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This is a very attractive "Electric" single action revolver in outstanding condition. The revolver is a spur triggered 32 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and exhibits negligible wear to the plating and is in virtually mint state. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as “Saturday Night Specials”. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase “Saturday Night Specials” is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the “Saturday Night Special”. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a “Saturday Night Special”. I now accept credit cards. Now Reduced!
Admiral Horatio Nelson - Strand of Hair. Now here is something for the Nelson collector who thought they had everything! A strand of Nelson's hair, nicely mounted and with a Certificate of Authenticity and facsimile copy letter written by Nelson's daughter Horatia explaining the provenance of the hair. A fascinating curio and relic and as close an artefact to Nelson as any collector would ever hope to own.
Excellent Iver Johnson Boston Bulldog Revolver This is an absolutely mint condition Boston Bulldog revolver in 320 short. I have never seen a better one. Mirror finish nickel, perfect hard gutta percha rubber grips and solid lockup and cylinder rotation. Story I was told was that it was purchased by the great grandfather of the vendor who bought it to take to the Klondike but unfortunately he broke his leg and he had to return home. Bulldogs are gaining tremendous popularity as they are now recognised as the gun that "really won the West". I doubt if you could find a better example.
Good British Bull Dog Revolver This is the quintessential British Bulldog revolver and identical to the revolver featured on the cover of George Laymans excellent book "The British Bulldog, the gun that really won the West". Bulldog revolvers were pocket sized and large calibre and were very popular in the Western frontiers as they were affordable and lethal. This is the largest Bulldog that can be legally owned without a FAC and is chambered in .44 calibre Webley. Cocks rotates and Locks fine in double action but on single action the trigger spring is slack and needs to be pushed forward. I can quote to have this dealt with. A high percentage of original nickel finish remains and the revolver has excellent grips with little or no wear. An iconic Western revolver.
Good Pattern 1844 Yeomanry Cavalry Carbine This is a very good P-1844 Yeomanry Cavalry Carbine. The P-1844 Yeomanry Carbine was adopted as a somewhat smaller and lighter variation of the P-1843 Second Pattern Victoria Carbine. Both guns utilized a P-1842 percussion lock, designed by George Lovell who was appointed the Small Arms Inspector at the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield Lock (RSAF) in 1840. Lovell was a very forward thinking and modern armorer, and strove for uniformity in production, high levels of quality control and sought to produce the most modern and perfected percussion weapons in the world. Lovell’s influence on British military small arms from the late 1830’s through his tenure as Small Arms Inspector had a major influence on British military small arms design and production. The M-1844 Yeomanry Carbine had a 20” smooth bore barrel that was nominally .66 caliber, a reduction from the Victoria Carbine’s .73 caliber bore. The smaller caliber was more in line with the traditional English carbine bore of .65 caliber. The barrel was secured to the stock by a screw through the tang of the breech and a pair of barrel wedges, of the same design that Lovell had introduced for the P-1842 musket, which replaced the pin barrel designs that the British military had utilized since the late 1600’s. The gun had a simple fixed post rear sight; a captive swivel ramrod and a single brass rammer pipe to help keep the ramrod secured when not in use. The butt plate and trigger guard were also of brass. The trigger guard had a skeletonised pistol grip extension to its rear, similar to that of the Brunswick rifle trigger guard, and the forward bow sported a single sling swivel. A sling bar of about 7” in length was mounted to the left side of the carbine This carbine is in very good to fine condition with a crisp lock, plethora of proof and view marks and has the letter RMLYC engraved on the butt plate which I am told explains it was issued to the Royal Midlothian Yeomanry Cavalry. Metalwork is excellent and the woodwork is sound, altogether a very pleasing example and becoming scarcer. One comment I would make is that there are six uniform scratch or "tally" marks near the foresight which clearly were put there deliberately. Were these to indicate battle success. I doubt if you would take the trouble to do this shooting rabbits! Feel free to ask any questions or for additional images to serious enquirers.
1 of 300 Rare Sharps 1870 Trial Rifle This is an extraordinary rifle! In 1870 the US Ordnance Department purchased 300 of what would become known as the M1874 breechblock from Sharps. Springfield Armory used these new M1874 pattern blocks, newly modified levers, and parts of their own manufacture (or modification) to assemble 300 trial rifles. Like the guns that had been altered by Springfield, these new Type II rifles were chambered for the .50-70 Government cartridge. Like the earlier alteration Type 1 rifles, the guns had 35” Springfield made barrels that were secured to the forend with two-barrel bands. The barrels of both Type I and Type II rifles were serial numbered to the receivers at the left breech, above the stock line. In the case of the alteration rifles, if the receiver serial number included a “C”, indicating 100,000, it was omitted from the barrel number. Springfield modified existing, obsolete musket stocks to obtain the buttstocks and forends. The butt plates were also surplus Civil War era musket butt plates. The cleaning rod and rear sight were of the current production US M1870 pattern. The breechblocks, hammers, locks, levers, trigger plate and lever catch were colour case hardened, while the rear sight, screws, lever hinge pin, firing pin, extractor and barrel band springs were heat blued. The balance of the metal parts, including the barrel, barrel bands, butt plate, ramrod and sling swivels, were left in the white; better known as National Armory Bright. These altered trials rifles used their original Sharps serial numbers, while the newly made Type II Rifles such as this one was serial numbered in their own unique sequence from 1 to 300, with the number appearing on the left side of the barrel breech and on the receiver tang. The receivers bore either the original Sharps percussion era patent markings, or the earliest of the cartridge era markings, but no others. The repurposed musket butt plates bore their original U.S. marks, and the left side of the buttstock bore the script inspection cartouche of Erskine S. Allin, the master armorer at the Springfield Armory. These incredibly rare experimental Sharps rifles were issued during 1871 and 1872 and most of them saw service with the army on the frontier. Many of the Type II rifles were issued to the 13thUS Infantry, which was deployed to deal with Indian issues in Wyoming, Utah and the Dakota Territories during the early 1870s. The regiment was eventually recalled to the East and was stationed in New Orleans in very late 1874. The overall field performance of the M1870 Sharps rifles (as well as the Remington rifles) was not as good as the M1870 Springfield Trapdoor. As a result of the field trials, a new pattern of Trapdoor, chambered for the newly developed .45-70 Government cartridge was adopted in 1873, and the brief experiment with the .50-70 cartridge and altered Sharps firearms came to an end. By 1875, the guns were considered obsolete and were already being sold as surplus by the US government. Many of these guns ended up with Buffalo Hunters as they were less expensive than the series of Model 1874 “sporting” rifles. This particular example is as good as I’ve ever seen. The butt plate bears the usual U.S. mark on the tang. The rifle is marked with a crisp script ESA in an oval cartouche on the left wrist of the buttstock; this is the mark of Springfield’s Master Armorer Erskine A. Allin. A small capital A is stamped to the right of the receiver under the trigger guard. The receiver is stamped on the left side C SHARPS’ PAT. SEPT. 12TH1848. The serial number of the rifle is stamped on the left-hand side of the barrel and is serial no 16 so one of the first made. The receiver retains some case colour and all screw heads are excellent. The bore is clean and bright with deep rifling as it should be and the mechanism works flawlessly and also disassembles easily for cleaning as it should. The correct cleaning rod is present as are the ladder rear sights. The walnut stock has handling marks and there is a chip missing from the rear of the receiver in front of the trigger guard. This is repairable and I can recommend a repairer but I tend not to “improve” guns and feel this is always best left to the discretion of the new owner. Sharps are an iconic firearm associated with the Civil War, Indian Wars and Buffalo hunting. This is an incredibly rare type II trials rifle in the obsolete 50-70 calibre and can be owned without license but would make an excellent example for shooting subject to proofing and licensing. A superb example of investment quality. I will consider part exchange. See this and other interesting collectible firearms at the Sandown Park Antique Arms Fair on Sunday 4th October. Social distancing and safe dealing in practice.
11 bore hammer gun by T J Watkins Now here is an interesting shotgun! It is an 11 bore under lever shotgun manufactured by Birmingham Gunmaker T J Watkins circa 1868. If ever you wanted a magnificent looking breech loading hammer shotgun to hang over the fireplace without worries about security issues then this is the one for you as it is in a scarce obsolete calibre! The shotgun has an excellent grained walnut butt and fore end with an unusual chequered partially engraved iron butt plate, iron being the sign of quality at the time and indicative of "that bit extra". Good chequered wrist and fore end with just one sliver missing from the left hand sde of the fore end but not really noticeable. The butt has a nice silver (possibly gold if not tarnished silver) inlaid escutcheon. Foliate engraved side locks , trigger guard and tang and decent damascus barrels with a mellowing patina with some slight pitting if you look for it. The makers name is engraved on the top rib and side plates with a brass foresight. Mechanically sound with good striking firing pins and a decent bore and an action that locks tight. This gun was originally made as a 10 bore and obsolete 10 bore cartridges fit perfectly but it was proofed as an 11 bore by the Birmingham proof house based on barrel size and marked accordingly. If you measure the barrels they are 11 bore which also fits the proof limits for 10 bore. Overall a very decent gun and probably worthy of restoration which could prove economically viable and would greatly enhance its value but here it is priced to sell. There is an interesting anecdotal piece of provenance that accompanies the gun which was purchased many years ago in an antique shop in Monmouthshire and that is that vendor stated that the gun was made for the Sheriff of Worcester who at that time would have been a William Hanford Flood see the London Gazette Entry at www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/23704/pages/474 A lot of gun for your money!
15th Century Mortar This is an exceptionally early English Mortar dating from around 1450 and would have been in use probably until the end of the 16th Century. The mortar is unusual insofar as it has been hand forged and not cast and overall is 8" high with a 1.5" diameter bore within a 3.5" octagonal barrel. The mortar is marked with an incised cross and has a large touch hole and priming pan. The mortar has a 15 Degree cant which indicates that some aggressive use was anticipated but it is believed that these were generally used for signalling and for advising time during encampment on campaign. The piece is heavy and weighs more than 20 pounds, It is remarkable that this has survived and English ordnance of this age is scarce if not rare.
17th Century Executioners Axe 17th Century Executioners Axe circa 1650 , modern handle for representation only, original handle would have been significantly longer. Gruesome unpleasant artefact but rare and seldom available. Cutting edge approximately 8", Length of blade 14.5". Hand forged.
1863 Petengill Revolver This is another first for Pembroke Fine Arms the rare Petengill revolver. If you are a black powder shooter it may be ringing some bells with you and you would be right! This was the predecessor of the well known Rogers and Spencer Revolver, look at the barrel and the grips. A total of 1,500 Pettengill Army revolvers were delivered in 1862 with another 501 being delivered in early 1863 making a total of 2,001 received by the government during the six months before mid January of 1863. However, existing serial numbers, ranging from 1600 to 4600, would indicate that about 3,000 were actually produced. The serial number on the government inspected arm featured in this posting is 4307. Many of these arms were issued to the Army of the Mississippi under General William S. Rosencrans and other Federal troops in the West. They very likely were used at the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky in 1862 and although a failure in the field and officially "discarded", many undoubtedly served through the war or at least until the user thereof could replace it with a more efficient side arm. It's front end design was later incorporated into the Rodgers & Spencer .44 cal. single action revolver, which, although the better of the two arms, arrived too late for service in the war. This rare example has no original finish but the grips are fine and it works. There is some surface pitting but it is so rare as an example that it would probably merit a refinish and that's something I have never, ever commented on before so it must be rare! Something for the advanced collector who has everything but not one of these!
18th Century Cemetery Gun - unusual. This is an unusual piece and definitely one for the flintlock collector who thought he or she had everything. This is a Flintlock alarm gun with simple flared blunderbuss style barrel and flint-fired musket lock mounted to an unusual wooden casing. The gun has an iron pintle underneath with a sliding trigger bar which allows the forward motion of a tripwire to pull the trigger to fire the gun. The gun also has three iron rings which would have allowed the gamekeeper or church warden to set up to three tripwires. This gun is circa 1800 give or take 5 years either way. Generally good condition as can be seen, one band appears absent but everything else sound. These guns were set up to dissuade poachers and were also placed in cemeteries to discourage grave robbing. It has been debated that when in use the barrel would also be filled with shot to harm the intruder. Certainly at this time “mantraps” were in use. Corpses were frequently “stolen” from graves for educational purposes , for training surgeon’s anatomy lessons. Valuables were also sought and in one notorious case, two grave robbers stole a lead coffin and melted it down for scrap value. An interesting but bizarre example of a flintlock.
19th Century Naval Swivel Cannon This is an interesting Swivel Cannon that would be mounted on the bow or stern of a ship with the capability of being quickly portable to place it anywhere. This would have been made at the turn of the 19th Century and would have fired a one pound solid shot or grape. Formidable at close quarter for sweeping decks. Overall length 24". Could possibly be improved with fresh black paint but my Mantra has always been "leave as found" to allow others the pleasure of "improving or ruining" The short sea service pistol is simply to indicate the size and is not included but offered elsewhere. This is heavy, estimated weight 65 pounds.
4 pound cannon later carriage Now I don't intend to lugg this around the arms fairs and it has come in as a part exchange. Lets list the defects first! Later white oak carriage not original. Touch hole half spiked in the correct manner so it needs to be taken out. Bronze weld on the breach ring which was revealed when the black paint was removed. Other than that I think that it would look great if it was repainted or treated with Zeebrite fireplace blacking. I am not a cannon chap as I would hate to take it to the range but I am told it is a 4 pounder, Length is 43.5" , bore is 3.5" and it has the tapped holes for a flintlock ignition system and sights. Probably manufactured in Falkirk Scotland by the Carron Ironworks. There are no markings that I can see and the weight is in the region of 2.5 cwt. I can arrange a reasonable delivery cost dependent on where you are. Because of the sheer logistics of moving the item this is sold on a non return basis only.
54 Bore double barrel percussion pistol This is a good quality Potts double barrel 54 bore pocket pistol with drop down twin triggers. Clearly from the state of the woodwork and the crisp mechanics the pistol saw little use. On cocking the pistol each trigger drops down and locks and then on firing springs back into its recess immediately and with some force. The barrel appears to be hammer forged with an elaborate demascus type motif which is difficult to discern from my photographs but should not be mistaken for pitting. This type of pistol was a "heavy weight" of its time and was manufactured around the time of the emerging transitional revolvers. The overall barrel lengths are 4.5" exposed, 5" internal and the overall length of the pistol is 9.5". 3" barrels are more commonly seen on these pistols. Overall a quality example of a British made and proofed double barrel pistol and difficult to improve on.
A Father\'s Advice - Shooting Safety Poster Throughout the English-speaking world, shooting people are familiar with Mark Hanbury Beaufoy's verses on gun safety called A Father's Advice. Although originally published in 1902, the advice contained in the poem is as appropriate today as it was then. This print is a high quality reproduction of an Eley Brothers 1960’s marketing poster and is reproduced in limited numbers by the kind permission of Eley Brothers. The poster is printed on high quality 170gsm satin paper and is produced in A3 size (297mm x 420mm – 11.7” x 16.5”) and is supplied ready for framing or ready framed in a glazed black wooden frame. Beaufoy began to shoot at the age of twenty and became an enthusiast for game shooting, preferring quality of game to quantity. He had his own shoot at Coombe House, near Shaftesbury, in the border country of Wiltshire and Dorset, consisting of about fifteen hundred acres, plus another five hundred which he rented. The land was ideal for pheasant shooting. Beaufoy also ran a second shoot at Ashmore in Dorset Mark Hanbury Beaufoy's name will always be associated with “A Father’s Advice”, though he has far greater claims to recognition. He was born in 1854 and educated at Eton and Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He owned a successful vinegar manufacturing business and was a Liberal Member of Parliament who advocated the eight hour working day which he introduced in his own factory. In order to give a chance in life to poor children, he founded the Beaufoy Institute (now taken over by the London County Council) to succeed the "ragged school" which his family had established before the Education Act of 1870. He also carried on the family benefactions to the City of London School. This poster is an interesting and novel addition to any gun room and would make an ideal gift for the shooting enthusiast. Quoted price is framed.
Adams 54 Bore tailed bullet mould. This fine mould stamped Adams Patent was manufactured circa 1851 and designed for the Adams revolver which was initially produced without a rammer, the principal being that the cast tail of the bullet was pushed into a wad to retain the bullet in the cylinder.This did not always work! Bullets would sometimes fall out of the cylinder sometimes to the fatal embarrassment of the user and as a consequence of this the system was dropped and replaced with a rammer system to seat slightly oversized bullets tightly. Probably less moulds extant than revolvers! A fine mould.
Adams Revolvers - A W F Taylerson Essential reading for the collector of English revolvers. This is the only specialist book published on Adams' revolvers and now long out of print. A very good copy.Book Description: Barrie & Jenkins, London, 1976. Hardcover. Book Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good, plastic cover. First Edition. 240 pages, well illustrated, cloth, very good. From the Wikipedia website: "Robert Adams (1809-1880) was a 19th-century British gunsmith who patented the first successful double-action revolver in 1851. His revolvers were used during the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, the U. S. Civil War, and the Anglo-Zulu War. ~ In 1867, Robert Adams' brother John Adams patented a breech-loading revolver which was adopted by the British government in place of the Beaumont-Adams. It was a solid frame pistol with six chambers, in .450 caliber. After official acceptance of his pistol, Adams left the London Armoury Company and established his own factor, the Adams Patent Small Arms Company. His pistol was manufactured in three distinct variations (differences related mainly to methods of spent cartridge ejection) between 1867 and about 1880. The models were tested and adopted by the British Army and Navy, with the last, the M1872 Mark III, seeing the widest use. The John Adams revolver remained the official sidearm of the British Army until replaced by the Enfield Mark I in 1880." Price includes postage.
Adams/Tranter 54 Bore mould. This is an Adams or Tranter unmarked conical 54 bullet mould with 2 cavities and a later sprue cutter. Ideal for making up a cased set or as an accessory to a 54 bore revolver. This one is in reasonable condition as can be seen from the photographs.
Aetna Arms of New York Pocket Pistol Aetna Arms of New York were extant from 1869 to 1880 and manufactured 6,000 guns. They mainly produced brass nickel plated revolvers in 32 and 22 RF and this is such an example in obsolete 32 RF calibre. The revolver locks and cocks fine and has an unbelievably strong cocking mechanism. Plating is faded paricularly on the cylinder as can be seen and this would be a nice example that wouldn't need much restoring. I have several examples of these small revolvers and many were made to a very high standard and produced to be concealed on the person for self defence. An interesting revolver from an uncommon manufacturer seldom seen in the UK.
Alarm Gun circa 1840 This is another alarm gun designed for alarming a door. The gun is screwed to the door frame and a cord passed across the entrance to the trigger. Simple and effective. A customer commented that it could be a belt pistol and it is similar to some later German devices but I don't think so. Interesting and unusual.
Allen & Wheelock 31 calibre Although the firm of Allen & Wheelock was only in business for eight years - from 1857 to 1864 - it produced a surprisingly large variety of firearms. This is one of them! Their products included single shot, double barrel, 4, 5, and 6 shot pepperbox pistols; single barrel, double barrel and revolving cylinder rifles, both muzzle loading and breech loading; and over 20 revolver models with more than a hundred variations. Included in this proliferation were the five percussion revolver models with which we are concerned. This entire arms production was based upon the various patents of Ethan Allen. Allen held 22 firearms patents, of which five were applicable to percussion revolvers. The first, No. 3,998 of April 16, 1845, was .not granted for a percussion revolver but for a pepperbox. Its double action mechanism, in which the hammer was raised and dropped and the barrels revolved by a single pull of the trigger, was an improvement on his 1837 patent, which applied only to single shot pistols. The revolving mechanism was very simple a screw in the side of the trigger pivoted an arm, which acted on the ratchet on the rear of the cylinder. Many percussion revolver makers used variations of this. This particular pistol is in 31 calibre and is cased in a modern box containing the pistol, a contemporary percussion cap tin and an aluminium mould to produce balls to suit the pistol. The action on this is fine but no finish remains which is reflected in the price. A good honest little pistol that represents a transitional stage which culminated in the revolver as we know it today.
Allen & Wheelock Side Hammer USA Civil War Era Revolver This is an Allen & Wheelock 32 RF Side hammer rim fire Revolver of Civil War Era .Revolver made by Allen and Wheelock, Ethan Allen & Co. Made c. 1858-1865, total quantity estimated over 1,500. 32 rim fire; 6-shot cylinder. Barrel length 2 1/2”. All barrels octagonal. Iron frames. Walnut grips, blued finish now faded to mostly grey but some finish left. Barrel markings: ALLEN & WHEELOCK, WORCESTER, MASS. U.S./ALLEN’S PATENTS SEPT. 7, NOV.9 1858. On the frame: JULY 3, 1860. Cylinders are engraved with five circular panels depicting mounted rider, standing Indian (seal of Massachusetts), ship and other military trophy deigns. Early model: cylinder pin of long, narrow, round shape entering from rear; hammer strikes to right of centre; grip frame has comparatively sharp drop. Grooved top strap for sighting. Very good condition. This is a scarce revolver in the UK.
Allen and Thurber Pepperbox pistol The pepper box pistol was so called as it resembled a pepper pot and was a multiple barreled pistol with revolving barrels. Unlike a conventional revolver in this weapon the barrels rotated. Ethen Allen was an outstanding and innovative gunmaker and this particular pistol was made during the partnership of Allen and Thurber. The bar hammer is stamped "Allens Patent" and the barrel has the Worcester address, "cast steel" and the date of 1857 making this one of the last produced pistols of the partnership before it became Allen and Wheelock. This 36 calibre six shot pistol is mechanically sound with a tremendously strong cocking spring. Although well used and markings are wearing it has good grips and is a nice example of a pepperbox revolver sometimes sold by Allen as a "life and property preserver". In it's time the Allen pepperbox pistol was the most popular pistol sold to civilians and was known as the "Gun that won the East". An interesting early American pistol.
American Small Arms - Edward S Farrow Edward S Farrow was probably the best person qualified to write this book in 1904 as a result of his extensive military experience. For example he discusses one encounter "During (my) association with the Unatilla Indians and when (I) captured the tribe of "Sheepeater" Indians in the Salmon River Mountains of Idaho in 1879 (I) had a great variety of arms at my disposal for the purpose of making comparisons. No two Indians possessed arms of the same pattern and caliber and yet with few exceptions each thought his arms possessed features of merit"... Rare book, 1st edition 408 p.p +2 Profusely illustrated with excellent engravings, illustrations and photographs featuring the well known and not so well known arms of the era.
Arisaka Type 38 rifle with Chrysanthemum. This is a Model 38 6.5 mm live firing Arisaka rifle that was clearly a battlefield pick up as evidenced by the Imperial Chrysanthemum symbol on the knox which hasn't been defaced. The rifle has been recently proofed and has a good bore and is mechanically sound. There is clear evidence of field use with dents and pressure marks and what looks like a bayonet defense mark on the fore end.There are no cracks or problems with the walnut stock which would affect shooting. The Model 38 was used throughout the Japanese Chinese Invasion and WW2 and was the work horse of the Imperial Army until the introduction of the Model 99. This rifle was manufactured by the Kokura Arsenal in the 26th Series. As a matter of interest the arsenal mark on the rifle represents a pile of 4 cannon balls viewed from above. This is a rifle that definitely saw action and is as accurate today as it was 80 years ago.
Arisaka Type 99 rifle. This Arisaka rifle is probably the finest available in the UK today. Unlike most, it still features the Emperors royal "Chrysanthemum" motif on the receiver signifying a battle field pick up or surrender. The 7.7mm Arisaka featured one of the finest actions of its day and had several unusual features including an optimistic aircraft sight ( extant) and bolt dust cover (extant). This is an earlier rifle and as a consequence does not have any of the economies encountered with later models. Excellent woodwork and good shooting bore and a recent UK proof.
Attractive Sporting Rifle by WW Greener This is a very nice 14 bore sporting rifle manufactured by the famous firm of W W Greener. The previous owner informs me that it was acquired from the sale conducted by Wallis & Wallis after the demolition of the Greener Factory in Birmingham in 1965 to make way for the “Spaghetti Junction”. The rifle is basically untouched and unusually has the original browning extant on the barrels. The barrel is stamped WWG along with SF and various proof and view marks. Other than some pressure marks on the stock the rifle appears to have had very little use and its acquisition from the Greener sale coupled with the lock which has no engraving makes one ponder if it was ever sold. The overall length of the rifle is 48” with a barrel length of 32” and length of pull is 14.5”. The three leaf rear sights are still extant. Overall a good honest gun from one of the most famous of all British Gunmakers who was a prolific inventor in his own right. W W Greener had a fascinating life and was apprenticed to the famous London Maker Joe Manton before going into business himself in 1829. This rifle would appear to have been manufactured circa 1840.
Baby Dragoon with accoutrements This Colt Dragoon has all matching serial numbers including the wedge and arbor. Mechanically sound it has a very good bore with sharp rifling. This revolver has the scarce 6" barrel. As you can see the screws are good as are the grips and there is evidence of etching on the cylinder which is matching and has the correct serial number. The "T" inspectors mark for William Tulley is exactly where it should be. It would be difficult to better this for the price and is a very good "honest" example of an iconic revolver and a "must have" for any Colt Collector.
Beaumont Adams 54 Bore revolver circa 1860 This is a very reasonable example of an iconic Beaumont Adams revolver in 54 bore ( approximately .44 calibre ) which was the first mass produced double action revolver that was the predecessor of all modern double action revolvers. The Dean and Adams revolver was shown at the Great Exhibition of 1851 and subsequently approved by the British Army's Small Arms Committee in addition to being adopted by the East India Company for use by their cavalry. Orders for the revolver were great enough to prompt the Deane brothers to make Adams a partner in their firm, which became Messrs. Deane, Adams, and Deane. Although highly regarded, the hand-crafted Adams revolver was more expensive than Colt's mass-produced guns. It also lacked a recoil shield behind the cylinder, which left the shooter's hand subject to powder burns resulting from "blowback" caused by the sometimes unpredictable black powder of the era. The lack of a hammer spur was also criticized since the longer trigger pull of the Adams made it less accurate than the Colt. Furthermore, the Adams' nipples, upon which the percussion caps were set, were unhardened and sometimes burst upon firing. An "Improved Frame" model was offered in 1854, presenting both a sleeker look and more comfortable grip. In that same year the British Board of Ordnance reviewed the Adams together with other percussion revolvers with a view to adopting one as an official service sidearm. Concerns about the gas escape between the cylinder and barrel during discharge resulted in no decision being made. Nevertheless, British officers purchased the Adams privately and the gun proved its worth in battle during the Crimean War. In 1855 a veteran of the Crimean conflict, Lieutenant Frederick E.B. Beaumont, improved the gun by linking the trigger to a spurred hammer, permitting both single- and double-action fire. A new version of the revolver, the Beaumont–Adams, was produced and became very popular. Adams had a falling out with the Deane brothers the following year and founded a new arms concern, the London Armoury Company, on February 9, 1856. Another important stockholder was Adams' cousin, James Kerr, who later invented the Kerr’s Patent Revolver. The factory was established on the former site of the South-Eastern Railway Company in the Bermondsey section of London. The Indian Mutiny of 1857 established the Adams as the official revolver of the British Army. In the bitter fighting it was found that rapid fire was more important than accuracy, and the man-stopping power of the Adams' large calibre bullet was also valued. This particular revolver has typical British proof marks and is stamped with the London Armoury Company Shield as can be seen on the images. The mechanics of the revolver are perfect in both actions but there is a flaw on the barrel, presumably caused by overloading so this one is definitely a gun cabinet example as it would be unsafe to put onto a FAC. A decent example of an iconic revolver that should be in every English revolver collection..
Beautiful Albini Braendlin 11mm Fortress Model Short Rifle The Albini-Braendlin rifle was a single-shot 11mm rifle adopted by Belgium in 1867. The action on the rifle was designed by an Italian officer Augusto Albini and was perfected by an English gunsmith, Francis Braendlin who was possibly of Belgian descent. The rifle has a front-hinged, forward lifting action that has a mechanism which works together with the hammer-striker assembly to simultaneously lock and fire the rifle. When fired, the striker moves into the back of the breech block striking the firing pin and locking the block in place at ignition. Both striker and firing pin move in the same line as the rifle bore. Pulling the hammer back withdraws the striker from the breech block allowing it to be lifted on its pivot pin by means of a small fixed knob on the right side of the block. This is a beautiful example of the Albini-Braendlin 11mm calibre fortress artillery rifle that was manufactured in 1901 from service rifles and cut down for use by defending fortress troops. These are sometimes referred to as carbines but in fact are short rifles. Unlike the full size rifle this rifle did not have a bayonet bar. The rifle was then arsenal refurbished prior to issue. There are photographs extant of invading troops holding captured Albini Braendlin rifles during World War One! This example is particularly eye catching and was purchased in the 1980’s from the Swiss Army Museum by the previous owner. It is likely that the rifle saw little service and is in immaculate condition with excellent wood and superb metal. The only flaw I can report is that the tip of the original cleaning rod is missing but these are not difficult to find. The rifle is stamped 1868 which was the actual patent date not the date of manufacture as is often assumed. It would be very difficult to better this rifle and a collection featuring the development of “trap door” rifles would be an interesting and absorbing project as there were many different designs including early conversions such as the Allen and Snider conversions, Werndl and Wanzl etc. A good rifle.
Beautiful Beretta Onyx 686 Shotgun. I do not normally advertise my modern guns on this website but on this occasion will do so as this really is a collectible gun. This is a Beretta Onyx 12 Gauge and was one of the first ones imported into the Country many years ago and it looks as if it was made yesterday! It has seen little if any use and is in immaculate order with a stunning Walnut stock as can be seen from the images. The gun has 28" multi choke barrels and a gold plated trigger. An exceptional shotgun. I can deliver overnight to your RFD by courier for £15
Beautiful Little Stevens Take Down Rifle This is a very nice Stevens Favorite take down rifle in 25 Stevens Calibre. Excellent bore and much finish as can be seen. The Stevens rifles were manufactured in their thousands and were the USA equivalent of our "Rook & Rabbit" rifles. This rifle has a perfect butt cap often seen damaged and generally has seen little use. Reduced crack in lower trigger tang needs TIG weld.
Beautiful W C Scott 10 bore antique hammer gun. This is an exquisite W C Scott and Son of London 10 bore hammer gun. The gun was manufactured in 1879 and has seen little use. The gun features 30” Damascus barrels and the top rib is engraved with the makers name and Great Castle Street, Regents Circus, London address with “patented triplex lever” to describe the gun. For the technical minded, Length of Pull is 14” and the left barrel measure .778” and the right barrel also measures .778” with an original proof of .775”. Bores are bright and the weight of the gun is 8.8 lbs. The barrel chokes are 041” and 0.32" The gun is very tight and has no issues and has a wonderful Damascus pattern to the barrels that doesn’t really show in the photographs. The barrels are browned as was all of W C Scott’s production at this time. The chambers of the gun are 2.7/8” so will not chamber modern 10 gauge cartridges and consequently it is exempt from licensing and can be owned as an object of curiosity. The engraving is excellent and features a hunting dog on one lock plate and a Grouse on the other with a plethora of engraving around the locks and the trigger guard. If you look at the engraving of the dog, the dog actually has personality and I reckon a real dog was the subject matter. There is considerable original finish including nitre blue on the gun and the barrels are unblemished. There is a vacant silver escutcheon on the underside of the butt and the side plates are both engraved with the makers name W C Scott & Son. This is a quite beautiful example of the British Gunmakers art at the height of its popularity in the last quarter of the 19th Century. W C Scott were prolific manufacturers and made guns in three qualities, A, B and C. Most B and C guns were sold to retailers who engraved their own names on the gun and most A grade guns such as this bore W C Scott’s name and were retailed from their London premises and proofed in London. In 1871 the firm moved to 10 Great Castle Street, Regent Circus (now Oxford Circus) where the firm was to remain until 1899. On 18 January 1875 William Middleditch Scott patented an external twin bolting system for barrels (No. 186) which comprised cross-bolts on either side of the action. Patent No. 1902 of 25 May 1875 covered a bolt which was part of the top lever. It engaged with the top rib extension and became famous as the Triplex top lever grip (in use up to 1892 when it was replaced by Scott's Improved Bolt). This gun features this action. Minor changes were made to the basic design over the next few years and it was widely used until gradually replaced by the rectangular crossbolt introduced in 1892, it was discontinued by Webley & Scott in 1914. This is an attractive and interesting gun manufactured at the pinnacle of the career of one of England’s most revered gunsmiths.
Beautiful Winchester Model 12 in 16 gauge. This Winchester Model 12 Shotgun chambered in 16 gauge is in quite wonderful condition for its age and has clearly seen little use. As well as being an uncommon gauge for this gun it has the advantage of being a take-down model. The 28” barrel maintains the bulk of its original bluing and all stamping details are crisp and legible. Overall length is 46” with LOP at 13.25” and chambered for 2.3/4” cartridges with a full choke. The factory fitted butt pad is clean and undamaged and clearly is compatible to the high condition of the gun. The serial number dates the gun to 1936 which was mid- term in the manufacture of these fine guns and at their pinnacle of engineering excellence. The bore is bright and clean and overall I would rate this gun as NRA very fine condition or 90%+ The Model 1912 (shortened to Model 12 in 1919) was the next step from the Winchester Model 1897 hammer-fired shotgun, which in turn had evolved from the earlier Winchester Model 1893 shotgun. The Model 12 was designed by Winchester engineer T.C. Johnson, and was based in part on the M1893/97 design by John Moses Browning, in that it used a sliding forearm or "pump action" to cycle the mechanism. It was initially available in 20 gauge only (12 and 16 gauge guns such as this one were not sold until late 1913). The Model 12 was the first truly successful internal hammer pump-action shotgun ever produced. Its tubular magazine was loaded through the bottom of the gun. Empty shotgun shells ejected to the right. Depending on the particular wooden plug installed in the magazine, two, three, or four shells could be stored in the tubular magazine. The magazine holds six 2¾-inch shells, when no plug is installed, unlike most shotguns of today which hold four or five shells. With forged and machined steel parts, the ultimate reason for discontinuation in 1964 was that it was too expensive to produce at a competitive price. In 1952 the 16 gauge was manufactured as the “Featherlight” and these can be recognised by the prefix “F” before the serial number. This shotgun is unrestricted and would have to be purchased with the requisite entry on a Firearms Certificate but I can arrange for the gun to be restricted at cost for purchase with a shotgun certificate. An interesting and unusual bird gun seldom seen in the UK.
Belgian manufactured British Bulldog revolver. This is a Belgian made Bulldog revolver in obsolete .442" calibre. The revolver works as it should in both single and double action and has a good bore and excellent grips. Belgian revolvers are usually of high quality as the Belgian proof test was more rigorous than the British proof test. This revolver has mellowed to an even patina and although not a Webley is as close to a Webley as one could imagine and at less money. The British Bull Dog was a popular type of solid-frame pocket revolver introduced by Philip Webley & Son of Birmingham, England in 1872 and subsequently copied by gun makers in Continental Europe and the United States. It featured a 2.5-inch (64 mm) barrel and was chambered for .44 Short Rimfire, .442 Webley, or .450 Adams cartridges, with a five-round cylinder. Webley produced smaller scaled .320 Revolver and .380 calibre versions later, but did not mark them with the British Bull Dog name. The design of the British Bull Dog revolver had been in existence since 1868, but Henry Webley registered the trademark in 1878. From that time to the present, the term has come to mean any short barrelled double-action revolver with a swing-out ejector rod and a short grip. Intended to be carried in a coat pocket as an affordable means of self-defence, it can be argued that the Bulldog was actually the gun that really “won the west” as it was produced in far more significant numbers than the more expensive USA manufactured revolvers. The design originated in 1868 for the Webley Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) model revolver and was manufactured as late as 1917.
Bergmann Model 1896 No 3 Automatic Pistol The Bergmann Automatic Pistol is instantly recognisable and R K Wilson in his tome "Textbook of Automatic Pistols" considered the Bergmann to be the first true automatic pocket pistol. Theodore Bergann began experimenting with self loading pistols at an early date, his first patent was published in 1892! This is a well made arm of simple blowv back type. It is significant that there is no mechanical extractor, when the bolt opens there is still sufficient gas available to blow the cartridge case out backwards. The case then strikes the next round in the magazine and in theory bounces clear. A gas escape port in the chamber acts as a safety should the case rupture. The early cartridges had no rim of any kind and relied on a sharp taper to avoid any risk of jamming in the chamber. Wilson also regarded this as the most accurate and "pointable" pistol on the market an felt it was better suited to close combat than the Mauser C96 which he states in a derisory manner is a "continental officers pistol, looks good on the hip and designed for long range shooting when the enemy aren't close!" This particular pistol is in fine condition as can be seen and is accompanied by it's magazine which is more of a stripper clip than a magazine and much rarer than the pistol itself as most were lost. This is an excellent example of a Bergmann Pistol for the advanced collector and in an obsolete calibre so in the UK you don't have to be a criminal to own it!
Bill Reid VC autographed print - an extraordinary man! Bill Reid was Scottish and an extraordinarily brave but modest man. His Lancaster Bomber was badly strafed during a bombing raid and his navigator and other crew members killed but he carried on with his mission, dropped his bombs and returned home despite being severely wounded and as a consequence saving the remainder of his crew. On a later mission his aircraft was hit and severed in two by a bomb dropped from above him and he kept the aircraft in the air long enough for his crew to bale out and just managed to bale out himself landing heavily and breaking his arm. This limited edition print entitled "Chadwick's Masterpiece" is only one of 10 that were signed by Bill Reid three years before he passed away. The print is glazed and measures 21" x 15" and is an excellent representation of a Lancaster Bomber as flown by one of the bravest pilots of the War. See Bill Reid's VC citation as below ; He was awarded the VC on 14 December 1943. The citation reads: Air Ministry, 14th December, 1943. The KING has been graciously pleased to confer the VICTORIA CROSS on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery: — Acting Flight Lieutenant William REID (124438), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No. 61 Squadron. On the night of November 3rd, 1943, Flight Lieutenant Reid was pilot and captain of a Lancaster aircraft detailed to attack Dusseldorf. Shortly after crossing the Dutch coast, the pilot's windscreen was shattered by fire from a Messerschmitt 110. Owing to a failure in the heating circuit, the rear gunner's hands were too cold for him to open fire immediately or to operate his microphone and so give warning of danger; but after a brief delay he managed to return the Messerschmitt's fire and it was driven off. During the fight with the Messerschmitt, Flight Lieutenant Reid was wounded in the head, shoulders and hands. The elevator trimming tabs of the aircraft were damaged and it became difficult to control. The rear turret, too, was badly damaged and the communications system and compasses were put out of action. Flight Lieutenant Reid ascertained that his crew were unscathed and, saying nothing about his own injuries, he continued his mission. Soon afterwards, the Lancaster was attacked by a Focke Wulf 190. This time, the enemy's fire raked the bomber from stem to stern. The rear gunner replied with his only serviceable gun but the state of his turret made accurate aiming impossible. The navigator was killed and the wireless operator fatally injured. The mid-upper turret was hit and the oxygen system put out of action. Flight Lieutenant Reid was again wounded and the flight engineer, though hit in the forearm, supplied him with oxygen from a portable supply. Flight Lieutenant Reid refused to be turned from his objective and Dusseldorf was reached some 50 minutes later. He had memorised his course to the target and had continued in such a normal manner that the bomb-aimer, who was cut off by the failure of the communications system, knew nothing of his captain's injuries or of the casualties to his comrades. Photographs show that, when the bombs were released, the aircraft was right over the centre of the target. Steering by the pole star and the moon, Flight Lieutenant Reid then set course for home. He was growing weak from loss of blood. The emergency oxygen supply had given out. With the windscreen shattered, the cold was intense. He lapsed into semiconsciousness. The flight engineer, with some help from the bomb-aimer, kept the Lancaster in the air despite heavy anti-aircraft fire over the Dutch coast. The North Sea crossing was accomplished. An airfield was sighted. The captain revived, resumed control and made ready to land. Ground mist partially obscured the runway lights. The captain was also much bothered by blood from his head wound getting into his eyes. But he made a safe landing although one leg of the damaged undercarriage collapsed when the load came on. Wounded in two attacks, without oxygen, suffering severely from cold, his navigator dead, his wireless operator fatally wounded, his aircraft crippled and defenceless, Flight Lieutenant Reid showed superb courage and leadership in penetrating a further 200 miles into enemy territory to attack one of the most strongly defended targets in Germany, every additional mile increasing the hazards of the long and perilous journey home. His tenacity and devotion to duty were beyond praise
Blue Jacket No 2 Revolver with pearl grips This is a nice example of an Harrington and Richardson Blue Jacket No 2 revolver in 32 rim fire manufactured circa 1875. The top strap is stamped with the makers name, model and patent date of March 28th 1871. The revolver rotates, cocks and locks and has period pearl grips and was obviously a "fancy" gun for the time. The revolver disassembles easily. An interesting piece of Americana.
Boer War Mauser Model 1897 Orange Free State This is a Mauser DWM model 1897 shipped to South Africa imminently prior to the Boer War and purchased by the Orange Free State. The serial number of the rifle confirms it was in the last batch of 1000 rifles landed before a total embargo was instigated by British Forces. The OVS deliberated for some time over the choice of the Mauser as there was a strongly held preference for larger calibre single shot rifles such as the Martini and some prejuduce towards the smaller 7mm calibre in the "modern" rifle. These prejudices were soon forgotten within a very short period of time. Ron Bester summed it up succinctly in his excellent book Small Arms of the Anglo Boer War 1899-1902 when he wrote " Think of a Boer Commando and automatically the picture comes to mind of a rugged, bearded warrior moulded to his pony and armed with a Mauser rifle, with which he could perform superhuman feats of markmanship. The Mauser crept so deeply into the hearts of the Boers that the adage that they put their trust in "God and the Mauser" became more than just a saying. This particular rifle is in good order and hasn't been messed with. It has a shooting bore with deep lands and the sights are intact and working. The Mauser "D" cartouche is still extant on the side of the butt as is the OVS cartouche under the receiver. The bolt serial number does not match but in the field the consternation of collectors 110 years in the future did not bother the armourers. All other serial numbers match and the bolt has been turned down which was a deliberate action to stop the standard straight bolt from slamming in your kidneys when the rifle was strapped across your shoulders on horseback, evidence that this rifle saw field service. At about the same time the Argentinians were ordering their rifles with turned down bolts for the same reason. Overall the woodwork is good with no major defects or cracks and this is simply a decent example of a Boer rifle of the sort that kept us at bay in another war that was supposed to be over by Christmas! I can hold at no cost for a variation to be processed.
