoum lasted from March 13, 1884, to January 26, 1885. It was fought in and around Khartoum between Egyptian forces led by British General Charles George Gordon and a rebel Sudanese army led by the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. Khartoum was besieged by the Mahdists and defended by a garrison of 7,000 Egyptian and loyal Sudanese troops. After a ten-month siege, the Mahdists finally broke into the city and the entire garrison was killed. Before the city fell a relief expedition was despatched [although too late] to save them. The relief expedition was attacked at Abu Klea on January 17, and two days later at Abu Kru. Though their square was broken at Abu Klea, the British managed to repel the Mahdists. The Mahdi, hearing of the British advance, decided to press the attack on Khartoum. On the night of January 25–26, an estimated 50,000 Mahdists attacked the city wall just before midnight. The Mahdists took advantage of the low level of the Nile, which could be crossed on foot, and rushed around the wall on the shores of the river and into the town. The details of the final assault are vague, but it is said that by 3:30 am, the Mahdists managed to concurrently outflank the city wall at the low end of the Nile while another force, led by Al Nujumi, broke down the Massalamieh Gate despite taking some casualties from mines and barbed wire obstacles laid out by Gordon's men. The entire garrison, physically weakened by starvation, offered only patchy resistance and were slaughtered to the last man within a few hours, as were 4,000 of the town's inhabitants, while many others were carried into slavery. Accounts differ as to how Gordon was killed. According to one version, when Mahdist warriors broke into the governor's palace, Gordon came out in full uniform, and, after disdaining to fight, he was speared to death—in defiance of the orders of the Mahdi, who had wanted him captured alive. In another version, Gordon was recognised by Mahdists while making for the Austrian consulate and shot dead in the street. What appears certain is that his head was cut off, stuck on a pike, and brought to the Mahdi as a trophy and his body dumped in the Nile. Advance elements of the relief expedition arrived within sight of Khartoum two days later. After the fall of the city, the surviving British and Egyptian troops withdrew from the Sudan, with the exception of the city of Suakin on the Red Sea coast and the Nile town of Wadi Halfa at the Egyptian border, leaving Muhammad Ahmad in control of the entire country. The sword sits a little proud in the scabbard.
An Exceptional French 1822 Pattern Gendarmerie Pattern Pistol A most collectable pistol of the French military police of the early French Restoration Royale period. From the era of King Louis XVIII and Charles X (1814–1830), the July Monarchy under Louis Philippe d'Orléans (1830–1848), the Second Republic (1848–1852), and the Second Empire under Napoleon III (1852–1871). 1840 percussion conversion silex action. A most robust pistol of excellent quality with numerous inspectors marks and poincons. Lock marked Mre Rle Du Chattellerault [made at the Royal Armoury in Chattellerault]. Although for Gendarmerie issue, these strong manstopper bore pistols were so effective and reliable they became much favoured by all officer's as a highly effective personal protector. This would have been the type of pistol used by fictional Police Inspector Javert, who appears in Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, and who spent his career hunting down the story's main protagonist and hero, Jean Valjean. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Exceptionally Rare 'Lefaucheux' 12 Shot Revolver of The Civil War Era. The big 12 shot cylinder revolver is quite simply, immensely rare, and few now remain in existence. They are normally now only to be seen in the great arms collections, such as in the Tower [of London] Armoury and the Metropolitan in the USA. This fine gun is in very good condition with good functioning action, though it is a unnamed example, it lacks the Lefaucheux name, likely in order to avoid the payment of royalties, that was most prevalent at the time. Lefaucheux, in 1835, patented an ingenious brass-based paper shot shell that was ignited by a hammer striking a pin that extended through the rear of the case, which rested upon an internal fulminate percussion cap. This was the basis for all the pinfire revolvers that Lefaucheux designed. During the Civil War, when both the North and the South were avidly trying to purchase British and Continental arms, the Lefaucheux pinfire became a highly desirable arm on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, for instance, carried an engraved Belgian-made Lefaucheux that had been presented to him by his officers, and Confederate Major Generals J E B Stuart, Braxton Bragg and Richard H. Anderson favored a similar, but 9 shot revolver, but theirs were also fitted with an additional large central calibre that fired a single shot shell. The large majority of pinfires were probably used by the Yankees, simply because they were more successful at importation of both arms and ammunition. It is estimated that next to Colt, Remington and Starr, more Lefaucheux pinfires were used by the Union than any other make. By the war's end almost 12,000 had been purchased. The Confederates' pinfire accumulation was more haphazard, and a wider variety was imported. 7mm cal. 4.75 inch barrel.
An Good Antique Turkish Balkan Yataghan With Nice Blade and Hilt The Yataghan is a very distinctive Turk sword that in many ways resembles the Cossack Shaska, used in the Ottoman Empire and in the Balkan region. It has a finely gilt metal mounted single handed hilt, and a double curved blade with intricate text inscription and most interestingly, a large pouring vessel. 18th to 19th century. Signed 'Ameli usta Ali Sallah' [Made by master smith Ali Sallah]
An Highly Attractive Antique Indo-Persian Khula Khud & Dhal In the traditional Medieval style likely 19th century. Highly decorated with a multi figural design which is similarly matching on the shield with Islamic script panels. The beautiful steel helmet [Khula Khud] has a central steel spike, and mail type neck defenses. A most attractive round shield [Dhal] with four central bosses.
An I8th Century Small Sword Circa 1740 Anglo French War Period. A very inexpensive early sword due to it's surface aging. This was once a most fine 18th century English small sword, with a colishmarde blade. But now with a russet overall surface. Perfectly intact original most finely multi plaited steel wire binding to the grip.Double shell guard with pas d'ans rings. Single knucklebow and egg shaped pommel. The colichemarde descended from the so-called "transition rapier", which appeared because of a need for a lighter sword, better suited to parrying. It was not so heavy at its point; it was shorter and allowed a limited range of double time moves.The colichemarde in turn appeared as a thrusting blade too and also with a good parrying level, hence the strange, yet successful shape of the blade. This sword appeared at about the same time as the foil. However the foil was created for practising fencing at court, while the colichemarde was created for dueling. With the appearance of pocket pistols as a self-defense weapon, the colichemardes found an even more extensive use in dueling. This was achieved thanks to a wide forte (often with several fullers), which then stepped down in width after the fullers ended. The result of this strange shape was a higher maneuverability of the sword: with the weight of the blade concentrated in one's hand it became possible to maneuver the blade at a greater speed and with a higher degree of control, allowing the fencer to place a precise thrust at his/her adversary. Tiny tip area lost and loose shells
An Iconic, Original, Late 18th Century American 'Kentucky' Rifle The 'Kentucky Rifle' [also known as the Pennsylvania Rifle] is probably the most famous, and certainly the most beautiful rifle ever made in America's long history of fine arms making. It was used to incredible effect by the backwoods and mountain men in the American Revolutionary War, and by Congressman and Tennessee hero Davy Crockett, and his world renown riflemen, in the Creek Indian War in 1813 and at The Alamo, in the battle with the Mexican forces of the despot Santa Anna in 1836. These finest 18th century century early American longarms, were the epitome of beauty and function. This fine gun has a superb, long, heavy barrel, traditional crescent butt, a fine double set-trigger action [for hair-trigger pull adjustment], and a beautiful walnut stock, wonderfully set of with a finely hand cut brass patchbox. A half length stock with wooden ramrod and all fine brass funiture. It was the early American Long Guns that were shown to great effect in the film 'The Patriot' the award winning film of the American Revolution. The back country riflemen of the Carolinas and the Mountains of Virginia confounded the British due to their weapons accuracy and long range effectiveness, these were true beginnings of guerrilla warfare which influenced the British decision to create the Rifles Regiments of skirmishers. Early in the conflict gunsmithing was placed under virtual control of the Continental Congress, which fixed the prices for guns and decreed that gunsmiths deliver all guns to the patriot army or be branded as enemies and deprived of the tools of their trade. Pennsylvania makers helped materially to supply the nine companies of riflemen that were raised in this State and placed initially under the command of Colonel William Thompson of Carlisle. The defeat suffered by the riflemen under Benedict Arnold in the ill-fated attack on Quebec was avenged somewhat by the later victories at Saratoga and at King’s Mountain, where the “Tomahawks” comprised a large part of the American forces. Major Patrick Ferguson, commander of loyalist American troops fighting for the British army, who was killed by a rifle bullet at King’s Mountain, had his unit experiment with a breech-loading rifle of his own invention at the battle of the Brandywine. He had urged its adoption by the British army, but the musket continued to be used commonly by all European armies until well into the nineteenth century. The bloody repulse of the British at New Orleans early in January 1815 by the men of Tennessee and Kentucky under Andrew Jackson’s command is another epic in the saga of this historic firearm. Westward across the plains, over the mountains, and beyond the sunsets it was carried by hunter, trader, prospector and settler. Indians respected the “fire stick” and learned to use it against the white intruders in many forays that chronicle the struggle for the West. To the south and west the American national domain was in part carved out by the use of the Kentucky-Pennsylvania-type gun in the war with Mexico. Some of the above information was from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The Kentucky- Pennsylvania long arm is a most significant part of American history and it's evolution, and it is essential that this history, it's use and it's stories, be passed on to future generations. Showing these arms, in conjunction with detailing just a small part of their history, is a vital way to ensure that these important past events remain alive. By making it as interesting as possible, hopefully, the young of today will both learn and enjoy it, and thus they may want to continue to learn more. This fine historical gun was originally flintlock action but it was converted to the far more efficient percussion action [that could work in wet weather] around the time just before the battle of the Alamo. By doing this the gun's effective working use was extended by another 30 years or more. In the US fine examples of early Kentucky-Pennsylvania guns can fetch as high as the record $184,000 for a John Small Kentucky rifle, and in 2010, a campaign was launched by the Jacobsburg Historical Society's Pennsylvania Long Rifle Museum president and muzzleloading author Dave Ehrig to designate the historic Pennsylvania Rifle as the official firearm of The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A bill was subsequently introduced in the state Senate, but stalled in committee. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Imperial German Damascus Sword Presented by Baron von Hammerstein Damascus swords of Imperial Germany are the most desireable of all German swords. This superb example was presented by one of the German nobility, in Cassel, in 1887. It bears a presentation inscription, given by Ernst Baron von Hammerstein to his friend Rudolf Frank. On the obverse, For Service, Cassel 1887. Ernst von Hammerstein attended high school in Hildesheim, Hanover, the Royal Corps of Cadets, the University of Göttingen and the Forest Academy Mariabrunn in Austria. In 1857 he was a lieutenant in the 3rd Hanoverian Infanterie-Regiment Infantry Regiment and in 1858 First Lieutenant. In 1866 he took part in the Battle of Langensalza. He was, until 1871, in the personal service of King George V of Hanover. The Von Hammersteins had a most influencial part in German history from the 1600's. Ernst's later relative was Commander of the German Army until Hitler took power, and was also a fervent anti Nazi, taking part in several conspiricies, but never caught or imprisoned, until his natural death in 1943Born to a noble family in Hinrichshagen, Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Germany in 1878, Baron von Hammerstein-Equord joined the German Army on 15 March 1898. In 1907 Hammerstein married Maria von Lüttwitz, the daughter of Walther von Lüttwitz. He was attached to the General Staff during World War I and participated in the Battle of Turtucaia. Hammerstein-Equord was loyal to the Weimar Republic, opposing the Kapp-Lüttwitz putsch in 1920. He served as Chief of Staff of the 3rd Division from 1924, as Chief of Staff of the I Group Command in 1929, and as Head of Troops in the Office Ministry of War from 1929. A close friend of Kurt von Schleicher, he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Reichswehr in 1930, replacing General Wilhelm Heye. Another was a U Boat Commander in WWII Adolf-Wilhelm von Hammerstein-Equord joined the Kriegsmarine in 1937. He went through U-boat training from Oct 1940 to April 1941. He went through U-boat familiarization (Baubelehrung from April to May 1941 and then became First Watch officer (1WO) on the new U-402 (Kptlt. Siegfried von Forstner) from May to Oct 1941. He left the boat just prior to its first patrol at the end of Oct 1941 (Busch & Röll, 1999). He then became the First Watch officer (1WO) on the U-71 (Kptlt. Walter Flachsenberg) in Oct 1941 and served on the boat until April 1942 (Busch & Röll, 1999). During this time he went out on 2 war patrols, 92 days at sea, and took part in sinking 5 ships for almost 39,000 tons. von Hammerstein-Equord then went through U-boat Commander training with the 24th Flotilla and U-boat Commander sea training on the "duck" U-149 from April to July 1942 Adolf-Wilhelm Baron von Hammerstein-Equord took command of his old boat U-149 on 1 Aug 1942, commanding the boat until 14 May 1944 (Busch & Röll, 1999). The boat was a school boat and von Hammerstein-Equord never went out on patrol with it. Leaving his boat he joined the Staff of the U-boat Command in Norway and stayed in staff positions there until the end of the war in May 1945
An Indonesian Spear With Meoteorite Steel Blade Pamor is the pattern of white lines appearing on the blade. Kris blades are forged by a technique known as pattern welding, one in which layers of different metals are pounded and fused together while red hot, folded or twisted, adding more different metals, pounded more and folded more until the desired number of layers are obtained. The rough blade is then shaped, filed and sometimes polished smooth before finally acid etched to bring out the contrasting colors of the low and high carbon metals. The traditional Indonesian weapon allegedly endowed with religious and mystical powers. With probably a traditional Meteorite laminated iron blade with hammered nickle for the contrasting pattern. Meteoritical blade form in traditional straight bladed Kris . Hardwood long haft [with bend]. Embossed brass decorative haft mount.
An Indonesian Spear With Serpentine Form 'Meoteorite' Steel Blade Pamor is the pattern of white lines appearing on the blade. Kris blades are forged by a technique known as pattern welding, one in which layers of different metals are pounded and fused together while red hot, folded or twisted, adding more different metals, pounded more and folded more until the desired number of layers are obtained. The rough blade is then shaped, filed and sometimes polished smooth before finally acid etched to bring out the contrasting colors of the low and high carbon metals. The traditional Indonesian weapon allegedly endowed with religious and mystical powers. With probably a traditional Meteorite laminated iron blade with hammered nickle for the contrasting pattern.
An Interesting 18th Century Flintlock Semi Holster Pistol With very nice quality brass mounts and butt. The walnut stock is inlaid with thin lines of silver filigree. The shortened barrel is of steel as is the lock. Good tight action and a most unusual very early feature of the barrel tang screw coming up from the trigger recess instead of down to it, a form of barrel mounting more usually seen in the 17th century. It is likely this flintlock is possibly made with some Italian or even English parts for the export Ottoman market. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Most Interesting 19th Century Eastern Kindjal Dagger. Very Long Blade A nice horn hilt with decorative geometric brass line inlay. Blade held in by four iron rivets. Blade engraved with fuller and false edge on the reverse.
An Original American Civil War Sergeant's Sword Cast brass hilt shell guard and single edged blade. A good example of the swords used by the Union infantry in the American Civil War.
An Original Ancient 13th Century, Knight's Iron Battle Mace Head Pineapple shaped head with large mounting hole. The type as were also used as a Flail Mace, with the centre mount being filled with lead and a chain mounted hook, when it was not mounted on a haft, as this mace is. Flattened pyramidical protuberances, possibly English or East European. Made for a mounted Knight to use as an Armour and Helmet Crusher in mortal combat. It would have been used up to the 15th to 16th century. On a Flail it had the name of a Scorpion in England or France, or sometimes a Battle-Whip. It was also wryly known as a 'Holy Water Sprinkler'. King John The Ist of Bohemia used exactly such a weapon, as he was blind, and the act of 'Flailing the Mace' meant that his lack of site was no huge disadvantage in close combat. Although blind he was a valiant and the bravest of the Warrior Kings, who perished at the Battle of Crecy against the English in 1346. On the day he was slain he instructed his Knights [both friends and companions] to lead him to the very centre of battle, so he may strike at least one blow against his enemies. His Knights tied their horses to his, so the King would not be separated from them in the press, and they rode together into the thick of battle, where King John managed to strike not one but at least four noble blows. The following day of the battle, the horses and the fallen knights were found all about the body of their most noble King, all still tied to his steed.
An Original Antique Ching Dynasty Dao Sword A big and impressive sword with a long single edged blade. Black iron mounts to the scabbard and sword guard, wooden pommel cord wrapped grip. Ching Dynasty. Used during the Taiping Rebellion, the Opium Wars and into the Boxer Rebellion era, and most likely brought back to England by a soldier that either served in the Taiping Rebellion the Opium War, or defended the legations at the siege in Peking. This weight of sword was frequently used not only in battle but for executions. All black finish. String bound hilt grip. The Taiping Rebellion was a widespread civil war in southern China from 1850 to 1864, led by heterodox Christian convert Hong Xiuquan, who having received visions, maintained that he was the younger brother of Jesus Christ against the ruling Manchu-led Qing Dynasty. About 20 million people died, mainly civilians, in one of the deadliest military conflicts in history. Hong established the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, officially the "Heavenly Kingdom of Great Peace", with its capital at Nanjing. The Kingdom's army controlled large parts of southern China, at its height containing about 30 million people. The rebels attempted social reforms believing in shared "property in common" and the replacement of Confucianism, Buddhism and Chinese folk religion with a form of Christianity. The Taiping troops were nicknamed "Long Hair" by the Qing government. The Taiping areas were besieged by Qing forces throughout most of the rebellion. The Qing government crushed the rebellion with the eventual aid of French and British forces. The Opium Wars, also known as the Anglo-Chinese Wars, divided into the First Opium War from 1839 to 1842 and the Second Opium War from 1856 to 1860, were the climax of disputes over trade and diplomatic relations between China under the Qing Dynasty and the British Empire. After the inauguration of the Canton System in 1756, which restricted trade to one port and did not allow foreign entrance to China, the British East India Company faced a trade imbalance in favor of China and invested heavily in opium production to redress the balance. British and United States merchants brought opium from the British East India Company's factories in Patna and Benares, in the Indian state of Bengal, to the coast of China, where they sold it to Chinese smugglers who distributed the drug in defiance of Chinese laws. Aware both of the drain of silver and the growing numbers of addicts, the Dao Guang Emperor demanded action. Officials at the court who advocated legalization of the trade in order to tax it were defeated by those who advocated suppression. In 1838, the Emperor sent Lin Zexu to Guangzhou where he quickly arrested Chinese opium dealers and summarily demanded that foreign firms turn over their stocks. When they refused, Lin stopped trade altogether and placed the foreign residents under virtual siege, eventually forcing the merchants to surrender their opium to be destroyed. In response, the British government sent expeditionary forces from India which ravaged the Chinese coast and dictated the terms of settlement. The Treaty of Nanking not only opened the way for further opium trade, but ceded territory including Hong Kong, unilaterally fixed Chinese tariffs at a low rate, granted extraterritorial rights to foreigners in China which were not offered to Chinese abroad, a most favored nation clause, as well as diplomatic representation. When the court still refused to accept foreign ambassadors and obstructed the trade clauses of the treaties, disputes over the treatment of British merchants in Chinese ports and on the seas led to the Second Opium War and the Treaty of Tientsin. Hero of China, British General Gordon, was presented with an identical example, and he is carrying his, while dress in his Chinese garb, in the picture shown in the gallery. Overall very good condition.