Boer War Webley Mk IV revolver British South Africa Company issue This is a very interesting Webley Mark IV revolver in .455” calibre. This model is often called the “Boer War” model as it was introduced in 1899. The majority of these revolvers had a 4” barrel but this has an original 6” barrel as indicated by the corresponding serial numbers on the barrel and the frame. A significant number of these revolvers were retro-fitted just before WW1 with a longer barrel but this revolver is original. The revolver is contained in a contemporary case with an oil bottle. The back strap of the revolver is stamped BSAC (British South Africa Company ) with a number. This offers virtually irrefutable proof that the revolver was used in Africa. The BSAC were effectively the British Colonial Armed Police in Africa and under the control of Cecil Rhodes who wished to see Britain in economic control of Africa from “Capetown to Cairo”. The BSAC were the prime motivating force behind the failed Jameson’s raid which is considered a trigger for the Boer War. It may be possible to research the original user of this revolver as I believe BSAC records are extant. The revolver is mechanically excellent with a good bore, unchipped grips with a finish that has mellowed to a plum patina as can be seen in the photographs. This will require a Section 7 historical collecting authority to purchase. I am always happy to hold purchased firearms at no charge for the processing of variations.
Box of Webley Mk IV unopened bullet heads/ This is an interesting item for the Webley Collector - an unopened box of Mk IV bullet heads. The Mark IV was introduced at the end of the 19th Century and is popularly known as the "Boer War" model. Some minor scuffs to the box as can be seen but generally very good condition.
Brander & Potts Flintlock Pistol This is a good untouched Brander & Potts Flintlock pistol in 18 bore. The pistol has a nicely swamped 9" brass barrel featuring the makers Minories London address and has not been messed with in any way - a nice find and good representative sample of a flintlock pistol circa 1805. Martin Brander and Thomas Potts are recorded at 70 Minories and Goodman’s Yard between 1802 and 1827 Some wood loss on left hand side of forend as can be seen from photographs hence the price but really only "honest travel" and age worn.
Brass Flintlock Pistol by John Twigg John Fox Twigg, Gunmaker, London (1732-1792) This approx 24 bore (.57) flintlock pistol circa 1770 exudes quality and is an excellent example of this outstanding and celebrated gunmaker's art and would enhance any fine collection of English Flintlocks. Wood has a beautiful mellow patina and the overall lines of the pistol are clean and without significant blemish as can be seen from the photographs.The pistol is in good working condition and features Twigg's early signature and it should be noted that contemporary "copies" of this celebrated gunmaker are known but this is Twigg "through and through" John Fox Twigg was born at Grantham, Linconshire, in 1732 and is listed by Heer (1978) as being apprenticed to the Irish gunmaker, Edward Newton (active 1718-1764), though no dates for the apprenticeship are offered. By 1755, Blackmore (1986) lists Twigg working as a gunmaker from Angel Ct., Charing Cross until 1760 when he moved to 132 Strand, opposite Catherine St., and continued at this address until 1776. He moved again in 1776, this time to Piccadilly where he remained until 1790. During these 14 years he opened several warehouses; at little Somerset St., in 1771; 30 Cornhill, 1777 and Tower Hill in 1779. His only son, John, was apprenticed in 1786 to Henry Nock, and subsequently inherited his father's business. In 1788 Twigg formed a partnership with his newphew, John Bass (b.1761 - d.1794) although this was cut short by Twigg's death. As Blackmore notes, however, the trade directories are misleading in this respect, and show the business continuing at Piccadilly until 1795.
Brevet Nagant Rook and Rabbit Rifle in 45 calibre This is an attractive little rifle of the "rook and rabbit" genre manufactured in Belgium under the Nagant patent. The quality of the rifle is excellent with crisp mechanics and a good bore. The rifle is chambered for Colt 45 and was probably intended for the US market. An unusual little rifle in an unusual calibre for its type. I can hold without charge for a variation to acquire and can ship to a RFD of your choice. See this at the Birmingham International Arms Fair February 17th.
British Bull Dog Revolver Here is an example of the gun that "really won the West". The Bull dog revolver was cheap, portable and mechanically sound and a fraction of the price of a Colt or Remington. Although introduced by Webley thousands were made in Belgium, France and Germany and even copied in the USA. This particular example is in excellent condition and retains most of the original nickel finish with good grips. This one is in 320 revolver and exhibits Belgium proof marks. The Liege proof was a much stricter test than British proof so these revolvers were built well.
British Bull Dog Revolver This is the quintessential British Bulldog revolver and identical to the revolver featured on the cover of George Laymans excellent book "The British Bulldog, the gun that really won the West". Bulldog revolvers were pocket sized and large calibre and were very popular in the Western frontiers as they were affordable and lethal. This is the largest Bulldog that can be legally owned without a FAC and is chambered in .44 calibre Webley and the cylinder is marked 44.. Cocks rotates and Locks fine in double action but on single action the cylinder occasionally slips on one position and has to be encouraged forward. A high percentage of original nickel finish remains with most wear showing on the side of the cylinder where the revolver had lain for many years. The revolver has good grips as can be seen and is eye catching. An iconic Western revolver.
British Bulldog Revolver Belgian Copy circa 1880 This revolver is a copy of a Webley no 2 Bulldog manufactured circa 1880. The revolver has little finish but has faded to an even patina. The revolver, rotates, cocks and locks in both single and double action but there is some play because of a weak pawl spring that needs adjusting. The revolver has good walnut grips, the cylinder gate is still extant with a good spring and it disassembles flawlessly. The Liege proofs are stamped on the rear of the cylinder and frame and the calibre is stamped on both sides of the frame. The calibre of the revolver is obsolete .442 also known as .44 Webley and is typical of the thousands of guns that were manufactured primarily for the export market. With the escalating rise in value of Webley Bulldogs because of increasing interest by USA collectors, this is an opportunity to buy a type example for far less than the price of a Webley. You can read about these early black powder revolvers in George Layman’s excellent book “The British Bulldog revolver the forgotten Gun that really won the Wild West. Price includes carriage and you must be over 18 and sign a VCR declaration to purchase this interesting piece of history.
Brunswick later pattern rifle by Holland Here is another Brunswick rifle manufactured by John Holland and Sons. This is a British made rifle not to be confused with the rifles manufactured in Nepal. In total there were only 30,000 Brunswick's manufactured and as they were quickly replaced by other rifles, survival rates of British rifles are modest and a rifle by Holland even scarcer. Professor Christopher Road, in his excellent book "The British Soldiers Firearm", explains how Holland & Sons were a London based firm and one of the four main contractors in 1852 to produce this pattern but withdrew from their contract because they couldn't make a profit no doubt because of the amount and quality of work that had to go into each rifle and their workmen advancing their cost by 16.25%. Unusually the lock post dates this contract by 9 years but in 1861 Holland accepted a contract to supply Lancaster rifles to the Army and no doubt this was an occasion where old stock was recycled and a batch of Brunswick's supplied and dated to that year. John Harris Holland later merged with his nephew Henry Holland to establish the renowned firm Holland & Holland. This particular rifle is marked with Holland's stamp on both the barrel and the lockplate ( John Holland Barnett ). Metal is in the white and the wood has a pleasing patina. The cleaning rod is original as is the patch box lid, trigger guard and cleaning rod ferrules. It should be noted that most of the Nepalese imports have modern reproduction patch box lids and triggers as these were taken off to be sold as scrap in the past. There is no doubt that this rifle saw service it has the usual dents and scrapes that you would expect on an issued 150 year old rifle but there are no major problems. Bore is dark but there is plenty of deep rifling as you would expect on a Brunswick. This rifle was manufactured for issue to Colonial forces as evidenced by the "I" under arrow stamped on the lock. Altogether an attractive looking rifle and manufactured by one of the better makers.
BSA 303 Sporting Rifle This BSA rifle was manufactured by BSA from the best of their military surplus stock and regulated to shoot the .303 Mk V11 "high velocity" round. There were two grades of these rifles manufactured and this was the better grade. This rifle has an excellent bore. good chequered stock with Express sights and detachable magazine. These rifles were carried in Africa and were used to shoot everything from Elephants to Antelope. The rifle has the advantage of being light, superbly balanced and quick to point. In their day they were regarded as fine rifles and their cost reflected that, now they are sadly underestimated and disappearing quickly. Sold with the relevant BSA catalogue page from the 1932 catalogue. .303 calibre, Section 1.
Californian Gold Rush Bowie Knife This Bowie knife has an overall length of 12" and a blade length of 7.5". Knife has excellent etching which reads " Californians ask for nothing but for what is right and submit to nothing that is wrong" Also " I can dig Gold from Quarts" and "The Californian Bowie Knife". The knife is stamped with the makers name and VR with a crown circa 1845 -1855. Ivory handle with later sheath, a rare blade and highly sought after.
Calisher & Terry 30 Bore Volunteer Rifle This is a superb and scarce rifle. The Calisher and Terry patented breech loading rifle was used with great success by British and Colonial forces worldwide. Approximately 16,000 were manufactured between 1857 and 1869. The Confederate General "JEB" Stuart was renowned for carrying a C&T as his personal side arm. Most C&T's are encountered as Carbine's and it is rare indeed to find a rifle with a full length stock. This Volunteer rifle has an excellent walnut stock, good bore, iron mounts and the lock is engraved Calisher and Terry 1869. The rifle has a 30 bore 5 groove 32" barrel with a bayonet lug and rear ladder sights which has turned to a pleasing blue brown patina. The C&T was a capping breech loader and the forerunner to modern bolt action British rifles. A manufactured combustible cartridge was placed in the breech and ignited by a percussion cap which offered the user faster loading and the opportunity to fire and load prone - a huge advantage compared to conventional muzzle loading rifles of the time. The breech was sealed with a greased leather washer . An impressive rifle!
Capping Tool no 2 Another spring loaded capping tool but not the maker is not named but nevertheless of high quality. The tool is stamped no "2" and is mechanically sound and is untouched. A very reasonable example which would date between 1840 and 1860.
Cartridge Display Board Ideal for your gun room this is an amateur produced shotgun cartridge display board to illustrate many types of shotgun cartridge ranging from tiny shotshells to large signal cartridges. Many are collectible in their own individual rights such as early pinfire and large bore brass cases. This is an interesting display that is 1/10 of the cost of a professional board such as Kynoch but nevertheless is pleasing to look at. Featured under shotgun category because I cannot guarantee that some of the cartridges are inert so I must see a shotgun certificate to hand over. Any apparent visual defects to the glass are due to my poor photographic skills and are not evident "in the flesh". As far as delivery is concerned this is heavy and glazed and whilst I can pack it well it is not the best item to ship but I do travel extensively and could deliver along the M4, M5,M6 This is the sort of thing we would all like to make but haven't got the time to do! Thank you for your interest.
Cased Adams 54 Bore \"Automatic\" Revolver. This is an attractive composed cased set with accessories of an early Adams "automatic" self cocking revolver in 54 bore. These early revolvers were double action that held the advantage of speed as the whole action of cocking and releasing the hammer was undertaken with one pull of the trigger and as a consequence, they were made without a trigger spur. These revolvers were latterly modified with a rammer as originally the bullets were pushed in by thumb and had a propensity to fall out which could prove to be an embarrassment at the wrong moment! The revolver has a 6" barrel with the top strap engraved " Deane, Adams & Deane, 30 King William St, London Bridge". The frame is engraved B 1020 on the right-hand side and is also engraved Adams Patent No 11304" which is actually the serial number not the patent. The revolver has been re-blacked in antiquity and has a captive cap container in the butt. The revolver features foliate engraving, an adjustable foresight and fine walnut chequered grips. Both the hammer and cylinder safeties are extant and the revolver works flawlessly. There is a decent compliment of the correct accessories and a tin of contemporary cast bullets. The powder flask was made by Hawksley. The case includes a box of Eley percussion caps, a cleaning rod, nipple key and cap extractor tool. The case is lockable and has the key. There is an Adams Label in the lid of the case. Overall a decent example of an Adams self cocking revolver and at the right price.
Cased Colt London Navy Revolver This is a decent Colt London Navy with the top strap address reading - Address- Col.Colt, London. Serial No is 27696 all matching including the wedge and the correct London dome headed screws. 36 calibre 6 shot with a 7.5" octagonal barrel. Overall condition is very good with a high percentage of the original varnish still on the walnut grips and a very visible cylinder scent. This gun has not been messed with and the dome head screws are perfect except some "Bubba" has chewed up the cylinder wedge screw as can often be seen as this is the only screw that should be touched. The revolver is cased in a contemporary Colt case with the original Colt patented double cavity mould and a contemporary Dixon type powder flask. There is also a nipple key, Eley cap tin and some old bullets with some Kapok wool for cleaning. This came out of an old american collection and has an old type written label. Overall this is a very pleasing set and at a price less than I have seen similar quality revolvers selling for. Colt London's are under estimated as there were only 42,000 manufactured compared to 215,438 manufactured in Hartford USA and it is said that Colt used some of his best artisans and skilled men in London as he felt at the time that the British market with its Empire was his best opportunity.
Cased Colt London Pocket Revolver Good cased London revolver with no real flaws. All original and honest with crisp mechanics,good bore, no nicks or dents on barrel and no one has tried to use it as a hammer! The screws haven't been messed with and this is a real "sleeper" and as good as you will find for the money. This set has all of the original accessories including the Colt marked mould, nipple key cleaning rod and correct Dixon's powder flask.Original loading instruction sheet although faded and much original varnish left on grips. A much better gun than many offered and in its original case with key and functioning lock. All serial numbers match including the wedge and there is much silver plate on the trigger guard and a good cylinder scene including "Colts patent" and evidence of safety stops on the cylinder. I have seen worse sets than this retailing at considerably more money. This is a very nice example of a Colt London pocket pistol. Colt was reputed to have sent many of his his best craftsmen to London as he felt that Britain and its Empire was the largest potential market for his wares and as a consequence the London guns attract a premium over USA manufactured models.Feel free to ask questions.
Cased Colt London Pocket Revolver This is a good fifth model Colt Pocket London with matching serial numbers including the wedge. The top strap is stamped "Address Colonel Colt London" The cylinder has an excellent cylinder scene and there is evidence of case hardening extant as can be seen from the photographs. The revolver has the usual London refinements of domed screws and heavier cross hatched hammer spur. The case is 100% Colt as is the mould which casts a conical and ball bullet. The flask is contemporary but not the usual Dixon, and the loading instructions are original. The bore of the revolver has fine and deep rifling but there is some minor pitting but overall this is a fine example and better than most. The serial number dates the revolve to 1855. This is fresh to the market and has been in one family's hands for 150 years. The family explained that the original owner bought it from new to protect his licensed premises in the East End of London! This is overall a very decent cased set that hasn't been messed with and at a reasonable price for the quality.
Cased Colt Roots 2nd Model revolver. This is a decent Colt Roots second model side hammer revolver in 28 Calibre. It is estimated that only 2.99 % of these revolvers survived. This particular revolver was manufactured in 1856 at the Hartford factory and is contained in its original USA case. The case contains the correct mould with the flying Eagle motif, powder flask and an Eley cap tin. Poignantly the mould contains two cast bullets frozen in time, oxidised and obviously contemporary to the revolver. There would have been made by a previous owner. They are loose and will drop out of the mould. The revolver has much original finish, the patent date and Hartford address on the top strap and most of the original varnish. The cylinder scene is extant but faint and the Colt Patent banner is clear. The case has an old crack in the lid which isn’t going anywhere and could be restored. Personally, I would leave it. The Roots had fierce competition from larger Colt models such as the Navy and Army and eventually they were made in 31 calibres as were the Colt Pocket model 1849.Despite its small size, designed to be easily concealed, there are numerous images of Civil War soldiers carrying these as their sidearm.
Cased Daw 54 Bore transitional revolver. This is a superb cased transitional revolver manufactured by Witton and Daw. The manufacture is fairly accurately dated to 1855 so a real competitor to Colt. The revolver features Polygroove rifling and is known as the “long type” See Taylerson for further details and I will supply copies to the purchaser. The revolver is a gas seal revolver which means that the reciprocating cylinder moves laterally to seal the breech. Many of us will know that the Nagant revolver is similar and as the cylinder locks that revolver was one of the very few that could use an effective silencer, but back to 1853! The revolver has a 6” barrel, in 54 bore, excellent finely chequered walnut grips and the butt features a hinged trap for storing percussion caps. The entire frame and trigger guard is engraved in top quality style. The top strap features the correct London Threadneedle street address that Witton and Daw occupied from 1855 to 1860. The case has all of the correct and contemporary accessories including a near mint bullet mould with the correct belted cavity, a wonderful tortoise shell tin with a full set of spare nipples, good powder flask, turn screw and nipple key with internal nipple pricker and cleaning rod and accessories with a cap tin. The revolver has much original finish as can be seen, some slight case pitting on the left side where it has laid undisturbed for generations and some very small erosion in front of the cylinder as this gun has been used Overall a handsome piece from a superb maker and considerably undervalued in comparison to its rarity and historical importance.
Cased Foudroyant medal This mint condition medal was made from Copper salvaged from the copper bottom of Nelson's flagship Foudroyant. This was minted in the Centeniary Year after Trafalgar and is complete with its original case. Very scarce in this condition.
Cased J Purdey Hammergun This is an interesting gun formerly one of a pair made to special order for Audley Harvey in June 1885. Captain (John) Audley Harvey was an officer in the 42nd Scottish regiment although his family were from Devon. After Harvey the gun has been in the ownership of the Baskerville family who kindly confirmed provenance. This gun is in a contemporary leather travelling case with a number of accessories including the original double tampion, cleaning rod and Purdey snap caps. The gun has some very nice features, and these include exceptional quality engraving of a game scene, the spaniel almost looks as if he will jump off the lock plate. The top rib has the usual Purdey address with the addition of noting that they are made from Sir Joseph Whitworths fluid steel. There are the normal proofs with the addition of a "not for ball" stamp next to the viewing and proof marks. Originally the gun was supplied with a gold escutcheon on the butt but sadly this was removed some time in the past, previous owner states it came into their family after the Great War and was missing the escutcheon then, possibly because it had the original owners initials but more likely because of the depression and the fact it was gold. Gun is tight and obviously in proof and the owner state it was recently re-jointed for shooting after a "retirement" of 40 years! There is some pitting in the internal mid section of the barrels but not enough to stop use but at the price and quality these would merit sleeving for regular hard use. Barrels are 30" long and length of pull is 14.5". An ideal game or pidgeon gun with a lot of history and character and worthy of investing a little time and money to bring up to specification, not exactly a sleeper but certainly a "rouser" ! This will need a shotgun certificate to transfer. SEE US AT THE BRISTOL ANTIQUE FINE ARMS FAIR SEPT 2nd
Cased pair of target pistols circa 1830 This is a cased set of percussion target pistols of some quality manufactured circa 1830. The pistols were made by Lehanne a Herve a manufacturer of quality based in Herve a province of Liege in Belgium. Belgium was a main competitor to the British guntrade and also a supplier. The Liege proof standard was notable as being in excess of that of the London and Birmingham proof houses. This pair of pistols were made in .550 calibre ( 13.5mm) and have a set trigger. The barrel lengths are 10" with an overall length of 16". The walnut stocks each have a gold (vacant) escutcheon and the locks are engraved with the makers name. Each pistol has an ebony and ivory ramrod with worm. As can be seen the pistols have been used and there is an old crack near the lock but nothing dreadful. Barrels are rifled which at the time was indicative of top quality. The pistols are marked with the serial numbers 1 and 2. The pair are contained in a 19th Century continental case which has been relined. There is a good powder flask but some of the tools are not contemporary. Overall a good looking set.
Cased Tranter 54 Bore Revolver REDUCED! Great Value. Excellent originally cased Tranter 54 Bore Revolver This is a very good second model double trigger Tranter revolver in 54 bore accompanied by a full and correct set of usual accessories to include a bullet mould, correct Dixons powder flask, cleaning rod, bullets and lubricant etc.The japanned lacquered bullet tin contains some original oxidised bullets which would have been there for over 150 years and there is still evidence of the patent lubricating compound in the lubricant tin, the set is virtually a time capsule in itself! The lock up and timing of this revolver is the best I have ever seen and is mechanically as perfect as the day it left the factory and would be suitable to place on a firearms certificate 180 years after manufacture!!. In the oil bottle compartment is a curious accessory. It has the external appearance of an oil bottle but has been machined to accept a 54 bore bullet and has a steel spike on the inside with 4 laterally cross drilled holes. One hypothesis is that it was used to make "Dum-Dum" bullets which would be a reasonable explanation given the failings of low calibre smaller bullets at the time of the Indian Mutiny and Crimean War. The revolver is crisp and mechanically sound with a good bore and superb lock up. There is no real wear , scratches or dents and has more original finish (60%) on one side than the other side which is faded but the revolver has nice sharp edges. This would be graded in the top 20% of such revolvers and is a very pleasing set. I would be happy to send high definition photographs to interested parties.
Cased Tranter Second Model revolver circa 1855 This is a very good cased Tranter no 2 revolver in 54 bore complete with all accessories circa 1855. The revolver can be fired single or double action by the double trigger as there is no hammer spur. The lower trigger pulls the hammer back to its stop position which can then be released with the upper trigger or it can be fired double action by pulling both triggers simultaneously. The revolver has a blank top strap but a Riley makers label in the lid of its oak case. The loading rammer is correctly stamped "Tranter's patent" and the grips are very good. A full set of accessories include the correct bullet mould, powder flask, nipple key and turn screw, bullets, percussion caps, cleaning rod and the key for the lock. A very decent example of one of Tranter's interesting designs.
Cased Webley Mk 1 New model air pistol. This is quite a wonderful set. To say it is rare would be an understatement. This is a very early pre-war Webley Mk 1 new model .177 calibre pistol in its original case. Not only has the pistol seen little if any use but it has the original Webley “tag” on the trigger guard extant. The pistol has a rifled barrel and the indicative sign of an early pistol is the rear cap retention screw which was removed early into the series. The fact that at the time the case cost the same as the pistol meant that the percentage of these outfits purchased was small and the survival rate of course even smaller. As expected the screws are all perfect and there is in excess of 95% original bluing with very little fading. Gordon Bruce’s excellent work “Webley Air Pistols” would leave me to believe that this was manufactured during the first year of manufacture in 1935. This is an iconic pistol and the set is a real “time capsule” that I doubt could be bettered. I will be listing more rare and interesting air pistols and rifles on my website.
Charles Lancaster Target Pistol Here is something you will not see every day! A rare Charles Lancaster Saloon or target pistol in obsolete 320/230 Rook Rifle. Is this a cut down rifle? Probably not as some research has resulted in another surfacing. An image of a similar pistol has been posted by the celebrated author Joel Black on the Gunboards Forum and he confirms that this is in the same calibre and definitely a pistol and not a cut down rifle. Charles Lancaster was famous for his four barrel Howdah pistols which had a patented rotary firing pin action, he also made a variety of other weapons including rook rifles. We can surmise that this was made to compliment a rook rifle and in the same calibre and was probably made up as part of a commissioned garniture. In more relaxed and times and long before 1984, target shooting at home on the lawn or even indoors was a popular hobby and many makers produced "saloon" or target pistols, usually in .22" calibre which have been prohibited by our politicians as being too dangerous to own. This however, is not prohibited and as close as we can get to owning one of the early target pistols that can now only be seen in museums. See Stewart's excellent book on William Tranter to see more illustrations of similar pistols.
Chassepot Bayonet circa 1870 The classic French bayonet, the fifth in the Yataghan series of bayonets. Lighter than the original 1840 bayonet that started the family, the bayonet has the same brass hilt and double curved yataghan blade. Manufactured from 1866 until some time after the introduction of the 1874 Gras. All Chassepot bayonets were hand engraved with the place of manufacture and this one is engraved with the name of the St Etienne Arsenal. The bayonet was phased out after 1874 but used as late as 1900 for ceremonial duties.The bayonet has not been cleaned but the spring retention clasp works fine and there is no unseemly pitting to worry about. A reasonably priced bayonet to start a collection with or to fill a gap.
Civil War Colt Army Revolver cut for Shoulder Stock This is a 6 shot Colt Army revolver in 44 calibre that has been factory machined for a shoulder stock. The revolver has a 4 screw, frame as did all that were machined for a shoulder stock. The revolver is mechanically excellent and has a bit of original colour and is a pleasing example. The bore is reasonable and clearly the revolver had been looked after as most of these that are extant had been “hammered” during the Civil War. This is instantly recognised as an early model as the calibre is not stamped on the frame and the serial number identifies it as being manufactured in 1861. The serial numbers are all matching, the wedge is vacant but clearly contemporary to the revolver. The revolver has good grips with some slight erosion to the heel of the left grip with the frame being marked “Colts Patent” with the address on the top of the barrel reading “ADDRESS, COL.SAML COLT NEW-YORK- U.S. An AMERICA”. The revolver cocks and locks on half and full cock and the rammer is tight and not loose as is often found. There appears to be an indented figure “1” on the bottom of the left grip. The bore is decent with all rifling extant. All in all, a reasonable Civil War Colt Army that would enhance any Colt or Civil War collection. The last image shows how the revolver would fit in a shoulder holster and this is a modern replica not included with the revolver.
Civil War Dog Lock Blunderbuss / Musketoon circa 1645 This is the oldest English gun I have ever had the pleasure of handling This is an English Civil War Dog Lock Blunderbuss or Musketoon with a 25\" barrel and an overall length of 39.5\". Diameter of the bore is approximately 1\" flaring to 1.5/8\", approximately 4 bore. This dates from around 1640 and has a second English lock with early London Gunmaker\'s view mark identified as circa 1640 from Howard Blackmore\'s excellent book British Military Firearms 1650-1850. Originally this would have had a thick wrist but this has been reshaped about a hundred years later, maybe as early as 1720 and is now similar to the more familiar \"Brown Bess\". The forend has also been repaired in the distant past and the horn tipped ramrod has been added later (probably 18th Century). The gun has been used and remodelled to suit both fashion and practicality for at least a hundred years since it was first made. I\'ve personally never seen such an early English gun in private ownership, most are held in museums. See Baxter ( Arms and Armour Press 1970) for more information. Feel free to ask for more photographs if interested and I will consider part exchange and lay away on this item
Civil War Era Greene Bolt action rifle This is a rare and extraordinary rifle! James Durell Greene thought this rifle , it has the distinction of being the first bolt action breech loading rifle purchased by the USA Army and a host of extraordinary features. The most significant feature is that it is forward loaded, the bullet is behind the charge which means that the first shot is blank unless you insert a loose bullet. This allowed the bullet at the rear to seal the breech which was then pushed forward by a plunger within the bolt. The cartridge was detonated from the side by an under hammer percussion cap. Greene also incorporated into the rifle a Lancaster Oval Bore on the basis that it wouldn't foul and would adapt the rifle for muzzle loading should the bolt seize. Another innovation was a compartment in the butt for the cleaning rod which was subsequently adapted for most USA Military rifles. Greene was a prolific inventor and produced the Greene Carbine with a different locking mechanism to this which utilised Maynard tape primers and also a rotary magazine which was then copied in the Krag rifle. The rifle is in very good as can be seen, much original finish, no major problems with woodwork except the usual dings and pressure marks expected on a 150 year old rifle. The bolt action is as tight as the day it was made and the under hammer action is flawless. This is one of only 900 rifles so there is a low survival rate particularly in this condition and is as an interesting rifle as one would ever wish to own. The rifle will be supplied with an extensive and erudite article on the rifle which explains the development and use. Potential Investment quality and a superb and interesting rifle!
Civil War Era Manhattan Mk V Revolver This is an excellent example of a Manhattan Mk V percussion revolver in 36 calibre. The Mk V is easy to identify as it has a two-line New Jersey Address on the top rib and was modified from 5 to 6 shots, quite a logical thing to do but this only happened in the last series. What is remarkable is that they were able to use the original cylinder tooling so the diameter of the cylinder and the roll forming impressions are the same as that of the 5 shot cylinder and they are always found with the cylinder stamped with the 1859 patent date. The Manhattan Arms Company revolvers were ostensibly copying of Colt revolvers but with improvements. The Manhattan revolvers featured a positive lug safety stop that engaged the hammer between cylinders unlike the Colt safety pins that could slip or wear. Manhattan Firearms produced percussion revolvers until the late 1860’s and it is apparent that they attempted to find a market for their .36 calibre revolvers in England and several of them have appeared with London proof marks as indeed are exhibited on this example. The revolver has evidently been properly maintained and has a good bore and locks and cocks on half and full cock as it should do. This revolver was previously held on a firearms certificate but was removed from the certificate to allow its sale as an antique. Manhattan revolvers are rapidly gaining recognition and values are accelerating. A lovely example for any collection that would be difficult to better. The Manhattan Fire Arms Manufacturing Co. was founded by a group of New Jersey businessmen in 1856. Their goal was to take advantage of Colt's patent for revolving firearms that was due to expire in 1857. The founders hired Thomas Bacon to become the Superintendent of Manufacturing. Manufacturing began in Norwich, Connecticut and in 1859 moved to Newark, New Jersey. Thomas Bacon remained in Norwich and started his own firearms company. During their existence, Manhattan Firearms produced approximately 175,000 pistols. Only Colt, Remington, and Winchester produced more guns during this era in which included the Civil War. While waiting for Colt's patent to expire, Manhattan first made copies of American firearms that no longer had patent protection. These included pepper boxes and various single-shot designs. Shortly thereafter, they turned their attention to making Colt-style revolvers in both the .31 calibre Pocket and .36 calibre Navy styles. Manhattan patented an extra set of cylinder safety notches on these models. Manhattan’s can be easily identified by the many notches on their cylinders as demonstrated by this example. After the Civil War, Manhattan production primarily consisted of a copy of the Smith & Wesson .22 calibre cartridge revolver and a single-shot boot pistol under the name "HERO". Manhattan changed its name in 1868 to American Standard Tool Company and began to market industrial tools as well as firearms. American Standard Tool closed during the financial panic of 1873.Manhattan Firearms also manufactured guns under the trade names "Hero”, “London Pistol Company", and "American Standard Tool". To learn about Manhattan Firearms read the book by Waldo E Nutter (Who wouldn't buy a book by an author named Waldo Nutter!)
Civil War Martially Marked Remington Army Revolver This is a good representative Remington Army revolver in .44 Calibre. Most of the finish as turned to a plum patina with a bit of original finish in protected areas. Remington legend worn and some slight loss to heel of right hand grip as can be seen. Inspectors mark "M" on brass frame. Bore is quite good 8/10 and mechanically sound as it was just taken off a FAC as the previous owner shot it and looked after it. A solid honest Civil War era revolver.
Classic WInchester Model 1894 Rifle mfg 1894 The Marlin 1893 underlever rifle was the first Marlin that was manufactured in excess of 50,000 units, in fact a million rifles were made until the design was superceded in 1935 by the model 1894 which had a shorter action to allow the chambering of pistol cartridges. The model 1893 was an improvement on the previous model underlever rifle as it could handle much larger cartridges. The iconic Marlin 1893 was a direct competitor to the Winchester 1894 but had the advantage of side ejection which allowed easier mounting of scopes on top of the receiver. This particular good looking rifle is in obsolete 32-40 calibre so can be owned as an object of curiosity without a license. The rifle has a good tight action, nice bore and excellent wood with no major issues. The rifle features an octagonal barrel, steel crescent butt plate and is a special factory order length for this calibre of 30” which is scarce in a “safety” (high grade steel) barrel. Usual maker’s marks and patent marks are nicely stamped and in the correct place where they should be and the rifle has toned to a nice even colour as can be seen. This rifle is set up with a Lyman tang sight and the owner told me it was set up for long distance prairie dog hunting and bench rest shooting. Overall a pleasing example and somewhat scarce with an octagonal 30” barrel. For further information on this model read the excellent Marlin Firearms History by Lt Col William S Brophy.
Coaching pistol by Ketland Circa 1790. This good Queen Anne style brass barrelled flintlock pistol is typical of the type that would be carried by travellers and mail men who expected their firearms to be exposed to weather. The pistol is stamped "Ketland & Co" on the left hand side of the lock and "London" on the right hand side with some floriate engraving. Ketland & Co was a firm of prolific gunmakers and had a workshop at Canon street, London circa 1785-1790. The pistol has a flat sided walnut butt. barrel and London proof mark to the underside of the frame. Oval silver escutcheon inlaid to the rear of the grip with the initials "JP" The screw off 28 bore barrel is 5.5" long and a little longer than those usually encountered. Overall in good condition and interesting to find the escutcheon with the original owners initials. An interesting piece.
Colt .38 Rimfire New Model Breech Loading Pocket Pistol Colt .38 Rimfire New Model Breech Loading Pocket Pistol This is an excellent nickel-plated example of the Type 5 Pocket Pistol as described in the definative work on these guns, "Variations of Colt's New Model Police & Pocket Breech Loading Pistols" by Breslin, Pirie and Price. It is one of a run of 3,425 newly made pistols that first shipped in 1875. The serial number range of this type is from 1750 to 5450 in the second serial number range; the serial number of this revolver being 4605. The condition of this revolver is better than the example illustrated in the book cited above. It retains 90% plus of original nickel plate to the cylinder, barrel and frame with a complete and sharp stagecoach scene on the cylinder. The hammer retains all its original finish and the brass trigger guard has mellowed to a mustard colour with some original plating in protected areas. The action is tight with perfect timing and solid lock up. It appears to have had very little use as indicated by the strong rifling and the chambers of the cylinder still retaining their internal plating. The grips are in good condition with about 90% plus original varnish, the screws are undamaged and those attaching the trigger guard and grip, still have bright charcoal blueing. The patent marks, barrel address and serial numbers are all clear and sharp. It would be difficult to find a better example of this early Colt breech loader and it would make a fine addition to a serious Colt collection. Barrel length 3.5" Overall length 8.5" Should you wish to acquire a Colt Dragoon, this would be relatively easy to achieve. Should you wish to acquire an example of this model in this condition, this would be very difficult.
Colt 1862 Police Revolver Considered by many gun collectors to be the pinnacle of the Colt's factory streamlined revolver design, this five-shot cap and ball weapon has matching serial numbers of 12021 including the cylinder, wedge and spline. Production in the third or fourth quarter of 1862. The five-shot, rebated and fluted cylinder has mellowed to a plumb colour. Cylinder nipples are not chipped nor broken, and the safety pins are not completely hammered down. Hammer lip extremity has some small chips often seen on this revolver but not too bad as can be seen. Cylinder is matched with a 5½" long barrel and a creeper-style loading lever. A clear and sharp "ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW YORK US AMERICA" marks the top of the barrel. All barrel gunmetal has mellowed down with some minor evidence of bluing and frame exhibits traces of the original casehardening. Piece shows a pleasing mix of plum with a bright and dusky gray patina overall. The bore is very nice with crisp rifling and no evident pitting, clearly this gun has been looked after. The standard "COLTS / PATENT" is stamped on the left side of the frame. Revolver is mechanically crisp with strong action and excellent lock up. Grips are of one-piece, varnished walnut, strong and tight and exhibit slight shrinkage. Triggerguard shows faint traces of the original silver-plated wash remaining. The small stamping ".36 CAL" is visible on the brass triggerguard. Frame screws are very good and not messed with. These revolvers were originally designed for Security agents such as Police and Pinkerton's agents and had a small foresight for rapid drawing and quick close pointing and firing. These are scarce as only 28,000 were manufactured over a 10 year period and many were converted to metallic cartridges so pleasing examples are not easy to find in the UK. This particular revolver issued in 1862 may well have ended up in the hands of a Civil War soldier as many did. Altogether a pleasing Colt.
Colt 3rd Model (Thuer) Derringer. Very good Colt 41 RF Deringer. The lock on this pistol is tight and it is an excellent example. Good bore some slight loss of nickel finish but a very pleasing looking example. Officially know as the Colt 3rd Model Derringer this pistol is more commonly referred to as the Colt Thuer Derringer after the weapon's designer, Alexander Thuer. I will supply an INERT period .41RF cartridge for display purposes with this pistol.
Colt Dragoon 1st Model with round cylinder stops This rare revolver is a 1st model Colt Dragoon in .44 Calibre. Usual 7.5" barrel and brass frame the revolver has all matching serial numbers including the wedge and arbor. 100% genuine with correct machining marks and bore. I can provide more macro photographs to a far better quality than this site provides and also provide provenance to serious enquirers. Revolver has some finish in protected areas and very faint cylinder scene. Mechanically sound the revolver would make a significant addition to any Colt collection. Serial number dates the revolver to 1848.
Colt Dragoon 44 Calibre This Colt Dragoon has all matching serial numbers including the wedge,cylinder, loading lever and arbor. Mechanically sound it has a very good bore with sharp rifling. As you can see the screws are good as are the grips and there is evidence of etching on the high relief of the cylinder scene which is matching and has the correct serial number. You can read "Colts Patent" and also " Model U.M.S.R" indicating a martial arm.There are some inspectors marks notably a "T" on the brass frame that stands for Captain William Andrew Thornton a government inspector and also an "H" under the serial number below the cylinder which I believe stands for James Hawkins who only inspected 2nd Model Dragoons.. The last two digits of the serial number is also just visible on the inside of the wooded grips. It would be difficult to better this for the price and is a very good "honest" example of an iconic revolver and a "must have" for any Colt Collector. The revolver has a mellow even patina and has great eye appeal.
Colt London Navy Revolver This is a decent.36 calibre London Navy manufactured in 1855 in Col Sam Colt's London factory and impressed on the top of the barrel in deep and legible letter's with the London address. This Colt has all matching numbers including the wedge and has an overall mellow patina. There is some original varnish left on the grips and although some pitting in the barrel it was not "shot out" and has good rifling in the bore. Mechanically it works well and there is a solid lock up. This revolver has had some "honest travel" and has not been messed with. One slight problem is loading lever latch which has some fault but does operate. This revolver is a family heirloom and is purported to have been privately purchased by a British Army Officer and of course the date is right for the Crimea but it has no ordnance marks. There is no engraving evident on the cylinder and is so smooth one wonders if there ever was? The Colt London is iconic insofar as Colt believed at the time that the British trade would be his most important so he ensured that he employed the most skilled of workmen and ensured the materials and finish were top rate. For a superb background to Colt's London revolvers read Rosa's book Colonel Colt London.
Colt Navy 1861 Model I've looked at literally hundreds of Colt's and it would appear that the Colt Navy 1861 is pretty rare compared to the 1851 Navy. In broad terms the 1851 outnumbers the 1861 by 10 to 1 and the survival rate of 1861's is reckoned at less than 3% so there are probably only around 1000 extant. This revolver is an extremely good looking example as there are no major "dinks" or scratches and the grips are excellent. The bore on this revolver is excellent and the revolver indexes , cocks and locks tightly. This revolver would be suitable for adding to a FAC subject to inspection by a qualified gunsmith and proofing. This particular revolver has the safety stops left which is a big plus when considering Colt's. The safety stops are little pins that protrude from the cylinder which you rest the hammer on between the caps when you are carrying it. These wear first and are the first things to look for when considering condition as they are virtually impossible to replace so if they are flat , even if the gun looks decent it has had considerable use. The grips are good with no cracks or wood missing and a high level of original varnish left and no one has used this as a hammer which is very common and the first thing to look for when excessive wear is possible. Screw heads are not buggered and the overall finish is a low pleasing "plum" patina. Loading lever works fine and the Colt Legend is readable on the top of the barrel as is the patent no on the cylinder and there is some cylinder scene. Serial numbers match on everything except the wedge but this is no real problem because it has a serial number contemporary to the revolver which means it is not a modern reproduction. These things were lost and people replace them and this wedge has come from another Navy of that era. As can be seen from the photograph there is a clear inspectors mark on the trigger guard. Overall a very nice looking Colt and a scarce model in good mechanical order and competitively priced.
Colt Single Action Army 1875 45 Colt British Proofed 1899 This is an extremely attractive looking SAA in 45 Colt which exhibits London Victorian Proof marks including Nitro proof marks on a gun that was originally made for black powder rounds. The serial number dates the manufacture to 1899. The action is perfect and the bore is mirror clean and the hammer has "all the clicks", overall a handsome gun. The American purist would frown on the British proof marks but I feel these add character and rarity, not from a financial sense but from the sense that this awkward but easily pointed gun clearly took someone's fancy in the UK whilst having to compete with the Webley Government one of the finest revolvers ever made. To look at contemporary development of this revolver whose serial number is in the 182000 range,in 1896, at serial number 164,100, a spring-loaded base pin latch replaced the cylinder pin retaining screw and by 1900, at serial number 192,000, the Colt Single Action was certified for use with smokeless powder. From 1873 through 1940 (with small numbers assembled during and after World War II, the so called "Pre-War, Post-War" model), production of the Colt Single Action Army reached 357,859. This is identified as the "Pre War" or "First Generation" of the model. Calibers, at least thirty in all, ranged from .22 rimfire through .476 Eley, with approximately half, or 158,884 (including Bisley and Flat Top Target variations), chambered for .45 Colt. The next most prevalent were the .44-40 Winchester Center fire (WCF) at 71,392; 38-40 (38 WCF) at 50,520; 32-20 Winchester (32 WCF) at 43,284 and, the 41 Colt at 19,676. This gun has a tiny chip out of one corner of a grip. Sadly in the UK this is a Section 7 but I am happy to store at no charge for certificate variation and can usually arrange to hand deliver.
Commonwealth Outriders Blunderbuss circa 1660. This is a rare and untouched item that has not been available on the market for many decades having been held privately since before the Second World War. Ex-Hampton Court, ex- Lord Hereford and Baskerville collections, this gun is quite extraordinary and a formidable weapon in its time. The lock is English but of Huguenot manufacture and clearly the gunsmith was showing off his art at the time! The 2 ring three stage cast iron barrel is 16" long with an overall length of 29" long. Make no mistake, iron denotes quality, this was a more difficult material to work with than brass and could accept larger charges. One of the wonderful things about this blunderbuss is that the woodwork was painted at the time to simulate the best burr walnut which would have easily deceived at a distance, a device sometimes used in 17th Century furniture. No doubt the weapon was bought by someone who wished to enhance their station or by someone of stature that wanted to make a good impression! The fact that it has not been worn or sanded off in 350 years is incredible! A similar example can be seen in Baxter's work on Blunderbusses. ( Arms and Armour Press 1970). There is some evidence of worm hole that has been treated decades ago and is non active but the rest is untouched and unmolested. This is one of the very few but finest examples of an early long arm outside of a public collection. Additional images available and would consider part exchange on this item.
Constabulary Pinfire Revolver circa 1860 This is a pin fire 11 mm revolver manufactured circa 1860 with Liege proofs. Generically called “Constabulary revolvers” this was a sizeable revolver that would not have been carried by civilians. There is provision for a lanyard ring which indicates this. A pinfire cartridge is an obsolete type of metallic firearm cartridge in which the priming compound is ignited by striking a small pin which protrudes radially from just above the base of the cartridge. Invented by Frenchman Casimir Lefaucheux in the 1830s but not patented until 1835, it was one of the earliest practical designs of a metallic cartridge. Its history is closely associated with the development of the breech loader which replaced muzzle-loading weapons. Pinfire became obsolete once reliable rimfire and centre fire cartridges became available because without a pin which needed aligning in the slot in the chamber wall they were quicker to load. They were also safer because they had no protruding pin which could cause the ammunition to accidentally detonate during rough handling, particularly of loose ammunition. Many of these revolvers were sold to the military and were popular amongst Confederate Officers during the American Civil War. This particular revolver exhibits Liege proofs which was a significantly higher proof test than the English test at the time. The revolver has most of its nickel plating remaining with good ebony grips and the loading gate is extant which is often missing. The revolver has a clean bore and is mechanically perfect. The manufacturer is researchable and I will determine the manufacturer shortly but thought I would advertise it to meet Christmas postage. A substantial and interesting revolver.
Continental percussion target pistol circa 1855 This is an attractive foliate engraved Continental 18 bore target pistol of quality. Barrel length is 7" and has pronounced rifling and the pistol is enhanced with a percussion cap compartment in the butt. Overall a very attractive pistol.
Continental Target Pistol circa 1870 This is an interesting continental target pistol of some quality. The pattern has some similarity to Tranter's patent but the breech is opened by an extended trigger in front of the trigger guard. The 8" barrel has Liege proofs and a makers mark of AD. This is clearly an expensive target pistol with foliate engraving and silver escutcheon ( vacant) on the butt. Liege proofs were considered superior to British proofs at this time. The calibre is obsolete 30RF and given the duelling style of the pistol with a spur trigger guard it was manufactured fairly early in the life of rimfire cartridges. I estimate circa 1870. The hammer is quite interesting as it is machined to present a horizontal striking bar which is mechanically far stronger than a conventional machined rimfire hammer ( see photo). An interesting target pistol of quality and at a reasonable price.
Copy Webley Bulldog revolver. This is an interesting Webley copy bulldog revolver in obsolete 320 British Calibre. There is a cartouche under the grips that identifies the maker as François LOVINFOSSE-HARDY gunmaker of 76 Hayeneux Street in Herstal. This gun maker was granted two patents in 1885 and 1909. The action and timing works well and it cocks and locks as it should. The revolver is stamped with Liege proof marks which were actually a higher standard than British proof marks of the time. Grips are ivory and there is a facility for a lanyard ring. Quite an attractive looking little late 19th Century double action revolver.
Copy Webley RIC revolver circa 1875 This is a good copy of a Webley double action RIC pocket or Police revolver circa 1875 in obsolete .320 British calibre. The revolver was manufactured to operate in double action only and has a loading gate and ejector rod. The revolver was manufactured in Belgium and has Liege proofs. The action works perfectly and the finish has faded to a grey plum finish with some light surface scale from storage on the barrel that could be improved. Grips are good as can be seen and the lanyard ring is intact. The revolver features a rebounding hammer safety which was advanced at the time. The revolver is of good quality and was manufactured to compete with Webley
Crimea Ware Era Cased Beaumont Adams revolver. This is a very good example of a cased Beaumont Adams 54 bore (.442” calibre) revolver manufactured in circa 1855. The revolver was retailed by C G Edwards of 2 George Street Plymouth as evidenced by the engraved address on the top of the frame although the case contains an Adams label. The firm traded from this address until 1925 moving to 1 Frankfort Lane when it closed in about 1934. From 1885 to 1903 the firm traded as C G Edwards and Son. That such an advanced revolver was retailed in Plymouth is not a surprise as Plymouth is home to Devonport Naval base that has been supplied from Plymouth since the 17th Century. A Beaumont Adams revolver was supplied with 1500 balls and charges to HMS Excellent the Navy gunnery school in 1855 for testing and shortly afterwards the Government ordered 300 revolvers from Adams. At this time officers were often expected to supply their own sidearm and the Beaumont Adams was the choice of the British Army. On 20th February 1856 Lieutenant Frederick E B Beaumont of the Royal Engineers was granted a British patent for improvements to the Adams revolver which allowed them to be cocked and fired either by manually cocking the hammer as in single actions revolvers such as the Colt or just by pulling the trigger. Beaumont was granted a US patent in June 1856. This revolver revolutionised the revolver as it allowed a greater rate of fire and incorporated many other innovations including Kerr’s patent rammer, an improved frame with integral barrel, a safety catch to lock the cylinder, a rebounding hammer safety and of course at .442 calibre was larger than the .36” calibre Colt revolver. The speed of the Adams trigger cocking action for close quarters fighting together with the larger calibre spelt the death knell for Colt who had set up a factory in London to compete with British manufacturers. The emergence of this vastly superior weapon together with the fact that Colt had been discovered clandestinely supplying weapons to the Russian enemy forced the closure of the Colt London factory soon afterwards. This example features a good action and bore, much original finish and the side safety extant which sometimes is missing. There is much original finish remaining and a full compliment of accessories including a powder flask, mould, tools and key for the military style case which features a vacant brass round escutcheon on the lid. The frame is engraved Adams Patent No 40649 and this number is matched on the 5 shot cylinder. This is not the patent number but the serial number of the revolver. Overall a very decent example of a cased Crimean War era Beaumont Adams 54 bore revolver.
Darne Halifax Interwar Sliding Breech Side by Side Shotgun I try not to feature "modern" guns on this website unless they are interesting and uncommon and this is no exception to my rule. This is a pretty little Darne Halifax manufactured between the two World Wars. This is a 16 Gauge and clearly someone had heard of Churchill as it has 25" barrels and is fast and light. This gun has recently been serviced and re-blacked sympathetically and has the iconic French sling swivels which are often cut off this side of the Channel. Darne shotguns cannot be considered rare but are certainly uncommon and have unique handling characteristics with a very interesting sliding breech mechanism that is very fast once mastered. An interesting gun. Section 2 Shotgun License required.
Daw & Company Cased Percussion Revolver Daw Percussion revolver with very good bore and mechanics , lots of original finish and in a correct Daw case with nice contemporary trade label but clearly the case has been messed around with to fit this gun but can be sympathetically and easily repaired. The quality of Daw's patent revolvers was always exceptional and this is no different, they were recommended by a number of people in the shooting world including Lord Elcho and Llewellyn Jewitt and also by General Garibaldi.
Deeds that thrill the Empire. 5 volume set of this iconic work that is essential reading for the Great War medal collector. True accounts of heroism in the field leading to awards of gallantry medals. Very good reading copies but covers rubbed as can be seen and some loose content but nothing missing or drastic.
Deringer of Philadelphia Pocket Revolver circa 1865 The term derringer is a genericized misspelling of the last name of Henry Deringer, a famous 19th-century maker of small pocket pistols. Many copies of the original Philadelphia Deringer pistol were made by other gun makers worldwide, and the name was often misspelled; this misspelling soon became an alternate generic term for any pocket pistol, along with the generic phrase palm pistol Deringer\'s competitors invented and used in their advertising. The original Deringer pistol was a single-shot muzzleloading pistol. This particular revolver was manufactured by Deringer of Philadelphia and is a tip up 32 RF calibre revolver and is a scarce revolver seldom seen The revolver has a plum patina and is mechanically sound and an interesting revolver produced by an iconic name in the gun world.
Desirable Early Adams Cased \"Automatic\" revolver. This is an extremely attractive cased set with all accessories of an early Adams "automatic" self cocking revolver in 54 bore. These early revolvers were double action that held the advantage of speed as the whole action of cocking and releasing the hammer was undertaken with one pull of the trigger and as a consequence they were made without a trigger spur. Many of these revolvers were later modified with a rammer as the bullets were pushed in by thumb and had a propensity to fall out which could prove to be an embarrassment at the wrong moment! To keep the bullets in place they were made with a spiked tail and this set contains the correct mould that is probably rarer than the revolver. The revolver has a 6" barrel with the top strap engraved " Deane, Adams & Deane, Maker to HRH Prince Albert, 30 King William St, London Bridge". The right hand side is engraved Adams Patent No 6738R" which is actually the serial number not the patent. The revolver exhibits much original finish and has a captive cap container in the butt. The revolver features foliate engraving, an adjustable foresight and fine walnut chequered grips. There is a full compliment of the correct accessories and contemporary cast bullets. The powder flask was made by James Dixon and Son Sheffield. Overall an excellent case with accessories and seldom seen in such good and complete condition.
Dreyse Reichsrevolver Model 1993 Officers pattern This is a Dreyse Reichsrevolver Model 1883 often referred to as an Officers Model as it has a shorter barrel than the model 1879 and was made with a better finish. This is a solid frame non-ejecting six shot revolver in 10.6 x 25R calibre which was contemporary to the 44 Russian round in size and power. Loading is via a gate on the left hand side and the casings were removed by removing the cylinder and withdrawing the axis pin and using this to remove the casings by hand. In practise a separate small rod was supplied and stored in the ammunition pouch worn on the uniform. These revolvers were unique insofar as they had a side lever safety which was applied when the revolver was in half cock position. This particular example has a serial number of 340 so of early manufacture and the serial number is stamped on the frame, axis pin and chamber. Each chamber is marked 1 to 6 and the makers name and address are stamped on the left-hand side of the frame. The revolver is a single action and mechanically it is tight , there is strong rifling in the bore but some light pitting. It cocks and locks as it should do. The original finish has worn away and there is light overall pitting which looks far worse on a photograph than it is. Although a very dated black powder design these revolvers were in use from 1879 until the end of World War One and later in colonial units. This revolver was issued and there are unit markings on the back strap. An interesting revolver.
Dutch Beaumont Rifle Model 71/88 This is a good Dutch Beaumont 71-88 rifle that was used by the Dutch Army at home and in the Dutch East Indies. This rifle is all matching and with the cleaning rod which is often lost and has an amazing number of stamps and cartouches. There is a fine Maastricht cartouche on the butt dated 1878 and various other proof marks and ciphers. Condition is good, mechanically excellent, nice bore , good walnut stock with no chunks missing except a thin crack on one side only of the butt as can be seen. This rifle started life in 1878 and then was converted with a Vitali magazine, the bolt is complex and contains the spring for the firing pin a feature copied by the Japanese for their Murata rifle ( Don't they copy everything!). Sadly the Beaumont had a short life as it couldn't compete with small bore smokeless powder propelled ammunition such as the Mauser so was replaced soon after the Vitali modification. This is a big chunk of a rifle for your money and is a real "sleeper" this has the patina of laying idle for over 100 years and hasn't been cleaned. Originally these were supplied in "the white" and this could be cleaned up nicely.
Early 19th Century Later Sea Service Pistol by Brasher This is a reasonable Later Sea Service Pistol by John Brasher who had premises in Birmingham and London. Brasher was a quality maker who had an interest in multiple barreled weapons and these are encountered. This particular pistol is 13 bore (.69) and has a 9" tapered barrel with ramrod and brass furniture. The lock works perfectly and has a tight two stage action. Lock plate is engraved "Brasher" with a military Crown over GR as expected. A decent military flintlock Pistol.
Early Adams 54 Bore This is a very early Adams patented self cocking or "automatic" revolver in 54 bore. The serial number is under 1000 and pre-dates the investment into Adams by a merchant bank. This is a significant revolver as it does not have a rammer but used spiked bullets pressed into a wad. This proved unsatisfactory as bullets could drop out of the cylinder much to the embarrassment (or demise) of the owner. Subsequently rammers were fitted as standard or often as a retrofit to earlier models. This revolver has not been touched. The Adams revolver was a very significant development in British Firearms History and nice examples are scarce. Ultimately it was the quality of Adams' work and his contemporaries such as Tranter and Webley that lead to the demise of Colonel Colt's manufacturing aspirations in the United Kingdom. The revolver has good mechanics and cocks, rotates and looks without problem and is tight. There is over 50% of the original finish remaining and even some case hardening evident. As can be seen the grips are very good and indicative of the quality of the revolver, there is a percussion cap compartment in the butt. The full Adams & Deane address is engraved and nicely visible along the top strap and there is strong rifling in the bore. Other than transitional revolvers this would have been about the first serious competition to Colt who was emerging with great success at this time. A very pleasing revolver.
Early Dixons Rifle Powder Flask This is a particularly early Dixon Flask embossed with a hanging game scene and the makers name "James Dixon and Sons" This is a scarce flask and has been copied in the past but this is genuine from an old collection I am listing. The spout and lid unscrew easily but the spout spring is broken but are available from specialist dealers such as Peter Dyson and Henry Krank. There are no splits in the body of the flask and thankfully it has not been polished in recent history. There are some dents and the patina of 175 years. Overall a pleasing looking British flask from a famous maker.
Early Eagle Powder Flask as supplied with Colt cased sets This is an original Eagle motif pocket pistol powder flask as supplied with cased Colt 31 calibre pocket pistols. These flasks are one of the most copied of all powder flasks and caution should be exercised in purchasing "bargain" examples. The provenance of this particular flask is that is was removed from a cased London colt pistol set which had remained with the same family for generations. The new owner decided he wanted to replace the Eagle flask which was contemporary to the revolver with a British Dixon's bag flask. I can provide provenance on this item for many decades and certainly before the flood of fakes turned up in the 1970's. The flask has acquired a mellow patina and the graduated spout is removable but the lid is solid and probably needs penetrating oil to remove it as it has not been opened for decades. A very good condition accoutrement that would enhance any cased Colt pocket pistol.
Early Model Breech Loading Field Gun - Good Model This is an early breech loading field gun circa end of the 19th century and modelled on a Krupp Cannon.This is a fine quality model and features a spring loaded removable breech with an integral firing pin to fire caps. Most of the original paint is extant and this would have been sold at around the time of the Anglo Boer War. A very good quality item and unusual to find a complete one with the breech mechanism intact.
Early Moore No I all metal derringer manufactured by National Arms Company. Another interesting breech loader this is a Moore’s No 1 all metal derringer with the rarer 2” barrel chambered for 41 rim fire calibre. The all metal derringer is considerably scarcer than the one with walnut grips that are usually encountered. This was a significant firearm when first introduced as it was the first large bore (41 rim fire calibre) derringer. This example was made by the National Arms Company who succeeded Moore’s Patent Firearm Company in 1865 and who was subsequently purchased by Colt in 1870. Most examples have a 2.5” barrel but this pistol features the shorter and rarer barrel. Approximately 3000 pistols were manufactured by the National Arms Company and this design was adopted by Colt for their popular derringer that was introduced in the 1870’s. The cylinder is released by a latch and is side opening and the metal grips and receiver are foliate engraved and complimented with a cross hatch on the rear of the pistol to enhance grip. The makers name is stamped into the top flat of the barrel. Varieties are known that feature more complex or simpler engraving but all 2” barrels are scarce and attract a premium. Even scarcer are pistols that are not heavily pitted as the cartridges for the pistol used corrosive mercury primers and black powder and consequently the majority have very poor bores. This one was obviously looked after and has a clean bore. The pistol is mechanically sound and a very attractive example that would be an important addition to any collection of derringers.
Early S&W Model No 1.1/2 Second Issue Revolver This is a Smith and Wesson Model Model No 1.1/2 2nd issue revolver in 32 rim fire calibre. There early revolvers were the forerunners of the modern break action Smith and Wesson revolvers. The second series of the Model 1.1/2 was an improved issue of the first model and had a more streamlined appearance. Internally it featured a cylinder stop in the top strap rather than in the bottom strap. This revolver features the Company name and Springfield location together with the patent dates of 1855, 1859 and 1865 on the top strap. The revolver has a good bore with pronounced rifling, cocks, locks and rotates fine and has some finish left as can be seen and the original wooden grips are still extant with no damage to them. This is a good example of an early Smith and Wesson in NRA very good condition.
Early Webley Fosbery Automatic Revolver. This is a handsome looking example of an iconic and rare revolver. It is an early model 1901 Fosbery manufactured in 1902 with a 6” barrel. The revolver has the original foresight and is marked on the top of the barrel with the retailer ARMY & NAVY CSL who of course were significant suppliers to British army officers who had to purchase their own sidearms. The top strap has the early type Mk 1 fixed rear sight and marked on the side “WEBLEY FOSBERY AUTOMATIC”. The frame is marked “.455 CORDITE ONLY” and is fitted with the original safety. Metalwork retains nearly all of an excellent factory refinish. The Webley Fosbery Automatic Revolver really needs no introduction. Invented by Colonel G V Fosbery in the closing years of the 19th Century the revolver was almost a hybrid weapon. Webley-Fosbery revolver used recoil energy generated by each discharge, to rotate the cylinder and cock the hammer for the next shot. To be able to do so, it had a two-part frame. Bottom part consisted of a grip with trigger unit, and has rails on its upper surface. The upper frame, which held the cylinder and tip-down barrel, as well as hammer unit, as able to recoil on the lower frame rails against a spring. Upon recoil, a special stud, fixed on the lower frame, followed the zig-zag tracks in the cylinder to rotate it and index next loaded chamber with the barrel. At the same moment, hammer was cocked. Once all ammunition in the cylinder was expended, revolver was reloaded by pushing on the barrel lock release and swinging the barrel down on its hinge, thus tipping the rear of the cylinder up. This movement activated the automatic extractor which pulled empty cases out of cylinder chambers simultaneously. Once cylinder was emptied, fresh cartridges were loaded (either one by one or all at once, by using a Prideaux or similar speed loader reloading device), then barrel was swung up and locked. After reloading, revolver could be fired either by double action pull on the trigger, or by manual cocking of the hammer with subsequent single-action trigger pull. Webley-Fosbery revolvers were unusual in respect of the fact that they were also fitted with manual safety levers, located on the left side of the grip frame. The revolver is then carried "cocked and locked". Suitable for both Section 7(1) and Section 7(3) ownership. Private sale from my collection FAC to FAC.
Egg This is an exquisite little double barrelled pistol of good quality and very similar to the “Baby Egg” genre of single trigger pocket pistols which were popular in the first quarter of the 20th Century. This pistol features 2.7/8” barrels with a single trigger and full external springs and is virtually identical to the Durs Egg “Baby” featured on the cover of the April 1989 Issue of Guns Review magazine which contained an article on these interesting little pistols over two months. I will send copies of these articles to the buyer of this pistol. This particular pistol is engraved W Morgan who could be the William Morgan who was recorded at 106 Broad Street Reading in 1829. The quality of this pistol is excellent and matches Egg or Tatham so could possibly be the progeny of a famous manufacturer. The bore of this tiny pistol is approximately 120 bore. As can be seen from the photographs the pistol is in very good condition and is a splendid example of a small defensive flintlock. Examination by an Egg specialist has confirmed the pistol was manufactured at the Egg workshops.
Elegant Hopkins & Allen Ranger No 2 Revolver This is a very elegant little revolver manufactured by Hopkins and Allen in the late 1870's and early 1880's. The revolver rotates, cocks and locks and virtually all of the good quality nickel finish remains as can be seen. The revolver was marketed as a "Ranger No 2" and is in obsolete rim fire calibre. The excellent gutta percha grips look like plastic but were actually made from the latex from the sap of a gutta percha tree and is a hard rubber. The revolver also has patent dates on the top strap of March 28th 71 and May 27th 79 (1879). A very attractive revolver.
English Civil War Harquebusier's I am privileged occasionally to handle artefacts of historical significance that may send a shiver down my spine. This is one of those artefacts! This is an English Civil War period iron Harquebusier's Helmet commonly known as a “Lobster Tail” helmet because of the truncated neck guard which looks like a lobster’s tail. These helmets were worn by both sides but predominantly by Royalist’s. The term “roundhead” has nothing to do with this or any other helmet this term was used in a derogatory sense because Cromwell’s troops kept their head shaved and wore very simple uniforms. The analogy is that of being called “square” in our youth in contemporary times. This type of helmet was stocked in the Tower and private arsenals prior to the war as well as produced for the war, thus dating it about 1635-45. Iron skull made in two pieces with a rolled central seam. The pivoting peak or brim with rolled edge and suspending a triple bar face guard. A number of examples of this type were preserved at Littlecote House, and are now at the Royal Armouries, formerly Tower of London. This example has definitely seen combat with a contemporary riveted repair to the peak band at the right side and a distinct sword blow impact mark to the right side as well which probably caused the damage needing repair. These helmets were worn over knitted felt “Monmouth” caps and it is likely that the wearer was concussed but survived that particular blow. The cheek pads have been removed which was not unusual at the time and a virtually identical example without cheek pieces can be seen in the National Trust collection. The point of the peak is slightly distorted from lamination or straightening an impact damage. The neck guard and peak shows slight loss to the rolled edge as can be seen in the photographs and not unusual in an artefact that is at least 373 years old. I have steel buckets in my garden two years old that have not lasted as well! Most Lobster tails were imported but this is an English example and overall very pleasing with a wonderful patina that has developed over nearly 400 years and has clearly been cared for by generations of custodians to arrive with me. This is an item that looks better in the hand than any photograph can do justice to. This is not a stage prop (many so called “original” lobster tails are actually Victorian, made for theatrical use) but a genuine artefact that was most definitely used in earnest as can be seen from its “battle scars”. There were surprisingly few battles in the English Civil War and in my day you were taught them, Marston Moor, Adwalton Moor, Naseby, Roundaway Down and Newbury. There were also several sieges notably at Gloucester, Oxford, Hull, Newark and Carlisle. This is a Lobster tail helmet that would have been worn by an individual present at one or more of these events, no doubt about it and that is what sent the shiver down my spine!
English Civil War Harquebuster\'s \"Lobster Tail\" Helmet circa 1640. English Civil War Harquebusier's “Lobster Tail” Helmet circa 1640. I am privileged occasionally to handle artefacts of historical significance that may send a shiver down my spine. This is one of those artefacts! This is an English Civil War period iron Harquebusier's Helmet commonly known as a “Lobster Tail” helmet because of the truncated neck guard which looks like a lobster’s tail. Some tails were articulated but most were not. These helmets were worn by both sides but predominantly by Royalists. The term “roundhead” has nothing to do with this or any other helmet this term was used in a derogatory sense because Cromwell’s troops kept their head shaved and wore very simple uniforms. The analogy is that of being called “square” in our youth in contemporary times. This type of helmet was stocked in the Tower and private arsenals prior to the war as well as produced for the war, thus dating it about 1635-45. Iron skull made in two pieces with a rolled central seam. The pivoting peak or brim with rolled edge and suspending a triple bar face guard. A number of examples of this type were preserved at Littlecote House, and are now at the Royal Armouries, formerly Tower of London. This example has definitely seen combat with a contemporary riveted repair to the peak band at the right side and a distinct sword blow impact mark to the right side as well which probably caused the damage needing repair. These helmets were worn over knitted felt “Monmouth” caps and it is likely that the wearer was concussed but survived that particular blow. The cheek pads have been removed which was not unusual at the time and a virtually identical example without cheek pieces can be seen in the National Trust collection. The point of the peak is slightly distorted from lamination or straightening an impact damage. The neck guard and peak shows slight loss to the rolled edge as can be seen in the photographs and not unusual in an artefact that is at least 373 years old. I have steel buckets in my garden two years old that have not lasted as well! Most Lobster tails were imported but this is an English example and overall very pleasing with a wonderful patina that has developed over nearly 400 years and has clearly been cared for by generations of custodians to arrive with me. This is an item that looks better in the hand than any photograph can do justice to. This is not a stage prop (many so called “original” lobster tails are actually Victorian, made for theatrical use) but a genuine artefact that was most definitely used in earnest as can be seen from its “battle scars”. There were surprisingly few battles in the English Civil War and in my day you were taught them, Marston Moor, Adwalton Moor, Naseby, Roundaway Down and Newbury. There were also several sieges notably at Gloucester, Oxford, Hull, Newark and Carlisle. This is a Lobster tail helmet that would have been worn by an individual present at one or more of these events, no doubt about it and that is what sent the shiver down my spine!
Enigmatic Early Colt London Navy Revolver This is an interesting revolver as it is stamped with Colt's London address but has no British Proof marks. The serial number denotes early production so unlikely to be assembled in the USA with redundant parts as it has a very early production date and has all matching numbers. The revolver is mechanically perfect with a good bore and locks in every position. There are a number of theories. Rosa in his seminal work "Colonel Colt of London" mentions "lunch box specials" as a number have been recorded without proof marks or serial numbers. As this revolver has serial numbers I doubt it was stolen. What is more likely it was one of a batch Colt was smuggling to the Russians at the height of the Crimean War. Colt was caught when several thousand revolvers were discovered in Belgium hidden in British cotton bales. Colt's father was a Cotton trader so Colt had knowledge of the trade. Colt established his London factory as he had aspirations of selling to the British Government which at the time was the dominant global military power. Shortly after Colt's treachery was discovered he suddenly closed the London factory and probably only escaped arrest as he had diplomatic status. Despite the lack of finish this is a good looking revolver and worthy of much more research.
Excellent 1863 Tower Carbine .577 Calibre This is a very attractive smooth bore carbine made for Native Troops. excellent woodwork, nice even patina on the metalwork and very difficult to better. Note no provision for sling.
Excellent Adams Pinfire Shotgun circa 1860 This is an excellent Adams breech loading pinfire 13 bore shotgun manufactured between 1860 and 1870. The first breech loading shotguns were chambered for pinfire cartridges with the pin of the cartridge protruding from the breech and ignited with a flat faced hammer. The system was not as safe as centrefire cartridges and was largely redundant by 1870. Adams was a manufacturer renowned for his revolvers that competed with Colt and were purchased by the UK Government. This particular shotgun exhibits Adams patented lever release system that was inherently strong but not as successful as the Jones patent system. Adams patent no 285 was granted in 1860. The gun features 30" beautiful Damascus barrels that are clean and length of pull is 14.5 ". The forend has an ebony nose cap and the butt has a vacant silver escutcheon plate. Overall the shotgun is in excellent condition with a nicely chequered walnut stock. These shotguns are fairly scarce as they were quickly replaced and unusual to find one in this condition. As an obsolete ignition system the gun can be owned without a license as an object of curiosity. This is an important example demonstrating the beginning of breech firing shotguns.
Excellent brass barreled flintlock pistol by John Twigg circa 1770 John Fox Twigg, Gunmaker, London (1732-1792) This approx 24 bore (.57) flintlock pistol circa 1770 exudes quality and is an excellent example of this outstanding and celebrated gun maker's art and would enhance any fine collection of English Flintlocks. Wood has a beautiful mellow patina and the overall lines of the pistol are clean and without significant blemish as can be seen from the photographs.The pistol is in good working condition and features Twigg's early signature and a grotesque mask butt piece. It should be noted that contemporary "copies" of this celebrated gun maker are known but this is Twigg "through and through" John Fox Twigg was born at Grantham, Linconshire, in 1732 and is listed by Heer (1978) as being apprenticed to the Irish gunmaker, Edward Newton (active 1718-1764), though no dates for the apprenticeship are offered. By 1755, Blackmore (1986) lists Twigg working as a gunmaker from Angel Ct., Charing Cross until 1760 when he moved to 132 Strand, opposite Catherine St., and continued at this address until 1776. He moved again in 1776, this time to Piccadilly where he remained until 1790. During these 14 years he opened several warehouses; at little Somerset St., in 1771; 30 Cornhill, 1777 and Tower Hill in 1779. His only son, John, was apprenticed in 1786 to Henry Nock, and subsequently inherited his father's business. In 1788 Twigg formed a partnership with his newphew, John Bass (b.1761 - d.1794) although this was cut short by Twigg's death. As Blackmore notes, however, the trade directories are misleading in this respect, and show the business continuing at Piccadilly until 1795.
Excellent Bullard Single Shot Rifle Now this is an excellent and rare rifle! Only 600 are known to have been made so they are rare but to find one in this condition is rarer still. The rifle is chambered in 22-15-60 Stevens and marked 22-15 on the knox. This is an obsolete calibre and consequently does not require a license to own. The rifle has Victorian Black Powder proof marks and modern nitro proof marks as presumably at some stage somebody wished to shoot the rifle with the authority of a firearms certificate. The walnut stock is in excellent condition and there is considerable original finish on the metalwork including some iridescent deep blue on the hammer. This is an interesting and beautiful collectible little rifle that is seldom encountered. Much rarer than a Winchester High Wall and a fraction of the price! A fine rifle.
Excellent Cased Colt London Pocket Pistol This is a Colt London pocket pistol in 31 calibre in its original case with all accessories. This is a complete "sleeper" and completely untouched. From Rosa's excellent book "Colonel Colt of London" we know this is a very early model and it has all matching numbers, excellent grips and cylinder scene with a tight mechanical action. There is little or no wear on the accessories which is commensurate to the condition of the revolver. This set has not been apart for more than 150 years. Colt was determined to sell to the British Government and the work put into the London models was superior to that of his Hartford factory. Improved details included dome head screws and better hatching on the hammer spur. Very difficult to better and if the finish hadn't faded it would be double the price. An excellent example.
Excellent cased Colt London Pocket Pistol circa 1855 This is another really outstanding cased Colt London pocket revolver with all original accessories. The case contains all accessories in unused condition , some lead conical bullets and the key is extant. The revolver was purchased from a gentleman who was able to explain to me that he inherited it from his grandfather and by descent and family history it dates back to an ancestor that owned an East London Public House where it was bought for defence purposes. Clearly, from the condition of the revolver and accessories it was never used in anger, in fact the tin of 500 percussion caps has never been opened and has its original paper seals! From Rosa's excellent book "Colonel Colt of London" we know this is a very early model and it has all matching numbers, excellent grips and really good cylinder scene with a tight mechanical action. There is little or no wear on the accessories which is commensurate to the condition of the revolver. This set has not been apart for more than 150 years. Colt was determined to sell to the British Government and the work put into the London models was superior to that of his Hartford factory. Improved details included dome head screws and better hatching on the hammer spur. There is much original finish left on the revolver including case hardening and varnish on the grips and the set represents excellent value, the next grade of finish would double the price. An excellent example and a true “London” revolver made and sold in London.
Excellent Civil War Era Cased LAC Kerr Revolver. This is an outstanding cased single-action, Kerr’s Patent single action percussion revolver made by the London Armoury Company of London. This company exported these sturdy, five-shot revolvers to the Confederacy in large numbers during the Civil War. Considered a secondary issue sidearm in the South, the cap and ball percussion revolver was also privately purchased by many Confederate officers for personal use. This revolver features the most popular 54 bore size (.44 calibre) with a five-shot cylinder matched to a 5½” octagonal barrel. Sidearm measures 11” long, weighs 30 oz. and has a one-piece English walnut chequered grip. The Butt strap is secured by two screws and has a lanyard swivel ring attached. An external side spring located on the left side of the frame behind the recoil shield allows for the cylinder to be removed. With the side spring held back, the matching long cylinder pin is removed, and the cylinder drops down and out. Loading lever is thick and flat with a rounded, knurled grip that secures to the bottom of the barrel. These revolvers were designed with a unique side action lock that could be detached from the revolver to allow easy working on the lock and internal mechanism. I have seen many Kerr’s with broken mainsprings over the years, so this was probably not a bad idea. It is said that a blacksmith could repair a Kerr and blacksmiths are easier to find than gunsmiths. Kerr’s were first produced in 1859 by the London Armoury Company, founded on February 9, 1856 as a Joint Stock Company whose primary investors included well known makers Robert Adams, Frederick Edward, Blackett Beaumont, William Harding and James Kerr, with Adams becoming the Managing Director due in large part to holding the largest number of shares of stock. Adams had transferred his revolver patent rights and machinery from a previous business as gun maker in the firm “Deane, Adams and Deane.” Kerr was Adams’ cousin and had worked with Adams previously at Deane, Adams and Deane. Located at 54 King William Street, the London Armoury Company first began production of the Beaumont Adams revolvers, but that enterprise was short-lived due to a conflict between the partners on the focus of manufacture of Enfield pattern 1853 muskets for the British government, as well as for private arms sellers. This decision led to Adams selling his interest in the company and stepping down as Managing Director in 1859. The company directors replaced Adams with Frederick William Bond as the manager and James Kerr as the factory superintendent. Kerr had recently been awarded two patents for an improved version of the Adams patent revolver (Numbers 2896 and 242) (Figure 10). The first Kerr Patent revolver was produced approximately March of 1859 and was tested on April 25, 1859 at the Royal Arms Factory at Enfield. Details include “L.A.C.” and “a crown over a ‘V’” and “crown over ‘GP’” proof marks and the Lower right side of frame exhibits the engraved “KERR’S PATENT No. 8082” and the same number appears engraved on the cylinder with proof marks. On lower left frame to rear is stamped “LONDON ARMORY”. London Armory company is engraved on the lock This number (8082) is sometimes confused and considered the patent number but it is actually the serial number and is different on every revolver. This serial number is within the range that was exported to the United States in the American Civil War. The five-shot, unrebated cylinder has all five original nipples that protrude from the back of the cylinder as well as five proof marks clearly stamped on the surface at the rear between the chambers. All frame screws original and not damaged. Mechanics are crisp and tight. The revolver is presented in its original oak case with a brass roundel ( vacant) on the lid and loading instructions still extant inside the lid. The accessories are all present and correct and include a belted mould for the bullets, a Sykes patent powder flask, tin of Joyce caps and cleaning rod. There is a cotton pouch of original bullets that are contemporary to the revolver and the rare Kerr nipple key. There is a huge amount of original finish extant and this is the best Kerr I have seen for many years.
Excellent Civil War Era Smith Carbine The Smith carbine is a single-shot, breech loading, percussion firearm used by Federal mounted forces during the US Civil War. It is a .50 calibre, capping breech loading carbine invented and patented by physician Gilbert Smith of Buttermilk Falls, New York in late 1855. In very superb condition, this Smith carbine measures 39½” long overall and weighs a hefty seven pounds and eight ounces. The two piece black walnut stock is made up of a 9” forearm held by a single barrel band. Stock is excellent with original feathering still in effect. A fine crisp government cartouche stamped at the left side of stock at the wrist area. The blued, 28 5/8” long barrel wears a dark blue grey patina overall. Barrel features an octagonal portion under the forearm with the remaining length rounded forward of the barrel band. Receiver and hammer still exhibits some case colours. Carbine has the original, folding single leaf rear sight with the “V” notch bar, the brass blade front sight and the saddle ring and sling bar. Left side of the barrel breech facet shows inspector marks “J.H.” while the left side of frame above the sling bar exhibits the following stamping, “ADDRESS / POULTNEY & TRIMBLE / BALTIMORE, U.S.A.” Found below the bar are markings “MANUFACTURED BY / AM’N M’CH’N WKS / SPRINGFIELD, MASS.” Stampings under the sling bar read, “SMITH’S PATENT. / JUNE 23, 1857.” All stampings are clear and strong. Serial number (5044) stamped on the bottom of the barrel / receiver hinge plate. Carbine exhibits very crisp mechanics. Bore is bright and sharp. Smith carbines saw extensive service with the following cavalry regiments: 1st Massachusetts, 6th and 9th Ohio, 1st Connecticut, 7th and 17th PA, 7th and 11th Illinois and the 3rd West Virginia Regiments. This Smith Carbine is an excellent example of a US Civil War military rifle that would be very difficult to better.
Excellent Commercial Mauser C1896 Pistol This is a somewhat scarce Mauser C96 as it is a pre War commercial model with hard rubber grips and an elaborate MWW logo moulded into the grips. Manufactured in 1905 this version had an improved double extractor fitted. The pistol is suitable for 7(1) or 7(3) and has a matching numbered stock. This is a very good example with a good bore and mechanically perfect. The pistol is not blemished with retailer engraving and has the Oberndorf address on the panel. All in all an excellent example.
Excellent H Nock Double Barrelled Travelling Pistol This is a mahogany cased double barrelled travelling pistol by Henry Nock which started life as a flintlock pistol but was expertly and expensively converted to percussion firing by Witton and Daw and is presented in its Witton and Daw case with original trade label and complimented by its accessories. The quality of this piece is excellent with wonderful 7” brown Damascus steel barrels, original case hardening and perfect lock mechanisms. The bore of the pistol measures at .57” so approximately 24 bore and the case contains the correct ball mould to suit but also a small leather pouch of swan shot so clearly the original owner meant business and this would have been an intimidating piece to face! Other accessories include a powder flask, additional cleaning rod, oil bottle, turn screw and original box of percussion caps Both locks function perfectly and are marked H Nock while the top rib bears the engraving "H NOCK LONDON MAKER to his MAJESTY". Bores are perfect. The grip has an un-engraved silver escutcheon and the case a similarly un-engraved brass plaque. The case also contains an 1803 Halfpenny coin which could indicate the manufacturing date and I am told has been with the case since living memory. This is a top of the range pistol by a pre-eminent maker and worthy of any collection as it offers an interesting piece in exceptional condition by a superior maker that exhibits the transition between flintlock and percussion with an expert conversion that cannot be criticised on quality. Nock was a prolific inventor and is best known for his formidable multi-barrelled volley guns which were purchased by the Royal Navy and in recent years brought back to public notice by the TV series Sharpe in which Sergeant Harper carries a Nock Volley Gun. There is an interesting and erudite article on Nock and his volley guns in the Gun Report magazine of October 1967 and I would be pleased to make a copy for the purchaser of this pistol if interested. Nocks volley gun also formed part of the arsenal of HMS Pandora when she sailed in pursuit of the mutineers of HMS Bounty in 1791. Howard Blackmore stated that Nock never made an inferior military or civilian gun and his contribution to the advance of gun making in general has sadly been considerably overlooked, MacDonald Hastings in his book, English Sporting Guns, pages 8 and 9, supports the enthusiasm of Blackmore , stating: “HENRY NOCK of London, with his patent (No. 1598) of April 25, 1787, achieved a breakthrough. Prior to his patent, the plug was a solid lump of metal. When the flint sparked the powder in the pan, the flame spurting into the touch hole ignited only a corner of the charge . . . In NOCK’s gun, . . . the priming powder fired in the middle of the charge. Guns shot harder and quicker . . . it was from NOCK’s patent that gun invention leapt forward.” Another common word we use today in respect of firearms is the “Knox form” which is a derivative from “Nocks Form” another of Henry Nock’s patented inventions. Here is a very limited biography of this pre-eminent gun maker. Henry Nock, Gun maker, London (1741-1804) Henry Nock opened business in London in 1772, appearing in the rate books for 1772 as a gunlock smith at Mount Pleasant, London. In April 1775 he formed a partnership with fellow gun makers, William Jover and John Green, to sell firearms made under English Patent No.1095 from 83 Long Acre. By 1779 he had moved to the Whitechapel district and appears at Castle Alley in Whitechapel the following year, 1780. That same year he designed and produced 7-barrelled guns for the Board of Ordnance and followed it up with a screw less lock (1786), a wall piece (1788), the Duke of Richmond's musket (1792), Royal House Artillery pistol (1793) and a cavalry carbine and pistol in 1796. From 1784 until his death in 1804 he was based at 10 Ludgate Street, with factories at Moses and Aaron Alley, 27 Goulston Street and 9 Castle Alley, Whitechapel. Across the same period he had a shooting ground at Clowters Gardens behind St. George's Church, on Blackfriar's Road. During these years he took out his own patent, English Patent No. 1598 in 1787 for an improved breech design. Shortly after moving into the Whitechapel district, Nock made a set of gauges for the Gunmakers Company Proof House in 1781, but shortly afterwards severed his ties with the Company by purchasing his freedom in 1784. This move reflected the sentiments of many gun makers who worked outside the Company's control over London's inner city area. Blackmore (1986) describes the situation: 'To the west extending along Fleet Street to the Strand and Charing Cross, and north to Long Acre and Holborn, were new generations of master gun makers who had served their time elsewhere and had no traditions of service with the City Companies.' From 1771 until 1804 Nock was a contractor to the Board of Ordnance and from 1777 until a year before his death, he was a contractor to the East India Company for the supply of arms. In July 1778 the Gunmakers' Company, after having argued that the loss of income was in part due to the lack of a Livery, petitioned the Lord Mayor and the Aldermen and were successful. As a result, the Gunmakers Company took its place in the social life of the City and played its part in its business and politics, including the election of Aldermen and the Lord Mayor. Obviously attracted by the newly found status in being attached to the Company, Nock took Livery in 1795 and rose through the ranks to become Assistant in 1792 to finally Master in 1802. He died in 1804 and was succeeded by his foreman and son-in-law, James Wilkinson (d.1849). James Wilkinson is the Wilkinson behind the famous Wilkinson Sword company who also retailed guns. (original sale not completed as a result of purchasers circumstances)
Excellent Hopkins & Allen Dictator Revolver 32 rimfire This is a pleasing little Hopkins & Allen Arms company Dictator Model revolver in 32 Rim fire calibre. The revolver has more than 95% of the original nickel plating with a few little spots of wear on the cylinder and the mechanics are sound, it cocks and locks perfectly with a crisp action. The Floral Motif grips are unblemished and the cylinder release mechanism works fine allowing the cylinder to be easily released. The 1879 patent date is clearly stamped on the top strap together with the maker and model name. These little revolvers, sometimes erroneously called “suicide specials”, were the mainstay of personal protection in the 1870-1890’s and beyond because they were inexpensive, reliable and at close quarter deadly and easily concealable. The Outlaw Jesse James carried a Hopkin & Allen model 1873. This is a pleasing and typical example of the type. Hopkins & Allen Arms Company was a US firearms manufacturing company based in Norwich, Connecticut that was founded in 1868 by Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The Hopkins brothers ran the day-to-day operations of the company. In 1874 Converse sold his interest in the company to Brothers William and Milan Hulbert, giving the Hulbert's 50% of the company's assets and capital. Hopkins & Allen became the exclusive maker of Merwin Hulbert revolvers as a result of this. Following the bankruptcy of the Hulbert brothers in 1896, Hopkins & Allen went bankrupt in 1898. The company was reorganized as Hopkins & Allen Arms Company but lost its factory and machinery in a fire in 1900, also along with the great robbery in 1905 shortly after, thieves cleared out the whole warehouse. Hopkins & Allen rebuilt its factory in 1901 and produced 40,000 firearms a year. In 1902, the company acquired Forehand and Wadsworth, for whom it had been making revolvers under contract. The company was awarded a contract to build Mauser rifles for the Belgian Army early in World War I, but the contract fell apart after Germany invaded Belgium. Although the company continued to manufacture firearms, it never financially recovered and went bankrupt in 1916 with Marlin-Rockwell purchasing its machinery, inventory and designs in 1917. In addition to the Merwin Hubert revolvers, Hopkins & Allen manufactured a variety of spur trigger single-action revolvers in .22, .32, and .38 calibres with trade names such as ACME, American Eagle, Blue Jacket, Captain Jack, Chichester, Defender, Dictator, Imperial Arms Co., Monarch, Mountain Eagle, Ranger, Tower's Police Safety, Universal, and XL, and later hinged-frame double-action models. Hopkins & Allen manufactured revolvers for Forehand & Wadsworth under contract as well as shotguns, rifles, and derringers for various sporting goods stores
Excellent Iver Johnson Defender Revolver 32 RF The Defender was manufactured by Johnson & Bye (later Iver Johnson) from 1873-1888. There were three different frame sizes for both square butt and birds head grip models. The small frame was chambered for .22 rimfire; the medium frame was chambered for .32 rimfire as is this nice example; and the large frame was chambered for .38 or .41 rimfire. Serial numbers for each frame size and model started at 1 and ran to 99,999, then started over again. Defender is the most common brand name, but Johnson & Bye also made the same guns under other names, including Eagle, Encore, Eureka, Favorite, Favorite Navy, Lion, Smoker, Old Hickory, and Tycoon. Pearl and ivory grips were available by special order, as were longer barrels. This one is in beautiful condition as can be seen and cocks and locks perfectly and has great Eagle motif gutta percha grips. The revolver disassembles easily as can be seen. There was a second series of guns made by Johnson & Bye from 1889-1899 that had rifled barrels and redesigned and improved lockwork. These were sold as the Defender 89. “Defender 89” was stamped on the topstrap and molded into the hard rubber grips. This is a Defender 89 revolver with the improved lock work.