An Original Antique Zulu Throwing Staff Formerly of the David Smith Collection. Carved with a stylised birds head top. The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. Following a campaign by which Lord Carnarvon had successfully brought about federation in Canada, it was thought that similar combined military and political campaigns might succeed with the African kingdoms, tribal areas and Boer republics in South Africa. In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was sent to South Africa as High Commissioner for the British Empire to bring such plans into being. Among the obstacles were the presence of the independent states of the South African Republic and the Kingdom of Zululand and its army. Frere, on his own initiative, without the approval of the British government and with the intent of instigating a war with the Zulu, had presented an ultimatum on 11 December 1878, to the Zulu king Cetshwayo with which the Zulu king could not comply. Cetshwayo did not comply and Bartle Frere sent Lord Chelmsford to invade Zululand. The war is notable for several particularly bloody battles, including a stunning opening victory by the Zulu at Isandlwana, as well as for being a landmark in the timeline of imperialism in the region. The war eventually resulted in a British victory and the end of the Zulu nation's independence.
An Original Colt No3 Theur Derringer .41 Cal Rimfire F. Alexander Thuer was a Prussian gunsmith who was recruited by and worked for Samuel Colt in Hartford, CT in 1849. Having learned the gun trade in his native Germany, he became a great friend of Colt and was regarded as an excellent marksman, and he often accompanied Colt on shooting demonstrations. Thuer, working at the Colt works, was famous for designing the Colt Derringer. A nice derringer, circa 1875, with walnut grips, nickle silver plated frame and blued barrel. Good tight and crisp action, COLT named engraved to the barrel top. Single shot with a pivotal side loading action, automatic extractor, and the early pattern pronounced bolster reinforcement on the frame. The Derringer has passed into history as one of the most famous pistols of the Wild West era. The name gained it's infamy as the make of pistol used to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, and from then on it was duly associated with the very small high calibre vest, boot or pocket pistols that became a most necessary part of life in the Old West. Colt was the most famous maker of these most interesting, historical and attractive pistols and practically every world renown gambler, and saloon character such as 'Doc' Holiday, 'Wild Bill' Hickock, Jack MaCall carried one Derringer or even several. There was one famous gunfight involving just two men, where over nine guns were drawn and used between them.
An Original Copper Hull Rod From Admiral Nelson's Flagship HMS Victory Removed during the ship's restoration and originally sold for the benefit of the 'Save the Victory Fund' with it's Certificate of Provenence signed by the then current commander of the flagship in 2000. We include this certificate. A copper hull rod from the flagship and bearing numerous ordnance broad arrow stamps. HMS Victory is a 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, laid down in 1759 and launched in 1765. She is most famous as Lord Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. After learning he was to be removed from command, [French] Admiral Villeneuve put to sea on the morning of 19 October, and once the last ship had left port, around noon the following day, set sail for the Mediterranean. The British frigates sent to keep track of the enemy fleet throughout the night, were spotted at around 1900hrs and the order was given to form line of battle. On the morning of 21 October the main British fleet, which was out of sight and sailing parallel some 10 miles away, turned to intercept. Nelson had already made his plans: to break the enemy line some two or three ships ahead of their Commander in Chief in the centre and achieve victory before the van could come to their aid. At 0600hrs Nelson ordered his fleet into two columns. Fitful winds made it a slow business and for more than six hours the two columns of British ships slowly approached the French line before Royal Sovereign, leading the lee column, was able to open fire on Fougueux. Around 30 minutes later Victory broke the line between Bucentaure and Redoutable firing a treble shotted broadside into the stern of the former from a range of a few yards. At quarter-past one Nelson was shot, the fatal musket ball entering his left shoulder and lodging in his spine. He died at half past four. Such killing had taken place on Victory's quarter deck that Redoutable attempted to board her, but they were thwarted by the arrival of Eliab Harvey in the 98-gun HMS Temeraire, whose broadside devastated the French ship. Nelson's last order was for the fleet to anchor, but this was countermanded by Vice Admiral Collingwood. Victory suffered 57 killed and 102 wounded She was also Keppel's flagship at Ushant, Howe's flagship at Cape Spartel and Jervis's flagship at Cape St Vincent. After 1824 she served as a harbour ship. In 1922 she was moved to a dry dock at Portsmouth, England, and preserved as a museum ship. She is the flagship of the First Sea Lord since October 2012 and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission. Rod 24cm long.HMS Victory Provenence Certificate shown with our name to obscure serial number details [they are clearly shown on original]
An Original Lord Lieutenant's Tunic With Gilt Bullion Sash Circa 1902 Superb silver bullion eppaulettes, collar, and cuffs. Gilt crown buttons red Melton wool cloth. Red bullion sash. To have a current Lord Lieutenant's tunic bespoke made today by a Saville Row tailor would cost £2,600 with an additional £750 for the sash. In England and Wales and in Ireland, the lord lieutenant was the principal officer of his county. The office's creation dates from the Tudors. Lieutenants were first appointed to a number of English historic counties by Henry VIII in the 1540s, when the military functions of the sheriff were handed over to him. He raised and was responsible for the efficiency of the local militia units of the county, and afterwards of the yeomanry, and volunteers. He was commander of these forces, whose officers he appointed. These commissions were originally of temporary duration, and only when the situation required the local militia to be specially supervised and well prepared — often where invasion by Scotland or France might be expected. Tunic in good condition for age, but a couple of tiny moth holes and very little inner liner remaining
An Original Spanish Cup Hilt Rapier 17th & 18th Century. This is simply a fascinating sword in that in it's working life has had a blade fitted from a 1796 British Heavy cavalry trooper's sword. Early Spanish cup hilt rapiers often originally had long and slender blades, that in the 18th century were very often changed, due to the changing methods of sword combat, for heavier, shorter broadsword blades, as the cup hilted sword stayed in favour in Spain for much longer than in the rest of Europe. However, we have never seen an original period addition of a British blade on one before, this is most intriguing. One must imagine it may well have been added at the time of the Spanish alliance with Britain during the Peninsular War in Spain, against Napoleon's occupying forces. The cup has some crush damage on one side. Crown 4 stamp to balde and maker's mark stamp on backstrap, probably Hadley.
An Original Wild West Remington Double Barrel Derringer. 41 Cal Rimfire Blued and case hardened finish. Nice tight action. A fabulous example and a true icon of the American Wild West era. The Remington double barrel Derringer is one of the all time famous guns, that has a profile recognised around the whole world. Colonel George Armstrong Custer is known on one occasion to have been given a derringer pistol in case of capture before going into an Indian encampment under a truce. The fear of Indian mutilation whilst an officer was still a live may have made the ‘secret’ carrying of such weapons a common practice. One eyewitness claim about the body of Custer is that he shot himself in the head with a Derringer type pistol. The famous Remington Derringer design doubled the capacity of the normal Derringer single shot, while maintaining the compact size, by adding a second barrel on top of the first and pivoting the barrels upwards to reload. Each barrel then held one round, and a cam on the hammer alternated between top and bottom barrels. The earliest Remington Derringer was in .41 Rimfire caliber and achieved wide popularity. The .41 Rimfire bullet moved very slowly, at about 425 feet per second (a modern .45 ACP travels at 850 feet per second). It could be seen in flight, but at very close range, such as at a casino or saloon card table, it could easily kill. The Remington Derringer was sold from 1866. Deringers sometimes had the dubious reputation of being a favoured tool of assassins. The single most famous Derringer, a single shot used for this purpose, was fired by John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
An Ottoman Turkish Yataghan Khard Dagger Probably 19th century or possibly early 20th century. A 'sleeper' kept in and old storage locker for decades and still very grubby. I]ivory grips attached with four rivets to the decorative hilt, with thin translucent red highlights, with a t section steel blade, original wooden leather covered scabbard with lattice work decoration [wear to leather. The knife length is 26.5cms. Some small chip to ears of ivory grips. Bought as a pair with it's identical matching dagger but we are selling them seperately.