Excellent Marlin Model 1893 underlever rifle in 32-40 calibre. The Marlin 1893 underlever rifle was the first Marlin that was manufactured in excess of 50,000 units, in fact a million rifles were made until the design was superceded in 1935 by the model 1894 which had a shorter action to allow the chambering of pistol cartridges. The model 1893 was an improvement on the previous model underlever rifle as it could handle much larger cartridges. The iconic Marlin 1893 was a direct competitor to the Winchester 1894 but had the advantage of side ejection which allowed easier mounting of scopes on top of the receiver. This particular good looking rifle is in obsolete 32-40 calibre so can be owned as an object of curiosity without a license. The rifle has a good tight action, nice bore and excellent wood with no major issues. The rifle features an octagonal barrel, steel crescent butt plate and is the correct 26” length for this calibre of a “safety” (high grade steel) barrel. Usual makers marks and patent marks are nicely stamped and in the correct place where they should be and the rifle has toned to a nice even colour as can be seen. For further information on this model read the excellent Marlin Firearms History by Lt Col William S Brophy. This is a pre-WW1 rifle made in approximately 1905.
Excellent P-60 Short Army Rifle 5 Groove Assembled by Swinburn and Sons this Tower P-60 .577” calibre Army short rifle is in outstanding condition and it would be difficult to find a better one. The 1860 model differentiates from the earlier P-56 rifle in several respects. The most significant difference is that it features the same barrel as the Naval P-58 which has a 1 in 48” twist 5 groove heavy barrel 33” long. This proved so accurate over 600 – 1200 yards compared to the earlier 3 groove barrels and standard P-53 rifles that this became the favoured rifle of Confederate sharpshooters during the American Civil War as it was more widely available than the Whitworth and Kerr “Sniper” rifles. There were other improvements including a spring retainer for the cleaning rod, rear sights calibrated to 1100 yards at an optimum focal plane for the shooter, an improved nipple and sling swivel located at the rear of the trigger tang instead of on the trigger. This particular rifle has an excellent bore, and retains excellent, sharp edges and wonderful lines. The wood to metal fit is exemplary as well throughout. The stock shows a number of minor bumps, dings and handling marks, but nothing at all significant in terms of wear. The stock is crisp and solid without any major defects. The lock still retains a significant amount of the original case hardening and the nipple protector is still extant with the original felt pad! There are traces of the original lacquer on the trigger guard and the sights and the bayonet bar is stamped with Swinburne’s mark together with the S&S stamp on the internal lock mechanism. The internal lock is of the highest quality and the action of the two stage lock is crisp and still retains the original vibrant blue on the tumbler. The lock is also stamped with the inspection mark “JT” who was Joseph Turner, Gunlock filer, son of Joseph Turner also a Gunlock filer who lived in Wolverhampton and was married in October 1838. The rifle has a plethora of crisp proof and inspection marks. Swinburn was regarded as one of the premier suppliers to the government and were gun makers of note who as a matter of interest made General Jacob’s trial rifle. This rifle was sourced from an old European collection that was being disbursed and on disassembly of the lock an original auction label dated 1964 was found so the rifle is now appearing on the market for the first time in 50 years! (The label will accompany the rifle). Army short pattern rifles are scarce in any condition as the vast majority were converted to the Snider action so to find a rifle dated at the transitional stage of conversion is unusual and in such condition is unusual to say the least. This is a real muzzle loading enthusiast’s rifle that has everything to commend it. Overall this is simply an EXCELLENT example of a scarce rifle that would enhance any collection.
Excellent Pair of English Turnoff Pistols. This is a pair of box lock pocket or muff turnoff pistols of some quality. The pistols have drop down triggers that fall on cocking and are in 80 bore calibre. Both have much original finish, mechanics are fine and the barrels turn off. The pistols have Birmingham proofs and are contained in a relined box with correct sized powder flask , percussion cap tin and balls. The locks are nicely foliate engraved and both butts have a vacant silver escutcheon.
Excellent Remington 1871 Rolling Block Pistol Here is another 1871 Remington Rolling Block Pistol in obsolete 50 calibre Remington centrefire. It is hard to know exactly why Remington made rolling block pistols when they did, since revolvers were so well established. Probably they were already tooled up for rolling block rifles, so making pistols didn’t require an additional investment. Remington revolver sales were in a slump, because from 1855 to 1871 Smith & Wesson had effectively tied up manufacture of advanced cartridge revolvers by licensing the Rollin White patent that covered any cylinder drilled through from end to end. Remington had only percussion pistols on offer during those years. The 1871 pistol was modified from earlier versions by moving the trigger and trigger guard forward and adding a spur to the grip to assist in controlling recoil. A firing pin retractor was also added. This pistol was commonly called the "Army and Navy". Manufactured circa 1872 to 1888 with a total production of approximately 6,000, with approximately 5,000 sold to the U.S. government. The pistol has an 8" blue barrel, casehardened frame with the distinctive 'hump' or spur on the back strap, the trigger is niter blue and bright hammer and breech block. The left side of the frame is marked "REMINGTON'S ILION N.Y. U.S.A. / PAT MAY 3D NOV 15TH 1864 APRIL 17TH 1866" and stamped with a "P" and "S" below and ahead of the marking. The pistol is mounted with a smooth walnut forearm and one piece smooth grip with a boxed script "C.R.S." inspection cartouche on the left. There are no major blemish's , a bright bore, crisp mechanics and some evidence of case hardening left with a nice blue trigger. Overall mottled patina as can be seen with a plum barrel. Not quite museum quality but at the top end of these very scarce pistols. Evidently little used if at all and the screw heads indicate it has not been messed with. These pistols are underestimated and are an interesting diversion from the revolvers that were dominant at this time.
Excellent Remington Smoot Revolver circa 1875 This is an excellent almost mint condition Remington Smoot Revolver in obsolete 30 calibre rim fire. The revolver is mechanically excellent and clearly has seen very little use. The Remington address and patent date of 1875 is crisply stamped into the top flat and the checkered grips are perfect. The Remington-Smoot New Model No1 is also sometimes known as the New Line Revolver No 1. This compact design, which was intended to compete with Colt's metallic cartridge pocket revolvers, features a distinctive design in which the frame, octagonal barrel, and ejector housing were of a single piece. Early production models also utilised a revolving recoil shield, while the standard version, which this revolver is an example of, featured a fixed recoil shield that was incorporated into the frame. These five-shot pistols are typically seen with a nickel-plated finish, although a blued finish was also offered. Both walnut and checkered hard rubber grips were available as well. The ejector rod is spring loaded and on this example very positive. Only approximately 3000 Remington Smoot revolvers were produced between 1875 and 1877. An interesting revolver. See this and other interesting guns at the HBSA Classic Arms Fair Bisley Surrey July 5th & 6th.
Excellent Springfield Trapdoor 50 Calibre Allin Conversion This is a very good 50 calibre “Trapdoor” model 1855 rifle. The rifle has a good American walnut stock with no cracks, only light handling marks. Wood to metal finish is excellent and the rifle has not been cleaned or sanded. It has toned down evenly and is mechanically fine. The Springfield Model 1866 was the second pattern of the Allin-designed trapdoor breech-loading mechanism. Originally developed as a means of converting rifled muskets to breach loaders, the Allin modification ultimately became the basis for the definitive Model 1873, the first breech-loading rifle adopted by the United States War Department for manufacture and widespread issue to U.S. troops. The Model 1866 corrected problems encountered with the prototypical Model 1865, in particular a simplified and improved extractor and a superior .50 calibre centrefire cartridge (the Model 1865 used a .58 calibre rimfire cartridge with mediocre ballistics), among many other less significant changes. It employed a robust version of the "trapdoor" breechblock design originated by Erskine S. Allin, Master Armorer of the Springfield Armory. Approximately 25,000 .58 calibre Springfield Model 1863 rifled muskets were converted by Springfield Armory for use by U.S. troops, the barrels being relined and rifled to .50 calibre and the trapdoor breech system affixed. The rifle was chambered for the powerful centrefire .50-70 Government cartridge (.50 calibre 450-grain (29 g) bullet; 70 grains (4.5 g) of black powder). Though a significant improvement over the extractor of the Model 1865 Springfield Rifle, the Model 1866 extractor was still excessively complicated and the extractor spring somewhat prone to breakage. However, it is a misconception that a broken extractor disabled the weapon. In the official 1867 government user booklet “Description and Rules for the Management of the Springfield Breech-Loading Rifle Musket, Model 1866”, the following is stated regarding a broken extractor and/or ejector: “It should be understood that the ejector and friction springs are convenient rather than necessary, and that the piece is not necessarily disabled if one or both of them should break, for the shell can be easily removed by the fingers after being loosened by the extractor hook.” Furthermore, the “ramrod” of the rifle can be used quite effectively to remove a stuck case in an emergency. Thus it is clear that this weapon is not as easily disabled as is sometimes believed. The Model 1866 was issued to U.S. troops in 1867, and was a major factor in the Wagon Box Fight and the Hayfield Fight, along the Bozeman Trail in 1867. The rapid rate of fire which could be achieved disrupted the tactics of attacking Sioux and Cheyenne forces, who had faced muzzle-loading rifles during the Fetterman massacre only a few months before. The new rifles contributed decisively to the survival and success of severely outnumbered U.S. troops in these engagements. A fine historical rifle used in the Indian Wars, scarce in the UK and an obsolete calibre. Inadvertently listed as zero stock last week!!
Excellent Stevens This is a beautiful little Stevens take down rifle in 32 long rifle calibre. This is the model known as a “Favorite” and was the equivalent of a British Rook and Rabbit rifle. This particular rifle is in outstanding condition and features a great bore, excellent woodwork and an original tang peep sight and undamaged butt plate. Overall length is 36.5” with a barrel length of 20.5” There is a large amount of the original case colour remaining on the receiver as can be seen. I have sold many Stevens rifles but seldom have I seen one is such great condition as these rifles were working tools and used hard. Stevens Arms was founded by Joshua Stevens with help from backers W.B. Fay and James Taylor in Chicopee Falls, MA, in 1864 as J. Stevens & Co. Their earliest product was a tip-up action single shot pistol. In that same year, the company produced a tip-up shotgun with approximately 24 gauge as the cartridge (.66" in diameter and 2.45" long). Business was slow into 1870, when Stevens occupied a converted grist mill and had just sixty employees. The 1873 Panic had a further negative impact on sales. By 1876 the company had recovered to the extent that it was then manufacturing twice the number of shotguns as it had been prior to that year. In 1886, the company was reorganized and incorporated as J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. The business was able to grow steadily with tool manufacturing and sales now accounting for the bulk of the business output, Beginning in 1880, the company began making falling block rifles. These, though less well known than Ballard or Winchester firearms, were of comparable quality. They were priced lower than those of Ballard or Winchester, making the Stevens' falling block models competitive in the marketplace. Under names like Favorite such as this rifle, Little Scout, Crack Shot, and Marksman, Stevens sold millions of reliable single-shots. The total number of single-shot firearms manufactured by the company exceeded 3.5 million by 1892. In addition, in 1887, Stevens developed the .22 LR round, which served as an introductory calibre for children for decades, as well as being very popular for plinking, as well as varmint and target shooting. The .22LR cartridge was available beginning in 1888, in the #1, #2, #9, and #10 break-top rifles, and in their New Model Pocket and Bicycle rifles. The .22 LR would outperform other Stevens rounds, such as the .25 Stevens and .25 Stevens Short, designed as competitors, and offered in models such as the lever action single-shot Favorite (produced between 1894 and 1935) and the Crack Shot #15 (introduced in 1900). This is an outstanding rifle and would make an excellent choice addition to any Rook and Rabbit rifle collection. Price includes door to door insured courier.
Excellent Thomas Turner Hammer Gun This is a classical back action top opening hammer gun made by esteemed Birmingham Gun maker's Thomas Turner of Fisher Street Birmingham. The gun features 30” barrels with LOP of 14.5”, excellent walnut stock with a silver escutcheon and wonderful browned Damascus barrels. This is a light gun weighing less than 7 pounds but no scalloped butt. There is evidence of the original case hardening extant on the locks and the bores are bright and undamaged with plenty of life left in them. Good English Hammer Guns are becoming scarcer thanks to the revival of interest and of course many recent excellent books being published on the genre such as Diggory Hadokes “Vintage guns for the modern shot”. This gun is black powder proofed and I can supply 200 cartridges that were professionally loaded to suit this particular gun. A very pretty and quintessential example of an English hammer gun that would grace any collection. Thomas Turner was one of the most successful and innovative gun makers and designers in Great Britain during the 19th Century. Born in 1805, Turner had a wonderfully successful career in Birmingham as a gun maker, operating in the trade from 1834-1890. The family business continued on until the 1900’s! During his tenure at the helm of the business, Turner received multiple English patents for everything from rifling that would not foul, to breech plugs and long-range sites. During the mid-1860’s he produced a line of very successful small bore (.451) target rifles that were as accurate and well received as the Whitworth & Kerr rifles. Turner was also a founding member of the Birmingham Small Arms Trade organization, which was located at Steelhouse lane in Birmingham from 1854-1878. This was a group of the 20 most prominent Birmingham gun makers on the list of British War Department list of contractors, based in Birmingham. The group was formed during the Crimean War to provide mutual support and share contacts for military arms. This was the first true organization of what had always been a number of cottage industry gun makers in the Birmingham region. These same 20 makers also launched the The Birmingham Small Arms Trade Company, LTD in 1861, with the goal of cooperatively being able to produce military small arms on the interchangeable parts principle, as was being done by the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield Lock (RSAF) and the London Armoury Company. Thomas Tuner was the 2nd largest shareholder in the company, with 95 shares of its stock. Only Joseph Swinburn held more shares, with 110. Turner was one of the four “old contractors” to the British War Department (which also included Swinburn, Hollis & Sheath and Tipping & Lawden), and was involved with the building of every pattern of British military arm in the mid-19th Century, often producing the prototypes in his workshop. He also served as the President of the BSAT for a time, and during the American Civil War delivered thousands of Enfield pattern muskets on contract to both CS and US buyers. Turner is underrated but a significant gun maker this is an opportunity to own a useful gun with considerable investment potential.
Excellent Thomas Turner Snider Volunteer Rifle This is another excellent Snider which was obviously commissioned by a keen shot for target shooting or possibly Volunteer Service. The quality is superlative and better than military issue. The rifle consists of a Thomas Turner Lock and Stock in excellent condition, even the Turner cartouche is still intact on the butt. The lock is stamped with Turners Birmingham address and the nipple protector and chain is still in situ but the barrel is by P Webley also of Birmingham. In the early 1870's there was much experimentation with Sniders and it was thought that iron barrels were more accurate than steel barrels although not as hard wearing. This rifle is such an example. The lock is a free or indented lock for a very smooth let off and the breech block features the desirable locking lug. From the condition of the breech block it has seen very little use and has been well looked after. The hammer is the Mark 111 flat hammer. The bore is clean and bright with a small amount of minimal pitting towards the end half inch caused by cleaning but is not detrimental to the rifle. I mention it but it is difficult to see. The locking cam is marked BSA and has Snider patent marks and the general appearance of the rifle is that of a Military Mark 111 with the rear sight next to the knox and an improved locking breech. There are several Birmingham proof and view marks and the stock has no cracks and only really minimal handling marks as can be seen from the images. A real "sleeper" that has not been messed with and should prove to be an excellent shooter should you wish to add it to a Firearms Certificate. There is an issue number on the rifle and also on the underside of the trigger guard. An attractive rifle that would be difficult to improve on. One of the best I have ever seen.
Excellent Webley Model 1909 9mm Browning Long Of all of the Webley pistols available for collection, other than the Mars the Model 1909 must certainly be the most elusive of the type. The Webley 1909 was short lived and was only manufactured between 1908 and 1922 and only 1694 examples were ever made. This particular pistol was manufactured in December 1914. The pistol was intended for military or police use with a smaller calibre than the service issue .455 calibre but lacked the power needed for its service. The pistol has several important innovative refinements including a grip safety which was replaced on later models with a slide safety, a slide stop which kept the slide open after the last shot was fired and a positive magazine release. Many of these features can be seen on the Colt 1911 government. This particular example is in extremely good shape and would rate as NRA fine with more than 85% finish and no internal wear with a superb bore. The hard rubber grips only show slight handling marks. Most of the original vibrant blue is extant and the balance is mellowing to a plum patina.
Excellent Webley Solid frame British Bulldog no 2 in 44 Rimfire calibre Webley British Bulldog revolvers in rim fire calibres are extraordinarily scarce if not rare in any condition and this is as good as you will find. Mechanically flawless and with at least 70% original finish this particular revolver is featured on page 65 of Joel Black, Homer Ficken and Frank Michaels’ book “Webley Solid Frame revolvers”. The rim fire cartridge chambering was short lived as centre fire 380’s, 44’s and 450’s were far more popular. This revolver is correctly stamped Webley’s No 2 44 rim with the famous flying bullet logo and the 2.3/8” barrel is stamped P.Webley & Son, London and Birmingham. The cylinder is also stamped with the last three digits of the serial number. The calibre is obsolete and always likely to remain so as production of the calibre stopped in the 20th Century. This revolver benefits from Section 58(2) of the Firearms Act as amended allowing ownership without a license for collection purposes. An exceptional revolver and one that would grace any advanced Webley collection. Provenance ex-Joel Black collection.
Excellent Winchester 1887 10 Bore Lever Action Shotgun This is another model 1887 shotgun in obsolete 10 bore calibre and one of John Browning’s' famous designs and a very handsome gun and as good as you will find without spending crazy money! This shotgun was first developed in 1887 by demand of a repeating shotgun for lawmen and cowboys to use. Many thought that two shots was not enough firepower for a scatter gun and a repeating shotgun was required to get the job done. Winchester asked Browning to build such a gun, well aware he was the best man for the job. Browning had already been working on a pump-action design (which would later become the Winchester 1897 shotgun), but Winchester wanted to keep tradition with a lever-action gun. The gun was chambered for 10, 12 and 16 gauge black powder cartridges. The standard barrel lengths were 20” and 30” but different lengths and finishes were available to order. This gun has a standard 30” barrel. These were working tools on the ranch and as they used black powder cartridges it is difficult to find them with decent bores. This one has a decent bore which I rate as 8/10, excellent woodwork as can be seen and it has not been messed with or “improved”. From the serial number (25082 ) this gun was actually manufactured in 1889. This is the best looking 1887 I have ever sold and has at least 90% original finish. It has not been messed with and the original steel butt plate is still extant which is pleasing as these were often removed to increase the length of pull with a rubber butt pad. There are some slight surface rust freckles in areas showing through the finish but no pitting and the screws are untouched. I’m not perturbed by the freckles as these prove the original finish. From the state of the action, woodwork and tubes I would say that the gun was bought, used once or twice and then salted away for the last years. The bore could be improved with a very light skim towards the chamber and with a little effort, if you don’t mind this sort of thing, the gun could be restored to museum quality mint condition. Personally I prefer to leave them as found. A very pleasing and iconic gun. The fraternity of Winchester collectors is ever expanding and in simplistic terms there are not enough good examples to go around so I would say that this one is a “safe bet” for future appreciation in value and in the interim you can enjoy a fine historical artifact. Further information on request. Obsolete calibre - no license required for collecting purposes.
Excellent Winchester Low Wall Model 1885 In 1878, the 23-year-old Browning designed a falling-block single-shot rifle, for which he was granted a patent the following year. Browning and his brother commenced making the rifles by hand in their second-floor workshop in Ogden, Utah, with limited success. In 1883, Thomas G. Bennett, Vice-President and General Manager of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, traveled to Ogden and negotiated the purchase of the single-shot design, as well as the prototype of what would become the Model 1886 lever-action – the beginning of the fruitful 20-year Winchester–Browning collaboration. Winchester's engineers made some improvements to Browning's design, including angling the block at six degrees to create a positive breech seal, and released the rifle as the Model 1885. Two popular models were made, the so-called Low Wall which showed an exposed hammer, firing less powerful cartridges, and the so-called High Wall for stronger cartridges whose steel frame covered most of the firing hammer when viewed from the side; but both were officially marketed by Winchester as the Single Shot Rifle. It was produced principally to satisfy the demands of the growing sport of long-range "Match Shooting", which opened at Creedmoor, New York, on June 21, 1872. Target/Match shooting was extremely popular in the US from about 1871 until about 1917, enjoying a status similar to golf today, An excellent manufacture and an investment quality iconic firearm requiring no license to own. An international antique and unlike many "investment grade" firearms offered in the UK this one hasn't been messed with.
Excellent Winchester Model 1901 10 Bore Shotgun This is another super nice Winchester 1901 Shotgun. The gun has a good bore, lots of original finish, particularly on the receiver, and has the original steel butt plate which was often removed and replaced with a rubber pad. The model 1901 was basically a redesign on the earlier 1887 model. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder shot shells, and so a redesign resulted in the stronger Winchester Model 1901, 10-gauge only, to handle the advent of the more powerful smokeless powder. No 12-gauge chambering was offered, as Winchester did not want the Model 1901 to compete with their successful 12-gauge Model 1897 pump-action shotgun. Other distinguishing characteristics of the Model 1901 are: a two piece lever the Winchester trademark stamp was moved to the upper tang, behind the hammer serial numbers between 64,856 and 79,455 This particular shotgun has a serial number of 77308 and can be dated to 1913 and would have been one of the last ones manufactured. This is about as good a 1901 I have seen and would be considered scarce in the USA but rare in the UK. A fine looking weapon Winchester 1901 that would be difficult to improve on.
Exceptiional Smith and Wesson New Model 3 Target Revolver This is an exceptional Smith and Wesson single action target revolver in obsolete 32/44 calibre as listed in the Home Office obsolete calibre list. A rare revolver, this antique revolver is in extraordinary condition and I hesitate to say mint but it is close. Wonderful condition and probably impossible to improve on. Other than the fairly common larger calibre "Russian" revolvers this is one of the few smaller cartridge "Russian" revolvers that is permissible to own under the Firearms Act as amended, A fantastic piece.
Exceptional 1847 Colt Walker Brevette The world record for a Colt revolver was made in April 2018 by Rock Island Auctions and was for a Colt Walker, the only one known to survive in a case. The price was a staggering $1.84 million! A “cheaper” one subsequently sold for $340,000. In their excellent book on Colt Brevet Revolvers by Roy Marcot and Ron Paxton they state that “in their multi-year study on Colt Brevet revolvers only three copies of Colt Walkers were found”. I’m not one to disagree with the experts but having been in this business for 40 years I believe I have seen six of these and of course three might have been the ones referred to in the book. Clearly these are rare. For the Colt Collector a Walker is the pinnacle of any collection but for mere mortals the aspiration to own a Walker is beyond us and merely a dream. The 1847 Colt Walker was the largest black powder repeating handgun ever made at that time, but contrary to popular belief in the United States, it was not the most powerful, as some Austrian and British revolvers of the 1850s based on the Adams-Beaumont design were even more powerful because of their large calibres. The Colt Walker was created in the mid-1840s in a collaboration between Texas Ranger Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker (1817–1847) and American firearms inventor Samuel Colt (1814–62), building upon the earlier Colt Paterson design. Walker wanted a handgun that was extremely powerful at close range. Samuel Walker carried two of his namesake revolvers in the Mexican–American War. He was killed in battle the same year his famous handgun was invented, 1847, shortly after he had received them. Only 1,100 of these guns were originally made, 1,000 as part of a military contract and an additional 100 for the civilian market, making original Colt Walker revolvers extremely rare and expensive to acquire. The metal of the Walkers was prone to flaws and it is reported that at least 30% failed because of overloading and cylinders blowing up. Some of this was put down to troops inexperience with the new invention but as a consequence the revolver did not have the best of reputations and the design evolved into the Dragoon. I suspect that a small batch was later ordered in Belgium as there was a requirement for a strong powerful revolver that surpassed the smaller Colt and Remington’s in .44 calibre with shorter cylinders. These revolvers were extremely well made as indeed were most Belgium guns and the Belgium proof house standards were greater than the British Proof House. Much of the components of the English gun trade including Tranter, Adams and Webley were made in Belgium. The metal was superior and quality excellent. This example is, to all intents and purposes, indistinguishable from a Colt Walker with the exception that it was not made by Colt and is not stamped Colt. Everything else is identical even down to weight. The revolver has a serial number stamped in several places including the wedge although it was clearly stamped to intimate that the manufacturer had made hundreds of them which of course from history we know this was not the case. The rifling in the bore is identical to the Colt Walker rifling, and is significantly different from the fast twist rifling of modern reproductions designed for present day shooters. The bore is difficult to photograph but it is clean with deep rifling extant. Mechanically the revolver locks tight on full cock and the half cock works flawlessly. The revolver is stamped US 1847 above the key as the original and the overall finish is excellent as can be seen. The revolver is contained in an older case that clearly was made for it and the case contains and original tin of percussion caps and a reproduction Walker powder flask. Were this a “real” Walker the serial number of 988 would place it as being manufactured during the first year of manufacture. The revolver is superbly made but has no proof marks and the romantic in me says what if……… An interesting contemporary example of an iconic gun and a superb addition to any advanced Colt collection. Seldom seen and I doubt if I will sell another one.
Exceptional Deane Harding Patent Revolver 54 Bore This is an exceptional Deane & Harding Patent 54 Bore double action revolver, five shots with a six-inch barrel. The revolver exhibits most of its original finish, in excess of 95% and the action is perfect. The top strap has the makers details Deane & Son London Bridge and the side frame is engraved with “Deane & Harding Patent” with the serial number and an “L” suffix indicating the second model. This serial number is also stamped under the rammer. Second models are easily recognised by the rammer hammer “in the white” which was subject to its own patent. Taylerson states that production of these revolvers commenced around April 1859 and on April 30th “The Illustrated London News” (Page 426) featured an article stating that “Messrs Deane & Son of King William Street, London Bridge, have just brought out a new rifle and pistol called the Deane Harding, which claims from its extreme simplicity, the attention of all who are interested in the subject”. The article goes on to say that “it can be made entirely by machinery, and so made as to interchange in its various parts……” This of course is a less than subtle comparison to Colt who promoted his machine-made revolvers being made in the “most modern way”. To compare the Deane Harding revolver to the Colt revolver would be like comparing a Sopwith Camel fighter plane to a Supermarine Spitfire. By comparison the Colt is single action, held together with a wedge that was often lost and wore quickly. This is actually quite a significant step forward for British manufacturing as until this point gunmakers were making their point that British firearms were “hand made and of the highest quality”. Makers such as Tranter and Adams began to appreciate that they could still produce quality firearms but to compete with the ruthless marketing employed by Colt, they had to either compete with mechanised production or fail. Harding's patent was for a two-piece frame that hinged together via a hook shaped wedge at the lower end of the frame, forward of the cylinder. By removing the screw at the top rear of the frame that secured the safety arm to the right side of the frame, the barrel could then be depressed and the upper frame un-hooked from the lower frame. The loading lever or rammer was considered quite revolutionary for a British maker as it was situated underneath the barrel instead of at the side allowing easier holstering of the weapon and this was probably indicative, including the 54 bore (44) calibre that Deane had aspirations to sell to the military as did most gunmakers of the day. The revolver was criticised for its propensity to malfunction in some quarters but at the time double action revolvers were heavily outweighed by single action revolvers that had the reputation of being reliable. This is probably the best Deane & Harding I have ever seen or likely to handle and would be a worthy addition to an advanced collection of English revolvers. This revolver has a lot of “eye appeal” and the only good revolver I can think of I have seen in recent years was refinished. An outstanding example.
Exceptional US Civil War Spencer Carbine with provenance. I recently offered a superb Spencer Model 1865 Carbine that was the best one I have sold. Unbelievably I have unearthed another one and this one has provenance to a Union Cavalry unit and is in remarkable condition. The rifle has most its original colour including the case hardening on the lever and lock mechanism as can be seen. The bore is bright with deep rifling extant and the mechanism is perfect. The carbine’s wooden stock is in excellent order with the usual minor pressure marks of being issued but no major problems or repairs. The butt is stamped with a number of numerals indicating the unit it was issued to. The knox is stamped with the Spencer Repeating Arms Co address and the Model type (M1865) is stamped on the barrel. There is only a small amount of pitting on the carbine which is adjacent but not obscuring the address and the model number as can be seen. The photographs highlight this small blemish but they do not detract from the carbines eye appeal. This is a carbine that would grace any Civil War Collection as an exceptional example of probably the most reliable and best considered carbine used in the conflict. The Spencer research society has identified the carbine to a block of weapons issued to the Union Army in August 1864 having been manufactured in June of that year. It was then supplied to K company of the 11th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry. The vendor has told me that he bought the carbine 25 years ago and at that time had identified the cavalryman who had been issued with it. Unfortunately he lost the details in the passage of time but I have no doubt that this can be researched as US records are very good and the carbine is stamped with an issue number. The 11th Michigan Cavalry was organized at Kalamazoo and Detroit, Michigan October 10 and December 10, 1863. Among its ranks was future Michigan politician and author Elroy M. Avery. The Regiment was part of General George Stoneman's campaign into eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina in 1865. The 11th Michigan Cavalry was one of three in the Second Brigade of Brig. Gen. Simeon Brown of St. Clair. Engagements: In Kentucky: Hazel Green, McCormick’s Farm, Morristown, State Creek, Mt. Sterling, Cynthiana, June 8–9, Point Burnside, June 30, 1864. In Tennessee: Clinch River,Nov.28; Cobb’s Ford,Dec. 2: Bristol,Dec. 13; Paperville,Dec. 13, 1864. In Virginia: Abingdon,Dec. 15; Wytheville lead mines, Mt. Airey, Marion iron works, Seven Miles Ford, Mount Sterling, Sept. 17; Saltville I, October 1–3, 1864, Union defeat.(Saltville Massacre); Sandy Mountain, Marion, December 17–18, 1864; Saltville II, December 18–21, 1864, destroyed salt works; After Saltville, returned to Knoxville; arrived Dec. 28, 1864; Departed Knoxville, March 16–21, 1865; Morristown, March 24; Jonesboro, March 25. Crossing into North Carolina and heading south, they conducted a series of raids on sites manufacturing goods vital to Lee’s troops—Boone, March 28–29 destroyed Patterson yarn mill below Blowing Rock; Yadkin River; Wilkesboro, March 30; Jonesville, April 1; Mount Airy, April 2; Christiansburg, VA, April 3; Danbury, April 9 destroying the Moratock Iron Works; Salisbury, April 12 (Destroyed prison); Statesville, April 13–16 (Taylorsville, April 14); April 14, Lincoln assassination; Morganton, April 17–19; Marion, April 20; Swannanoa Gap, (the Army was blocked there and went around to Howard’s Gap) April 20; Hendersonville, April 24 ; Asheville, April 25–28; Marshall, April 26; Ward’s Farm; Left Brevard, pushing through Saluda Gap in the Blue Ridge, they entered South Carolina, looking for Jefferson Davis. Caesar’s Head, April 30; Pickensville, Anderson’s Court House. The regiment was consolidated with the 8th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment on July 20, 1865. Mustered out at Nashville Tennessee on September 22, 1865. The Spencer repeating carbine was a manually operated lever-action, seven shot repeating carbine produced in the United States by three manufacturers between 1860 and 1869. Designed by Christopher Spencer, it was fed with cartridges from a tube magazine in the carbine's buttstock, as can be seen from the photograph of this particular carbine. The Spencer repeating carbine was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. At first, the view by the Department of War Ordnance Department was that soldiers would waste ammunition by firing too rapidly with repeating rifles, and thus denied a government contract for all such weapons. (They did, however, encourage the use of carbine breech loaders that loaded one shot at a time such as the Maynard carbine. Such carbines were shorter than a rifle and well suited for cavalry.]More accurately, they feared that the army’s logistics train would be unable to provide enough ammunition for the soldiers in the field, as they already had grave difficulty bringing up enough ammunition to sustain armies of tens of thousands of men over distances of hundreds of miles. A weapon able to fire several times as fast would require a vastly expanded logistics train and place great strain on the already overburdened railroads and tens of thousands of more mules, wagons, and wagon train guard detachments. The fact that several Springfield rifle-muskets could be purchased for the cost of a single Spencer carbine also influenced thinking. However, just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Spencer was able to gain an audience with President Abraham Lincoln, who invited him to a shooting match and demonstration of the weapon on the lawn of the White House. Lincoln was impressed with the weapon, and ordered Gen. James Wolfe Ripley to adopt it for production, after which Ripley disobeyed him and stuck with the single-shot rifles The Spencer showed itself to be very reliable under combat conditions, with a sustainable rate-of-fire in excess of 20 rounds per minute. Compared to standard muzzle-loaders, with a rate of fire of 2–3 rounds per minute, this represented a significant tactical advantage. However, effective tactics had yet to be developed to take advantage of the higher rate of fire. Similarly, the supply chain was not equipped to carry the extra ammunition. Detractors would also complain that the amount of smoke produced was such that it was hard to see the enemy, unsurprising, since even the smoke produced by muzzleloaders would quickly blind whole regiments, and even divisions as if they were standing in thick fog, especially on still days. One of the advantages of the Spencer was that its ammunition was waterproof and hardy, and could stand the constant jostling of long storage on the march, such as Wilson's Raid. The story goes that every round of paper and linen Sharps ammunition carried in the supply wagons was found useless after long storage in supply wagons. Spencer ammunition had no such problem. In the late 1860s, the Spencer company was sold to the Fogerty Rifle Company and ultimately to Winchester. You can see the Spencer influence in later Winchester lever action rifles. Many Spencer carbines were later sold as surplus to France where they were used during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870. This is an exceptional example Obsolete calibre no license needed.
Experimental percussion turnoff pistol circa 1830 When I first saw this little turn off pistol with a spring bayonet I wasn’t particularly excited as I assumed it was simply a flintlock conversion pistol. I was wrong! The Frizzen is not a Frizzen and this pistol has never had a pan so is not a flintlock conversion. The device that looks ostensibly like a Frizzen is actually a protective shield and lever supporting an annular ring or sheath that drops over the nipple to shield the percussion cap from dislodging. I believe that the pistol was designed to use a "top hat" type of percussion cap which would be held in place by the collar and impossible to dislodge. When the safety catch is pushed forward, not only does the hammer lock but a pin projects through the annular ring to secure the percussion cap. There is a screw adjustment and protruding little wedge from the front of the frizzen that appears to be an extractor so conceivably the device would not only protect the percussion cap during transportation and prior to firing when the safety catch was engaged, but also aid in removing the spent percussion cap. There is no makers name on the pistol except the mark “London” on the front of the lock, London proof marks and a “JM” stamped into the bottom flat of the bayonet. This is a fascinating little pistol and I have the advantage of being able to compare the quality with those of Nock and Manton and there is no doubt that this was made by a highly skilled gun maker. The pistol is 40 bore with finely chequered walnut grips and excellent engraving on the lock and trigger guard with fine wood to metal fit. The lock is strong and functions perfectly as does the spring bayonet which is released by moving the trigger guard to the rear as is usual. The barrel length is 3” and the overall length with the bayonet extended is approximately 11.5” These pistols were loaded in reverse by unscrewing the barrel, pouring in powder and then adding the ball on top which was secured in place by a coned forcing cone or chamber. It is interesting to see a positive safety that allows the hammer to be carried at full or half cock and a mechanism to secure the percussion cap because at this stage of the development of percussion caps, the fulminate of mercury used was highly volatile and an accidental discharge when carrying the pistol in a pocket was everyone’s nightmare scenario. The safety can be disengaged very positively and quickly on this weapon with the added surety that the percussion cap would not have fallen off during transit which would result in considerable embarrassment for the user should the pistol be drawn for defence! This is no doubt an experimental piece or a transitional piece exhibiting many of the skills of the best flintlock makers who would soon see their designs replaced by the percussion era. An unusual and interesting pistol and the first I have encountered.
Exquisite and rare cased Fagard revolver circa 1857 This is an extraordinary , rare and exquisite cased percussion revolver manufactured by Joseph Fagard of St Remy Liege between 1857 and 1870. The revolver features several superb features compared to the contemporary competitors of the time, notably Colt. Colt’s revolver is similarly an open frame revolver but to separate the barrel from the frame and cylinder a turn screw is required and something to knock out the wedge holding the two parts together. The whole process takes minutes, the frame was often damaged as a result, and the wedge and screw lost. Fargard’s ingenious method is a lever that operates a cam that solidly locks the barrel to the frame. A simple twist and the barrel and frame is separated in a second for easy cleaning or to allow a second charged barrel to be changed. Other features include a spline spring on the arbor pin that holds the cylinder by friction, so it doesn’t fall out when the revolver is disassembled. The hammer features a positive safety pin, so the hammer does not need to be carried on a safety stop between cylinders. Considering that Fagard patented this revolver in 1857 at the height of Colt’s popularity with Navy and Army single action revolvers , this revolver is double action and can be fired in both single and double action. The revolver has an integral rammer features a side hammer not unlike Kerr or Alan and Wheelock models introduced sometime later. The revolver is nominally 54 bore ( .44) and is contained in its French style fitted case with a range of accessories. There is good rifling extant in the bore and the mechanics are solid and perfectly timed. The revolver has excellent hardwood chequered grips that exhibit no wear and the frame and butt plate has profuse foliate engraving. The revolver is complimented with a German Silver foresight and rear sight and the makers name is clearly stamped on the top of the forcing cone. The revolver may have been refinished in antiquity and I have an open view on this as the condition completely marches the accessories which include a powder flask, turned wooden cap box, mould and cleaning rod. This is a very handsome looking gun of some rarity and I doubt I will see another. An excellent revolver for the advanced collector looking for something different of quality.
Exquisite French Inlaid Pocket Revolver circa 1885 This is an exquisite French pocket revolver in obsolete 7 mm revolver calibre. The revolver is inlaid with predominantly silver filigree and has ornate Bakelite grips. These pocket revolvers were very popular in the 1880’s as being concealable and safe with a retracted trigger that drops when the hammer is cocked. The revolver is mechanically perfect with an outstanding level of finish remaining. The manufacturer is researchable. Clearly this was an expensive revolver in its time and exhibits both engineering and artistic excellence. The 7 mm cartridges were short lived as a result of its ineffectiveness compared to larger calibres. This can be held without license as an object of curiosity subject to VCR 2000 regulations which you must comply with to purchase. An interesting piece of history.
Exquisite Maynard Tape Primed Revolver. This is an exquisite and rare little Maynard “automatic” pocket revolver. Edward Maynard was a prolific inventor and introduced his tape primer system to the USA army very successfully from a commercial point of view. He later went on the design a carbine which realistically was the first breech firearm to use a reloadable brass cartridge case. This developed quickly into the centre fire case we are familiar with today. This is a Maynard Automatic revolved cylinder revolver made in 28 calibre with a 3.5" barrel and is tape primed. The back strap is marked Patent/Jan 2 1855 and the primer door is marked Maynard's Patent 1845. Less than 2000 of these revolvers are known to have been made and the Massachusetts Arms Company that manufactured them was in dispute with Colt and had previously manufactured a similar hand revolving cylinder to avoid Colts patent. Interestingly the tape primer has only one nipple which fires each of the cylinder chambers in turn which had a firing hole large enough to allow the flame from the nipple to fire the cylinder chamber but small enough to stop the powder from exiting at the rear of the chamber. There is much original finish on the revolver and altogether this is a very interesting and uncommon revolver to be encountered. By far the majority of these revolvers have trigger faults which this one doesn’t have. This is caused by people trying to fire the revolver in double action and damaging the springs. Fortunately, this revolver has not been damaged and works as it should. To circumnavigate Colt’s patent the revolver is single action and cocking the hammer does not revolve the cylinder. The action of cocking turns a spigot wheel which pushes the tape primer over the nipple. Once cocked the cylinder is turned by pulling the trigger half way. Pulling the trigger all the way releases the hammer for firing. By interrupting the cylinder from the hammer Maynard “beat” Colt’s patent and avoided further litigation. John Brown of "John Brown's Body" etc fame purchased several hundred Maynard revolvers.
Exquisite Model British Naval Cannon I do have a soft spot for model cannons and this is one of the best I have offered. The detail is very fine down to the trunnion hasps which have removable wedge locks to dismount the brass barrel. The trunnions were regarded as one of the most important advances in the development of artillery. Old repair to two of the wheels if you look for it but other than that in excellent condition and a very fine model and difficult to better.
Extraordinary Civil War Sharpshooters Spectacles This is quite an extraordinary item insofar as it demonstrates a degree of technical competence way ahead of its time and is a fragile artefact that has survived. These glasses make a remarkable difference to your sight picture in all degrees of light and were used by sharpshooters to improve their performance. These spectacles were reputed to be found in the Fredericksburg area of Virginia and handed down for generations. Fredericksburg was an area in which some of the most savage battles of the American Civil War were fought with casualties running into the tens of thousands. This is a very personal and poignant item that would have been used by a "sharpshooter" or sniper who would already have some renown and be issued with a special rifle. I doubt if I will ever see the like again.
Extraordinary dual ignition shotgun by Jones In the world of gun collecting the word “unique” is often used for something rare or uncommon. There is no such thing as “quite or very unique” it is either one of a kind or it is not! It is unusual to be able to say that you own a unique gun but that is what I believe this is. This is an extraordinary and rare shotgun that was made with a dual ignition system so can be regarded as the epitome of transitional firearms. The lock features both percussion nipples and a flintlock these can be selected to fire flintlock, percussion or both by moving an interrupter switch which can isolate the platinum lined touch hole in the flash pan. Overall length is 45" with a barrel length of 29" with a bore measuring .6" so approximately 20 bore. This is not a conversion; this is a custom made bespoke dual ignition firearm. Locks are marked "Jones" and the overall quality is excellent and the gun has not been messed around with. There is one small contemporary repair to the butt which was clearly made during its short working life but not a significant detraction to the overall appearance of the gun. I assume that the gun was made for somebody who intended travelling overseas at the time it was made and who was concerned that he would not be able to purchase percussion caps overseas. The retention key or wedge that holds the barrels into the stock is equipped with a lanyard ring which is a novel idea and very sensible because the loss of this essential item in the field would have been disastrous. The locks are signed Jones and there is a silver escutcheon marked “CJ” which leads one to believe that the maker was Charles Frederick Jones. Charles Frederick Jones was the son of John Jones of Manor Row, Tower Hill (an armourer in the Hudson's Bay Company from 1785-1793). Charles was born in about 1800, and in 1814 was apprenticed to John Mason. He became a Freeman of the Gunmakers Company (by patrimony?) in 1822. He was recorded in business at "Near the Helmet", St Katherine's, as a gun and pistol maker in 1822, and it seems his brother, Frederick William, joined him soon after the business was established. He was not recorded again until 1829 when, probably in addition to the St Katherine's premises, he had an address in Pennington Street, Ratcliff Highway. At this time his brother left to set up his own business. In 1831 he opened a factory in Birmingham at 16 Whittall Street. In 1832 he was recorded at 26 St James's Street. On 7 March 1833 he patented a percussion lock with a cock, tumbler and trigger made in a single curved piece (concentric sears and triggers), and a waterproof sliding cover (No. 6394 in the UK but also patented France), and on 12 June 1833 an improvement with separate triggers and sears (No. 6436). The caps of these Jones patent guns fitted on to the hammer noses and had the fulminate on the outside. This system was called centre-fire, and they struck the nipple and ignited the powder in the chamber. I dare say that this gun is a derivative of Jones’ work on the waterproof sliding cover which developed into the sliding interruption switch on his dual ignition shotgun. In 1838 Charles Jones described himself as a "Patent and General Gunmaker", and later as a gun manufacturer. At about this time the firm had a shop at 32 Cockspur Street. There is no record of the firm in London after 1845, and the Birmingham factory may have closed in 1843, but Charles Jones was a member of the Acadamie de L'Industrie de France and the firm may have traded after 1845. Jones advertised that he was Gunmaker to HRH the Prince Albert ( as did many others as the Prince was an avid hunter) Renowned British Gunsmith Peter Dyson believes the brass bolsters were fitted because the maker was worried about sideways expansion if both methods of ignition were used simultaneously. Peter stated that in his 50 plus years in the gun trade including his time as a Gunsmith at the Royal Armouries in Leeds, he has never seen another of these dual ignition weapons. This has not been seen on the market for decades and as a rare and possibly unique item I doubt if it will appear again for many years. If I were not married – I would definitely not be selling this!, I would consider part exchange. A rare and significant Gun.
Extraordinary Jones Percussion Shotgun circa 1830 This is an extraordinary beautiful and rare gun. This percussion sporting shotgun was manufactured by Jones a maker to HRH Prince Albert. The shotgun has an overall length of 47”, the barrel length is 29.5” “ and the gun weighs 7 pounds. The bore is approximately 16 gauge and it features London proofs. The gun is in museum quality condition and features Gardner locks. The Gardner patent was designed to protect the shooter from fragmenting percussion caps and also to prevent the caps from falling off when carrying the gun loaded in the field which was a common occurrence. The design is straight forward. The percussion cap is placed on the nipple after the hammer is cocked and then a spring loaded “top hat” is lowered over the cap to completely cover it. The hammers of the gun have flat faces and when they drop they hit the “top hat” covering the percussion cap and transferring enough energy to ignite the cap. Gardner was a gunsmith based in Newcastle upon Tyne. This beautiful shotgun features gold inlays on the Knox and a gold “London” square escutcheon adjacent to the inlays. The finely chequered wrist features a vacant silver escutcheon and the fore end features a silver pineapple finial. The barrels have a breath-taking Damascus finish as can be seen. The stock features a cheek pad, not unusual for an early shotgun, and the wrist has good chequering. Quite why Jones decided to fit Gardner locks to this gun is a mystery as he was a great innovator himself, holding several patents for “waterproof” locks and a clever dual ignition system, an example of which I sold last year. The application of the Gardner patent was short lived with rapid improvements being made to the quality of percussion caps by several makers. This gun was previously misdescribed by an auction house as being a converted flintlock, probably because of the external spring of the Gardner mechanism. It is not a conversion and is in a condition as close as it could be to the original manufacture. This shotgun is quite stunning and would take pride of place in any percussion arms collection.
Extraordinary Minie Trials rifle. Over the years I have handled some interesting and bizarre firearms but none stranger than this. This is a Cordier Minie rifle and has some extraordinary features. The rifle itself was designed by Claude Minié, the original designer of the popular Minié ball, used in percussion rifles and muskets worldwide. The rifles were manufactured by Cordier and Cie, as indicated by the C. C marking in an oval, which is in front of the ladder sight (extant) which is optimistically calibrated to 1100 metres.. Minie’s name is clearly stamped on the rear of the removable barrel. The company existed in Paris, France, from 1850 to 1870. This particular design was also patented by Cordier in England, No. 1051, on 11 April 1862, so there was an anticipation of foreign sales and of course the British Army was the Jewel in the Crown for any manufacturer who had aspirations of global success. There is a quaint assertion that I read that these rifles were designed as training rifles for cadets so the explosion of the percussion cap would not frighten them and make them flinch. The rationale being that having trained for several months with the percussion cap exploding far away from the right eye, the cadet would then merrily enjoy shooting the rifle with the cap inches from the right eyeball. Of course, this is nonsense and Claude Minie was more scientific than worrying about the sensibilities of cadets, bearing in mind of course the hundreds of thousands if not millions of recruits that had trained previously with conventional percussion caps placed under the hammer, notwithstanding hundreds of years of flintlock use. If anything would make you flinch a flintlock would! The reality is that Minie decided that the optimum length for a rifle barrel should be 400 mm or roughly 16” which was pretty advanced thinking for the day. Not such a stupid idea when you realise that the SA80 standard barrel length is 518 mm or 20.4”. Clearly the problem with a short barrel is the sight plane so Miniie’s ingenious solution was to mount the short barrel on a full-length stock to give the sight plane he needed. The percussion cap is struck by a transfer rod from the hammer which is cocked locked and dropped in the conventional way. His ingenuity doesn’t stop there. Black powder rifles and muskets, in fact all black powder arms are notorious for fouling. In fact, at Rourke’s Drift, it was only the opportune skills of a sergeant who kept buckets of water to clean the Henry Martinis to stop them from fouling that probably saved the day given the fire power of the Zulu’s and the need to respond with rapid fire. Without a clean cool barrel cartridges get stuck. In this instance instant disassembly with a screwed barrel allows easy and rapid cleaning and such is the tolerance of the thread that the nipple lines up every time. I have tried it. There is also a pricker device to pierce a paper cartridge to ensure ignition. You will see this in one of the images. This is quite unusual and the most obvious comparison I can think of is Greene’s carbine adopted for a short period by the British Army during the Crimean War. This had a pricker cone designed to rupture the cartridge when the breech was closed. It also served to obdurate the breech but we won’t get into that now. Another innovation is that the percussion cap does not fire into a simple hole but it enters the breech through an annular machined ring within one of the screw pitches of the barrel retaining screw. In theory I can see that this would present the flash 360 degrees around the base of the cartridge to ensure perfect ignition. A cadet training rifle? I think not. This is more likely a rifle that Minie hoped to increase his fame and fortune after his spectacular bullet success. There is no money in arms for training, the real money is in mass production for front line battle. A hugely interesting rifle and in much better condition than the handful I have seen over the years. One in the USA and a couple on the Continent. A rifle that should belong in a museum or with an advanced collector who wants to share his collection with others.
Fantastic Philadelphia Derringer When I was first offered this at a trade show in the Southern States of the USA I thought ,Hmm very nice Italian reproduction. I was then told it was original so I took it apart and to my amazement it is! This is a mint condition, museum quality Philadelphia Derringer or Palm pistol circa 1860 more than likely from comparison made by Slotter and Co of Philadelphia. This percussion pistol is .41 calibre and designed to kill or maim "close and personal" as proved by the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by a virtually identical pistol made by Henry Deringer. The pistol exudes quality, It has 18 carat gold bands on the barrel complimented with an 18 carat gold foresight. Silver pineapple filial on the trigger guard with a silver escutcheon ( clear ) on the rear grip. This is a quintessential derringer and could not be bettered. Certainly you could pay three times as much for a mediocre Henry Deringer pistol but as an example of the gun makers art in respect of miniaturisation this is a museum quality piece that cannot be bettered.
Fascinating Civil War Cased Metropolitan Cased Revolver. This is an extremely interesting cased set, one of the most fascinating I’ve offered. The case is brass bound with side lever military style catch hooks to secure it and contains in addition to the revolver, a contemporary powder flask, cap tin and contents and a calico bag of bullets. At first glance it appears to be a Colt Navy revolver but actually it is a Metropolitan Arms Company of New York copy produced towards the end of the Civil War. How this revolver came into production was a direct result of the catastrophe that befell Colt. On February 4, 1864 almost the entire Colt manufacturing plant in Hartford, CT burnt to the ground. Theories abound as to the cause of the fire. Was it an accident or sabotage from Confederate sympathizers, etc.? Whatever the cause, the conflagration left Colt's main building in ruins with its steam engines, parts, patterns, and tools belonging to various contractors destroyed. Millions of dollars were lost and thousands of employees put out of work. To make matters worse, the plant was only partially insured. Sam Colt's widow vowed to rebuild but it would be quite some time before the company was back on its feet and could once again claim its market share of the revolver business. About this time the Metropolitan Arms Company appeared on the scene. The company, located in New York, took full advantage of Colt's missing product line by producing near-identical copies of the Model 1851 Navy Revolver, the 1861 Navy Revolver, and the 1862 Model Pocket Police from 1864 until 1866...which coincidentally is the year Colt resumed full production. During that two year period, the company manufactured approximately 6,000 copies of the 1851 Navy, fewer than fifty of the 1861 Navy, and 2,750 of the Pocket Police Model. This revolver is a copy of the 1851 in .36 calibre and many collectors argue that the quality of production exceeded that of Colt. These are scarce revolvers and this is the first I’ve offered for many years. Cased in a brass bound travelling case, what is extraordinary about the revolver is its apparent provenance indicated by stamps on the trade label on the inner case lid and an address stamped into the cylinder. The label has been over stamped “Griswold’s Georgia Nov 1864” and this is a trade stamp. The original label was for a Cincinnati supplier. A further name is stamped on the edge of the cylinder which is not quite discernible but the stamping of New Orleans is quite legible. These revolvers were originally made with a 7.5” barrel length but from time to time shorter barrel lengths are encountered and it is assumed that these were professionally shortened post production to make them easier to holster and handle. This particular revolver has a 6” barrel. Most finish is faded except in some protected areas and the cylinder naval scene is worn but discernible. The cylinder lock up is extraordinarily tight with a sound action. Bore is very good and serial numbers match. What is intriguing about this revolver is that a Griswold stamp on the trade label is dated November 1864 which is the first year of production of Metropolitan Arms. The trade label is for a Northern Distributor Benjamin Kettridge and has been over stamped with the Griswold trade stamp. The trade label is also stamped W L Brunsdon and the revolver cylinder is also stamped W L Brunsdon New Orleans. Presumably Brunsdon was a retailer of firearms or more than likely a Sutler. Sutlers were people who followed an army selling the troops a range of goods from foodstuffs to equipment including firearms. Possibly one could assume that the case was supplied with a different revolver but then to see the New Orleans stamp on the cylinder tends to negate that assumption. From looking at the stamping with a 600x electric microscope it is clear that the stamping is contemporary to the revolver. My hypothesis is that the revolver was shortened by Kettridge who had supplied Kentucky with arms. Kentucky was a border state that was not part of the Union at the start of the war but was key as recognised by Lincoln who was born there. There is no doubt that Kettridge had strong links with Kentucky and this is a state where literally “brother fought brother” so it would not be surprising to find arms entering the Confederacy from this State. This is a real Confederate “sleeper” that was missed by a UK auction house and dealer and is a fascinating find. How did it get to Georgia in the closing years of the US Civil War? Why was it stamped New Orleans and finally how did it arrive in the UK? The use of the other combatting side’s weapons in the Civil War is well documented and arms were captured or ran blockades, both sides for example used Enfield Rifles. I have never heard of a Metropolitan Arms revolver used by the Confederates but it must have happened. This is a true part of American history that merits further research and would be an exceptional item for any Civil War collector, particularly one who specialised in Confederate arms.
Fine 3rd Quarter 18th Century Musketoon by Daniel Goff. A fine 18th century flintlock musketoon by Daniel Goff, Master of the Gunmakers Company, London, with brass barrel and walnut stock, stamped Goff to lock plate, proof marks to barrel. Goff was gunmaker to Ordnance from 1782-1803 and East India Company 1780-1839. Apprenticed to William Brander in 1768, he was free of the Gunmakers Company in 1775. He submitted his proof piece in 1779, took Livery and had his mark registered in that year. In 1780 he became Elected Assistant, and was Master in 1784, 1797, 1805, and 1821. He established his own business in 1775 at 6 Victualling Office Square, Tower Hill. In 1782 he moved to 39 Mansell Street. Between 1783 and 1785 he moved to 119 Leadenhall Street, and in 1788/89 to 9 Bartholomew Lane. In 1790/91 he moved to 58 Mansell Street, and in 1796/97 to 21 Somerset Street, Goodmans Fields. In 1820/21 he moved to 57 Houndsditch. In 1828/29 the name of the business changed to Daniel Goff & Co and they moved to 5 Old Montague Street with additional premises at Frosty Court. Daniel Goff was a Gunmaker to Ordnance from 1782 to 1803, and to the East India Company from 1780 to 1840 when he died. William Hegley was his Manager, he took over Goff's contracts with the East India Company in 1840. This particular musketoon has a 10 bore 13.5” barrel with an overall length of 29.5” and has brass furniture with a captive ramrod, undoubtedly made for the Militia. The woodwork is very good and the lock functions perfectly on full and half cock. Proof marks are on top of the barrel and the makers name is on the lock. A good solid example of a musketoon.
Fine Ballards Deringer circa 1869 The Ballard Deringer is one of the scarcest Deringer pistols to find in reasonable condition. The survival rates are very low and the pistol was the only pistol manufactured by Ballard who was renowned for his superior quality rifles and who later became associated with Marlin Firearms. This particular pistol in 41 rimfire calibre is in exceptional condition with an unusually good bore, original silver plating and traces of case hardening and fire blue on the hammer and trigger. The makers name is on the top strap and the factory address and patents on the left hand side of the receiver. It is estimated that less than 1000 of these little pistols were manufactured in 41 calibre and the survival rate is very low. The grips are in very good condition with no cracks and the pistol functions properly with the ejector extant. An excellent example of a very scarce pistol.
Fine Civil War Kerr Revolver This is a fine example of a Civil War era Kerr revolver in 54 bore (.44”) and is a good looking specimen. This particular revolver is mechanically crisp, rotates and locks tight and has a good bore, around 40% of the original finish remaining and good intact grips which are often seen the worse for wear but not on this one. It also features the “anchor” importation mark on the butt which is considered to be the evidence of an importation by the Confederacy. The lanyard ring also gives credence to the fact that this was manufactured against a military requirement. This revolver originated in the USA on a recent trip so I would consider it as highly likely to be a Confederacy weapon. This isn’t the best Kerr I have seen but certainly I would place it in the top 20% and I can report no defects. There are fake anchor marks extant particularly in the USA but the vendor did not point out the mark to me as it is not bold and I don’t think it had been noticed as he was not a specialist collector but I noticed the mark and inspection with a digital microscope assures me that it is an old mark and not a recent “improvement” which sadly is becoming more of a problem in this business. The Kerr Revolver featured a side-mounted hammer on a back-action lockplate. Unlike other revolvers of the day, the lock mechanism of the Kerr revolver was identical to that of back-action rifle and single shot pistol percussion locks of the time. The simple action was designed to be easily repairable in the field without requiring model-specific spare parts. The Kerr had a top strap over the cylinder, which is held in place by a pin that runs into the back of the frame below the hammer. The pistol is 12.25 inches overall with a barrel length of about 5 inches. Nearly all were made in .44, or "54 bore", calibre; a few in the smaller .36 calibre. James Kerr had been the foreman for the Deane, Adams and Deane gun factory. Robert Adams, one of the partners and inventor of the Adams revolver, was Kerr's cousin. Kerr developed an improvement to the Adams revolver, British Patent No. 1722 of July 28, 1855, and when Adams left the Deane brothers to found the London Armoury Company on February 9, 1856, Kerr went with him. The London Armoury Company manufactured military rifles and revolvers. Kerr designed rifles for the company based on the 1853 pattern Enfield rifled musket. When the company directors decided to focus on rifle production in 1859 Adams left, taking his revolver patents with him. Kerr designed a new revolver in .36 calibres and .44 calibres (54 bore). Production began in April 1859. The British government did not initially purchase the weapon and civilian sales were modest. All the New Zealand revolvers were 54 bore (gauge) or .44 calibres. However, the U.S. Civil War began in 1860 and the governments of both the United States and the Confederacy began purchasing arms in Britain. In November 1861, 1,600 revolvers were purchased for the Union army, at $18.00 apiece. However Confederate arms buyers Maj. Caleb Huse and Cpt. James D. Bulloch contracted for all the rifles and revolvers the Armoury could produce (and the Confederate government could pay for). As a result, the London Armoury Company became a major arms supplier to the Confederacy, selling the most of the 11,000 Kerr revolvers produced to Huse. The Kerr revolvers sold to the Confederacy are now thought to range between serial numbers 3,000 and 11,000, but earlier serial numbers are thought by collectors to have also been shipped to the South, and there are no good records to show the exact number sold to the Confederate buyers. As with all Confederate imports from England (and Europe), these weapons had to pass through the Union blockade and the number that actually reached the Confederate army is unknown. Modern writers often state that the Confederates acclaimed the London Armoury Company's guns (which would include the first-class model 1853 rifle-muskets on the Enfield pattern) as the best weapons delivered to the Confederacy. The London Armoury Company supplied more revolvers to the Confederacy than the total produced by all the efforts of Southern manufacturers to make revolvers. As the Civil War progressed, the London Armoury Company was almost completely dependent on sales to the Confederacy and survived for only a year after the end of the war, dissolving in the Spring of 1866. A fine and interesting revolver and a very pleasing example.
Fine Winchester 1897 Shotgun in 16 Gauge This is an iconic Winchester 1897 shotgun in 16 Gauge. It is difficult to fault this slide action pump shotgun as it is in remarkable condition and would be difficult to better. Bright barrel, excellent bluing and no damage to the butt plate it has seen little use and is in excess of NRA 85% condition. Designed by the famous American firearms inventor John Moses Browning and introduced in November 1897 it has been used by hunters, police and the military since its introduction. In World War One it was used with a shortened barrel as a trench gun and has the distinction that the German government made diplomatic overtures to the US government as an "inhumane" weapon as it caused unecessary suffering! Pot calling the kettle black if you ask me! This shotgun has not been restricted so is a Section One firearm but can be restricted to be purchased on a shotgun license. Finish is everything in respect to valuing Winchesters and they have a broad value range, This is at the top end because of the condition and calibre. This is an uncommon shotgun to find in the UK. Proofed November 2013.
Fine Winchester Lee Model 1895 straight pull antique rifle. This is an interesting military long arm in obsolete 6mm calibre that can be owned without a license. In 1894 the US Navy determined that it wanted to adopt a new small calibre high velocity rifle that would be suitable for a universal cartridge that could also be used in machine guns. The Winchester Lee Model 1895 rifle (Model 1895) was based on the works of James Paris Lee (1831-1904), a Scottish-born inventor/gunsmith who eventually took up American citizenship during the course of his life. His greatest claims to fame would become the Lee-Metford and Lee-Enfield service rifles which both managed long storied careers. His work on the integral box magazine approach, coupled to a straight-pull, "cam-action" design, allowed his guns to be sold without patent infringement from traditional bolt-actions manufacturers. In 1895, the United States Navy accepted Lee's Model of 1895 (M1895) and adopted it in the rather limited 6mm calibre. Serial manufacture of the gun then fell to the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. The United States Navy commissioned for 100,000 of the rifles and the Model 1895 marked the first American-originated rifle to support a clip-loaded magazine. Although 100,000 rifles were ordered only 15,000 were delivered making this a scarce weapon. The rifle became known under various names throughout its service but remained of a conventional layout utilizing a solid, single-piece of wood that integrated the shoulder stock and grip handle. A single band joined the barrel to the stock for rigidity near the rifle's midway point. The action was contained at the bulk of the stock with the integral magazine set just ahead of the trigger unit. Sights were added to the receiver as well behind the muzzle in traditional fashion. Sling loops were present under the stock and under the forend. The rifle carried an overall length of the weapon was 48 inches with the barrel assembly measuring 28 inches long. Overall weight was 8.3lbs. The weapon utilized 6mm Lee Navy or 6mm USN cartridges through a wedge/cam locking action and five cartridges could be loaded into the fixed box magazine. This rifle has an excellent bore, is mechanically sound and has a good walnut stock without defects other than the handling marks you would expect from a rifle over 100 years old, Overall a splendid example of a collectible and iconic antique rifle seldom encountered in the UK.
Francotte Martini Rook Rifle in 297/230 calibre. This is an interesting Francotte Martini rook rifle in .297"/230 Morris obsolete calibre circa 1890. The rifle is clean and mechanically perfect with a good bore. Rook rifles were very popular in the 19th century and 297/230 calibre effected with a Morris tube was not unusual. The .297/230 Morris cartridges were produced for use in the Morris Aiming Tube, a commercial sub-calibre barrel inserted into the barrel of a large bore rifle or pistol for training or short range target practice. The Morris Aiming Tube worked well enough for it to be adopted for service in August 1883 by both the British Army and the Royal Navy for use in the Martini-Henry rifle. The Morris Aiming Tube was later adapted for use in the .303 British Martini-Metford rifle, the Lee–Metford rifle in 1891 and the Webley Revolver, with both the .297/230 Morris Short and the .297/230 Morris Long being fired through the tubes. It would not surprise me that the original owner of this rifle had access to military ammunition, hence the calibre. An attractive little rook rifle.
From Smooth bore to small bore Essential reading for the muzzle loader! Dr Roads' book is probably the best available resource to research the British Military Muzzle loading rifle and it's variants. Book Details - Herbert Jenkins, London, 1964. Publisher's Cloth. Book Condition: Near Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good+. 1st. Octavo. FIRST EDITION. "From Smooth-bore to Small-bore". 332 pages. 360 plates. In original navy-blue cloth boards, gilt-lettered to spine. Illustrated dust-jacket in very good condition not price-clipped. Clean and tight throughout, no inscriptions other than previous owners blind stamp.
George Daw Revolver This is a very pleasing and early and possibly a prototype Daw's revolver in a sympathetically relined case with original powder flask, some tools and reproduction oil bottle. The Daw was a well received revolver and much publicised by exponents such as Hans Busk. Daw was a self publicist as Colonel Colt was and he took every opportunity to promote his arms and presented one of his patented revolvers to General Garibaldi. The Daws has a "hesitating lock" and the principal is that, unlike the contemporary Adams self cocking revolvers, the Daws shooter could hesitate the hammer as it was pulled back allowing a steady aim. This revolver is unusual insofar as it has been fitted with brass nipple shields which has not been seen before. The proof marks are British and there is evidence of a small plug on the top strap which may have something to do with its suspected prototype origins. This is a high quality and interesting revolver with much original finish, good locking mechanism and crisp grips.
George H Daw Hammer Gun The Daw patent 1862 Hammer Gun is recognised as the first commercially viable and successful breach loading cartridge shotgun. This is the model that is featured on the front cover of Crudgington and Balers seminal work "The British Shotgun" which contains a very interesting chapter on this shotgun. The shotgun is nitro proofed with 30" barrels, LOP 14.5" and is in excellent condition and would make the starting point for any advanced English Shotgun Collection.
Good 120 Bore Pepper Box Revolver Conway of Manchester This 120 bore "Pepper Box" revolver is in excellent condition with good timing and strong action. Each of the 2.5" barrels is proof marked and the revolver is graced with foliate engraving on the frame, trigger guard, hammer and butt. The hammer is neatly finished with an escalloped head. Thomas Conway was an English Gunsmith with premises in Manchester at 179 Chapel Street, 3 Market Street & 43 Blackfriars Street, Deansgate between 1803-1852) This revolver was manufactured circa 1845 slightly predating Colt's emergence in the UK market with his new patented revolver. The revolver is contained in a refinished Victorian Case with a contemporary powder flask, powder measure and cleaning rod. The quality of workmanship of this revolver is excellent and an interesting artefact of a transitional period in English gun making.
Good 1886 Winchester underlever rifle. This is another great design by John Moses Browning. The Winchester Model 1886 was a lever-action repeating rifle designed by John Browning to handle some of the more powerful cartridges of the period. Originally chambered in .45-70, .45-90 WCF and .40-82 WCF, it was later offered in a half dozen other large cartridges, including the .50-110 Winchester. The Model 1886 continued the trend towards chambering heavier rounds, and had an all-new and considerably stronger locking-block action than the toggle-link Model 1876. It was designed by John Moses Browning, who had a long and profitable relationship with Winchester from the 1880s to the early 1900s. William Mason also contributed, making some improvements to Browning's original design. In many respects the Model 1886 was a true American express rifle, as it could be chambered in the more powerful black powder cartridges of the day, proving capable of handling not only the .45-70 but also .45-90 and the huge .50-110 Express "buffalo" cartridges. The action was strong enough that a nickel-steel barrel was the only necessary modification needed to work with smokeless powder cartridges, and in 1903 the rifle was chambered for the smokeless high-velocity .33 WCF cartridge. This particular rifle was manufactured in 45-90 calibre and has a factory standard 26" octagonal barrel. We know from the serial number we know it was manufactured in 1887 which ostensibly was the first full year of manufacture. The finish of the rifle has faded over 131 years but the mechanical action is fine and it has a good bore with no major problems. This is a typical “Cowboy” gun and would be used for both hunting game and for protection. This is a handsome looking rifle. Section 1 License required price includes shipping to your RFD
Good Beaumont Adams Double Action Percussion Revolver circa 1855 This is a very decent example of a Beaumont Adams double action revolver in 54 bore. The Beaumont–Adams revolver is a muzzle-loading, double-action, percussion revolver. Originally adopted by the British Army in .442 calibre (54-bore, 11.2mm) in 1856, many were later converted to use centrefire cartridges. It was replaced in British service in 1880 by the .476 calibre (actually 11.6mm) Enfield Mk I revolver. On 20 February 1856, Lieutenant Frederick E.B. Beaumont of the Royal Engineers was granted a British patent for improvements to the Adams revolver which allowed them to be cocked and fired either cocking the hammer as in Colt single-action revolvers, or by just pulling the trigger. It was the first true double-action system. Beaumont was granted a US Patent (no. 15,032[on 3 June of the same year. At that time there was intense competition between Adams and Colt, which was rapidly expanding its sales and had opened a London factory competing with the British firearms trade, manufacturing firearms with interchangeable parts. The older 1851 and 1854 Adams revolvers were self-cocking, also known as double-action. The Adams revolver was favoured by British officers in the Crimean War and colonial conflicts due to the stopping power of its larger 54 bore (.442 cal) bullet (compared with their main competitor, the smaller .36 cal Colt Navy revolvers), and the speed of the Adams trigger-cocking action for close-quarters fighting (over the more cumbersome Colt action) In partnership with George and John Deane, the company of Deane, Adams & Deane produced the new revolver in a variety of calibres and sizes, from pocket pistols to large military versions. The United Kingdom officially adopted the 54-bore (.442 calibre) Beaumont–Adams in 1856, Holland and Russia following soon after. To meet the growing demand for its weapons, Deane, Adams & Deane contracted companies in Birmingham and Liége to manufacture their weapons under licence. The new revolver gave Robert Adams a strong competitive advantage and Samuel Colt shut his London factory due to a drop in sales and in the knowledge that he had been discovered illegally shipping arms to the Russian Government at the height of the Crimean War and consequently would not be awarded British Government contracts. This particular revolver is in good mechanical condition and cocks and locks excellently in both single and double action. Unlike many of these revolvers which appear to have damaged nipples, this revolver is in great shape and evidently was not dry fired like many. Finish remains in places but most has faded but has an even patina as can be seen and very good grips. There is some light external pitting in parts that can be seen but nothing dreadful or that detracts from its eye appeal. The Deane & Son, King Street, London Bridge address is engraved on the top strap and the serial number is engraved on the frame and cylinder, the bore is clean. The revolver has London proof marks on the significant parts and is stamped LAC for the London Armoury Company and also has the LAC shield motif on the right hand side of the frame forward of the cylinder. The Beaumont Adams is an iconic revolver that was the predecessor of the modern double action revolver and as such is an important historical firearm. This is an attractive looking example that functions flawlessly and would grace any collection.
Good Boxed Colt Navy Revolver London Address Good cased London Navy The bore on this Colt is excellent with no pitting and the mechanics and lock up are perfect. I am not overwhelmed with Colt’s but sooner or later if you collect 19th Century revolvers you will want one for your collection. The market for Colt’s is no different from Coins or Stamps and based on condition, the world record price for a mint condition Colt Navy is several hundreds of thousands of dollars and it was made by the same machines and the same hands as this one but it saw no service and you would not want to touch it today without wearing gloves! This is different as it saw service, is equally as interesting and of course is also an investment that can be fired should you wish to add it to a Firearms Certificate. This is a decent Colt London Navy with the top strap address reading - Address- Col.Colt, London. It was one of the last batch made in London that was sent back to Hartford for final finishing and then returned to London to be proofed and sold via Colt’s Pall Mall Office The serial numbers are all matching including the wedge and it has the correct London dome headed screws. 36 calibre 6 shot with a 7.5" octagonal barrel. Overall condition is good with a good percentage of the original varnish still on the walnut grips and a visible cylinder scene. This gun has not been messed with and the dome head screws are perfect .The revolver is cased in a contemporary case with the original Colt patented double cavity mould and a contemporary Dixon type powder flask. There is also a nipple key, Eley cap tin and some old bullets with some Kapok wool for cleaning. The nipple key is also original. This came out of an old collection and has not been on the market for decades. Overall this is a very pleasing set and at a price less than I have seen similar quality revolvers selling for. Colt London's are under estimated as there were only 42,000 manufactured compared to 215,438 manufactured in Hartford USA and it is said that Colt used some of his best artisans and skilled men in London as he felt at the time that the British market with its Empire was his best opportunity. Colt prices are subjective and “all over the place” but if you want a really good example without paying thousands of pounds for the finish (colour) this is the one for you.
Good cased Beaumont Adams 54 Bore revolver circa 1856 This is a very nice example of a cased Beaumont Adams in 54 bore. The Beaumont–Adams revolver is a muzzle-loading, double-action, percussion revolver. Originally adopted by the British Army in .442 calibre (54-bore, 11.2mm) in 1856, many were later converted to use centrefire cartridges. It was replaced in British service in 1880 by the .476 calibre (actually 11.6mm) Enfield Mk I revolver. On 20 February 1856, Lieutenant Frederick E.B. Beaumont of the Royal Engineers was granted a British patent for improvements to the Adams revolver which allowed them to be cocked and fired either cocking the hammer as in Colt single-action revolvers, or by just pulling the trigger. It was the first true double-action system. Beaumont was granted a US Patent (no. 15,032[on 3 June of the same year. At that time there was intense competition between Adams and Colt, which was rapidly expanding its sales and had opened a London factory competing with the British firearms trade, manufacturing firearms with interchangeable parts. The older 1851 and 1854 Adams revolvers were self-cocking, also known as double-action. The Adams revolver was favoured by British officers in the Crimean War and colonial conflicts due to the stopping power of its larger 54 bore (.442 cal) bullet (compared with their main competitor, the smaller .36 cal Colt Navy revolvers), and the speed of the Adams trigger-cocking action for close-quarters fighting (over the more cumbersome Colt action) In partnership with George and John Deane, the company of Deane, Adams & Deane produced the new revolver in a variety of calibres and sizes, from pocket pistols to large military versions. The United Kingdom officially adopted the 54-bore (.442 calibre) Beaumont–Adams in 1856, Holland and Russia following soon after. To meet the growing demand for its weapons, Deane, Adams & Deane contracted companies in Birmingham and Liége to manufacture their weapons under licence. The new revolver gave Robert Adams a strong competitive advantage and Samuel Colt shut his London factory due to a drop in sales and in the knowledge that he had been discovered illegally shipping arms to the Russian Government at the height of the Crimean War and consequently would not be awarded British Government contracts. This particular cased revolver is in excellent mechanical condition and cocks and locks excellently in both single and double action. Unlike many of these revolvers who appear to have damaged nipples, this revolver is in great shape and evidently was not dry fired like many. The case has a full set of accessories with even wear matching the wear on the revolver which is in very good condition with a high percentage of original finish. This revolver was privately retailed by G Edwards of Plymouth whose name is engraved into the top flat. An attractive piece of British history that has been untouched and is new to the market after several decades.
Good cased Civil War Era London Armoury Kerr Revolver. Much has been written about the part that the Kerr revolver played in the US Civil War and its popularity with Confederate forces. As the interest in the US Civil War continues to gain momentum these interesting revolvers are becoming scarcer. I am fortunate to offer this one as I sold it two years ago and my customer has now part exchanged for a different gun. This is a good representative cased Kerr side hammer 54 bore revolver. The side hammer is very similar to a shotgun side lock and the rationale was that the revolver could be easily cleaned, serviced and repaired by anyone with a modicum of skill. James Kerr had been the foreman for the Deane, Adams and Deane gun factory. Robert Adams, one of the partners and inventor of the Adams revolver, was Kerr's cousin. Kerr developed an improvement to the Adams revolver, British Patent No. 1722 of July 28, 1855, and when Adams left the Deane brothers to found the London Armoury Company on February 9, 1856, Kerr went with him. The London Armoury Company manufactured military rifles and revolvers. Kerr designed rifles for the company based on the 1853 pattern Enfield rifled musket. When the company directors decided to focus on rifle production in 1859 Adams left, taking his revolver patents with him. Kerr designed a new revolver in .36 and .44 calibres (54 bore in British measurement). Production began in April 1859. The British government did not initially purchase the weapon and civilian sales were modest. However, the U.S. Civil War began in 1860 and the governments of both the United States and the Confederacy began purchasing arms in Britain. In November 1861, 1,600 revolvers were purchased for the Union army, at $18.00 apiece. However Confederate arms buyers Maj. Caleb Huse and Cpt. James D. Bulloch contracted for all the rifles and revolvers the Armoury could produce (and the Confederate government could pay for.) As a result, the London Armoury Company becomes a major arms supplier to the Confederacy, selling the most of the 11,000 Kerr revolvers produced to Huse. The Kerr revolvers sold to the Confederacy were said by William Edwards in his book Civil War Guns to be those between serial number 3,000 and 10,000, but earlier serial numbers are thought by collectors to have also been shipped to the South, and there are no good records to show the exact number sold to the Confederate buyers. Many of these revolvers are spuriously marked with an Anchor to signify Confederate usage and if the provenance is proven they command a high premium. This particular revolver was purchased in the USA but I can make no claims about Civil War usage except it was acquired in the USA. There appears to be a barely discernible anchor on the grip but maybe this is my enthusiasm tempered with nostalgia! The revolver has reasonable grips as can be seen and has the original correct Kerr double belted bullet mould which is foliate engraved and scarce. The revolver functions well and has a decent bore with a fair bit of original finish as can be seen and has good grips with crisp checkering. Correct powder flask and contemporary accessories are contained in the case but the case has been later relined but a high quality job has been made of it. The contents of the case match the wear on the revolver and accompanied the revolver on the original purchase. The loading instructions were on the original lining but appear to be too clean to be original but nevertheless are the correct instructions. An important English side arm that should be part of any definitive British revolver collection.
Good Cased Colt model 1862 Police revolver. This is a scarce and interesting revolver for several reasons. The Colt 1862 Police revolver was a hybridisation of the small frame 1849 pocket revolver and the larger Navy revolvers. The calibre of the pocket revolver was 31 calibre and that of the Navy being .36 calibre. The revolver had a five shot fluted cylinder of .36 calibre compared to the smaller pocket revolver and of course a barrel to match. The revolver used the pocket frame with a larger barrel and compensated for the larger calibre by reducing the number of chambers from 6 to 5. These were sold in substantial numbers to the Police and Law enforcement agencies and one might ask why they were not made in the larger .44 calibre? This, to an extent can be explained by the fluted cylinder which was designed to reduce weight. These revolvers were a working tool and designed to be carried on the hip or in a shoulder holster for possibly a 12-hour shift so weight was an issue. In reality these would have been used at very close quarter so the calibre almost became irrelevant. The revolver had a notch in the hammer and safety stops between each cylinder so it could be carried safely with the hammer dropped between two loaded cylinders. These revolvers are quite scarce and were the final percussion revolver manufactured by the Colt Manufacturing Company. Many were converted to rimfire in the early 1870’s so the survival rate of unconverted revolvers is low. To find one in its original case with all of the correct accessories is an exceptional find. This case contains a Colt Mould, correct Hawksley powder flask, Eley percussion caps, Colt cleaning rod, nipple key, oil bottle and turnscrew. The Oak box is as it should be and contains the key to lock it and a number of cast bullets which from their oxidisation dates them from the time the revolver was first placed in the box. There is a vacant name plate on the lid. The revolver has some original finish and traces of the silver plating on the frame and trigger guard with very good mechanics and a clean bore. The revolver has matching serial numbers in several places that date the manufacture to 1865. The revolver cocks and locks solidly as it should with the half cock for loading also engaging perfectly. The wedge is blank which is not uncommon on this model. The Colt USA address is clearly stamped on the top of the barrel. An interesting cased Colt of investment quality.