An Super 1790 EIC India Pattern 'Brown Bess' Musket Manufactured around 1790, used at the time when Wellington commanded armies of the EIC against Tipu Sultan, before his days against Napoleon. Barrell tang marked register and the lock marked EIC with number. The East India Co. was an English and latterly a British company with an Army that was led by British officer's with a mixture of British and Indian other ranks, all equiped with British styled weaponry and the third pattern Brown Bess musket, also known as the India Pattern Musket. This musket so so well designed it was adopted for use by the regular British Army for the use by all infantry. It had a most effective and powerful Navy and it's Army rivalled that of any in the world. It had many famous historical figures amongst it's members including, General Robert Clive [Of India] Lord Arthur Wellesley the Duke of Wellington, and a past Governor was Elihu Yale who was a British merchant and philanthropist, Governor of the East India Company settlement in Bengal, at Calcutta and Chennai and a benefactor of the Collegiate School of Connecticut, which in 1718 was renamed Yale College [of Connecticut USA] in his honour. The East India Company was, an anomaly without a parallel in the history of the world. It originated from sub-scriptions, trifling in amount, of a few private individuals. It gradually became a commercial body with gigantic resources, and by the force of unforeseen circumstances assumed the form of a sovereign power. The company's encounters with foreign competitors eventually required it to assemble its own military and administrative departments, thereby becoming an imperial power in its own right, though the British government began to reign it in by the late eighteenth century. Before Parliament created a government-controlled policy-making body with the Regulating Act of 1773 and the India Act eleven years later, shareholders' meetings made decisions about Britain's de facto colonies in the East. The Company continued to experience resistance from local rulers during its expansion. The great Robert Clive led company forces against Siraj Ud Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, Bihar, and Midnapore district in Odisha to victory at the Battle of Plassey in 1757, resulting in the conquest of Bengal. This victory estranged the British and the Mughals, since Siraj Ud Daulah was a Mughal feudatory ally. With the gradual weakening of the Marathas in the aftermath of the three Anglo-Maratha wars, the British also secured the Ganges-Jumna Doab, the Delhi-Agra region, parts of Bundelkhand, Broach, some districts of Gujarat, the fort of Ahmmadnagar, province of Cuttack (which included Mughalbandi/the coastal part of Odisha, Garjat/the princely states of Odisha, Balasore Port, parts of Midnapore district of West Bengal), Bombay (Mumbai) and the surrounding areas, leading to a formal end of the Maratha empire and firm establishment of the British East India Company in India. Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan, the rulers of the Kingdom of Mysore, offered much resistance to the British forces. Having sided with the French during the Revolutionary war, the rulers of Mysore continued their struggle against the Company with the four Anglo-Mysore Wars. Mysore finally fell to the Company forces in 1799, with the death of Tipu Sultan. The British government took away the Company's monopoly in 1813, and after 1834 it worked as the government's agency until the 1857 India Mutiny when the Colonial Office took full control. The East India Company went out of existence in 1873. During its heyday, the East India Company not only established trade through Asia and the Middle East but also effectively became of the ruler of territories vastly larger than the United Kingdom itself. In addition, it also created, rather than conquered, colonies. Singapore, for example, was an island with very few Malay inhabitants in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles purchased it for the Company from their ruler, the Sultan of Johor, and created what eventually became one of the world's greatest trans-shipment ports. The gun is in good operational order and condition, the furniture is a mixture of brass and steel..
An Unusual Basket Hilted Sword Sheet Steel Lapped and Rivetted Hilt Mounted with an 1826 pattern Scottish military broadsword blade, bearing the traditional Queen Victoria's cypher, and fitted in it's bright steel scabbard. The guard is most unusual in that it is more reminiscent of a piece made by an smith-armourer rather than a traditional basket hilt maker. With overlapped sheet steel bars intertwined [and of differing widths] that are rivetted at every crossed overlap, and set with a cushion pommel on a small rivetted ovoid top plate. The basket interior has traces of it's original red ocre paint. It is a most unusual Scots basket hilted broadsword, that was likely used by a highlander with past regimental connections, although this is most definitely not a regimental use sword.
Ancient Bronze Age Spear, 4000 Years Old An Amlash spear made around 2000 B.C. Good socket mount with excellent natural age encrustation patina.
Ancient Form Chinese Bronze Helmet, of Circa 400bc Warring States Era Style With good green aged patination, and as tradition dictates, cast in one piece. In the past 30 years or so we have had only a very few of these helmets, and just two have been original and the correct age that they should. We feel likely it is not the age as it appears to be, but a later made example known as 'Historismus'. Historismus armour was a name likely coined in the 19th century to describe pieces made in an earlier or even ancient form and style, but made much later. However, it is still a most beautiful piece of art, extremely pleasing, decorative, and it would compliment any historical or classical display of arms or antiques.31 cm high, weight 3 kilos.
Antique 18th-19th Century Khula Khud With Demon Face and Sipar A beautiful helmet suite of fabulous form and the most desireable design with a face fronted helmet. The front of the helmet skull is relief modelled in the form of a demonic face with eyes, eyebrows nose and hairy moustache, with a spike central finial, noseguard, chainmail camail, fully engraved helmet with seated figures and calligraphic panels all over decorated with traces of gold inlay. The steel sipar shield is also matching with figures and calligraphic script with four central bosses. All the inscribed surfaces are decorated with traces of gold and silver koftgari work.
Antique Arquebus Battlement Gun From The Armoury of Maharajah of Jaipur This huge gun would make a fantastic display piece. It is one of a collection we acquired from the Armoury of The Maharajah of Jaipur and stored since the time of Tippoo Sultan in the late 18th century. Walnut Stock, long steel barrel, matchlock mechanism, stamped with with Jaipur Arsenal Mark. Due to their size we cannot ship these guns outside of the UK. Amazingly impressive arm at very little cost and great value. Generic representative photos, all the guns are very slightly different. Approx 8ft long various degrees of natural age wear and some age damage. Stock will need a little work. Generic photos, please contact for further delivery details. UK Delivery only
Antique Brass Pressure/Steam Guage From The World's Oldest Aquarium A piece of Victorian public attraction history. We are fortunate to acquire a few old Victorian steam gauges, due to the refit of the world's oldest working aquarium in Brighton, now called the Sea Life Centre, and the largest in Britain. The main aquarium hall was some 70 metres long, a feat of Victorian engineering that housed a Victorian tea room and wondrous exhibits. First unveiled in 1872, the Aquarium was designed by Eugenius Birch, the man behind Brighton’s West Pier, at a cost of £130,000. One exhibit was a recreation of Captain Nemo's Nautilus, the legendary submarine, these gauges were part of the display, that has now been removed due to the restoration programme. One hundred years ago the Brighton Aquarium was acclaimed as being the largest and most imaginative Aquarium in the world. People came from far and wide to see the new sea world. The idea to build the greatest Aquarium in the world came from a London architect and designer of marine piers, Eusebuis Birch. Brighton, on the south coast, with splendid hotels and a new railway link to London, seemed the ideal choice. A site facing the West Pier, which he had already designed, was the first choice but the ultimate decision was for a building at the west end of a new road now known as Madeira Drive, where once stood a toll house for the famous Chain Pier. Before any work could commence it was essential to obtain permission from the local authorities and from Parliament. The first of several Acts of Parliament for the project received the Royal Assent on July 12th 1869 and work start immediately. The estimate for the building involved a sum of £100,000, further increased to £133,000 the following year. Because buildings were not allowed to rise above the Marine Parade, a great deal of excavating was carried out. Facing stones used in the protecting sea wall came chiefly from blocks that made up the original Blackfriars Bridge, London. The courtyard had five terra-cotta arches supported by pillars enriched with carvings of mermaids, sea nymphs and other marine symbols. In the large entrance hall and lining the 224ft. long corridor, were the fish tanks in archways leading up to a vaulted ceiling, supported by columns of polished red Edinburgh granite, and green serpentine marble, with pillars of Bath stone and a mosaic flooring. The somewhat subdued light coming from inside the tanks, controlled to suit the environment of the marine life inside, gave an impression of mystery and excitement, almost as though one was deep under the sea, looking into the strange world of fishes. The wide corridor led to a conservatory which had an attractive grotto complete with a cascade of water. Later this became a popular meeting place. Although the building was far from ready, it was decided to open on Easter Saturday 1872. with the idea that the official opening would take place during August, when the premises would have been completed. Queen Victoria's third son. Prince Arthur, arrived that Easter, in Brighton, with Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar. The Royal Party expressed a wish to see the new Aquarium and it was necessary to carry out immediate work on the roadway in order that the Royal Party and their ladies could enter the Aquarium without sinking up to their ankles in mud. With flags flying, the Princes enjoyed their visit. Pausing "ever and anon" to view the interesting specimens. The Press described this impromptu opening as "very propitious" and "It could scarcely have entered the minds of any of the most sanguine of the Aquarium directors that its opening would be attended by a Prince of the Blood Royal. On August 10th 1872 the Mayor, Sir Cody Burrows, declared the premises open, despite great problems with contractors, a difficult site, the sea and the weather, plus many battles with Parliament and Brighton Council. The Aquarium Clock Tower became famous all over the world and picture postcards of its familiar facade sold in their thousands.