Good Cased London Hartford Navy Revolver .36 calibre Here is a very good cased London Navy 36 calibre revolver that will appeal to the advanced Colt collector as it has so much going for it. The quality of Colt's London firearms was exceptional because he viewed Britain and his territories as his most important market ( The USA was only emerging as a significant power at this time ) and sent many of his finest workmen to London to set up the production line. Colt's London factory failed for a variety of reasons including competition from better evolved English revolvers and some partisan opposition to his wares. Colt London made revolvers are easy to identify other than the obvious "Colt London" address and the identifying marks include a cross hatched hammer and domed screw heads which were not incorporated into the USA manufactured arms. On the closure of Colt's London factory all part finished revolvers were shipped back to the USA and finished and many were sent back to be sold at Colt's London Sales Office. (Colt was tenacious and never quite gave up in the UK) These models are known as Colt London Hartford model and this is one of those. The revolver features all of the London characteristics such as domed screws and address but the "give away" detail of a Hartford finished revolver is the bevelled bullet cut out which made loading the bullet a little easier and the late serial number. This particular revolver has all matching serial numbers including the wedge which was often lost and replaced and has some other features of significance which include the rather rarer dove tailed foresight and an iron trigger guard. The revolver is mechanically sound,cocks and locks and has prominent rifling in the bore and there is around 60% of the original varnish on the grips left and the barrel has clean lines without any nasty nicks which are common. There is a very good cylinder scene and all of the proof marks are clear and the screw heads are good. There is some scattered impact marks on part of the cylinder but other than that it is a fine revolver. The case has all of the correct accessories, a Dixon flask, patent mould, nipple key, cleaning rod and Japanese lacquered percussion cap box. Of considerable interest is a bell shaped Hawksley oil bottle with an earlier serial number. This exact oil bottle which is marked Colt can be seen in Rosa's excellent book "Colonel Colt London" with the comment "later added". This is a bit of a vague remark and could mean later added when the revolver was finished in Hartford but the fascinating thing is that this cased set which is a different set has the same bottle which would tend to indicate that these bottles were used for cased London revolvers although the commonly seen bottle is the Dixon's round bottle. In the recent Heritage Arms (May) auction, the same oil bottle can be seen in a factory cased presentation Colt Navy so although scarce these are contemporary to the set. The case has the original loading label (not a repro) and a functioning lock with key. Some of the internal partitions could do with some attention but everything is there including some oxidised bullet heads. This revolver was purchased in Ohio, USA so I do not think it returned to Britain and is in an "as found" condition that could be improved should you be so inclined but I would leave this up to you. Colt firearms are increasing in value exponentially as there is a huge Colt collecting fraternity and there won't be any more. This is a good honest example and a lot of history and variation for your money but not quite ( but not far off ) good enough to command some of the 5 figure prices you see at the major Auction houses. I would be pleased to send more photographs to seriously interested parties.
Good Civil War Lefaucheaux patent pinfire revolver This is a very good military pinfire 12 mm Lefaucheaux patent revolver. Originally supplied in the "white" the revolver cocks locks and fires in both single and double action. The side loading gate has a tight spring mechanism that is still extant. This revolver was sourced in the USA and is a typical and decent example of one of the thousands that were imported by the Southern Confederate States before and during the Civil War. The pinfire system was at its height of popularity at this time and was truly a transitional system between cap and ball revolvers and metallic centre fire revolvers that were soon to follow. A decent revolver at a reasonable price that has not been messed with.
Good Civil War Starr Double Action .44 revolver. The Starr revolver was advanced and ahead of its time when introduced at the start of the US Civil War. The first revolvers issued to the US Federal Army were double action and employed a unique “lifting lever” to cock the hammer and revolve the cylinder. Eben T. Starr obtained his initial patent in 1856 and the patent date is stamped on both sides of the revolver. In his patent Starr claimed two unique features to his design: a “lifter lever” which looks exactly like a traditional revolver trigger and a real sear-releasing trigger which is the triangular-looking metal projection at the rear of the trigger guard. In short, pulling the trigger-looking “lifter lever” of a Starr double action revolver only rotates the cylinder and brings the hammer to full cock. In fact, you must use the “lifter lever.” You can’t thumb cock the hammer of a double-action Starr. In reality there are many similarities in design to the British Adams “automatic” or self- cocking revolver. At the point of raising the hammer, you have a choice to make. You can either continue pulling back the “lifter lever” until it contacts the small, projecting trigger at the rear of the trigger guard and fires the piece, or you can remove your finger from the “lifter lever” and place your finger behind the “lifter lever” and directly on the little, projecting trigger and fire the piece. You cannot simply pull back the hammer of a double action Starr revolver like a conventional single action revolver, the lifting lever has to be used in a deliberate manner. Starr also mortised the top frame of the revolver and this gave the revolver incredible robustness and durability and was the predecessor of modern top break revolvers. The top breaking frame secured by one large knurled cross screw allowed rapid disassembly of the firearm for cleaning and maintenance and also for loading spare cylinders. The elaborate cocking mechanism however frustrated Federal troops who were used to pulling back the hammers of single action Colt and Remington Army revolvers and the government asked Starr to manufacture his revolver in single action which I am sure he considered being a retrograde step but he did comply. More than 32,000 single action .44 Starr revolvers were then manufactured which together with the 23,000 double action revolvers such as this example, made Starr the third most popular revolver in the Civil war the most popular revolvers being Colt and Remington. Starr also manufactured a popular carbine. I usually pass Starr revolvers by because they are often seen with badly pitted bores even if the exterior looks good. I could not pass this one by as it has a perfect bore, sharp and mirror bright and functions as it was originally made. Clearly it was cherished as a “shooting iron” and someone took the trouble to clean and maintain it after shooting. The revolver cocks and locks fine and is mechanically sound. If I wanted to shoot a Civil War revolver this would probably be the one. The overall condition of the revolver is excellent as can be seen from the photographs, there are no messed up screws or “later editions” and only minor isolated scattered pitting that I only mention because you can find it if you look hard enough for it as you would expect on most guns that are around 150 years old. The revolver has several matching serial numbers. The only minor defect is a small crack in the heel of the wooden stock where it was probably dropped in the past but this could be easily hidden. I choose not to do this as it alters the history of the gun and as it stands it is untouched or “improved”. The Starr was considered the workhorse revolver of the Federal Army and was well made, better I consider than Colt or Remington. This is a quintessential Civil War Sidearm that has much eye appeal and has clearly seen action but was subsequently looked after. A good piece.
Good Collectible Arisaka Model 99 rifle. This is a another nice, live firing and collectible Arisaka Model 99 short rifle. The Model 99 superceded the Model 38 in 1939 and became the "workhorse" of the Japanese Army. This is an early 3rd Series model from the Torimatsu of the Nagoya arsenal and is particularly nice as the Receiver and Bolt Rear Safety Cover Royal Chrysanthemum marks haven't been defaced as most are. After the War dispensation was made to the Japanese to deface the Royal Chrysanthemum as this was the Emperor’s Imperial sign. As a consequence of this most Arisaka’s are found with defaced or ground “Chrysanthemum’s” but this one is intact which would more than likely signify a battle field pick up. This rifle was originally issued with "aircraft wings" on the rear sight to shoot the rifle at aircraft but these were often removed as being totally impracticable although this rifle still retains the “aircraft wings” which were calibrated 1 – 3 to represent the speed of an aircraft up to 300 kmh. The rifle has a good shooting bore which is chrome lined as are all the earlier rifles and features a “Chrysanthemum” dust cover. The rifle stock was made in 2 pieces and on most of the later type 99's and 38's unseasoned wood was used but this rifle was made at the height of the Japanese military might and workmanship and materials were excellent so there is no huge separation crack to be seen on the butt. The stock is generally in decent shape as can be seen from the photographs but there are the usual handling marks. There is some surface pitting on the receiver and under trigger guard but not drastic and still a decent looking rifle. Decent Arisaka’s are becoming difficult to source as there is now an insatiable demand in the USA to collect and shoot them and several excellent books published in recent years have increased interest in them. All Arisaka’s are well made including the erroneously named “last ditch” rifles that were made without many of the earlier refinements and this one is a good example and would make an excellent investment and provide some good shooting as well. I have seen prices in the USA double in the last 18 months particularly for examples with intact “Mums”. For an Arisaka that has seen action this is as good as it gets. I can courier to your RFD for £15.00. I am happy to store at no charge if a variation needs to be applied for.
Good Colt London Pocket Pistol in 31 Calibre Of all of the Colt's available to British Collectors, the Colt "London" has to be the most iconic. Manufactured and proofed in Britain it is accepted that the quality of workmanship is better than the USA made revolvers and this can be evidenced in some of the attention to detail such as dome headed screws and much greater defined cross hatching on the hammer spur. Colonel Colt believed that Britain and it's Empire was potentially his most lucrative market and spared no expense or effort in attacking it. To appeal to the market he had these arms stamped "London" and gave free samples to anyone and everyone of importance from Royalty down. For an excellent account read Colonel Colt, London: The History of Colt's London Firearms, 1851-57 by John Rosa. As to this example, we can see that it is a very handsome pocket revolver in .31 calibre with a 4" barrel that has not been messed with and is in NRA very good condition which means that the bore is good and there is 30% of original finish including varnish on the grips and there are no serious marks and the lettering is sharp and exactly as it should be. All of this can be seen from the photographs and I can send more if required but to be specific which a grading cannot explain; the revolver has mellowed to a pleasing dark patina and has clearly not been cleaned with abrasives at any time. The domed screw heads have seen some use but are not "buggered" ( Official USA phraseology for describing screws! ) and the cylinder scene is extant, not 100% but clear. Mechanically there is no problem and as previously mentioned the bore is good with nice deep rifled grooves. This is an early example and the serial number is 5051. The revolver is profusely marked with British proof and view marks on the frame, barrel and cylinder. All in all an honest gun and difficult to beat at this price. To transcend from this very good example to NRA excellent grade you would have to pay four times this price but would you achieve four times the enjoyment? I doubt it.
Good Colt Navy Flask by American Flask & Cap Co circa 1860 This is an early Colt Navy powder flask with correct angled spout. If you are fortunate enough to own a copy of “Colt percussion accoutrements 1834-1873” by Robin J Rapley you will find this scarce flask listed on page 177. This flask was manufactured for a cased pistol set and was made by the American Flask and Cap Co in 1860. This was featured in Colt’s wholesale price list at $2.00 which was more expensive than the public could be at retail! The flask features a left facing cannon with flags on its left and right serving as a backdrop. Above the cannon is an eagle holding a shield. At the top of the flask are crossed pistols. Below the cannon is a bugle, helmet, anchor etc. The flask was designed to hold half a pound of black powder and the angled nozzle was to facilitate easier loading. These were manufactured with and without suspension rings. This flask is untouched and has mellowed to a warm even patina. If you run your hands over it you will find one minor dent on the reverse but this does not impair the flask visually. This is a commonly copied flask but I guarantee this as 100% original. A desirable Colt accessory. Catalogue no #F30 by Rapley and priced at $1350 in 1993.
Good Colt New Line Revolver Ist year of manufacture 1873. This is a very good Colt new line revolver in 32 rimfire calibre. This was Colt’s answer to the plethora of small cheap revolvers flooding the USA market in the 1870’s. This particular revolver was made in 1873 which was the first year of manufacture as evidenced by its serial number. This scarce revolver has varnished rosewood grips and is mechanically sound and works as it should. The action is tight and it holds full and half cock and disassembles easily. The original blue finish has faded to an even dark patina. The makers name is stamped on the barrel. These little revolvers evolved as secondary sidearms that could be easily hidden in pockets to circumnavigate common firearms laws that prohibited the carrying of full-sized weapons into towns. This is an interesting piece of Wild West History.
Good Dutch Beaumont 71/88 Rifle circa 1888 This is a good Dutch Beaumont 71-88 rifle that was used by the Dutch Army at home and in the Dutch East Indies. This rifle is all matching and with the cleaning rod which is often lost and has an amazing number of stamps and cartouches.. Condition is good, mechanically excellent, nice bore , good walnut stock with no chunks missing. This rifle started life in 1878 and then was converted with a Vitali magazine, the bolt is complex and contains the spring for the firing pin a feature copied by the Japanese for their Murata rifle ( Don't they copy everything!). Sadly the Beaumont had a short life as it couldn't compete with small bore smokeless powder propelled ammunition such as the Mauser so was replaced soon after the Vitali modification. This is a big chunk of a rifle for your money. Originally these were supplied in "the white" as is this good example.
Good early Dragoon Adams revolver. This huge Adams patent self-cocking or “automatic” Dragoon revolver is in 38 bore (50 Calibre) and features an 8” barrel. These revolvers did not have a spur on the hammer and were fired double action. The cased set features all of its accessories including the rare “tailed” mould. These early revolvers were made without a rammer and the bullets were simply pushed into the cylinder by hand and the hope was that the tail or spike behind the bullet would pierce the wad and hold it in place securely. This was not always the case and often the bullets would simply fall out of the cylinder leading to embarrassing or even fatal events. The revolver is in remarkably good condition with much original finish and is marked on the top strap with the makers name and address “Deane Adams & Deane, Makers to HRH Prince Albert. 30 King William Street, London Bridge”. The revolver is mechanically sound and has good grips with a captive percussion cap container with a hinged lid. The accessories include a James Dixon powder flask, oil bottle, nipple key and turn screw, cleaning rod and oil bottle. There is a small bag of original cast bullets also contained within the box. There is no doubt that this is an original set as the good finish of the accessories matches the finish of the revolver. The English case has a vacant brass roundel in the lid and has its original key for the lock although the lock escutcheon is missing. It is very satisfying to find a complete cased set with the correct mould that has not been messed around with and without the later modification of a rammer addition. For further and detailed information on this revolver read Taylerson’s seminal work on the subject “Adams revolvers”.
Good Fancy Grade Winchester Model 1887 Underlever Shotgun Now this is a fancy Winchester 1887 the likes of which you do not often see. The gun in obsolete 10 Gauge so can be owned without a certificate and features the original buttplate that is often replaced with a rubber pad. The woodwork is American Maple and the gun has a full nickel finish. This was a private purchase in the USA and the owner told me it was his ancestors gun bought from new and used on the ranch and brought out at Rodeo's. The gun has clearly been used but the bore is good, mechanically fine with the nickel now toning down after 100 years. An interesting gun that will appeal to some and not to others.
Good Farquharson patent falling block sporting rifle by Braendlin Armoury. Between the early 1860’s and early 1900’s the Braendlin Arms Company was a force to be reckoned with and were a major manufacturer of excellent weapons and not only supplied the British Government but the bulk of the Birmingham and London gun trade. The chances are that if you have any nice good quality Martini action sporting or target rifles in your collection, no matter what the name on the top strap it was made by the Braendlin Arms Company and somewhere, maybe under the wood will be a discreet tiny mark of crossed pennants with a “B” on the weapon signifying it originated from the Braendlin Arms Company. The philosophy of the company was to make for anyone and everyone and they simply didn’t care if the product was attributed to another maker as long as they made a profit. This is a solid example of a Farquharson patent falling block rifle and in this instance Braendlin supplied direct and their name and London and Birmingham address is on the top of the barrel. The calibre is obsolete 450 3.1/4” Black Powder Express and the rifle features an excellent English Walnut stock, 28” Barrel and Express Leaf sights calibrated to 1000 yards. The bore is very good with no pitting and the overall appearance and balance of the rifle is outstanding and exudes quality. The Farquharson Rifle is a single-shot hammerless falling-block action rifle designed and patented by John Farquharson, of Daldhu, Scotland in 1872. George Gibbs, a gun maker in Bristol, became a co-owner of the Farquharson patent in 1875 and was the sole maker of Farquharson rifles until the patent expired. Fewer than 1,000 Gibbs-Farquharson rifles were made, the last one being delivered in 1910. A few years after the original Farquharson patent expired in 1889, many English gun makers began producing their own versions of Farquharson rifles utilizing actions made by Auguste Francotte in Herstal, Belgium. These actions were essentially exact copies of those used by Gibbs to build his military target Farquharson rifles, which had a solid combined lower tang and trigger guard. Farquharson action rifles are renowned for reliability and accuracy and those manufactured by Gibbs command an extremely high price. This is an opportunity to acquire a Farquharson actioned rifle at a realistic price in an obsolete calibre.
Good Forehand & Wadsworth Bulldog Revolver This is a very reasonable 38 rimfire Forehand & Wadsworth BULLDOG revolver. Around 90% nice nickel finish,cocks locks and fires. The Bulldog was renowned as the gun that "really won the West". See George Layman's excellent book on the subject. In addition to a high percentage nickel finish this one has original varnish remaining on the grips a nice revolver priced to sell.
Good Forehand and Wadsworth \"Bulldozer\" revolver. This is an excellent Forehand and Wadsworth rim fire revolver with a model name of "Bulldozer". Mechanics are fine with a good bore and it cocks and locks perfectly. On the side of the barrel is stamped "Forehand and Wadworth, Worcester Mass USA Patented Oct 22 61, Apr 20, 75. The revolver has good rosewood grips and disassembles easily. This is a typical "Saturday Night Special" carried in a pocket in towns that prohibited the carrying of full sized weapons in town on weekends. Forehand & Wadsworth (also known as Forehand Arms) was a US firearms manufacturing company based in Worcester, Massachusetts that was formed in 1871 by Sullivan Forehand and Henry C. Wadsworth after the death of their father-in-law, Ethan Allen of Ethan Allen & Company. The company was sold to Hopkins and Allan in 1902 who had previously made their revolvers under license. An interesting revolver of good quality.
Good Gahendra Rifle as issued to the Gurkhas. The Gahendra Rifle, often erroneously referred to as the Martin Henry Gahendra was based on a Westley Richards design and is quite a scarce rifle. It was manufactured in Nepal for the Gurkha Regiment under the direction of General Gahendra Rana to provide his troops with what appeared to be the latest British military rifle. It has a considerable advantage over the Martini Henry insofar as the entire action was removable for service or exchange making cleaning easy. The rifle is chambered for 577/450 which was the standard military cartridge which had proved very successful although its range was considered to be no more than 400 yards on a man sized target as the heavy bullet went subsonic after 300 yards. Gahendra faced considerable logistical challenges manufacturing these rifles so quality is variable and this one is better than most. Another different feature to the Martini Henry is the use of a tang and screws securing the butt to the receiver unlike the Martini Henry that uses a through bolt. By 1894 the Gurkhas faced severe shortages and this was remedied by the delivery of several thousand long lever Martinis making the Gahendra obsolete although they were in use until 1906. This particular rifle is in good working order with the original ramrod and clean metal surfaces with issue marks. The rifle has some brass fittings as can be seen which is quite characteristic of the region in which it was manufactured. There is one missing sling buckle and some slight wood loss near the edge of the top tang which could be easily cosmetically dealt with but I prefer to leave things “as found” as this is part of the rifles history. Superficially it looks like a Martini Henry but the resemblance stops in respect of the more complex action that utilises a flat and not coil spring. This is a seldom seen rifle in the UK in this condition as many have been passed by collectors assuming that the rifle was a tribal “Khyber Pass” clone of the Martini but in fact the Gahendra rifle played its part in British Military History.
Good Hall\'s Military Breech loading Rifle This is a good representative example of a Hall 52 calibre breech loading model 1841 rifle. The rifle functions flawlessly and has a good American Walnut stock and has a decent bore with no external issues of pitting. The rifle has the expected handling wear of a rifle 175 years old but is an attractive looking example of a scarce rifle seldom seen in the UK. John Harris Hall (1781-1841) proved a potent inventor and forward-thinking gunsmith during his time. Aside from his contributions to mass production, Hall also designed and developed the M1819 Hall Rifle that bears his name (along with inventor Dr. William Thornton). Though a single-shot long gun at heart, the primary quality of this rifle was its patented breech-loading system which now allowed the operator to load/reload his weapon at the action as opposed to the muzzle. The shooter no longer was required to stand his weapon on its butt and engage in a time-consuming reloading process which also presented him as a target for the enemy. The M1819 Hall Rifle became the first breech-loading rifle in the world to be adopted in notable quantities by a national army that had the benefit of interchangeable parts and could truly be regarded as “mass produced”. The first Hall rifle was a flintlock and Hall began limited production of his rifle until the US Army placed an order for 200 of the type to be delivered sometime in 1815. However, lacking the required manufacturing facilities to meet the government deadline, Hall turned down this commission. To address the issue, Hall began dissecting his rifle manufacturing process which could, at best, output approximately 50 units per year. This rethinking brought about a complete revision of the process which ultimately sped up production through use of interchangeable parts along an assembly line-type arrangement. With the streamlining initiative in place, Hall then approached Army authorities to revitalize the commission. Impressed, the US Army then placed a new order for 1,000 Hall Rifles in 1819 which earned them the designation of \"Model of 1819\" - otherwise \"Model 1819\". The guns were produced out of the Harpers Ferry Arsenal utilizing Hall\'s methodology. At one point, the US Army sought to test the Hall breech-loading rifles against contemporary smoothbore muzzle loaders (with a target at 100 yards) and found them to be more accurate and with a higher rate-of-fire, giving US infantrymen a considerable tactical advantage for the period. The Hall rifle features multiple groove shallow scratch rifling which was a considerable improvement on the conventional smooth bore muskets of the time. The breech of the rifle is opened by the secondary trigger spur in front of the firing trigger and this flips open the chamber block to allow either powder or a paper cartridge and ball to be introduced. The machining tolerances were very good considering the equipment available at the time but eventually wear would allow gas escape which was a later criticism of the rifle. By the time of the American Civil War (1861-1865), the percussion cap principle was rapidly replacing the centuries-old flintlock action. The actions were somewhat similar in that old flintlock firearms could be converted to newer percussion cap forms through a bit of engineering. Percussion caps were less susceptible to weather and humidity and consequently more efficient and reliable. The Model 1819 Hall Rifle saw a similar conversion as other guns in the lead-in to the Civil War, becoming the Model 1841 Hall Rifle. Paper cartridges, holding the propellant, and a .69 Ball were now in use. However, the life cycle of the rifle was quickly drawing to a close after several decades of consistent service. Many infantry also still preferred muzzle-loading weapons due to availability and familiarity. Hall Rifles did, however, still see use in the conflict before given up for good - all manner of guns and artillery were pressed into service by both the North and South - either produced in American factories or acquired form Europe. In all, 23,500 Model 1819 Hall Rifles were produced. This is an interesting rifle and an important design in the development of the modern military rifle.
Good Hall\'s Military Breech loading Rifle This is a good representative example of a Hall 52 calibre breech loading model 1841 rifle. The rifle functions flawlessly and has a good American Walnut stock and has a decent bore with no external issues of pitting. The rifle has the expected handling wear of a rifle 175 years old but is an attractive looking example of a scarce rifle seldom seen in the UK. John Harris Hall (1781-1841) proved a potent inventor and forward-thinking gunsmith during his time. Aside from his contributions to mass production, Hall also designed and developed the M1819 Hall Rifle that bears his name (along with inventor Dr. William Thornton). Though a single-shot long gun at heart, the primary quality of this rifle was its patented breech-loading system which now allowed the operator to load/reload his weapon at the action as opposed to the muzzle. The shooter no longer was required to stand his weapon on its butt and engage in a time-consuming reloading process which also presented him as a target for the enemy. The M1819 Hall Rifle became the first breech-loading rifle in the world to be adopted in notable quantities by a national army that had the benefit of interchangeable parts and could truly be regarded as “mass produced”. The first Hall rifle was a flintlock and Hall began limited production of his rifle until the US Army placed an order for 200 of the type to be delivered sometime in 1815. However, lacking the required manufacturing facilities to meet the government deadline, Hall turned down this commission. To address the issue, Hall began dissecting his rifle manufacturing process which could, at best, output approximately 50 units per year. This rethinking brought about a complete revision of the process which ultimately sped up production through use of interchangeable parts along an assembly line-type arrangement. With the streamlining initiative in place, Hall then approached Army authorities to revitalize the commission. Impressed, the US Army then placed a new order for 1,000 Hall Rifles in 1819 which earned them the designation of "Model of 1819" - otherwise "Model 1819". The guns were produced out of the Harpers Ferry Arsenal utilizing Hall's methodology. At one point, the US Army sought to test the Hall breech-loading rifles against contemporary smoothbore muzzle loaders (with a target at 100 yards) and found them to be more accurate and with a higher rate-of-fire, giving US infantrymen a considerable tactical advantage for the period. The Hall rifle features multiple groove shallow scratch rifling which was a considerable improvement on the conventional smooth bore muskets of the time. The breech of the rifle is opened by the secondary trigger spur in front of the firing trigger and this flips open the chamber block to allow either powder or a paper cartridge and ball to be introduced. The machining tolerances were very good considering the equipment available at the time but eventually wear would allow gas escape which was a later criticism of the rifle. By the time of the American Civil War (1861-1865), the percussion cap principle was rapidly replacing the centuries-old flintlock action. The actions were somewhat similar in that old flintlock firearms could be converted to newer percussion cap forms through a bit of engineering. Percussion caps were less susceptible to weather and humidity and consequently more efficient and reliable. The Model 1819 Hall Rifle saw a similar conversion as other guns in the lead-in to the Civil War, becoming the Model 1841 Hall Rifle. Paper cartridges, holding the propellant, and a .69 Ball were now in use. However, the life cycle of the rifle was quickly drawing to a close after several decades of consistent service. Many infantry also still preferred muzzle-loading weapons due to availability and familiarity. Hall Rifles did, however, still see use in the conflict before given up for good - all manner of guns and artillery were pressed into service by both the North and South - either produced in American factories or acquired form Europe. In all, 23,500 Model 1819 Hall Rifles were produced. This is an interesting rifle and an important design in the development of the modern military rifle.
Good Hood Firearms Marquis of Lorne revolver This is a very nice Hood Firearms 32 rim fire revolver marketed as "The Marquis of Larne" This is in very good condition and functions as it should and is also easily disassembled. Hood were a prolific manufacturer of such revolvers and this one was made to look like a Colt Newline revolver but offered at a considerably lower price than Colt. Hood manufactured various names such as the "Union Jack", "Czar" "Destroyer" etc and the various and sometimes outlandish names the revolvers were marketed under were an essential part of their success in competition to the larger manufacturers such as Colt and Remington. This is a great example of an interesting revolver manufactured by one of the leading gun makers of this type of weapon at the time.
Good Hopkins and Allen Blue Jacket No 2 revolver. This is another good “Blue Jacket No 2” 32 Rim fire spur trigger revolver manufactured by Hopkins and Allen. The revolver is mechanically fine, it cocks, locks and rotates perfectly and disassembles easily as can be seen from the photographs. It has good wooden grips with no cracks or chips. There is a high percentage of original finish remaining on the barrel and cylinder and it is an attractive looking revolver. These revolvers did not have loading gates and can only be loaded at half cock as the cylinder always stops halfway through cycling so the cartridges did not fall out, an interesting feature that needed excellent timing and workmanship. Hopkins & Allen Arms Company was a prolific US firearms manufacturing company based in Norwich, Connecticut that was founded in 1868 by Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The Hopkins brothers ran the day-to-day operations of the company. In 1874 Converse sold his interest in the company to Brothers William and Milan Hulbert, giving the Hulbert's 50% of the company's assets and capital. Hopkins & Allen became the exclusive maker of Merwin Hulbert revolvers as a result of this. In addition to the Merwin Hubert revolvers, Hopkins & Allen manufactured a variety of spur trigger single-action revolvers (sometimes known as Saturday Night Specials) in .22, .32, and .38 calibres with trade names such as ACME, American Eagle, Blue Jacket, Captain Jack, Chichester, Defender, Dictator, Imperial Arms Co., Monarch, Mountain Eagle, Ranger, Tower's Police Safety, Universal, and XL, and later hinged-frame double-action models. Hopkins & Allen manufactured revolvers for Forehand & Wadsworth under contract as well as shotguns, rifles, and derringers for various sporting goods stores. This is a decent example of a “Saturday Night Special” revolver by a good manufacturer and it would be possible to form a collection of dozens of these as there are so many variations and fortunately the larger rim fire calibres such as this one are all non-licenseable.
Good Hopkins and Allen Dictator revolver This Hopkins and Allen "Dictator" revolver is a typical "Saturday Night Special" designed to be carried into town concealed on the person at times when the larger revolvers such as Colt and Remington Army or Navy models were prohibited by local by-laws. This is a good example with much finish that rotates, cocks and locks. A nice looking revolver.
Good Hopkins and Allen Ranger No 2 Revolver This is a good “Blue Jacket No 2” 32 Rim fire spur trigger revolver manufactured by Hopkin and Allen with a patent date of 1871 on the top rib. The nickel plated revolver is mechanically fine, it cocks, locks and rotates perfectly and disassembles easily as can be seen from the photographs. It has good wooden grips with no cracks or chips. There is some loss of nickel on the cylinder as can be seen but overall 80% + remains and it is an attractive looking revolver. It would be possible to refinish this revolver and I can advise accordingly. Hopkins & Allen Arms Company was a prolific US firearms manufacturing company based in Norwich, Connecticut that was founded in 1868 by Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The Hopkins brothers ran the day-to-day operations of the company. In 1874 Converse sold his interest in the company to Brothers William and Milan Hulbert, giving the Hulbert's 50% of the company's assets and capital. Hopkins & Allen became the exclusive maker of Merwin Hulbert revolvers as a result of this. In addition to the Merwin Hubert revolvers, Hopkins & Allen manufactured a variety of spur trigger single-action revolvers (sometimes known as Saturday Night Specials) in .22, .32, and .38 calibres with trade names such as ACME, American Eagle, Blue Jacket, Captain Jack, Chichester, Defender, Dictator, Imperial Arms Co., Monarch, Mountain Eagle, Ranger, Tower's Police Safety, Universal, and XL, and later hinged-frame double-action models. Hopkins & Allen manufactured revolvers for Forehand & Wadsworth under contract as well as shotguns, rifles, and derringers for various sporting goods stores. This is a decent example of a “Saturday Night Special” revolver by a good manufacturer and it would be possible to form a collection of dozens of these as there are so many variations and fortunately the larger rim fire calibres such as this one are all non-licensable.
Good Le Faucheux Revolver This is an extremely good Le Faucheux pinfire revolver in 9 mm pinfire calibre (Obsolete) this is one of the finest pinfire revolvers I've handled and as usual there is superb bluing on the cylinder and the barrel which the photographs do not do justice to. This revolver has seen little if any use and will cock, lock and index as the day it was made. The loading gate spring is very tight, another indication of little use and the revolver has excellent grips. Unusually this revolver has a trigger guard, most are seen with drop down triggers. Liege proofs indicate manufacture between 1860 and 1870 and of course the Liege proof exceeded British proofs- they did not make much rubbish. Le Faucheux revolvers were high quality and were exported in quantity to the USA during the Civil War. If you wanted a representative example of a pin fire revolver, you couldn't do better than this one.
Good little 32 rimfire side opening Derringer This is a good little 32 rimfire side opening Derringer with virtually all of the nickel plaiting remaining. The pistol cocks and locks fine and there are no issues with the mechanism. A reasonably priced example of the ultimate concealed weapon of the Western Frontier.
Good Live Firing Mauser K98 dated 1941 Mauser K98 in 7.92/8mm Mauser Calibre, maker's mark of Bcd dated 1941. This particular example is in top order with an excellent bore and decent sling. These Mausers were battlefield "pick-ups" by the Russians at Stalingrad and Leningrad and were arsenal refurbished and released for sale after the Cold War. Unusually this one still has a swastika extant as these were centre stuck out by the Russians who obviously missed some. A good example of an iconic rifle now becoming scarcer. Purchase of this item will require a Firearms Certificate.
Good Manhattan Arms .36 revolver This is a good .36 calibre Manhattan Series IV Navy. The revolver itself is all matching and has a good lock up with 10 cylinder safety notches which allowed the revolver to be carried with the hammer dropped between the nipples, a feature unique to Manhattan. Manhattan was a serious competitor to Colt and many people consider them better made than Colt. This one has a six and a half inch barrel, deeply embossed address and good grips. The revolver spins freely one way on half cock as it should and locks on full cock, There is a reasonable cylinder scene . Manhattan firearms went out of business within a couple of years of the end of the Civil War and are scarcer than Colt and Remington.
Good Manton Percussion target pistol. This is an excellent percussion target/duelling pistol manufactured by Joseph Manton. The overall length of the pistol is 15” and the 10” octagonal barrel is 32 bore with scratch rifling. The pistol locks are profusely engraved as is the breech plug, with an engraved platinum vent, profusely engraved tang incorporating rear-sight, border engraved lock decorated with scrolling foliage throughout and signed, ‘Jn MANTON & SON PATENT. The pistol features a hammer safety, rear sight, silver escutcheon on butt (vacant) and an engraved butt plate. The trigger guard has a spur which was not doubt trialled as there was some criticism of the Manton heavy barrels. One of the greatest technologies Manton refined was the accuracy of the duelling pistol. The inaccuracy of the duelling pistols as they were led to less wounds and deaths and were designed for a quick draw. Manton wanted to improve the slow shot of the duelling pistol because of the increasingly popular event of target practice. Those who purchased these heavier barrelled duelling pistols from Manton were at a clear advantage if they were to be caught defending their honour. Many gentlemen would visit the shooting gallery of Manton to practice their slow shots and refine their precision so that they could always be ready for a duel. This is an very decent example of an early percussion pistol by a renowned London maker.
Good Mark IV Martini Henry Rifle This is a very good Enfield Martini Henry rifle Mk IV 1 as issued. Originally chambered in 402" these were converted to 577/450 calibre and re-barrelled. This one has a plethora of inspection marks and is in very good condition. Usual handling marks but no real issues such as cracks. Good bore and mechanics and now getting much scarcer to find than the Nepalese imports. Overall a very solid example and in very good condition.
Good Marlin Ballard rifle in 32/40 calibre Ballard's single-shot rifles were available in several sporting models and in various calibres. This No. 5 Pacific Rifle was made c. 1876-1891 and is in the popular obsolete 32/40 calibre which is an excellent bench rest round but was also used in the 19th Century for hunting game as large as Buffalo. Ballard was a popular name in guns during the late nineteenth century. Manufactured by Marlin Firearms Co., of New Haven, Connecticut, their basic configurations offered such a large variety of sights, stocks, levers, barrels, etc., that they came close to being custom" guns. Introduced around 1885, single-shot Ballard’s could be used for hunting, target shooting, or self-protection. It was quite common for shooters to hold both a target and hunting barrel for the same receiver. The Ballard single-shot rifle was based on U.S. patent 33,631 that was granted to C. H. Ballard of Worcester, Massachusetts on November 5, 1861 so essentially this target rifle was based on an earlier military rifle that was used during the American Civil War. In 1873 all patent rights, equipment, parts inventories, and properties were purchased by New York arms dealers Schoverling and Daly, who handled sales and distribution of Ballard rifles after reaching an agreement with John Marlin to continue production. This partnership would prove to be highly successful for all parties involved. In 1881, the Marlin Firearms Company was incorporated, and production of Ballard rifles continuing under the Marlin banner until they were eventually discontinued circa 1891 due to the rising popularity of repeating rifles. Ballard rifles enjoyed great popularity during the heyday of the Schuetzen rifle. According to one expert, the Ballard possessed one of the fastest hammer movements ever invented, and these rifles earned a solid reputation for accuracy. Ballard’s were also well-received by target shooting competitors in Germany, Great Britain, and France. This particular rifle features a Scheutzen stock with American walnut butt and forend. The rifle features an octagonal heavy 7/8” x 29.5” barrel with an excellent bore and good crown. The rifle has an original factory fitted Marbles tang sight and tunnel foresight. There is provision for other sight configurations with a rear dovetail that is currently fitted with the correct blanking piece. There are two very good old repairs on the forend that could be easily hidden if the forend was re-stained but as these are part of the rifle’s history so I suggest leaving the rifle as is. Ballard rifles are hugely popular in the USA and seldom encountered in the UK and this one would be suitable for proofing and added to a firearms certificate but is being sold as an antique. I can supply an inert 32/40 cartridge if required or live cartridges to FAC holders.
Good Marlin Model 1893 rifle in obsolete calibre. The Marlin 1893 underlever rifle was the first Marlin that was manufactured in excess of 50,000 units, in fact a million rifles were made until the design was superceded in 1935 by the model 1894 which had a shorter action to allow the chambering of pistol cartridges. The model 1893 was an improvement on the previous model underlever rifle as it could handle much larger cartridges. The iconic Marlin 1893 was a direct competitor to the Winchester 1894 but had the advantage of side ejection which allowed easier mounting of scopes on top of the receiver. This particular good looking rifle is in obsolete 32-40 calibre so can be owned as an object of curiosity without a license. The rifle has a good tight action, nice bore and excellent wood with no major issues. The rifle features an octagonal barrel, steel crescent butt plate and is a special factory order length for this calibre of 30” which is scarce in a “safety” (high grade steel) barrel. Usual maker’s marks and patent marks are nicely stamped and in the correct place where they should be and the rifle has toned to a nice even colour as can be seen. This rifle is set up with a Lyman tang sight and the owner told me it was set up for long distance prairie dog hunting and bench rest shooting. Overall a pleasing example and somewhat scarce with an octagonal 30” barrel. For further information on this model read the excellent Marlin Firearms History by Lt Col William S Brophy.
Good Model 1867 Remington Navy Rolling Block Pistol This is the predecessor of the Model 1871 Army pistol usually designated as the "1867 Navy" model. The Model 1867 Navy pistol uses a .50 cal. center fire cartridge and has an ordinary trigger with guard. It could be said that there was in reality no 1867 Model since the 1867 pistols were contract alterations of the Model 1865. The Model 1865 Navy was provided in .50 cal. rimfire with a sheathed trigger. Most of the 1865 Models were recalled by the Ordnance Department and a contract was made with Remington to alter them. The barrels were shortened with a new sight and the action was changed from rimfire to centre fire and a trigger guard added. Remington charged the ordnance department $4 for this work. This particular pistol isn't museum quality but it has seen "honest travel" and is in good order with nice even toning and no problems or defects. The mechanics are fine and the extractor is extant ( these are often missing) and it has a good bore with good sharp rifling and decent woodwork. These appear to be scarce and were an interesting intermediary development from rim fire to centre fire pistols. A good example.
Good Model 1879 EN Remington Rolling Block Rifle Another excellent Argentine rolling block rifle, about mint bore with crisp mechanics and very nice walnut stock from the reneged Argentine contract. Argentina purchased several thousand of these rifles but in mid contract decided to purchase Mauser bolt action rifles and did not take delivery. As these were not used in anger they are generally in excellent condition having been stored for nearly 100 years until the Bannerman company found them.This is Arsenal refinished as the entire hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, There are no cracks or other defects on the wood other than one small patch that has been lightly cleaned during arsenal refurbishment and the Remington "R" cartouche is still extant on the walnut stock. The rifle has the Argentina 1879 EN stamp on the Knox, three line Remington patent dates on the tang and original cleaning rod. Should you wish to put this onto a FAC reloading equipment is available. This is the only Remington rolling block rifle contract made with an octagonal knox and also the only rifle with a substantial Werndel type rear sight that is excellent in every respect. Altogether as good a rolling block that you could find.
Good Moore teat fire revolver with finish This interesting Teat-fire cartridge is a .32 caliber pistol cartridge designed by Daniel Moore and manufactured by Moore and his partner David Williamson for their Pocket Revolver, was produced under both the Moore and National Arms marques by the National Arms Company of Brooklyn, New York in the mid-19th century. The Moore Calibre .32 Teat-fire used a unique cartridge to get around the Rollin White patent owned by Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson, and proved very popular during the Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. The "Teat-fire" cartridges did not have a rim at the back like conventional cartridges, but were rounded at the rear, with a small "teat" that would protrude through a tiny opening in the rear of the cylinder. The priming mixture was contained in the "teat" and when the hammer struck it, the cartridge would fire. Thus, it was akin to a rimfire cartridge, but instead of having priming all the way around the edge of the rim, it is centrally located in the teat. Moore's Calibre .32 Teat-fire Pocket Revolvers proved very popular during the American Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. National Arms produced about 30,000 of the revolvers from 1864 to 1870, when it was acquired by Colt's Manufacturing Company. As can be seen, this particular example has much original finish and cocks and locks perfectly and easily disassembles. There were several interesting revolvers patented at this time that were front loaded to circumnavigate Rollin White’s rear chamber loading patent and along with the Slocum the Moore stands out as one of the few that enjoyed commercial success. Price includes overnight courier.
Good Pattern 1842 Musket This is an attractive looking 1842 musket manufactured by the renowned maker Potts. .75" smoothbore with tight wood fit and a good trigger mechanism. These muskets were still being issued and used in the Crimean War and were used in the US Civil War. The effective range was around 200 yards and they were predecessor to the Pattern 1853 rifled musket.
Good Peabody Rifle Franco Prussian War Capture This is a very good Peabody rifle, this particular pattern designated as the 1868/70 Spanish in 43 Spanish centrefire calibre. The Peabody rifle was the development of Henry O. Peabody of Boston, Massachusetts and initially patented in 1862, but fully developed too late to play any major role in the US Civil War. The basic patent relates to a heavy pivoting breech block, the front of which pivots down around a transverse fixed pin fixed through both the upper rear of the breech block and through the upper rear of the solidly built box receiver. Lowering the front of the breech block allows access to the chamber from above but, when elevated closed, transfers the force of firing to the rear of the receiver housing This particular rifle is interesting insofar as it has Prussian acceptance marks which are a square crown over a “V”. This explains that the rifle was a capture after the Franco Prussian War. This rifle is in very good condition with a good bore and only the usual handling marks on the woodwork. An interesting and seldom encountered rifle that has a combat history.
Good Portugeuse Mauser Kropatschek Rifle The Mauser-Kropatschek is perhaps one of the finest, most well-made rifles of its generation with an incredibly smooth action throughout, and this example is no exception. Manipulating the bolt is as smooth as silk and trigger pull and let off of the trigger is crisp and clean. The rifle is complete, with original cleaning rod. Some of these rifles were later designated for colonial service and fitted with a top hand guard, which is usually missing. This is one of those rifles that almost certainly saw colonial service in Portugal’s colonies. The metal is smooth and in very nice condition with 50% blue remaining on the barrel and receiver and with bolt parts finished in the white. The stock has good cartouches showing on both sides but of course there are some minor handling marks throughout. No cracks. No stock repairs. Nice bore. Like almost all Portuguese Kropatscheks, especially the colonial, the bolt group serial numbers don’t match the barreled receiver and stock, which do match each other. The bore is excellent and this rifle is eminently shootable as well as an important variation for the 19th century collector.One small problem, easily fixed is that the rear leaf sight spring needs replacing. Originally chambered for a black powder cartridge, it was updated to a smokeless cartridge by the alteration of the rear sight, extending its range. Rifle is complete with all original parts and all markings visible.