Antique Brass Steam/Pressure Guage From The World's Oldest Aquarium A souvenir of Victorian public attraction history. We are fortunate to acquire a few old Victorian steam gauges, due to the refit of the world's oldest working aquarium in Brighton, now called the Sea Life Centre, and the largest in Britain. The main aquarium hall was some 70 metres long, a feat of Victorian engineering that housed a Victorian tea room and wondrous exhibits. First unveiled in 1872, the Aquarium was designed by Eugenius Birch, the man behind Brighton’s West Pier, at a cost of £130,000. One exhibit was a recreation of Captain Nemo's Nautilus, the legendary submarine, these gauges were part of the display, that has now been removed due to the restoration programme. One hundred and forty years ago the Brighton Aquarium was acclaimed as being the largest and most imaginative Aquarium in the world. People came from far and wide to see the new sea world. The idea to build the greatest Aquarium in the world came from a London architect and designer of marine piers, Eusebuis Birch. Brighton, on the south coast, with splendid hotels and a new railway link to London, seemed the ideal choice. A site facing the West Pier, which he had already designed, was the first choice but the ultimate decision was for a building at the west end of a new road now known as Madeira Drive, where once stood a toll house for the famous Chain Pier. Before any work could commence it was essential to obtain permission from the local authorities and from Parliament. The first of several Acts of Parliament for the project received the Royal Assent on July 12th 1869 and work start immediately. The estimate for the building involved a sum of £100,000, further increased to £133,000 the following year. Because buildings were not allowed to rise above the Marine Parade, a great deal of excavating was carried out. Facing stones used in the protecting sea wall came chiefly from blocks that made up the original Blackfriars Bridge, London. The courtyard had five terra-cotta arches supported by pillars enriched with carvings of mermaids, sea nymphs and other marine symbols. In the large entrance hall and lining the 224ft. long corridor, were the fish tanks in archways leading up to a vaulted ceiling, supported by columns of polished red Edinburgh granite, and green serpentine marble, with pillars of Bath stone and a mosaic flooring. The somewhat subdued light coming from inside the tanks, controlled to suit the environment of the marine life inside, gave an impression of mystery and excitement, almost as though one was deep under the sea, looking into the strange world of fishes. The wide corridor led to a conservatory which had an attractive grotto complete with a cascade of water. Later this became a popular meeting place. Although the building was far from ready, it was decided to open on Easter Saturday 1872. with the idea that the official opening would take place during August, when the premises would have been completed. Queen Victoria's third son. Prince Arthur, arrived that Easter, in Brighton, with Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar. The Royal Party expressed a wish to see the new Aquarium and it was necessary to carry out immediate work on the roadway in order that the Royal Party and their ladies could enter the Aquarium without sinking up to their ankles in mud. With flags flying, the Princes enjoyed their visit. Pausing "ever and anon" to view the interesting specimens. The Press described this impromptu opening as "very propitious" and "It could scarcely have entered the minds of any of the most sanguine of the Aquarium directors that its opening would be attended by a Prince of the Blood Royal. On August 10th 1872 the Mayor, Sir Cody Burrows, declared the premises open, despite great problems with contractors, a difficult site, the sea and the weather, plus many battles with Parliament and Brighton Council. The Aquarium Clock Tower became famous all over the world and picture postcards of its familiar facade sold in their thousands. The gauge is iron framed, may work but may not. 10.5 inches across 12 inches high
Antique Ching Dynasty 'Rose Medallion' Canton Export Porcelain Lamp A superb and beautiful lamp, circa 1830, with the body of a Cantonese Vase [in Rose Medallion pattern] with lacquered highly decorative pierced brass bottom mount and an oil lamp top, converted to electricity.25 inches high [not including light fitting] 33 inches high with shadeYOBB
Antique Mandingo Chieftain's Slave and Gold Trader Sword With Tattoo Skin A slave and gold traders weapon. The Manding (Mandingo) are West African people. Their traditional sword comprises a sabre like blade, guardless leather grip and scabbard with exquisite leather work. This example is a long sized example, of a high ranking Mandingo, of very nice quality and finely tattooed. 25 inches long curved blade, leather grip and leather scabbard with leaf shaped widening tip, entirely tooled tattooed and decorated. Of special interest is the finely bound and decorated leather work. These weapons are well known for their leather-work and the tattooing applied to the leather of the scabbards. The iron work skills are less well developed. Many blades are taken from European weapons such as sabres and cutlasses. While the Baule are a distinct tribal group to the west, it is important to observe that ‘Malinke’ is a variant term applied to the ‘Mandingo’ (also Manding, Mandin, Mande). In general, these remain primarily considered Mandingo weapons, and from regions in Mali. These were of course invariably mounted with European sabre blades. Mandingo Tribe (also known as the Mandinka, Mande, or the Malinke Tribes) were the traders of the African West Coast, trading primarily in gold and slaves. The blades comes out a little from the chape. Small areas of leather seperation on the scabbard binding. Picture in the gallery of an 1850's engraving of a Mandingo Chief and his sword bearer.
Antique Mandingo Slave and Gold Traders Sword With Tattoo Skin Sheath A slave and gold traders weapon. The Manding (Mandingo) are West African people. Their traditional sword comprises a sabre like blade, guardless leather grip and scabbard with exquisite leather work. This example is a regular sized example yet of very nice quality and finely tattooed.16 inches long curved blade, leather grip and leather scabbard with leaf shaped widening tip, entirely tooled tattooed and decorated. Of special interest is the finely bound and decorated leather work. These weapons are well known for their leather-work and the tattooing applied to the leather of the scabbards. The iron work skills are less well developed. Many blades are taken from European weapons such as sabres and cutlasses. While the Baule are a distinct tribal group to the west, it is important to observe that ‘Malinke’ is a variant term applied to the ‘Mandingo’ (also Manding, Mandin, Mande). In general, these remain primarily considered Mandingo weapons, and from regions in Mali. These were of course invariably mounted with European sabre blades. Mandingo Tribe (also known as the Mandinka, Mande, or the Malinke Tribes) were the traders of the African West Coast, trading primarily in gold and slaves.
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Glengarry Badge 1882 to 1900 Pattern In pressed nickle with good clear definition and in good condition, 2 lugs.
Austrian Mannlicher Cavalry Bayonet Model 1895 Regimentally marked Used by the Austrian Empire in WW1. The sole difference between this and the common standard type [for infantry] is the inclusion of the rifle's foresight which surmounts the crossguard. Condition is very good. Exhibiting the Austrian cutting edge upwards feature that other countries do not have. Wood grips with two rivets.Combat marks to right grip. In it's original all steel scabbard and frog.9.75 inch blade.
Battle of Crecy 1346, Edward 3rd Penny, Archers Ring, Armour Piecing Arrow A fabulous medeavil collection, representing one of the most famous English medeavil battles, a resounding and extraordinary assymetrical victory by Edward IIIrd, the Battle of Crecy 1346. Edward III Medieval hammered silver penny. York mint. 1327-77 A.D. 19mm. Edward III iron arrow head with bent tip to suggest the impact on a helmet, and a superb archer's ring [small size as is normal of the era] with heavy shank and an angled expanding bezel designed to rest against the thumb, to relieve the pressure from the bow string. Crecy was was of history's greatest and remarkable battles, French deaths and casulaties numbered in their thousands, English deaths from as little as a few dozen to a maximum of 300. These battlefield recoveries of the Crecy era, come complete as a small collection, with a volume of Battles of English History, published in 1895. Dr Ian Mortimer wrote; Of all the battles of the Hundred Years War, both Crécy (1346) and Agincourt (1415) are particularly famed for their strategic importance. But while Shakespeare wrote his most patriotic work about Henry V, culminating in the battle of Agincourt, he wrote nothing comparable about Edward III and Crécy. Consequently, Henry V and Agincourt have acquired a unique cultural significance: iconic symbols of an English victory won against the odds. Therefore the visitor coming to Crécy-en-Ponthieu is entitled to ask: what is the significance of this place? If Shakespeare had chosen to write about Edward III, would the English language ring with famous lines associated with Edward on the field of Crécy? To answer this question it is necessary to know something about England in the fourteenth century. Edward III inherited a kingdom beset by two main zones of conflict: Aquitaine (South West France) and Scotland. It was therefore a turning point when he realised, in 1332, that the massed use of longbows could destroy a much larger army on the battlefield. Edward decided to resolve his political dilemmas through the use of thousands of longbowmen equipped with huge numbers of arrows. Edward III’s purposeful development of massed longbows in the years between 1332 and 1346 was a profoundly important military revolution. Previously battles had been fought by infantry and groups of heavily-armoured knights fighting hand-to-hand. The main strategic advantages had been those of outnumbering the enemy, cutting off their supply lines, or having a better-equipped army. Edward realised that a far greater strategic advantage lay in killing the enemy before the hand-to-hand fighting began. A force of longbowmen could tackle a much larger enemy army, for the archers could each kill several men without danger of being hurt themselves. When Edward III put his new thinking to the test against the Scots at Halidon Hill in 1333, he had fewer men than the Scots; nevertheless, his archers massacred the Scottish army. There was a third advantage to Edward’s archer-dominated armies. Longbowmen were much cheaper to employ and equip than aristocratic knights. Therefore it was possible for him to take an army of longbowmen deep into France itself, and show the French people how King Philip was unable to protect them. The key to all of this was preparation. Edward needed experienced longbowmen. He also needed enough bows and arrows. He encouraged the practice of archery – and with it the continual manufacture of new equipment in peacetime as well as war. When in 1341 he wanted to lead an expedition to Brittany, he simply issued an order for 130,000 sheaves of arrows to be gathered – a total of 2,600,000 arrows. No king of France could ever have hoped to gather so many at short notice. In July 1346 Edward landed at St Vaast-la-Hogue with about twelve thousand men and proceeded to fight his way across Normandy. He knew that a French army, when it gathered, was bound to outnumber him; but he knew that if he could force the French men-at-arms to charge uphill within range of his carefully arranged archers, he would be able to destroy them with the minimum of actual hand-to-hand fighting. Edward’s victory over the French at Crécy on 26 August 1346 astounded all of Christendom. It was doubly astonishing, for it was not just unexpected, it had obviously been carefully planned. Edward had achieved a military superiority over all his enemies. In later campaigns in France and Scotland in the 1350s he sought to repeat his success; he was never defeated. Scene from the Battle of Crecy, 1346. Fierce fighting between soldiers and knights in armour during the Battle of Crecy, Picardie,France. From "Les Chroniques de France"
Beautiful Antique Silver and Enamel Indo-Persian 'Rulers' Sword.Wootz Steel Quite simply one of the most beautiful swords, from the finest pedigree, that one can ever own. A Long curved, early antique Mogul blade showing fine Damascus of finest wootz steel [true Damascus] of the Kirk Narduban pattern, known as Mohamed's Ladder. Solid silver hilt with finest blue Basse Taille enamel, likely from the 18th century. Considered by many to be, alongside the Samurai sword, the finest sword blades ever made, the blades of the best Indo Persian swords were manufactured using wootz, otherwise known as 'true Damascus' steel. This creates a very particular grain on the surface of the blade. The exquisite enamel hilt is lustrous translucent blue over finest solid silver. Basse Taille, is French for "low cut", and was a technique where a hand cut pattern is created in the silver before translucent enameling, so that when the enamel is laid over it, the pattern shines through the transparent glass. 'Basse Taille' adds incredible texture and life to the design. A style of enamel work that was copied [and in some ways historically made his own] by the great Russian silver house, and personal enamalist to Czar Nicholas IInd, Carl Faberge. All of the world famous, and fabulous Faberge Easter eggs, that were made for the Russian Czars Alexander and Nicolas, utilized the [guilloche] simplified 'Basse Taille' enamel process, [guilloche is slightly easier to produce, and less organic, as it was machine cut patterning] but, it is little known to have been, in the greater part, created by the great Indo Persian artisans in the 18th century. We have spent many thousands of pounds over numerous weeks of highly specialist and intensive work to simply professionally clean it, as it the hilt was absolutely and totally blackened with age and accumulated age discolouration, thus making a proper appraisal impossible. The pommel cap is slightly misshapen through age, and this wehave decided to leave untouched.The blades of the best swords were manufactured using wootz, otherwise known as 'True Damascus' steel. This creates a very particular grain on the surface of the blade. True Damascus blades were manufactured in the Safavid Persian Empire (covering the area of modern Iran and parts of several other countries), originally in Damascus, and then later in Khorassan and Isfahan, using steels of Indian origin. Damascus steel is created by the extremely slow cooling of the melted iron, which encourages the formation of extremely hard Martensite crystals among softer Cementite ones. The veins of these Martensite crystals create the distinctive ‘watered steel’ pattern on Damascus blades, as well as giving them a fine balance of hardness and flexibility. In the 16th century, Persian ‘watered steel’ was famous across Eurasia. High quality Persian swords like this one were much sought after since they were easily capable of splitting contemporary European helmets with a single stroke, and, through legend, halving a silk handkerchief drawn lightly across their blades.