Good Quality 1st pattern Adams 120 bore cased revolver. This is a stunning little "automatic" 120 bore (.31) cased Adams. At the time of the Great Exhibition Adams was unable to procure his full requirement of frames from Tranter and he purchased a quantity of revolvers from Claude Dandoy a renowned Belgium Maker who manufactured under Adams' license. This fact forms part of the legend on the top strap. Superb quality with the correct accessories and a very pleasing pocket revolver. Correct tailed ball and conical mould which is rarer than the revolver and a nice contemporary case. Action is fine and the walnut grips are good as can be seen and finished off with an exquisite ebony scalloped butt piece, a sign of quality as this is more than ornamental as the ebony is stronger than the walnut and this is the most vulnerable part of the butt. The revolver was subsequently fitted with a patented rammer making the tailed bullets redundant but by some miracle the 120 bore tailed mould has remained with the revolver as can be seen. The accessories display even wear to the revolver and they all clearly belong together. Sold with a copy of the relevant information from Chamberlain and Taylerson's work "Adams' Revolvers".
Good quality Velodog revolver circa 1895 This is another interesting little pocket pistol manufactured in Belgium I circa 1895. The revolver is chambered in obsolete Velodog calibre and revolvers of this type were typically issued to Postmen and Government Officials for self-defence, literally to protect them from dogs who had a propensity to attack cyclists as cycling was a new phenomenon at this time! Velodog revolvers chambered a larger centre fire cartridge than the 22 RF but it was significantly underpowered. In reality many of the cartridges were filled with salt as the repercussions of shooting “mans best friend” could not engender good civilian relations and they were used as a deterrent. The calibre is actually 5.75mm. They were also used for self defence as they were easily concealable and relatively safe to carry with an enclosed trigger. This is a quality piece with much original finish extant and the drop-down trigger functions as it should and drops down when the hammer is raised. The revolver is mechanically perfect. Manufactured and proofed in Belgium the Liege proof was renowned as being a considerably greater test for a weapon than their British contemporary test. An interesting piece and seldom encountered. This revolver has a holster. This can be owned as a collectible object under Section 58(2) of the Firearms Act as amended subject to meeting VCR requirements.
Good Remington 31 calibre pocket revolver. This is an interesting revolver and scarce as most were converted from percussion to metallic cartridge by 1870 In 1865, as the American Civil War was coming to an end, the firm of E. Remington & Sons began to look at the reality of an immediate future without large US military manufacturing contracts as their primary market. This meant that for the foreseeable future civilian sales would likely be the bulk of Remington’s business, unless they could secure peacetime contracts with the US government or military contracts with foreign governments. One of the primary indications of the firm’s change in business strategy was the introduction of the Remington New Model Pocket Revolver. This diminutive handgun was clearly intended for sale to the general public and was not a military pattern firearm. The new pocket model was intended to compete with the venerable Colt Model 1849 “Pocket” revolver and was essentially a scaled-down pocket version of the large frame Remington percussion revolvers that had been sold to the US military by the thousands during the Civil War. The gun was a five-shot, single action, .31 calibre percussion revolver. The octagonal barrel was available in four standard factory lengths from 3” to 4.5” in half-inch increments. This revolver is mechanically sound, good grips and faded to an even grey patina but with distinct manufacturing stampings. A good example.
Good Remington no 4 take down rifle. This is another fine example of a Remington No 4 take down rifle or "Buggy Gun" in .32 rim fire calibre. (Obsolete)These guns were the USA equivalent of our Rook and Rabbit Rifles and were used both as working tools and as a light rifle to introduce young people to shooting. This particular example is in good condition and features a lever action take down to allow the rifle to be disassembled in seconds. A very pleasing example with crisp stamping, nice finish and good bore and mechanically sound. The rifle has good wood with no shrinkage or cracks and is overall in a very pleasing condition As a result of the escalating prices of Winchesters, manufacturers such as Remington are increasing in popularity with a commensurate increase in value. An interesting rifle.
Good Remington Pocket Revolver 31 calibre This is a very good Remington New Model pocket pistol in 31 calibre manufactured circa 1863. The revolver has a 3.5" octagonal barrel, rosewood grips and is in very good working order. The revolver cocks and locks tightly and has an excellent mechanism. These little Remington percussion revolvers are quite difficult to obtain and whilst not rare are uncommon. The Remington address and patents are extant on the top flat of the barrel and the finish has faded. A decent example.
Good RIC copy revolver in 320 British This is a very nice Belgium made Webley RIC style revolver "in the white" in excellent working order and with good grips and the original lanyard ring. The Belgium proof was considerably more stringent that the British proof so the revolvers had to be well made as this one is. Belgium supplied huge quantities of components and complete guns to the British gun trade at this time and this particular example would make a good addition to any collection.
Good Rogers and Spencer Revolver. The Rogers & Spencer Percussion Revolver was originally manufactured in Willowvale, NY about 1863-65. In January 1865, the United States government contracted with Rogers & Spencer for 5,000 of the solid frame pistols. Delivery on the contract was made too late for war service, and the entire lot was sold as scrap to Francis Bannerman and Son in 1901. Bannerman then sold the pistols throughout the first quarter of the 20th Century. Many original Rogers & Spencer revolvers are seen today in excellent condition as is this one. The Rogers and Spencer Army Model Revolver was actually an improvement of earlier pistols produced by the firm - the Pettingill and Freeman revolvers. The Pettingills were produced in the late 1850's and early 1860’s and were double action revolvers. The Pettingills were ahead of their time, being designed as hammerless pistols, which were popular in the last decade of the 19th Century, but certainly too Avant Garde for Army purchasers. The Navy Model was a .34 calibre, of which less than 1,000 were produced. The Army Model was a .44 calibre, and only about 3,400 were produced in the early 1860's. The Freeman Army Model Revolver was a solid frame .44 calibre pistol with a round 7 1/2" barrel, of which 2,000 are believed to have been produced in 1863-64, and in appearance the Freeman resembles a Starr Revolver. The Rogers & Spencer is an improved Freeman, with a less severe grip style, a heavier frame and a stronger octagon barrel of identical 7 1/2" length. This particular Rogers & Spencer has a high degree of original finish left and original varnish on the grips. Rotates, cocks and locks and the bore is excellent. These revolvers are favoured today by black powder shooters for the superb grips and excellent mechanics. The flared grips were prone to damage and this one has some chips, but the grips show little other wear and the military inspector’s cartouche is highly visible. There are three notches or etches carved into the grip and I cannot make my mind up if they are an initial or "kill" marks, that is for you to decide. A very pleasing revolver at the right price for the condition.
Good Snider Mk III Carbine with cleaning rods. There can be no doubt from the prolific inspectors view marks that this carbine has seen some action! There are no less than 7 inspectors marks with the last Enfield mark dated 1883. The Carbine has a good bore, excellent action and the original WD marked cleaning rods are in the butt trap. As a mark III it has the solid stock with no dowel filled hole for a cleaning rod in the fore end, it is marked "Steel" on the barrel as it should be and has a flat faced hammer. Dated 1870 with an Enfield mark this was the first year of production after the approval date of January 1869 during which year 970 carbines were made with iron barrels. The screws or pins holding the original leather sight cover are missing as can be seen and there is a small but good armory repair to the toe of the butt. The front trigger guard screw is missing its head so this could do with replacing. The action is tight and the lock does not have the usual dents seen with hard use and locks nicely with a perfect extractor. All in all a very pleasing Carbine and complete with the elusive cleaning rods. The butt markings indicate the 2nd Nottingham Regiment who served in India, Ceylon and Afghanistan between 1870 and 1880. The post 1880 inspection mark confirms the carbine returned with its user after the Afghan War.
Good Soper Rifle This is a very good Soper rifle and a nice example of a military version as it has a bayonet lug. Bore is good with strong rifling and mechanics are perfect. Chambered for 450 Soper this is an obsolete calibre rifle. Reputed to be one of the fastest shooting rifles of it's time assisted by the rifle firing from a falling block, Sgt Warwick of the Berkshire Volunteers shot 60 shots in 60 seconds with a Soper rifle at the 1870 Olympia Exhibition. Soper was marred by bad luck and timing and there was a possibility at one time that this rifle could have replaced the Martini rifle by the British Army had Soper supplied an example early enough and made different business arrangements. See following an article from "The Engineer". It would appear that the author had partisan interest elsewhere! The Soper Rifle The Engineer, 13 December 1867 The rifle invented by Mr. W. Soper, of Reading, and illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, was one of the number sent for the recent competition at Woolwich, and was rejected on the ground of "complication of breech arrangement." In this rifle the breech-piece is formed of a block of steel R, working freely up and down in a vertical slot at the rear of the barrel, and secured to a lever fixed at the bottom of the lock, which is placed in the center of the stock. The striker J is mounted inside the breech-piece, and works easily without any spring. The cock is also secured to the breech lever in such a manner that the breech-piece and cock are worked simultaneously. The attachment is effected by the swivel H, furnished with a projection and recess for working the extractor L, so that the one movement of drawing down the lever opens the breech, cocks the piece, and throws out the cartridge case. The trigger A is mounted on the lever, and has no connection with the sear E until the breech is placed home, and thus the rifle cannot be fired until the safety catch B is pressed. For cleaning purposes the lock and breech-piece can be removed by withdrawing a couple of screws. Fig. 3 shows a section of the rifling, the calibre being that of the service rifle. The trials of this rifle at Woolwich were satisfactory. For rapidity twelve rounds were fired in thirty-nine seconds with three mis-fires; the mean deviation of eight shots fired for accuracy from a shoulder rest at 500 yards, with Boxer cartridges, No. 3 pattern, was 2.30ft. Many excellent results have also since been obtained. Nevertheless we cannot but agree with the committee that the mechanism of the breech and lock is too complicated for a purely military weapon, and, moreover, that they were perfectly correct in doubting the value of the safety catch as a substitute of the ordinary half-cock. Mr. Soper has expended a great deal of ingenuity, and has produced a weapon which gives good results, but we think it cannot be denied that it is unsuitable for the use of the soldier. Breech-loaders V. Muzzle-loaders The Engineer, 6 August 1869 On Saturday, July 31st, a very interesting competition took place in the presence of Major Sir C.S.Paul Hunter, Bart., between Corporal Bainbridge and fourteen picked men of the battalion using long Enfield rifles and three men using the Soper direct-action breech-loader. The targets were similar to those for the file firing, but only half the usual size. Distance; 200 yards; time, three minutes. Each party to fire as rapidly as they please. The scores were as follows:- Enfield Rifles: 1st squad of five men, 84 points; 2nd squad of five men, 94 points; 3rd squad of five men, 94 points; total, 272. Soper’s breech-loader: Sergeant Soper, 140; Private Warrick, 138; Sergeant Gostage, 110; total, 388. Majority in favour of breech-loader, 116 points. It will thus be seen that two men with the breech-loader scored six points more than the fifteen men with the Enfield. Private Warrick having fired eighteen shots the first minute, twenty one the second, and seventeen the third, making a total of fifty-six shots in the three minutes; and Sergeant Soper having scored five bull’s-eyes before a single shot was got off by the squad opposed to him. This rifle is in good overall order and has a plated barrel identical to the one sold at auction last year ( £4250 + premium) The bore is good with strong rifling and mechanically it is excellent. The plating is faded in places as can be seen and would be possibly worthy of restoration although personally I would leave well alone. A rare rifle.
Good Spencer Civil War Carbine This is an excellent Civil War Spencer repeating carbine and a little better than most. The Spencer repeating carbine was a manually operated lever-action, seven shot repeating carbine produced in the United States by three manufacturers between 1860 and 1869. Designed by Christopher Spencer, it was fed with cartridges from a tube magazine in the carbine's buttstock. The Spencer repeating carbine was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. At first, the view by the Department of War Ordnance Department was that soldiers would waste ammunition by firing too rapidly with repeating rifles, and thus denied a government contract for all such weapons. (They did, however, encourage the use of carbine breech loaders that loaded one shot at a time such as the Maynard carbine. Such carbines were shorter than a rifle and well suited for cavalry. More accurately, they feared that the army’s logistics train would be unable to provide enough ammunition for the soldiers in the field, as they already had grave difficulty bringing up enough ammunition to sustain armies of tens of thousands of men over distances of hundreds of miles. A weapon able to fire several times as fast would require a vastly expanded logistics train and place great strain on the already overburdened railroads and tens of thousands of more mules, wagons, and wagon train guard detachments. The fact that several Springfield rifle-muskets could be purchased for the cost of a single Spencer carbine also influenced thinking. However, just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Spencer was able to gain an audience with President Abraham Lincoln, who invited him to a shooting match and demonstration of the weapon on the lawn of the White House. Lincoln was impressed with the weapon, and ordered Gen. James Wolfe Ripley to adopt it for production, after which Ripley disobeyed him and stuck with the single-shot rifles The Spencer showed itself to be very reliable under combat conditions, with a sustainable rate-of-fire in excess of 20 rounds per minute. Compared to standard muzzle-loaders, with a rate of fire of 2–3 rounds per minute, this represented a significant tactical advantage. However, effective tactics had yet to be developed to take advantage of the higher rate of fire. Similarly, the supply chain was not equipped to carry the extra ammunition. Detractors would also complain that the amount of smoke produced was such that it was hard to see the enemy, unsurprising, since even the smoke produced by muzzleloaders would quickly blind whole regiments, and even divisions as if they were standing in thick fog, especially on still days. One of the advantages of the Spencer was that its ammunition was waterproof and hardy and could stand the constant jostling of long storage on the march, such as Wilson's Raid. The story goes that every round of paper and linen Sharps ammunition carried in the supply wagons was found useless after long storage in supply wagons. Spencer ammunition had no such problem. In the late 1860s, the Spencer company was sold to the Fogerty Rifle Company and ultimately to Winchester. You can see the Spencer influence in later Winchester lever action rifles. Many Spencer carbines were later sold as surplus to France where they were used during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870. Mechanically the rifle works flawlessly and the original seven round magazine is extant in the butt. This handsome looking carbine would be difficult to beat for value and represents an iconic arm of the American Civil War. Obsolete calibre no license needed.
Good Stevens Model 44 Target Rifle 25--20 Calibre Single-shot rifles were manufactured in a multitude of designs by a host of makers including Ballard, Maynard, Remington, Sharps, Winchester and Stevens. The most prolific manufacturer of single-shot pistols, rifles and shotguns was Stevens. This is a beautiful Stevens Model 44 rifle in 25-20 centrefire obsolete calibre British Nitro Proofed. The rifle is about as good as you will find and is complete with the original Stevens Scope and mounts and the correct period Lyman Tang sight. The rifle has a very good bore and solid action and the extractor is extant. The original Stevens Bakelite butt plate has also survived and is in remarkable condition. The rifle evidences much original finish including case hardening on the receiver. There is one small sliver of wood missing from the end of the left-hand side of the forend but this is not easy to see unless you look for it and could be simply repaired if you had the time and inclination to do so. J. Stevens and Company was founded at Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts in 1864, Joshua Stevens being the senior partner with W.B. Fay and James Taylor providing financial backing. The company began to produce vest and pocket pistols based on Stevens’ patent of September 6, 1864 as well as a line of precision machine tools. In 1886 the firm was dissolved and the J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company incorporated. Stevens sold his shares in 1896 at which time he ceased to be associated with the company. By 1902 it was promoting itself as the largest producer of sporting arms in the world, a claim that is difficult to disagree with. In 1916 it was reorganised and renamed the J. Stevens Arms Company. In 1920 the Savage Arms Corporation bought the entire stock and the two merged. The J. Stevens Arms Company operated as a Savage subsidiary finally being integrated in 1920. Though never as popular or as highly regarded as the Winchester, Remington or Ballard single-shot rifles, the Stevens Ideal Rifle No. 44 endured and it’s a matter of historical fact they were still being made long after their better named and higher priced competitors such as Ballard ceased trading. In the 1903 catalogue Stevens’ advertising described the Ideal 44 as “manufactured to meet the demand for a reliable and accurate rifle at a moderate price . . . no better or stronger shooting arm can be made for the same cartridges. It is recommended without qualification and fully guaranteed.” If quantity of arms sold proved reliability and reputation then undoubtedly Stevens were ahead of its collective peers in every respect. Good quality US Stevens single shot rifles are becoming scarce and increasing in value as the US market recognises their quality and the scarcity of decent examples. These rifles were “work horses” and not purchased for show so although there are reasonable numbers of good quality functional rifles in the market, it is difficult to find such an example and certainly not with an original scope.
Good Stevens Take Down Rifle Model 1894 Another great little Stevens Model 1894 Favorite take down rifle in 25 Stevens Calibre. This one has much original finish, a really good bore and is mechanically sound with no defects to report other than the odd cosmetic ding that can be seen from the photographs. Stevens were popular as they were a fraction of the price of Winchester Low Walls and this is a very tidy example for the collector.
Good Stevens \"Favorite\" Boys Rifle Another really good example of a Stevens Favourite or Boys rifle in obsolete 25 Stevens Calibre. wood and metalwork and difficult to better this pleasing looking little rifle. I will include an inert 25 Stevens calibre round for display purposes.This is a take down rifle and disassembles in seconds. There is a lot of original finish on this rifle. Stevens Arms was founded by Joshua Stevens with help from backers W.B. Fay and James Taylor in Chicopee Falls, MA, in 1864 as J. Stevens & Co. Their earliest product was a tip-up action single shot pistol. Business was slow into 1870, when Stevens occupied a converted grist mill and had just sixty employees. The 1873 Panic had a further negative impact on sales. By 1876 the company had recovered to the extent that it was then manufacturing twice the number of shotguns as it had been prior to that year. In 1883 they purchased the Massachusetts Arms Company which Joshua Stevens had helped found in 1850.In 1886, the company was reorganized and incorporated as J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. The business was able to grow steadily with tool manufacturing and sales now accounting for the bulk of the business output. Stevens and Taylor were bought out in 1896 by I.H. Page, who was one of the new partners and the bookkeeper. Page led the company to significant growth, such that by 1902 Stevens had 900 employees and was considered one of the top sporting firearms manufacturers in the world. In 1901, Stevens entered into a partnership with J. Frank Duryea to produce the Stevens-Duryea automobile manufactured at a separate facility also in Chicopee Falls, MA. In 1915, Stevens led the U.S. arms business in target and small game guns. On May 28, 1915 Stevens was purchased by New England Westinghouse, a division of Westinghouse Electric. New England Westinghouse was created specifically to fulfil a contract to produce 1.8 million Mosin-Nagant rifles for Czar Nicholas II of Russia for use in World War I. They needed a firearms manufacturing facility in order to accomplish this and chose Stevens. After the purchase they sold off the tool making division, halted production of Stevens-Duryea automobiles, and, on July 1, 1916, renamed the firearms division the J. Stevens Arms Company. When the Czar was deposed by the communists in 1917, New England Westinghouse was never paid and they fell into financial distress.They managed to sell most of the rifles to the U.S. Government and keep the Stevens firearms facility operational and did return to limited production of civilian firearms between 1917-1920 while looking for a buyer for Stevens. Stevens was purchased by the Savage Arms Company on April 1, 1920 with Stevens operating as a subsidiary of Savage but in a semi-independent status until 1942.This merger made Savage the largest producer of arms in the United States at the time.8 After World War II they were renamed as Stevens Arms and sometimes identified as "Savage-Stevens" after 1948. In 1960 Savage closed the Stevens Arms facilities in Chicopee Falls and moved Stevens production to various Savage manufacturing sites. In 1991 the Stevens name was discontinued but was resurrected in 1999 as the brand name for Savage's budget line of rifles and shotguns.
Good Steyr Model 1886 rifle This is a decent example of Steyrr Model 1886 "Kropatschek" rifle. The Mauser-Kropatschek is perhaps one of the finest, most well-made rifles of its generation with an incredibly smooth action throughout, and this example is no exception. Manipulating the bolt is as smooth as silk and trigger pull and let off of the trigger is crisp and clean. The rifle is complete, with original cleaning rod. Some of these rifles were later designated for colonial service and fitted with a top hand guard, which is usually missing. This is one of those rifles that almost certainly saw colonial service in Portugal's colonies. The metal is smooth and in very nice condition with and receiver and with bolt parts finished in the white. The stock has a good cartouche but of course there are some minor handling marks throughout. No cracks. No stock repairs. Nice bore. This rifle is as an important variation for the 19th century collector. Originally chambered for a black powder cartridge, it was updated to a smokeless cartridge by the alteration of the rear sight, extending its range. Rifle is complete with all original parts and all markings visible.
Good Swiss Model 1869/71 Bolt Action Service Rifle This is a very nice example of the Swiss Vetterli 1869/71 Infantry rifle in obsolete 10.4 x 38 Rimfire calibre. Although no great attention is currently paid to the manufacturers of these fine rifles I predict this will change and this rifle was manufactured by W von Steiger of Thun who commenced manufacturing in April 1871 and manufactured only 15,200 of the total production of 114,000. The rifle is in excellent condition as can be seen from the photographs and has the usual good Swiss bore. Mechanically the rifle is perfect and has a plethora of makers and military markings. These rifles were revolutionary at the time as they had a tubular magazine holding 11 rounds. The overall length of the rifle is 51.25” with a barrel length of 32.25” and it weighs a hefty 10 lbs. Again this would be a difficult rifle to better and in outstanding condition considering it is around 144 years old!
Good Swiss Model 1869/71 Bolt Action Service Rifle This is a very good example of the iconic Model 1869/71 Swiss Vetterli rifle manufactured by SIG of Neuhausen, the rifle features many refinements over the earlier model 1869 rifle and this allows us to date the rifle to circa 1872. At this time the Swiss were still cross hatching the forend with some primitive looking checkering and this is sometimes mistaken as being added by servicemen but that is not the case. The Vetterli rifles were a series of Swiss army service rifles in use from 1869 to circa 1890, when they were replaced with Schmidt-Rubin rifles. Modified Vetterli rifles were also used by the Italian Army. The Swiss Vetterli rifles combined the American Winchester Model 1866's tubular magazine with a regular bolt featuring for the first time two opposed rear locking lugs. This novel type of bolt was a major improvement over the simpler Dreyse and Chassepot bolt actions. The Vetterli was also the first repeating bolt action rifle to feature a self-cocking action and a small calibre bore. Due to the Swiss Federal Council's early 1866 decision to equip the army with a breech loading repeating rifle, the Vetterli rifles were, at the time of their introduction, the most advanced military rifles in Europe. The Vetterli was the replacement for Amsler-Milbank rifles, which were a metallic cartridge conversion from previous Swiss muzzle loading rifles. This particular example has an excellent bore and perfect mechanics, some pressure marks and “dings” on the wood as you would expect from a rifle that is around 140 years old but generally is a very attractive example which is why I bought it. The rifle has not been cleaned or messed with in any way but has been kept in its original state and it is as nice an example as you can find of these iconic rifles. The rifle was sourced in the USA and was brought into the country in the 1920’s by the grandfather of the vendor who was a German Soldier in the Prussian Guards who was an immigrant to the USA. I should quickly add that there was no fighting between Switzerland or Germany; the original owner simply thought it was a nice rifle so bought it. I can supply the purchaser of this rifle a contemporary inert 43 Swiss rim fire round.
Good Tranter Breech Loading Revolver no 2 circa 1863 This is an attractive Tranter’s patent Breech-loading Revolver no 2 in 320 rimfire calibre in excellent condition. These revolvers are scarce in good condition with by far the majority that escaped the melting pot being pitted and with no remaining finish. This particular revolver has significant bluing left on the barrel and has great eye appeal. The revolver has good walnut cheek grips with crisp chequering and cocks and locks tightly. It was retailed by E M Reilly of Oxford Street London who was a notable gunsmith of the time and next door neighbours to Purdey & Co. These particular revolvers were introduced in 1863 and there were a number of variants and improvements made, this one having a loading gate added and a half cock safety. Interestingly the notches on the side of the cylinder were added to allow the shooter to be able to extract fired cartridge cases with a turn screw or screwdriver. The rifling of these revolvers was five bands turning to the right and the weight is 1 lb 2 oz. The action mainspring is complimented with a trigger spring that locks the action when cocked with the hammer spur. This design was widely copied by other manufacturers and was an extremely successful revolver that was probably the predecessor of most of the later American “Saturday Night Specials”. This is an essential revolver for an English collection.
Good Velodog pistol circa 1890 The manufacturer of this weapon is the Manufacture d’armes RONGE Jean-Baptiste fils S.A. places Saint Jean, 4 in LIEGE then place Xavier Neujean. The house would have been founded in 1789 according to their publicity but actually the period of inscription to the proofhouse is between 1832 and 1929
Good Velodog \"Bicycle\" revolver circa 1895 This is an interesting little pocket pistol manufactured in Belgium I circa 1895. The revolver is chambered in obsolete Velodog calibre and revolvers of this type were typically issued to Postmen and Government Officials for self-defence, literally to protect them from dogs who had a propensity to attack cyclists as cycling was a new phenomenon at this time! Velodog revolvers chambered a larger centre fire cartridge than the 22 RF but it was significantly underpowered. In reality many of the cartridges were filled with salt as the repercussions of shooting “mans best friend” could not engender good civilian relations and they were used as a deterrent. The calibre is actually 5.75mm. They were also used for self defence as they were easily concealable and relatively safe to carry with an enclosed trigger. This is a quality piece with most nickel plate extant and the drop-down trigger functions as it should and drops down when the hammer is raised. The revolver is mechanically perfect. Manufactured and proofed in Belgium the Liege proof was renowned as being a considerably greater test for a weapon than their British contemporary test. An interesting piece and seldom encountered. This can be owned as a collectible object under Section 58(2) of the Firearms Act as amended subject to meeting VCR requirements.
Good Volunteer Snider Cavalry Carbin Potts & Hunt This is a very attractive looking Mark 1 Snider Carbine manufactured by the renowned military maker Potts and Hunt. The carbine has good wood, good metal to wood finish and a nice bore. It has an original brass muzzle tompion and nipple protector. This carbine would have been issued to a volunteer unit as a private purchase. A very attractive Carbine.
Good Wanzl model 1860 Rifle The Wanzl rifle is significant as it was the first breech loading rifle of the Austrian Hapsburg Army and was developed in 1860 utilising a conversion of the Lorenz muzzle loading rifle. The rifles were manufactured in both centrefire and rimfire calibres (14mm x 33mm) and the calibre is obsolete so can be owned in the UK without a license. The lock of this rifle is dated 1862 and is a centrefire rifle in excellent condition with a tight action and clean bore. The rifle exhibits numerous military markings and the unit it was issued to would be researchable. The rifle was replaced by the Werndl rifle in 1867 but unbelievably was still in use at the end of World War One which is a testament to their robustness. Some 70,000 rifles were converted and survival rates in good condition are low. An interesting rifle seldom encountered in the UK.
Good Wanzl model 1860 Rifle Rimfire dated 1863 The Wanzl rifle is significant as it was the first breech loading rifle of the Austrian Hapsburg Army and was developed in 1860 utilising a conversion of the Lorenz muzzle loading rifle. The rifles were manufactured in both centrefire and rimfire calibres (14mm x 33mm) and the calibre is obsolete so can be owned in the UK without a license. The lock of this rifle is dated 1863 and is a rimfire rifle in very good condition with a tight action and clean bore. The rifle exhibits numerous military markings . The rifle was replaced by the Werndl rifle in 1867 but unbelievably was still in use at the end of World War One which is a testament to their robustness. Some 70,000 rifles were converted and survival rates in good condition are low. An interesting rifle seldom encountered in the UK.
Good Webley Bentley Revolver circa 1863 The Webley Bentley Wedge Frame percussion revolver is easily identified by its open frame with the barrel secured to the frame with a wedge key similar to Colt’s revolvers. Unlike Colt’s early revolvers however, Webley had already mastered, along with other British gunmakers such as Adams, the ability to interlink the trigger with the hammer and cylinder so you did not have to manually cock the hammer each time to rotate the cylinder. This double action or “automatic” method of firing gave the potential for extremely rapid fire and it would be some time before Colt caught up with this innovative and disruptive invention. This particular revolver was made in England and exhibits English proof marks. It is a six shot 60 bore revolver with a good mechanical action. Everything works as it should. The grips are Walnut with decent chequering and the revolver has been profusely engraved with floriate engraving that includes the butt plate and trigger guard. There is no retailers name on the revolver and the original finish has completely faded but nevertheless as the screws have not been messed with and there are no significant dents or dinks, it is a very pleasing revolver and would make a fine addition to any revolver collection. There is a very similar revolver exhibited as plate 27 of Taylerson, Anderson and Frith’s excellent book “The Revolver 1815-1865” The loading arm or rammer coupled with the flash shield on the top frame allow us to identify this revolver as being made around 1863.
Good Webley No 2 British Bulldog revolver. Birmingham manufactured Webley Bulldog revolvers are becoming scarce and in my estimate are outnumbered by generic examples by at least 10 to 1. This is a particularly handsome looking Webley “British Bulldog” revolver in obsolete .44” Webley (.442”) calibre. The revolver has a faded finish but little or no pitting and has excellent grips. The top strap is marked “British Bulldog” and the barrel has the maker’s name P. Webley & Son with Birmingham & London stamped on the side of the barrel. The revolver features Webley’s famous flying bullet logo and the model number and calibre. The revolver has a good bore and functions as it should in both single and double action. The British Bull Dog was a popular type of solid-frame pocket revolver introduced by Philip Webley & Son of Birmingham, England in 1872 and subsequently copied by gun makers in Continental Europe and the United States. It featured a 2.5-inch (64 mm) barrel and was chambered for .44 Short Rimfire, .442 Webley, or .450 Adams cartridges, with a five-round cylinder. Webley produced smaller scaled .320 Revolver and .380 calibre versions later, but did not mark them with the British Bull Dog name. The design of the British Bull Dog revolver had been in existence since 1868, but Henry Webley registered the trademark in 1878. From that time to the present, the term has come to mean any short barrelled double-action revolver with a swing-out ejector rod and a short grip. Intended to be carried in a coat pocket as an affordable means of self-defence, it can be argued that the Bulldog was actually the gun that really “won the west” as it was produced in far more significant numbers than the more expensive USA manufactured revolvers. The design originated in 1868 for the Webley Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) model revolver and was manufactured as late as 1917. This is a decent revolver that would enhance any collection of British revolvers.
Good Webley style 320 British pocket revolver. This is a good Webley style double action revolver with Liege proofs. The bore is good with good rifling, good deep grooves and flat lands with no black powder erosion. Excellent grips virtually as new and the revolver cocks and locks and works fine in both single and double action. The safety works and the loading gate which is often missing is present. The revolver strips easily and clearly has been well looked after. I would emphasis that it is not a Webley but modeled on one and has a lot of eye appeal.
Good Werndl Carbine Austrian Hungarian Army issue. SCARCE AUSTRIAN MODEL 1867 WERNDL CARBINE: In very good original condition. 11mm calibre. 39 5/8 inch overall length, barrel length 21”. Fine metal retaining a good amount of its original finish mixed with a smooth and brown aged patina. Fine markings. Unit marked on butt plate. Original cleaning rod. Good stock with normal handling marks throughout. There is a crack on the wrist that is tight and old and doesn’t seem to go anywhere. Very good action and excellent bore. Josef Werndl (1831 -1839) was the son of Leopold Werndl a large gun maker employing 500 people. Josef had visions of a factory on an American scale and consequently travelled to the USA in the early 1850’s and worked at Colt, Remington and Pratt & Whitney to learn the American methods of mass production. When he returned from the USA he put his education to practise and turned the industrial town of Steyr into an Industrial giant called Oestereich Waffenfabriks Gesellschaft (Austrian Arms Manufacturing Company) which is usually shortened to OEWG or simply Steyr. Their first big success was their single shot rifle which became the primary shoulder arm of the Austrian – Hungarian forces. It performed very well and this scarce example is the carbine version used by Cavalry and Artillery Regiments. A scarce and desirable carbine that has not been cut down or messed with.
Good Werndl Rifle pattern 1866/7 The Werndl rifle and its development. The Werndl rifle was adapted as a consequence of the first war between two major continental powers in seven years. The Prussian Army used von Dreyse's breech-loading needle gun, which could be rapidly loaded while the soldier was seeking cover on the ground, whereas the Austrian muzzle-loading Lorenz rifles could only be loaded slowly, and generally from a standing position. The main campaign of the war occurred in Bohemia. Prussian Chief of General Staff Helmuth von Moltke had planned meticulously for the war. He rapidly mobilized the Prussian army and advanced across the border into Saxony and Bohemia, where the Austrian army was concentrating for an invasion of Silesia. There, the Prussian armies, led nominally by King William I, converged, and the two sides met at the Battle of Königgrätz (Hradec Králové) on 3 July. The Prussian Elbe Army advanced on the Austrian left wing, and the First Army on the centre, prematurely; they risked being counter-flanked on their own left. Victory therefore depended on the timely arrival of the Second Army on the left wing. This was achieved through the brilliant work of its Chief of Staff, Leonhard Graf von Blumenthal. Superior Prussian organization and élan decided the battle against Austrian numerical superiority, and the victory was near total, with Austrian battle deaths nearly seven times the Prussian figure. Austria rapidly sought peace after this battle. Traditionally the Austrian tactics were to present a long skirmish line, which attacked with the bayonet. In contrast the Prussians latest strategy presented smaller units who held their ground with volley fire. During the earlier Franco Prussian War it was believed by the French that the Dreyse fired high, so a charge had a potential successful outcome, but this intelligence was vastly overrated by the Hapsburg Army. During the first twenty minutes of the Battle of Konninggratz the Hapsburg Army lost 10,000 men. This was because Dreyse’s needlefire rifle was capable of being fired at a rate of 12 shots a minute compared to the average rate of fire of 3 rounds a minute for the Lorenz muzzle loader which also required the rifle to be reloaded standing up presenting a large target to the Prussians. By the end of the War it was apparent to the Hapsburg Army that it was significantly outgunned by the use of breach loading rifles and an urgent trial was accelerated in which 33 different breach loading rifles were being evaluated. Initially the front runner for adoption was the Remington Rolling Block Rifle which was robust and relatively easy to manufacture. There is no doubt that Austrian pride and political machinations and intrigue behind the scenes about the USA resulted in the adoption of an Austrian design which was the Werndl. The Landwehr had up until this time used the muzzle loading Lorenz rifle and latterly a number of breech converted Lorenz rifles converted with the Wanzl system whose large bore rimfire cartridge proved unpopular also arriving too late to be of influence in the Austrian Prussian War. The rifle was designed and patented by Josef Werndl (1831–1889) and Karel Holub (1830–1903) later bought out all the rights, but was involved in name only. It was the first successful small bore breech loading rifle of the Austrian Army The new rifle designated the Model 66/67 was rated during trials at 14 aimed shots a minute or 20 un-aimed shots and was determined to be capable of hitting a man sized target at 200 paces and a horse at 200 paces. The original cartridge case was 11.15mm x 42 mm rimmed and fired a 308 grain bullet at a velocity of 1430 feet a second. Unusually the carbine version was issued with a different case which was only 36 mm long. In contrast other manufacturers such as Remington used the same cartridge as their rifles with a reduced charge. Interestingly the carbine cartridge was also used in the huge Montenegro Gasser revolver. The rifle has a robust mechanism with an extractor on the left hand side. The “tang” is actually a flat spring which serves to lock the breech with a secondary locking mechanism of the hammer. The firing pin is canted through the breech block and is centrefire. A disadvantage is the inordinate trigger pull which usually measures at over 10 pounds. The rifle has a half cock safety feature. The rifling has 6 grooves with one turn in 29”and the barrel is fitted with a bayonet lug to take a sabre style bayonet. In 1878 the rifle was modified to take a 58 mm long cartridge which fired a patched bullet increased in size from 308 to 370 grains which was more in parity with the competing Rolling Block rifles. The old stock of rifles was rechambered for the new round and the sights changed. Josef Werndl’s father founded the Steyr factory and an initial order for 600,000 units placed by Josef Werndl basically formed the foundations of the Steyr factory that is still extant today. In 1869 a journalist from the British Times Newspaper visited the Steyr factory and it is reported that Wendl test fired a rifle to illustrate its accuracy and then threw it out of the top office of the factory into the cobbled courtyard and fired it again without loss of accuracy and this was repeated three times. The journalist reported that there was only cosmetic damage to the rifle stock, but the mechanism was undamaged, and it held its accuracy. The rifle remained in service until the Mannlicher straight pull bolt action rifle was introduced as its replacement in 1886 but was still in use with secondary units as late as 1918. It is reported that a large consignment was acquired by the USA Bannerman company who supplied several USA militia units with the rifle. This particular rifle is in very good condition and mechanically sound and is unit market. There is no doubt the rifle has seen field use and has the bumps and dents in the walnut stock to show this but fortunately nothing major to report and this isn’t one that was thrown out of a top office window! An interesting rifle developed and introduced as a result of an overwhelming defeat. See also my example of a later Werndl Carbine.
Good Winchester 1897 Pump Action Shotgun manufactured 1904 This is a nice Winchester 1897 in 12 Gauge. The gun is restricted so can be owned on a Shotgun Certificate. There is a lot of original colour and contemporary checkering on the butt with an original steel butt plate. Many 1897's are cut down and fitted with rubber butt pads to increase the length of pull. Some non original screws in the fore end wood and these are being brought across from the USA later this month. A scarce gun in good condition in the UK. Shotgun certificate required for purchase in UK.
Good Winchester 1901 10 Gauge Shotgun Another fine Winchester 1901 Under lever shotgun, This one has good wood, a good bore and has been unmolested with the original steel butt plate intact. Now getting scarce to locate. I have a similar condition model 1887 also in stock.
Good Winchester Model 1894 Saddle Ring Carbine This is a Winchester Model 1894 saddle ring carbine in obsolete 32-40 calibre so no license required. This particular rifle was manufactured in 1898 so is an antique under US laws and can be freely imported into the USA. As antique 1894 rifles are found this is about as nice as you will find. It is completely untouched, no sanding or abrasive cleaning, tight mechanics, excellent wood and a good bore. Stamping is crisp and the rifle has mellowed overall to a plum colour as can be seen. The Carbine has the correct ladder rear sight and the full length magazine. This is a good honest Winchester Carbine which is scarcer than the rifle. The Winchester Model 1894 was the first commercial American repeating rifle built to be used with smokeless powder. The 1894 was originally chambered to fire 2 metallic black powder cartridges, the .32-40 Winchester and .38-55 Winchester. In 1895 Winchester went to a different steel composition for rifle manufacturing that could handle higher pressure rounds and offered the rifle in .25-35 Winchester and .30-30 Winchester. The .30-30 Winchester, or .30WCF (Winchester Centre fire), is the cartridge that has become synonymous with the Model 1894. Starting in 1899, the Model 1894 was also chambered in .32 Winchester Special. The Model 94's combination of potent firepower in a compact, lightweight, comfortable-to-carry, and quick-shooting package has made it an extremely popular hunting rifle, particularly for white-tailed deer in the dense forests of the Eastern United States, where most game is killed at relatively short distances. The Winchester 1894's design allowed the cycling of longer cartridges than the Winchester 1892 carbines could permit. When the lever is pulled down, it brings the bottom of the receiver with it, opening up more space and allowing a longer cartridge to feed without making the receiver longer. The mechanism is complex but very reliable. Complete stripping of the action is a multistage task that must be accomplished in precise sequence. However, it is rarely necessary to completely strip the action. The largest cartridge that the 1894 action can accommodate is the .450 Marlin, which was chambered in some custom rifles and the short-lived Timber Carbine on a beefed-up 1894 "big bore" receiver. As previously mentioned this particular rifle is chambered in 32-40 and I illustrate an example of the round so you can see the length of it in respect to the action. This rifle was manufactured in nickel steel. I will supply an inert cartridge for display purposes if required. Price includes insured courier to your door.
Good Winchester Model 1901 10 Gauge Shotgun This is another nice Winchester 1901 Shotgun. The gun has a pretty good bore, original finish on the receiver, and has the original steel butt plate which was often removed and replaced with a rubber pad. The rest of the finish is faded as can be seen but the woodwork is good with no problems. This is a pretty good representative gun. The model 1901 was basically a redesign on the earlier 1887 model. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder shot shells, and so a redesign resulted in the stronger Winchester Model 1901, 10-gauge only, to handle the advent of the more powerful smokeless powder. No 12-gauge chambering was offered, as Winchester did not want the Model 1901 to compete with their successful 12-gauge Model 1897 pump-action shotgun. Other distinguishing characteristics of the Model 1901 are: a two piece lever the Winchester trademark stamp was moved to the upper tang, behind the hammer serial numbers between 64,856 and 79,455 This particular shotgun has a serial number of 66855 and can be dated to 1902 and would have been one of the first ones manufactured. A real “Cowboy” gun. This is a good 1901 I have seen and would be considered scarce in the USA but rare in the UK. I am finding these increasingly difficult to source in the USA as there are actually more registered Winchester collectors than the number of these guns that were manufactured! This shotgun is chambered for the short 10 gauge cartridge and does not require a license to own it in the UK.