Beautiful Circa1730 Queen Anne Dragoon Officer's Pistol By Barbar of London 12 inch Barrel, bearing early proof stampings of AR, and crossed sceptres, of Queen Anne. The pistols military furniture is all brass, with a typical officer's type short eared style butt cap terminating with a grotesque mask [the early type, from the time of King William IIIrd, before the long spurred style became fashionable in the 1740's]. The lock is the early banana form, typical of the early 18th century, with a the good and clear name of Mr. Barbar inscribed. It has a good and responsive action. The stock is fine walnut. It has a single ramrod pipe, also typical of the early Queen Anne style. This would not be an issued, trooper's pistol, but a officer's private purchase example, from one of the great makers and suppliers to the dragoon regiments and officers of his day, during the time of King George IInd. This pistol would have seen service during the War known as King George's War of 1744-48, in America, and the 7 Years War, principally against the French but involving the whole of Europe, and once again, also fought in America. Recognized experts like the late Keith Neal, D.H.L Back and Norman Dixon consider James Barbar to be the best gun maker of his day. Dixon states, "Almost without exception, unrestored and original antique firearms made by James Barbar of London are of the highest quality". In Windsor Castle there are a superb pair of pistols by James Barbar and a Queen Anne Barbar pistol also appeared in the Clay P. Bedford exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Barbar supplied complete dragoon pistols for Churchill's Dragoons in 1745, also guns for the Duke of Cumberland's Dragoons during 1746 to 48, and all of the carbines for Lord Loudoun's regiment of light infantry in 1745. James was apprenticed to his father Louis Barbar in October of 1714. Louis Barbar was a well known gun maker who had immigrated to England from France in 1688. He was among many Huguenots (French Protestants) who sought refuge in England after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685. Louis was appointed Gentleman Armourer to King George I in 1717, and to George II in 1727. He died in 1741 . James Barbar completed his apprenticeship in 1722 and was admitted as a freeman to the Company of Gunmakers. By 1726 James had established a successful shop on Portugal Street in Piccadilly. After his father's death in 1741, James succeeded him as Gentleman Armourer to George II, and furbisher at Hampton Court. He was elected Master of the Gunmakers` Company in 1742. James Barbar died in 1773. The book "Great British Gunmakers 1740-1790" contains a detailed chapter on James Barbar and many fine photographs of his weapons. This lovely pistol is 19 inches long overall. It has had some past srvice restoration, but nothing at all onerous. The mainspring is replaced, the for-end stock has old repairs, and the rammer is a replacement. But, it is hardly surprising as this pistol may likely have seen rogourous combat service for upwards of 80 years. It is now a beauty and a fine example of the early British military gunsmiths art. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
Beautiful European Topographic Watercolour of A Castle on The Rhine 19th C. In the British romantic landscape style, not far removed in quality by the greatest exponant of the art, Joseph Mallord Willam Turner who is said laid the foundation for Impressionism. This is a beautiful Victorian watercolour, superbly executed. Titled but unsigned, possibly by William Callow 1812-1908 Callow was a landscape, architectural and marine artist. He taught in Paris and was appointed drawing master to the family of Louis Phillippe who was King of France between 1830 and 1848. Callow was elected to the Royal Soc. of Painters in Water Colours in 1848. 7 X 9.5 inches, Frame 18.25 x 15.25 inches
Beautiful Pair Of Antique, English Civil War, Armour Cavalry Gauntlets To be worn on horseback, by a cavalry officer, wearing a front and back armour cuirass, a buff hide coat and a lobster tail or burgonet helmet. A very beautiful pair of 17th century pattern composite gauntlets, that at sometime likely during the 19th century have had the cuffs, articulation, philanges restored and releathered. Three of the philanges leathers have now perished apart.
Brass Cannon Barrel Blunderbuss By 17th Century London Maker, Calloway A singularly beautiful early Blunderbuss. Brass cannon barrel, finest walnut stock with fabulous patina, fine complimentary brass furniture which bears all it's original natural aged patina. Horn tipped ram rod with worm screw for the removal of a misfired ball. The barrel is stunning with good Tower of London private proof marks. The lock has been percussion converted in the 19th century in order to extend it's working life. The blunderbuss was probably the most famous flintlock long gun ever made, certainly the most beautiful and simply glorious in it's elegance. It was typically issued to a single sergeant in a troop of cavalry, who required the use of a lightweight, easily handled maneuverable arm capable of short bursts fire for powerful effect, often to protect the officer of the troop. In the Sharp films of the 95th Rifles, his sergeant, Harper, carried a short barreled volley gun exactly for that very purpose. In addition to the cavalry, the blunderbuss found use for other duties, in which it's unique properties were desirable, such as for guarding prisoners or defending a mail coach. The blunderbuss was used by the British Royal Mail service during the period of the 18th to early 19th century was a flintlock with a long flared brass barrel, and brass furniture. A typical mail coach would have a single postal employee on board to guard the mail from highwaymen, armed with a brass barreled blunderbuss and a pair of pistols. During the 18th century, Customs and Excise Officers were armed with pistols, hangers and swords and blunderbusses, especially the early horse patrols. Gentleman's coaches could also maintain the use of a outrider armed with a blunderbuss for psychological as well as physical security. There is a very persuasive psychological point to the size of the muzzle, as any person facing it could not fail to fear the consequences of it's discharge, and surrender or retreat in the face of an armed blunderbuss would be a happy and desirable result for both parties. The original of the name is likely from the flemish word for a similar gun, the donderbus [which translates to 'thunder gun' ]. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. 29 inches long overall.
Bronze Medal, With SIS Connections, International Airship Exhibition 1909 This medal was made for The International Airship Exhibition, that was held in Frankfurt in 1909 as the world's largest and most important air show on 10 July to October 1909 for a period of 100 days, in Frankfurt. It was obtained as a souvenir, by an anonymous confederate, of a previously top secret British spying mission, against Imperial Germany, by one of the most famous British spies in history, the so-called 'Ace of Spies', Sidney Reilly MC. It is of the International Airship Exhibition at Frankfurt; Obverse: relief of a nude male figure, with an airship in the background, embossed with text, a quote from Goethe, "UND EIN FLUGEL PAAR FALTET SICH LOS! DOKTHIN! ICH MUSS! ICH MUSS! GONNTMIR DEN FLUG"; Reverse: embossed text "1783 INTERNATIONALE LUFTSCHIFFAHRT AUSSTELLUNG FRANKFURT A/M 1909". An example of this rare medal is in the Smithsonian in America, donated by the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences Inc. Inventory number: A19640403000. The Ace of Spies, biographer, Robin Bruce Lockhart recounts Reilly's alleged involvement in obtaining a newly developed German magneto at the first Frankfurt International Air Show ("Internationale Luftschiffahrt-Ausstellung") in 1909. According to British diplomat, SIS agent, and journalist Sir Robert Bruce Lockhart, on the fifth day of the air show a German plane lost control and crashed, killing the pilot. The plane's engine was alleged to have used a new type of magneto that was far ahead of other designs. Reilly and a British SIS agent posing as one of the exhibition pilots diverted public attention while they removed the magneto from the wreck and substituted another. The SIS agent quickly made detailed drawings of the German magneto, and when the engine had been removed to a hangar, the agent and Reilly managed to restore the original magneto. Lieutenant Sidney George Reilly, MC, was born Shlomo Rosenblum, famously known as the Ace of Spies, was a Jewish Russian- or Ukrainian-born adventurer and secret agent employed by Scotland Yard, the British Secret Service Bureau and later the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS). Throughout his life, Sidney Reilly maintained a close yet tempestuous consanguinity with the British intelligence community. In 1896, Reilly was recruited by Superintendent William Melville for the émigré intelligence network of Scotland Yard's Special Branch. Through his close relationship with Melville, Reilly would be employed as a secret agent for the Secret Service Bureau, which the War Office created in October 1909. His exploits are the stuff of legend, worthy of the best of James Bond, but here we only have time to briefly detail his most famous. In 1918, Reilly began to work for MI 1(c), an early designation for the British Secret Intelligence Service, under Sir Mansfield Smith-Cumming [later known as 'C']. Reilly was allegedly trained by the latter organization and sent to Moscow in March 1918 to assassinate Vladimir Ilyich Lenin or attempt to overthrow the Bolsheviks. He had to escape after the Cheka unraveled the so-called Lockhart Plot against the Bolshevik government. The endeavor to depose the Bolshevik Government and assassinate Vladimir Ilyich Lenin is considered by biographers to be Reilly's most daring scheme. On September 3, the aborted coup was sensationalized by the Russian press. Reilly was identified as a leader, and a dragnet ensued. The Cheka raided his assumed refuge, but Reilly avoided capture and met with Captain Hill. Hill proposed that Reilly escape Russia via Ukraine using their network of British agents for safe houses and assistance. Reilly instead chose a shorter, more dangerous route north to Finland. With the Cheka closing in, Reilly, carrying a Baltic German passport, posed as a legation secretary and departed Moscow in a railway car reserved for the German Embassy. In Kronstadt, Reilly sailed by ship to Helsinki and reached Stockholm. He arrived in London on November 8 to meet the SIS chief. The day before Reilly and Hill met with Sir Mansfield Smith-Cumming ("C") in London for their debriefing, the Russian Izvestia newspaper reported that both Reilly and Lockhart had been sentenced to death in absentia by a Revolutionary Tribunal for their roles in the attempted coup of the Bolshevik government. Their sentence was to be carried out immediately should either of them be apprehended on Soviet soil. This sentence would later be served on Reilly when he was caught, tortured and executed, after a most complex and successful plot to ensnare him, called operation 'Trust' by the OGPU in 1925. After Reilly's death, the London Evening Standard published in May, 1931, a Master Spy serial glorifying his exploits. Later, Ian Fleming would use Reilly as a model for James Bond. Today, many historians consider Reilly to be the first 20th century super-spy. 7cm across.
Commemorative Medal for the Franco-Prussian War 1870-1871 Circular gilt bronze medal with ribbed loop for ribbon suspension; the face with an Iron Cross (cross pattée) with rays between the arms, inscribed ‘1870 1871’ within a wreath of laurel; the reverse with the crowned monogram of King Wilhelm above the inscription ‘Dem siegreichen Heere’ (the victorious army), circumscribed ‘Gott war mit uns Ihm sei die Ehre’ (God was with us To Him the Glory); the edge inscribed ‘AUS EROBERTEM GESCHUETZ’ (from captured cannon); The medal was instituted on 20 May 1871 for those active in the War with France. It was in bronze for combatants and steel for non-combatants. The conflict between France and Prussia that signalled the rise of German military power and imperialism was provoked by the Prussian (later German) Chancellor Otto von Bismarck as part of his plan to create a unified German Empire. The French armies were overcome at Sedan by the efficient Prussian forces, battle-hardened from their conflicts with Denmark and Austria. In Paris, a bloodless revolution led to the overthrow of Napoleon III. The city was besieged by the Prussians from 19 September and held out, suffering severe privation, until 28 January. France was forced to cede Alsace and Lorraine to the Germany which had been proclaimed an empire under Wilhelm I on 18 January 1871 in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles, sowing the seeds of future 20th Century conflicts. A very good example.
Dumbartonshire Volunteer's Badge Cast white metal with one lug missing 82mm x 62mm
Early Sikh Khanda Hilt Firangi Sword All steel hilt and blade, straight single edged blade typical Khanda Hilt with flattened guard 17th 18th century.This is the form of sword used by the Sikhs in India and symbolic of their nation
Early Sikh Khanda Hilt Firangi Sword 17th to 18th Century All steel hilt and blade, straight single edged blade, double fullered, typical Khanda Hilt with flattened guard, 17th 18th century.A most interesting and beautioful sword. One hilt section seperated.
European Axe 13th Century. In Very Good Excavated Order The iron axe from medeavil times is a fascinating weapon, and one of our favourites. In many ways because they contain so much thick iron, they could be in be an excavated state lose a quarter of an inch of iron yet still 95% complete and functionable. if a sword from this era is excavated, and lost a quarter of an inch, it could be so thin and perilously fragile as to be almost untouchable. Plus, a sword from the period, even in an excavated state, would be close to ten times the price [up to £10,000 plus] so an axe is simply a tremendous value for money ancient collectable. They were also a double purpose weapon, being just as useful for craft when battle was not prevalent. The Romans were crucially famous in these circumstances, with a battle hardend legionary being as much an engineer [as a fort and road builder] as a warrior. With many Roman axes specifically designed for use in battle and construction. Many famous historical figures were associated with the axe. At the Battle of Stiklestad, in 1030, one of the most famous battles in the history of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway was killed while using the axe. He was later canonized, and thus the axe also became the symbol of St. Olaf. Olaf II was king of Norway from 1015 to 1028, and his axe can still be seen on the Coat of Arms of Norway a crowned, golden lion rampant holding an axe with an argent blade, on a crowned, triangular and red escutcheon. Its elements originate from personal insignias for the royal house in the High Middle Ages, thus being among the oldest in Europe. King Stephen of England famously used a Danish axe at the Battle of Lincoln.The Battle of Lincoln or First Battle of Lincoln occurred on 2 February 1141. In it Stephen of England was captured, imprisoned and effectively deposed while Empress Matilda ruled for a short time. Also after his sword broke Richard the Lionheart was often recorded wielding a large war axe in numerous Victorian novels, though references are sometimes wildly exaggerated as befitted a national hero: "Long and long after he was quiet in his grave, his terrible battle-axe, with twenty English pounds of English steel in its mighty head..." Richard is, however, recorded as using a Danish Axe at the relief of Jaffa. The Battle of Jaffa took place during the Crusades, as one of a series of campaigns between Saladin's army and the forces of King Richard the Lionheart. It was the final battle of the Third Crusade, after which Saladin and King Richard were able to negotiate a truce. Geoffrey de Lusignan is another famous crusader associated with the axe. In the 14th. century, the use of axes is increasingly noted by Froissart in his Chronicle, with King Jean II using one at the Battle of Poitiers.The Battle of Poitiers was fought between the Kingdoms of England and France on 19 September 1356 near Poitiers, resulting in the second of the three great English victories of the Hundred Years' War: Crécy, Poitiers, and Agincourt. In 1356 and Sir James Douglas used an axe at the Battle of Otterburn. The Battle took place on the 5 August 1388, as part of the continuing border skirmishes between the Scottish and English. The best remaining record of the battle is from Jean Froissart's Chronicles in which he claims to have interviewed veterans from both sides of the battle in 1388. Bretons were apparently noted axe users, with Bertrand du Guesclin and Olivier de Clisson both wielding axes in battle. This is a lovely 13th century axe, and if it could only talk the wonders it might reveal. Here is a very smal list of famous battles that occurred when this axe was in use, any one of many that it may have seen use in, naturally we will never know which.. 1282 The Battle of Orewin Bridge 11 December – Welsh troops decisively defeated by the English. 1288 Battle of Worringen 5 June – Battle for duchy of Limburg. Brabant defeats the forces of Cologne, Luxembourg and Nassau. 1289 Battle of Campaldino Florence and allies defeat Arezzo. 1291 Siege of Acre Mameluks capture the last Crusader city. 1294 Battle of Conwy 11 November – English army routed at Denbigh by Welsh rebels during the revolt of Madog ap Llywelyn. 1295 Battle of Maes Moydog 5 March – one of Edward I's armies defeats Welsh rebels, hastening the end of Madog ap Llywelyn's revolt. 1296 Battle of Dunbar 27 April English defeat Scots and occupy much of Scotland; first battle of the Wars of Scottish Independence. 1296 Battle of Curzota Genoa defeats Venetian fleet including Marco Polo. 1297 Battle of Stirling Bridge 11 September – Scots under William Wallace defeat English of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. 1297 Battle of Furnes 20 August – French under Robert II of Artois defeat the Flemish at Bulskamp, near Furnes (Veurne). 1298 Battle of Falkirk (1298) 22 July – in Stirlingshire – English archers defeat Scots led by William Wallace, English longbow's first great victory. 1299 First Siege of Stirling Castle Scottish forces besiege constable John Sampson unsuccessfully. 1299 Battle of Falconaria 1 December – Sicilians under Frederick II of Sicily defeat Neapolitans under Philip I of Taranto. See D. Nicolle 1988 p. 522.
Exceptionally Fine 1796 Light Infantry Officer's Sword, Deluxe Etched Blade Blued steel hilt with it's original blued steel and leather scabbard. The blade is deluxe etched with scrolls, a stand of arms and lances and topped with with an army shako helmet, and to the reverse, further fancy scolls, ancanthus leaf branches and the allegorical winged figure of Victory. Prior to the 1803 Pattern sword, the British Light Infantry regiment's officers of the 95th, 60th & 52nd etc. had the option to purchase and carry the standard 1796 Infantry sword, but many felt it's blade was to narrow, straight and ineffective. Another design was quickly created based on the highly popular 1796 Light Dragoon officers sword, but with a shorter and more curved blade. Used by Officer's of the 95th and 60th Rifles, during the Iberian Peninsular War, the American War of 1812 and The Battle of Waterloo. This is the pattern of British Officer's sword carried by gentlemen who relished the idea of combat, but found the standard 1796 Infantry pattern sword too light for good combat. The light infantry regiments were made up of officers exactly of that mettle. The purpose of the rifles light infantry regiments was to work as skirmishers. The riflemen and officers were trained to work in open order and be able to think for themselves. They were to operate in pairs and make best use of natural cover from which to harass the enemy with accurately aimed shots as opposed to releasing a mass volley, which was the orthodoxy of the day. The riflemen of the 95th were dressed in distinctive dark green uniforms, as opposed to the bright red coats of the British Line Infantry regiments. This tradition lives on today in the regiment’s modern equivalent, The Royal Green Jackets. The standard British infantry and light infantry regiments fought in all campaigns during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing sea-service at the Battle of Copenhagen, engaging in most major battles during the Peninsular War in Spain, forming the rearguard for the British armies retreat to Corunna, serving as an expeditionary force to America in the War of 1812, and holding their positions against tremendous odds at the Battle of Waterloo.The sword was used, in combat, in some of the greatest and most formidable battles ever fought by the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars in Europe the Peninsular Campaign and Waterloo. This is a very attractive sword indeed and highly desirable, especially for devotees of the earliest era of the British Rifle Regiments, such as the 95th and the 60th. As a footnote, in Bernard Cornwall's books of 'Sharpe of the 95th', this is the Sabre Major Sharpe would have carried if he hadn't used the Heavy Cavalry Pattern Troopers Sword, given to him in the story in the first novel. Overall this battle cum dress sword is in very good order and quite stunning. Overall in very nice condition indeed. Steel P hilt,sharkskin ribbed grip with triple wire binding, deeply cursive flat sided blade beautifully fully etched. Leather and steel scabbard. Overall length in scabbard 37.25 inches blade, blade 29.75 inches measured across straight under the hilt. Leather with very old splits, blade with small areas of edge pitting. Leather being completely restored
Fabulously Rare, 1796 British Officer's 'Blue and Gilt' Bladed Sword Stick It has a superb fully engraved blade with King George IIIrd cypher with finest blue and gilt décor. Used during the Battle of the Nile, Battle of Trafalgar period, the Peninsular War in Spain, the American War in 1812, and the Battle of Waterloo era. The blade would have been used by in a sword by an British infantry or naval officer, and possibly on his retirement from military or naval service, his blade has been fitted into a wooden sword stick that was disguised as a country hawthorne cane, by decorating the stick with simulated hawthorne branch knots and covering with vellum. It would then have been covered in a black lacquer or bitumen. The blade type was introduced by General Order in 1796, replacing the previous 1786 Pattern. It was similar to its predecessor in having a spadroon type form, i.e. one straight, flat backed and single edged with a single fuller on each side. Blades of the finest swords were may be extensively decorated, often with a stunning blue and pure gold decor, but less than 1% of those that started life with blue and gilt blades, survive today in this condition. The vellum has come apart from a few areas, and the blacking worn off. We are leaving it, however, exactly as is, as this simply reflects it's natural aging from over two centuries of use. It could of course be restored and re-blackened but that is, subjectively, for the next owner to decide. A very fine and very, very rare example. The last one we had, which was almost identical to this also with a bitumened vellum finish, was over 25 years ago, and we are the main sword-stick specialists in England. 28 inch blade
Fine Pair of 18th Century French Indian Wars 'Cour Royal' Holster Pistols 'Cour Royal' was the name for the King of France's Royal Court, and these pistols were made during the reign of the King Louis XV [1715-1774], and used by an officer appointed by the Royal Court. France was one of the leading participants in the Seven Years' War which lasted between 1754 and 1763. France entered the war with hopes of achieving a lasting victory both in Europe, against Prussia, Britain and their German Allies, and across the globe against their major colonial rivals Britain. In America France began asserting control over the Ohio Country as early as 1749, but when they began constructing a series of forts in the Ohio River watershed in 1753, the British responded. In 1754, George Washington sparked the beginning of the war with an attack on a French scouting party near present-day Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. When they learned that the British were planning to send regular army troops to the area for the 1755 campaign, the French sent a large body troops to New France before the British could blockade their ports. These troops, and strong alliances with native tribes, gave France a string of victories from 1755 to 1757. In one of the most notorious incidents of the French and Indian War, under command of General Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Gozon, Marquis de Saint-Veran and Commander of the French forces in America, his native allies violated the agreed terms of surrender and attacked the British column, which had been deprived of ammunition by the terms of surrender. They killed and scalped a significant number of soldiers, took as captives women, children, servants, and slaves, and slaughtered sick and wounded prisoners. Early accounts of the events called it a massacre, and implied that as many as 1,500 people were killed, even though it is unlikely more than 200 people (less than 10% of the British fighting strength) were actually killed. The exact role of General Montcalm and other French leaders in encouraging or defending against the actions of their allies, and the total number of casualties incurred as a result of their actions, is a subject of historical debate, however Montcalm was deemed by many during and after the war, as very likely the greater part the honourable commander rather than the dishonorable, hence the engraving, that is showing his honourable intentions much to his credit, is to be seen in our gallery. However, the memory of the killings influenced the actions of British military leaders, especially those of British General Jeffery Amherst, for the remainder of the war. France was able to consolidate control of the Ohio Country as well as the strategically important Great Lakes. After their initial successes in North America, however, France began to starve the theatre of forces and supplies, preferring to concentrate on the war in Europe. Montcalm leading his troops into battle during the failed attempt to defend Quebec in 1759. This contrasted sharply with the British, who put great emphasis on the war for control. In 1758 the British launched several major offensives, capturing Louisbourg, Fort Duquesne, and Fort Frontenac, although they were stopped at Fort Carillon. The following year a large force under General Wolfe sailed up the St Lawrence River to besiege Quebec City. The French commander in Quebec, Louis-Joseph de Montcalm, had orders to try to hold out until the winter spell, with the promise that major reinforcements would arrive from Europe the following year. Montcalm almost achieved this, delaying British attempts to capture Quebec until the autumn, when the British finally won the Battle of Quebec and captured the city. In spite of this, a large force of French escaped westwards, intent on resuming the campaign the following year. In 1760 the French launched a surprise effort to re-capture Quebec, which succeeded in blunting one British advance on Montreal. Other British armies advanced on Montreal from the south and west, completing the Conquest of Canada. In the West Indies the French saw the valuable sugar islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique captured by British forces. A final attempt to capture Newfoundland from the British failed in late 1762. While the first few years of war proved successful for the French, in 1759 the situation dramatically reversed and they suffered defeats on several continents. In an effort to reverse their losses, France concluded an alliance with their neighbours Spain in 1761. In spite of this the French continued to suffer defeats throughout 1762 eventually forcing them to sue for peace. The 1763 Treaty of Paris confirmed the loss of French possessions in North America and Asia to the British. France also finished the war with very heavy debts, which they struggled to repay for the remainder of the eighteenth century. This pistols would have been used right through the Anglo French war in the Americas, and a very fine novel was written on these events in part called 'The Last of the Mohicans'. It was transferred to many Hollywood epic movies, the last and best starring Daniel Day Lewis. Locks engraved Cour Royal and an indistinct makers name, but obviously it would have been one of the Royal appointed smiths. The locks have are now conversion silex locks, which was made to improve and prolong the pistol's life into the 19th century. These pistols are in nice condition for age with very good armourer's seal marks to the barrels. Pistols for officers of the Royal Court are very rare and scarcely seen, and if one was making deliberate search to find an original pair, they might take years to find. Fine engraving to the steel mounts, finely chisseled barrels, long eared butts, all steel rammers. The steel has overall aging and the stocks bear a most pleasing colour. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables
French 1830'S Shako Helmet Plate Brass plate of Cockerel and stamp of 'Return to Liberty' July 1830
French 1830's Shako Helmet Plate. Copper plate of a Cockerel over French symbols.
French Marquetry 19th century Bureau-Plat, Floral and Scroll Marquetry Top A stunning French antique writing desk or display centrepiece with four large pembroke style legs, walnut top with large central panel of a large Adam style urn with American Indian head profiles and scroll floral marquetry. Four side serpentine form.YAOB
Good British Infantry Officer's Sword 1796 Of The Peninsular War - Waterloo In nice order with silver wire grip, copper gilt hilt mounts and matching scabbard mounts. The mercurial gilding is all original, and, quite remarkably, over 85% complete. The grip is solid silver, multi twisted wire, and perfectly intact and sound. Double shell guard, single flattened knuckelbow and a faceted pommel. Only the blade shows it's natural age. Used by an officer, serving under the Duke of Wellington, in the army of King George IIIrd, during the era of the Peninsular War, The War of 1812 in America and Canada, and the 100 Days War, against Napoleon, at Quatre Bras and Waterloo. This delightful piece would make a very fine addition to any collection of top drawer swords, an excellent start to a new collection, or as a superb compliment to a decorate a room furnished with fine antiques. Maker inscribed by Egington, Birmingham Sword Cutler to HRH The Duke of Kent. Blade maker marked G
High Sheriff's Heraldic Crested Ceremonial Halberds With Armorial Bearings of the High Sheriff of Chester. Large steel ax