Gorgeous Joseph Egg 28 Bore flintlock travelling pistol. Maker: Joseph Egg (1775-1837), London I don't think I've used Gorgeous as a superlative before. Joseph Egg, nephew of Durs Egg, can be classified as one of the top five London gun makers at the turn of the 19th Century. He is best known for his beautiful flintlock and percussion Baby Egg pistols an example of which I sold in recent times. These pistols seldom appear on the market and are eagerly sought after by collectors. This splendid example of a 28 bore travelling pistol is rare as the two periods during which Joseph Egg made flintlocks in his own name was relatively short. He may have made a few from his own premises in Great Windmill Street in 1800 but this was short lived as he formed a partnership with Henry Tatham the following year which lasted until 1814. At this time he recommenced trading in his own name from his shop at 1, Piccadilly on the opposite corner of Coventry Street/Haymarket - in fact directly opposite where his uncle Durs Egg had his premises between 1786-1804. Joseph Egg remained at 1, Piccadilly between 1814 - 1834 (his sons took over in 1835), it was during this period that he made his Baby Eggs, drawing upon the experience of the over and under flintlocks made in the Tatham and Egg period. The pistol being sold here was made soon after he recommenced work in his own name as within a few years the majority of pistols he manufactured changed to the “new” percussion system with the exception of special commissioned over and under pistols and cased duelling sets made for discerning clients who did not wish to break with tradition. This particular pistol demonstrates the skill of Joseph Egg which was to be enhanced on his exquisite Baby Egg pistols. The 4.1/2” barrel is signed "Joseph Egg London" and has a flat top provided with a blade foresight and V shaped rear sight on the tang which is engraved. The overall length of the pistol is 9”. The Lock is engraved with flowers and sun rays and is signed "Joseph Egg". The lock and cock is engraved with a border of wheat ears which is typical of Joseph Egg’s work. The lock has a roller frizzen with a rainproof pan and has a sliding safety lever which still exhibits much of its deep fire blue case hardening. The flint cock has matching flower engraving to the lock plate which is continued on the lock plate, tang and culminating is a martial drum and flag scene on the trigger guard. The trigger guard is then finished with a pineapple finial. The pistol is accompanied by its original ebony brass tipped ramrod with a concealed worm. The lock is mechanically sound with a heavy spring and cocks and locks on both full and half cock. An observation about minor issues is that the vacant silver escutcheon on the tang has a crease where presumably someone removed initials at a time contemporary to its initial ownership. There is much remaining finish as can be seen but some light pitting around the engraved name on the top flat. The walnut stock has an outstanding grain as can be seen and the butt is very finely finished with cross hatched diamond chequering in the style of the Baby Eggs. The gorgeous pistol exudes quality and as a representative example of Joseph Eggs work it would not be easy to improve on as these are seldom seen on the market.
Great War Medal Trio Drvr C M du Preez SASA This trio is accompanied by an original photograph of Drvr du Preez and the Victory Medal is bilingual. I was told by a customer that when he was doing National Service in South Africa he became friends with a du Preez family who owned a gold mine! Worthy of further research. Medals are G.VF.
Greene (British Type) Carbine 1855-57 This is a 54 bore capping breech loader of exceptional quality. James Durell Greene was a prolific firearms inventor and determined to make his mark! This carbine was manufactured by the Massachusetts Arms Company and exported to Great Britain after being inspected and stamped with the Queens Crown by British inspectors in the USA. These were used by the British Cavalry in the Crimean War but re-exported to the USA after the Crimea War. These were deemed to be very accurate but the paper and linen cartridges of the time were criticised as being prone to swell in the damp and consequently the carbine did not find favour with the British Government. The carbine features an unusual "floating thimble" to obdurate the breech and an internal "pricker" (see photograph) that punctured the cartridge. It also featured Maynard Tape priming which was in the forefront of priming technology at the time and the mechanism for this is in perfect condition. The patch box contains some old instructions for loading and firing the carbine and the carbine will be supplied with some interesting articles published on the weapon some 40 years ago. The quality of workmanship is exceptional and it breaks and locks as crisply today as it did when it was made 156 years ago. An exceptional item in outstanding condition. Only 2000 manufactured and most broken up as evidenced by numerous examples of lock plates extant in the market.
Greener W.W.Greener was a prolific and reputable manufacturer of rifles and his range covered everything from Big Game rifles in large calibres to gallery target rifles in .22 RF. This is an exceptionally interesting little rifle - a MkII Sharpshooter's Club rifle in obsolete 310 calibre in a take down version. The take down facility is fast and positive, simply push forward the barrel latch and unthread the barrel. The idea here was to allow the rifle to be carried in luggage ( those were the days! ). This particular rifle has a minty bore and plenty of original finish on the Receiver. Mechanics are fine and should you wish to place this on a FAC, it would make a good shooter. These rifles are becoming difficult to find as so many were erroneously handed in during firearms "armistices" and more than difficult to find in such pleasing condition. If you consider that the average cadet rifle is now selling at £650 this is a sound investment. See this at the Bristol Antique Arms Fair Sunday 3rd March.
Greener Best Express Rifle W W Greener is famous for many patents and his shotgun's found International repute. Greener offered every conceivable type of firearm including revolvers, whale harpoon guns and flare guns. An area that the Greener company specialised in was single shot rifles, many of which were sold to the Colonies for hunting Big Game. This is a superb example of a Greener single shot rifle in .375 Express calibre which is a flanged round and not to be confused with the .375 H&H introduced by Holland and Holland in 1912. This rifle is of excellent quality with an unusual "jewelled" engraving on both sides of the receiver. The bore is excellent and the wood is also very good and the rifle has perfect mechanics and has seen little use. These are uncommon rifles as many were replaced with bolt action rifles and not preserved.
Greener Humane Cattle Killer Now this is UNUSUAL! A Victorian Greener cattle killer circa 1895 complete with box. A fantastic thing for a Greener Collector or the collector of the unusual. This gun metal pistol/killer fired a 310 bullet (Obsolete) into the brain and spinal cord for a quick death. The large gunmetal or bronze cup protected the user from both sound and ricochets. This is complete with two INERT 310 rounds as seen in the photo. The only negative is the original leather handle has been replaced with a plastic one but this could be replaced. Very rare in its original box. The top unscrewed and the cartridge was placed inside and the striker was hit with the wooden mallet. This one is virtually unused.
H.Nock Experimental Carbine for the Light Horse Volunteers circa 1798. Henry Nock (1741-1804) is best remembered for manufacturing the famous 7 shot “Volley Gun” and for designing the pattern of musket that evolved into the Land Pattern or “Brown Bess” musket used as the standard firearm in the revolutionary and peninsular wars. In 1798 unable to obtain the Harcourt Carbine, Colonel Charles Herries commissioned the design of a new carbine from Henry Nock who had been involved in the design and production of the Harcourt and Heavy Dragoon Carbines. The Carbine had a 30” barrel which was longer than the Heavy Dragoon barrel. These were later cut down to 26”, a patch box added together with a sword bayonet. The standard ordnance carbine was smooth bore 0.75” bore and Nock later reduced this to 0.65” as is this example. All of the Light Horse Volunteer Carbines were fitted with a leather cheek pad as has this one which is in a remarkable state of preservation. The carbine features London proof marks and has a rack number on the forend brass cap. The barrel is the original 30” length and the quality is conducive to that of Nock’s manufacture. The Lock is marked “H.Nock” with “London” on the top of the barrel. Other than one small sliver of wood loss by a retaining pin that doesn’t detract from the looks of the carbine, this is a handsome looking and unusual carbine celebrating its 219th Birthday this year. The leather sling is probably a later Victorian addition. Flintlock arms were still being used by the Militia long after the introduction of percussion cap ignition. For further information on the experimental arms of Henry Nock see British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard L Blackmore who devotes a whole chapter to the subject. British gun making at its best and an example that would grace any early martial flintlock collection.
Harrington & Richards This is a Harrington & Richards “Victor no 3” revolver that was manufactured circa 1876. The revolver is a spur triggered 30 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and does exhibit some wear to the plating but this is restricted to wear and not corrosion or pitting and there is an overall smooth finish to the gun. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as “Saturday Night Specials”. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase “Saturday Night Specials” is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the “Saturday Night Special”. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a “Saturday Night Special”. I now accept credit cards. No Reduced!
Harrington & Richardson This is another nice Harrington & Richardson "Victor no 3" revolver that was manufactured circa 1876. The revolver is a spur triggered 30 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and does exhibit some wear to the plating but this is restricted to wear and not corrosion or pitting and there is an overall smooth finish to the gun. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as ?Saturday Night Specials?. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase "Saturday Night Specials" is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the ?Saturday Night Special?. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a "Saturday Night Special" and in little less better condition than the other one I offer but nevertheless a nice revolver.
Harrington & Richardson This Harrington and Richardson Blue Jacket No 2 revolver is a typical "Saturday Night Special" designed to be carried into town concealed on the person at times when the larger revolvers such as Colt and Remington Army or Navy models were prohibited by local by-laws. This is a good example with much finish that rotates, cocks and locks.
Hood Firearms Colt copy The Hood Firearms Company was a prolific manufacturer of low cost but decent quality "Saturday Night Special" revolvers marketed with a variety of names including the "Czar", "Tramps Terror", "Union Jack" and "Destroyer" etc. This one is titled "Marquis of Lorne" and is seldom found in this condition. To be frank this is an out and out copy of a Colt revolver but of course is a fraction of the price that a Colt would cost in this condition. This is a super 30 RF calibre revolver in great mechanical and cosmetic condition and a perfect example of this genre that could not be bettered.
Hood Firearms Revolver 32 Rimfire This is a perfect Hood Firearms 32 rim fire revolver with a side button release for the cylinder. This is in excellent condition and functions as it should with a tight lock up. Hood were a prolific manufacturer of such revolvers and neither myself nor my USA colleagues have seen one un-named such as this one so it could be a pattern. Hood manufactured various names such as the "Union Jack", "Czar" "Destroyer" etc and the various and sometimes outlandish names the revolvers were marketed under were an essential part of their success in competition to the larger manufacturers such as Colt and Remington. This is a great example of an interesting revolver manufactured by one of the leading gun makers of this type of weapon at the time.
Hopkins & Allen This is a solid little Hopkins & Allen Arms company Model 1871 “Blue Jacket” revolver in 32 Rim fire calibre. The revolver has more than 90% of the original nickel plating with a few little spots of wear and the mechanics are sound, it cocks and locks perfectly with a crisp action. The wooden grips are unblemished and the cylinder release mechanism works fine allowing the cylinder to be easily released. There is some slight pitting half way down the barrel not really evident from the photo and it may clean but doesn’t detract from the overall appearance. These little revolvers, sometimes erroneously called “suicide specials”, were the mainstay of personal protection in the 1870-1890’s and beyond because they were inexpensive, reliable and at close quarter deadly and easily concealable. The Outlaw Jesse James carried a Hopkin & Allen model 1873. This is a pleasing and typical example of the type. Hopkins & Allen Arms Company was a US firearms manufacturing company based in Norwich, Connecticut that was founded in 1868 by Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The Hopkins brothers ran the day-to-day operations of the company. In 1874 Converse sold his interest in the company to Brothers William and Milan Hulbert, giving the Hulbert's 50% of the company's assets and capital. Hopkins & Allen became the exclusive maker of Merwin Hulbert revolvers as a result of this. Following the bankruptcy of the Hulbert brothers in 1896, Hopkins & Allen went bankrupt in 1898. The company was reorganized as Hopkins & Allen Arms Company but lost its factory and machinery in a fire in 1900, also along with the great robbery in 1905 shortly after, thieves cleared out the whole warehouse. Hopkins & Allen rebuilt its factory in 1901 and produced 40,000 firearms a year. In 1902, the company acquired Forehand and Wadsworth, for whom it had been making revolvers under contract. The company was awarded a contract to build Mauser rifles for the Belgian Army early in World War I, but the contract fell apart after Germany invaded Belgium. Although the company continued to manufacture firearms, it never financially recovered and went bankrupt in 1916 with Marlin-Rockwell purchasing its machinery, inventory and designs in 1917. In addition to the Merwin Hubert revolvers, Hopkins & Allen manufactured a variety of spur trigger single-action revolvers in .22, .32, and .38 calibres with trade names such as ACME, American Eagle, Blue Jacket, Captain Jack, Chichester, Defender, Dictator, Imperial Arms Co., Monarch, Mountain Eagle, Ranger, Tower's Police Safety, Universal, and XL, and later hinged-frame double-action models. Hopkins & Allen manufactured revolvers for Forehand & Wadsworth under contract as well as shotguns, rifles, and derringers for various sporting goods stores
Hopkins & Allen Dictator 32 RF revolver This is a very decent Hopkins and Allen "Dictator" revolver in obsolete 32 RF calibre. The top strap is stamped with the makers name and the patent date of May 27th 1879. Revolver cocks and locks well and is in overall very good condition as can be seen with birds head gutta percha grips with one small sliver loss on right grip. This is a very typical example of the gun known as a "Saturday Night Special" as it was easily concealed to overcome legislation at the time which forbid the carrying of sidearms on weekends. There were literally hundreds of different named revolvers manufactured at this time and this is not one of the commonest.
Hopkins & Allen Ranger No 2 revolver. To say this is a fancy little Saturday Night "Special" would be an understatement! This is a factory engraved spur trigger .32 rimfire revolver made by Hopkins and Allen between 1870-1880 time period. The revolver is factory engraved in the classic Hopkins and Allen / Merwin Hulbert factory style. The bright red celluloid birds-head grips were a scarce factory option that was designed to simulate coral. There are a few little chips on one grip as can be seen but I do have those. The mechanics are a little off. The hammer locks solidly back in both half cock and full cock, and the trigger releases the hammer as it should. The hand rotates the cylinder but the lock up is a little slack, not a real problem as a collectible. An interesting and unusual little revolver.
Hopkins & Allen XL revolver. Hopkins & Allen Arms Company was a US firearms manufacturing company based in Norwich, Connecticut that was founded in 1868 by Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The Hopkins brothers ran the day-to-day operations of the company. In 1874 Converse sold his interest in the company to brothers William and Milan Hulbert, giving the Hulbert's 50% of the company's assets and capital. Hopkins & Allen became the exclusive maker of Merwin Hulbert revolvers as a result of this. Following the bankruptcy of the Hulbert brothers in 1896, Hopkins & Allen went bankrupt in 1898. The company was reorganized as Hopkins & Allen Arms Company but lost its factory and machinery in a fire in 1900, also along with the great robbery in 1905 shortly after, thieves cleared out the whole warehouse. This particular revolver is more substantial than most "suicide specials" as they were called as it is in 38 calibre. This revolver has a solid frame and good mechanics and interesting grips featuring a "hound dawg" motif. The top strap is stamped "Hopkins & Allen Mfg Co" Pat March 1871 and May 1878" and XL No 5 38 RF. Another interesting revolver.
Hopkins & Allen XL revolver. Reduced! Another good example of a Hopkins and Allen XL no 4 revolver in.38 Rim fire obsolete calibre. Large rimfire calibre revolvers are scarcer as they really were competing with small frame centre fire revolvers. This one is in sound mechanical finish with lots of finish and wooden walnut birds head grips. The revolver has patent dates of March 28th 1871 and April 27th 1876. The chilling thing about this revolver is that there are three distinct notches cut into the grip that are contemporary to the age of the revolver so I believe this artifact was put to the use it was intended in the past.
Hopkins and Allen This Hopkins and Allen "Defender 89" revolver is a typical "Saturday Night Special" designed to be carried into town concealed on the person at times when the larger revolvers such as Colt and Remington Army or Navy models were prohibited by local by-laws. This is a good example with much finish that rotates, cocks and locks. Very ornate gutta percha grips that boldly state the pistols name with only a tiny sliver missing from one edge that is insignificant.
Hopkins and Allen This is a typical "Saturday Night Special" in obsolete 30 RF calibre. The maker is Hopkins and Allen and the model is the "Defender". Revolver cocks and locks perfectly and is a decent example of an iconic gun that was carried in the "Wild West" by thousands of people as their means of personal defense.
Hopkins and Allen This is a very decent Hopkins and Allen "Dictator" revolver in obsolete 32 RF calibre. The top strap is stamped with the makers name and the patent date of May 27th 1879. Revolver cocks and locks well and is in overall very good condition as can be seen with fancy grips. This is a very typical example of the gun known as a "Saturday Night Special" as it was easily concealed to overcome legislation at the time which forbid the carrying of sidearms on weekends. There were literally hundreds of different named revolvers manufactured at this time and this is not one of the commonest. Price includes overnight courier to your door. Please note that I comply with VCR legislation.
Hopkins and Allen Revolver with Robbery Provenance This is an interesting revolver. A later Hopkins and Allen Defender model revolver in 32 RF obsolete calibre with high quality flying Eagle grips. The revolver is in overall excellent condition and cocks and locks perfectly. The interesting thing about the revolver is that it is accompanied by an old hand written tag that states that the "Gun was used in the robbery of the Sacremento and Northern Depot". The vendor told me he had bought the gun in the early 1970's and the person who sold it told him that his father was a Sheriff and this came out of an evidence locker that was being disposed of because of age and to raise funds for the police department. It is highly unusual to find these little guns with any provenance and this is a fine example that could be researched as Railroad robberies were always reported in detail. Revolver looks better than the photographs.
Huge Adams 38 Bore cased revolver circa 1850. This huge Adams patent self-cocking or “automatic” Dragoon revolver is in 38 bore (50 Calibre) and features an 8” barrel. These revolvers did not have a spur on the hammer and were fired double action. The action on this revolver is exceptional and extremely fast, certainly as fast if not faster than a modern double action revolver! The cased set features all of its accessories including the rare “tailed” mould. These early revolvers were made without a rammer and the bullets were simply pushed into the cylinder by hand and the hope was that the tail or spike behind the bullet would pierce the wad and hold it in place securely. This was not always the case and often the bullets would simply fall out of the cylinder leading to embarrassing or even fatal events. The revolver is in remarkably good condition with much original finish and is marked on the top strap with the makers name and address “Deane Adams & Deane, Makers to HRH Prince Albert. 30 King William Street, London Bridge”. The revolver is mechanically sound and has good grips with a captive percussion cap container with a hinged lid. The accessories include a James Dixon powder flask, oil bottle, nipple key and turn screw, cleaning rod and oil bottle. There is a small bag of original cast bullets also contained within the box. There is no doubt that this is an original set as the good finish of the accessories matches the finish of the revolver. The English case has a vacant brass roundel in the lid and has its original key for the lock although the lock escutcheon is missing. It is very satisfying to find a complete cased set with the correct mould that has not been messed around with and without the later modification of a rammer addition. For further and detailed information on this revolver read Taylerson’s seminal work on the subject “Adams revolvers”.
Huge Webley Bulldog Revolver 500 calibre with provenance A rare opportunity! If ever you have wanted to own a huge .500 calibre Bulldog Webley revolver, now is your chance! These revolvers are RARE and seldom appear on the market. Not only is this magnificent looking chunk of British engineering design rare but it has celebrated provenance and has appeared in several books including; The Webley Story by William Chipchase Dowell This revolver was owned by Dowell and sold in the auction of his renowned collection. Webley Revolvers by Gordon Bruce, Christian Reinhart Page 88 Figure IV/71 with the caption "This five shot brute is the largest known Bull Dog revolver. It bears British proof marks but no serial number." Webley Solid Frame Revolvers by Joel Black, Homer Ficken, Frank Michaels Pages 254 and 255 with the comment ".....huge revolver" According to Joel Black and his co-authors, this is one of less than 12 “true” Webley 500 revolvers extant and the gun is very well known. It is also featured in the Gun Digest “Book of the Revolver” although the publishers have juxtaposed the title of it on the adjacent Behemoth revolver. Very few of these revolvers are known and fewer still with British proof marks. Barrel length 6.7cm Overall length 17.5cm Weight (unloaded) 705g (1lb 8 3/4ozs ... in old money) The revolver was manufactured in Belgium possibly by Dumoulin, but was proofed in Birmingham. Webley & Son most probably marketed the revolver; the "JD" stamping on the cylinder is one of the two sets of initials (the other being HM) found on the cylinders of Belgian-made Webley Bulldogs that were sold by Webley. The top strap does not have the Bulldog legend, but the revolver is of that form. Many British Revolvers of this period were actually made in Belgium because of quality and price and this is a practise that was established decades before. This fine looking revolver is as seen, mechanically sound, it cocks and locks as it should and the loading gate has a good strong spring, the grips are very good and commensurate with the rest of the revolver and it has some very light surface pitting but overall a pleasing patina. The bore is good with deep rifling and overall a very impressive piece of hand artillery!
Huge Webley Pryse Style Counet .500 revolver Other than some surface roughness and minor pitting here and there, this revolver is in surprisingly good condition after at least 120 years of existence. And this was one of the biggest shooting machines available especially for British Officers as well as for any others who wanted a true man-stopping firearm (see paragraph below). The action works quite well both SA and DA and the lock-up is fairly tight with some minor movement in the cylinder. The bore is in very good condition with strong rifling and some minor pits here and there. The extraction system operates just as it should. The original nickel is only found in a few spots and small areas, otherwise the lines and marks are good. There is more minor surface pitting on the barrel and barrel assembly (as well as some larger areas on the cylinder), and unfortunately one of the spots of noticeable surface pitting is right where the original marks are stamped at the left rear of the barrel. But the marks are still visible enough to work out the following: BREVET COUNET, 3463 - this number is most likely a patent number because the serial number is stamped further down on the action itself: 4482. The caliber of 500 is also stamped on the left of the barrel assembly. This revolver is a classic Counet with the large headed bolt on the left, which when turned with the arrow pointing back allows the center post to be removed. The revolver uses the Pryse system for the opening of the top-break mechanism. This is the full Pryse system with the two fingers that lock bolts into both sides of the post on the rear of the barrel assembly – while adding a bit of complication to the top-break system the Pryse locking mechanism was a much safer system than the type of lock used on the Smith & Wesson (and its copiers). The revolver also has the finger rest under the trigger guard, which in the handling of the larger revolvers really does help in steadying the gun for firing; it doesn’t help on any quick draw attempts, but a gun this big wasn’t designed either for fancy draws nor for spinning in the hand. The grips are in good condition showing normal wear, and the entire original pattern is still present. For size comparison I have shown the revolver next to a Webley .450 Calibre Bulldog, itself a "chunky" revolver, the Counet .500 is substantially larger, and that with only 5 chambers! The barrel measures 5-5/8 inches (142mm), and overall the revolver is 10-5/16 inches long (262mm). The revolver is marked on the rear of the cylinder with the inspector’s mark of a star over R (1877 to 1968) and the pre-1894 Liege proof. This proof was the very best in Europe in the 19th century; each chamber had to be proofed or proved by firing a double load 4 times. No junk ever got past that proof. Several manufacturers in Great Britain, France and Germany sent their finished small arms to Belgium just for this proof. Altogether this is a fine Counet/Pryse system revolver manufactured in Belgium to some of the strictest requirements in 19th century Europe. THE COUNET-PRYSE PATENT: Phippe Counet patented this particular revolver in Liege in 1876 and it was available in chamberings from .320 right up to .500 Webley, as with this one. We actually found one about 5 years back that was chambered for the monster .577 cartridge. Philippe Counet was registered for proof tests in Liege between the years of 1865 and 1905. Having the 1877 inspection mark as well as the pre-1894 Liege proof means that this revolver was manufactured sometime in this period. But I assume it was made closer to 1880 when the .500 Webley round came out. A MARKET AMONG BRITISH OFFICERS: Although the big-bore Belgian and British revolvers were sold commercially to anyone who wished to haul a cannon around, the main market to which these were directed was the officer corps among the British armed services. The Zulu troubles in South Africa and uprisings in Sudan had taught the British Military that they needed handguns that were chambered for something more powerful that the .450 Adams cartridge that had been the first centerfire, brass cased cartridge to be used by the British. The British eventually chambered their ordinance revolvers in the new .455 (sometimes called the .476) in 1892. But in answer to the call of the officer’s themselves, who had to purchase their own sidearms, the .500 Webley or .500 Tranter cartridge had already appeared sometime about 1880 (see paragraph below). The .500 Webley revolver became almost the sidearm of choice for hundreds of British officers who wanted a big enough punch to actually stop in their tracks any attacking enemy (and in most cases kill them with one shot). The only commerical cartridge that surpassed the .500 was truly big .577 Webley. That was a round that was not topped in overall impact (and pure destruction), even with its relatively slow velocity, until the .41 Magnum appeared in 1964. The only setback to packing a .577 Revolver around was the huge machine that had to be built around the bullets. It was the kind of revolver that was more often kept under the seat on a wagon or stage than in a holster, because all that weight in a holster either caused a horribly lopsided stride or worse, brought about the embarrassing phenomenom of encounting ones trousers around the ankles. Even the big .500 requires a strong hand and steady aim, and was never the favorite revolver of the quick draw crowd. The battle experience of British Officers using this big round was enough to keep interest high and keep manufacturing of these revolvers and their ammo profitable right up into the first decades of the 20th century. THE .500 WEBLEY CARTRIDGE: The .500 Webley or .500 Tranter revolver cartridge, was introduced around 1880 in England for use in revolvers based on the Tranter and Webley patents. It was designed in answer to the call of British officers for a truly man-stopping handgun cartridge. The bullets weighed in the range of 340 to 350 grains and developed about 650 fps with its black powder load (that doesn’t sound like a screaming bullet, but nothing was left standing when it hit). British production of the cartridge ended by 1920;
Husqvarna 600 Rolling Block Elk Rifle in original case. Magnificent is not a superlative I use very often but in this case I will make an exception. This is a cased Husqvarna Moose or Elk rolling block rifle in approximately 600 calibre. The rifle is in superb condition and has seen very little use, there is vibrant case hardening still extant on the receiver and the chequering is crisp and sharp. Swedish Rolling block hunting rifles are often encountered as the Swedes were one of the first nations to adopt Remington’s innovative design for their military and naturally civilians also wished to use what was considered the most advanced rifle of its day. In later years many military rifles were sporterised to give further service but these are generally seen in the 12mm calibre range, this beast is more than double the size of these and has been designed for one thing alone, stopping power to hunt the largest mammals extant in the Northern Hemisphere. The bore of this rifle is excellent and measures 0.618” and should you wish to place the rifle on a firearms certificate to seek the extremely elusive British Moose, cases can be fire formed from 24 gauge brass shotgun cases and the rifle is accompanied by a custom made mould. The Swedes produced these rifles with virtually straight rifling which allowed the user to shoot both ball and shot to circumnavigate shooting laws at the time which prohibited the shooting of Elk with shotguns so the gun had a dual purpose as it could be used to fire shot as well. The size of the projectile fired by this rifle is quite extraordinary, a standard 0.577” Enfield Minie bullet simply drops through the barrel! The action on the rifle is crisp and there are no significant defects to report and this would make the centrepiece of any rolling block rifle collection and would be difficult if not impossible to improve upon. See this and other interesting rifles on my stand at the Birmingham International Arms Fair Sunday 17th February.
Iconic EV11 SMLE BSA rifle dated 1908 This is a very good pre-war Enfield Mk 111 complete with volley sights and magazine cut-off. BSA manufactured in 1908 this is the quintessential SMLE issued before the reality and rigours of WW1 revealed that the idea of Volley sights to fire at Cavalry at a distance and magazine cut-offs to save ammunition were really memories of the past and not relevant in the 20th Century. The owner tells me it was re-barrelled and reproofed by Fultons in the 1970's and has seen little service since. This is both a shooters rifle and a wonderful historical artefact. There are several cartouches and numbers on the butt. Overall a very tidy rifle and all changes admitted. I can deliver to your RFD for £25 and I will be exhibiting at the Northern Shooting Show at Harrogate and Bisley in May. Section 1 will require a FAC
Iconic Remington Type 2 41 Calibre Derringer The Remington Double Derringer Type II, Model Number 3 in .41 Rimfire was manufactured from 1888 to 1911 with an estimated quantity of 80,000 produced. This Double Derringer has a finish that has turned to a mellow plum/grey patina with 3 inch barrels and has a grooved rear sight and post front sight. Along the top of the upper barrel this pistol is marked "REMINGTON ARMS Co. ILION N.Y." This Remington remains in very nice condition save from the bores which shows some pitting among the strong rifling which is quite common as a result of the mercuric primers of the day. A major issue with these pistols is cracked and repaired top hinges and many "bargain" pistols have damaged hinges . This one is perfect with no damage to the hinges and only some slight loss to the grip which can be seen in the photographs. The pistol is contained in a naive ( crappy ) secret compartment jewelry box which I don't think I could give way but nevertheless I am! The Remington Derringer in 41 rimfire is an iconic pistol from the days of the Wild West much favored by Gamblers and Ladies of the Night ( or so we are led to believe ). This is a reasonable example at a reasonable price that includes overnight courier charges.
Iconic US Civil War Spencer Model 1865 carbine. This is an excellent Spencer repeating carbine manufactured by the Burnside rifle company that exudes quality. The Spencer repeating carbine was a manually operated lever-action, seven shot repeating carbine produced in the United States by three manufacturers between 1860 and 1869. Designed by Christopher Spencer, it was fed with cartridges from a tube magazine in the carbine's buttstock. The Spencer repeating carbine was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. At first, the view by the Department of War Ordnance Department was that soldiers would waste ammunition by firing too rapidly with repeating rifles, and thus denied a government contract for all such weapons. (They did, however, encourage the use of carbine breech loaders that loaded one shot at a time such as the Maynard carbine. Such carbines were shorter than a rifle and well suited for cavalry.]More accurately, they feared that the army’s logistics train would be unable to provide enough ammunition for the soldiers in the field, as they already had grave difficulty bringing up enough ammunition to sustain armies of tens of thousands of men over distances of hundreds of miles. A weapon able to fire several times as fast would require a vastly expanded logistics train and place great strain on the already overburdened railroads and tens of thousands of more mules, wagons, and wagon train guard detachments. The fact that several Springfield rifle-muskets could be purchased for the cost of a single Spencer carbine also influenced thinking. However, just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Spencer was able to gain an audience with President Abraham Lincoln, who invited him to a shooting match and demonstration of the weapon on the lawn of the White House. Lincoln was impressed with the weapon, and ordered Gen. James Wolfe Ripley to adopt it for production, after which Ripley disobeyed him and stuck with the single-shot rifles The Spencer showed itself to be very reliable under combat conditions, with a sustainable rate-of-fire in excess of 20 rounds per minute. Compared to standard muzzle-loaders, with a rate of fire of 2–3 rounds per minute, this represented a significant tactical advantage. However, effective tactics had yet to be developed to take advantage of the higher rate of fire. Similarly, the supply chain was not equipped to carry the extra ammunition. Detractors would also complain that the amount of smoke produced was such that it was hard to see the enemy, unsurprising, since even the smoke produced by muzzleloaders would quickly blind whole regiments, and even divisions as if they were standing in thick fog, especially on still days. One of the advantages of the Spencer was that its ammunition was waterproof and hardy, and could stand the constant jostling of long storage on the march, such as Wilson's Raid. The story goes that every round of paper and linen Sharps ammunition carried in the supply wagons was found useless after long storage in supply wagons. Spencer ammunition had no such problem. In the late 1860s, the Spencer company was sold to the Fogerty Rifle Company and ultimately to Winchester. You can see the Spencer influence in later Winchester lever action rifles. Many Spencer carbines were later sold as surplus to France where they were used during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870. This particular carbine is the Burnside produced carbine with a 20” barrel and overall length of 37” and is chambered for 50 calibre rim fire. The bore is good and the metalwork and woodwork is excellent. Mechanically the rifle works flawlessly and the original seven round magazine is extant in the butt. This handsome looking carbine would be difficult to beat for quality and value and represents an iconic arm of the American Civil War. Obsolete calibre no license needed.
Iconic Webley Air Pistols Occasionally I sell air weapons and here we have a small number of Webly air pistols with their original boxes. I have two Webley Premier and one Webley Senior type E designation. One of the Premier's is .177 calibre and the other .22". All are very nice pistols in very good order as can be seen. The Webley Premier that does not have the makers name in white was an American export and repatriated from the USA. The boxes containing instructions pasted into the lid and some accessories such as pellets, targets and one has a cleaning brush. Feel free to ask questions. Prices range from £265 to £350. For more information see Gordon Bruce's excellent book on the subject. Webley sold pistols in the USA in the 1960's as "indoor practise" guns to save the cost of ammunition and their market was focused on an older user. These are interesting and iconic guns that many of us owned as children and they are now increasing substantially in value as many were badly used and are difficult to find in excellent condition.
Iconic Winchester Model 1887 Shotgun .The Winchester 1887 repeating shotgun was one of John Browning’s most famous designs. The shotgun was developed in 1887 because of the demand for a repeating shotgun for lawmen and cowboys to use. Many thought that in close combat two shots were not enough firepower for a scatter gun and a repeating shotgun was needed to get the job done. Winchester approached Browning to build such a gun well aware that he was the best man for the job. Browning was already working on a pump action shotgun ( which eventually became the Winchester Model 1897 shotgun ) but Winchester felt that they should keep to the tradition of a lever action gun despite Browning’s protestations that his pump design was superior. Browning agreed to Winchester’s request and designed the Winchester Model 1887 in a remarkably short space of time. The shooter was now armed with five shots in the tubular magazine plus one in the chamber to triple the fire power compared to conventional shotguns. The 1887 was chambered in 10, 12 and 16 gauge, this example being 10 gauge which is an obsolete calibre that does not require a license to own it in the United Kingdom if held as an object of interest and curiosity only. As Browning anticipated, his pump design became more popular with the military but the 1887 lever action, later superceded by the Model 1901, remained a favourite with cowboys and lawmen late into the 20th century, and even became the iconic gun used in the Terminator movies by Arnold Schwarzenegger. The 1887 was designed for black powder loads and as a consequence of being used on the range and then stood in a corner without cleaning; it is very difficult to find examples without heavily pitted bores and often corroded mechanisms. This example clearly saw little use which is evidenced by the excellent woodwork and a special factory order 28” barrel with a bore that rates 8+ out of 10 and a perfect mechanism. Model 1887's were made at 32" and 20" for saddle use as standard but with special factory orders available with a 26" or 28" barrel. The magazine spring is exceptionally tight, again suggesting little use. Most of the original rust blue/black has faded on the receiver but there is a large amount of colour left on the barrel and magazine that has mainly turned to a plum brown colour as can be seen in the photographs and no dents or damage to the tubes other than a few minor surface scratches. Given the state of the woodwork and the barrel and the scarcity of nice examples this is one of the few occasions where I would suggest a professional re-blacking of the gun would be of benefit. Normally I would recommend leaving well alone but this gun could be improved. This is an iconic gun in great shape and would make a great enhancement to any shotgun or western shooting collection. See this and other interesting guns at Bisley October 17th/18th and 25th.
Iconic Winchester Model 1887 Shotgun 10 Bore 1st year of manufacture. This is a model 1887 shotgun and another of John Brownings' famous designs. This shotgun was first developed in 1887 by demand of a repeating shotgun for lawmen and cowboys to use. Many thought that two shots was not enough firepower for a scatter gun and a repeating shotgun was required to get the job done. Winchester asked Browning to build such a gun, well aware he was the best man for the job. Browning had already been working on a pump-action design (which would later become the Winchester 1897 shotgun), but Winchester wanted to keep tradition with a lever-action gun. The gun was chambered for 10, 12 and 16 gauge black powder cartridges. The standard barrel lengths were 20” and 30” but different lengths and finishes were available to order. This gun has a 28” barrel and is not cut down as evidenced from the position of the factory fitted foresight. These were working tools on the ranch and as they used black powder cartridges it is difficult to find them with decent bores. This one has a decent bore, reasonably good wood as can be seen and it has not been messed with or “improved”. From the serial number (3232) this gun was actually manufactured in 1887, the first year of production and is in great shape for a firearm that is 128 years old! An iconic shotgun and these are now getting scarce as the number of Winchester collectors is ever increasing.
Indian Mutiny F Pattern Musket 7th Gwalior Regiment. This is a very decent and historic .75” East India Co. F Pattern percussion musket to the 7th Gwalior infantry who were in the thick of the Indian Mutiny. EIC ‘F’ pattern side lock with bun nut retained hammer struck with EI Co. Rampant lion mark. Walnut stock with regulation F pattern brass furniture including spurred trigger guard for improved grip when fighting with a bayonet and F pattern bayonet catch. The right side of the butt with a brass marker disc engraved 7.GWI.I for issue to the 7th Gwalior infantry regiment. Barrel struck with feint London Proof marks has standing read sight and front sight / bayonet stud fitted. Last of the smooth bore muzzle loading percussion muskets adopted by the East India Company the F pattern was their issue equivalent of the British Ordnance issue Pattern 1842 musket and was a very solid reliable weapon being widely used by the company’s armies in India for many years. In good used service condition with some small losses to the edges of the stock, good barrel with much finish turning to blue brown with a fair bore and very good mechanical condition. An interesting piece for the British or EIC collector issued to one of the most famous of the company’s regiments. Accompanied with much research into the Regiment and its involvement in the Mutiny and weapons issued.
Indian Pattern \"Brown Bess\" Musket. This is a Third Pattern Brown Bess musket better known as the India Pattern. It was adopted by the British Army in 1797 replacing the previous Long Land and Short Land Patterns. During the 1790s the Honourable East India Company had an urgent requirement for a musket based on the Long and Short Land Patterns but with the aim of producing one easier and cheaper as well as more quickly than the patterns in use by the British Army at the time. The result was the Third or India Pattern Brown Bess in 1795. With the French Revolutionary Wars raging in Europe and elsewhere the British Army adopted this design in 1797 as a replacement for the more expensive previous pattern muskets which took longer to produce at a time when the army was expanding. As a result the Third or India Pattern became the standard British musket in use throughout the remainder of French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and was used in almost every theatre in which the British were present. It was the musket that the British soldier carried during the Peninsular War and the Hundred Days campaign including both the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo. It was also used in the War of 1812 in North America. This particular musket was made by a well known military maker – Parsons and the lock is engraved as such. The stock is in good condition with no cracks and the lock mechanism works perfectly with a very strong action. The gunmakers stamp has also been applied under the barrel. This is a reasonable example of an iconic firearm that clearly was issued and used.
Interesting Austro - Hungarian Werndl Jager Carbine This is a rather decent Werndl Model 1867/77 Carbine in obsolete 11mm calibre. This rifle is in original condition and has not been cut down or tampered with. There rifles had a rotary breech block with an external hammer and were virtually indestructible although extraction issues were reported as a result of the rotary breech. Good bore and no issues with the woodwork as can be seen other than superficial scuffs and scratches. Mechanically perfect and a real “sleeper”. These were made by Osterreichische Waffenfabriks- Gesellschaft , Steyr between 1867-74. The trigger guard indicates this was issued to Jager troops. These are quite difficult to find in reasonable condition and saw service in the Franco Prussian War. I will be listing a number of early rifles over the coming weeks.
Interesting Bayonet Boarding Pistol by Wilson circa 1800 The Wilson Family were extant as Gunmakers in London from 1730 to 1832 and were prolific Gunmakers turning their hand to basically anything including ducks foot pistols and Ferguson rifles! There is quite a bit of information available on the Wilsons, so an excellent research project for the next custodian. Brass pistols were generally manufactured as defensive weapons for stage coaches and offensive weapons for the military. They were made in brass as they were to be used at sea or in all weathers. This interesting example has a brass “blunderbuss” swamped barrel and the top is fitted with a 3” bayonet with the release fitted on the tang. Despite popular misconception, blunderbusses did not spread shot extensively, the design was to make loading easier on a moving coach or rocking boat at sea. The 12-bore pistol has a waterproof pan, and the lock is engraved Wilson with “London” engraved on the top of the barrel. The lock functions flawlessly and the ram rod is present, brass is in excellent order and the spring bayonet functions well with no loss of action of the spring. There is a tight old crack in the wood at the lock plate which isn’t going anywhere. Sometimes known as boarding guns and used in cutting out parties, these pistols were designed for close combat with the back up of a bayonet as there would be no time to reload in a cutting out party at sea. A pleasing example.
Interesting BSA Martini Cadet Rifle in 310 Calibre The Martini Cadet is a centre fire single shot rifle produced by BSA and W.W. Greener for the use of Australian military Cadets. Based on a miniature version of the Martini-Henry it was internally different. Chambered for the .310 Cadet also known as the .310 Greener, they were also sold to the public as the BSA No.4, 4a, 4b and 5 in other calibres like the .297/230 and .22 rim fire. This particular rifle has a good bore and the standard rear sight has been removed and replaced with a receiver mounted peep sight by someone that meant business on the range! A reasonable rifle the stock could be improved but the essential parts are working fine and it has a good bore, functional cocking indicator and a nice let off on the trigger. Chambered in 310 calibre these rifles are becoming increasingly popular again on Gallery ranges. Sold as an antique and curiosity this can be added to a Firearms Certificate if it were intended to be shot.
Interesting Colt 1863 Civil War Springfield Rifle This is an interesting rifle seldom seen in the UK and just the sort of thing I like to offer and shoot myself as it has so many dimensions which appeal to the collector, shooter, and restorer. The Springfield Model 1863 rifled musket is a .58 calibre rifled musket that fired a 1 ounce Minie bullet that was produced by the Springfield Armoury between 1863 and 1865. The Model 1863 was only a minor improvement over the Springfield Model 1861. As such, it is sometimes classified as just a variant of the Model 1861. The Model 1861, with all of its variants, is assumed was the most commonly used long arm in the American Civil War, with over 700,000 manufactured. The Model 1863 also has the distinction of being the last muzzle loading long arm produced by the Springfield Armoury. In reality in excess of 900,000 Enfield P53 rifles were exported to the USA so this is debatable. If you have a P53 and you probably do if you are interested in this rifle, then this is our US Cousins direct counterpart to our standard long arm at this time and used in one of the most dreadful conflicts of modern times. The Model 1863 was produced in two variants. The Type I eliminated the band springs and replaced the flat barrel bands with oval clamping bands. It also featured a new ramrod, a case-hardened lock, a new hammer, and a redesigned bolster (percussion chamber). Several of these modifications were based upon Colt's contract model 1861, known as the "Colt special". 273,265 Type I variants were manufactured in 1863. This is an excellent “Colt Special” dated stamped 1863 with Colts Hartford address on the lock. This is a shooters rifle and has a great bore with sharp rifling and an excellent lock mechanism and trigger let off. Springfield Armoury supervised the manufacturing and distribution of the Model 1861 muskets. In order to fulfil shortages, production was sub-contracted to a number of private manufacturers including Colt. The "Special" Model 1863 contract represented a transition from the Model 1861 design and incorporated many new features namely the contoured hammer, flat bolster and removal of band springs. Colt Fire Arms Manufacturing Co, Hartford, Connecticut produced approximately 70,000 muskets under this contract and this is one of those. Musket was designed as a single shot 58 cal. rifled muzzleloader, iron butt plate, contoured hammer, bolster is milled flat eliminating the clean out screw, leaf sight, three barrel bands are rounded with tightening screws . Round barrel length 40in. The rifle was delivered “in the white” so if you find one blued its wrong. This particular rifle is interesting as the previous owner had two stocks, the original for display and a superb walnut replacement for occasional shooting. The rifle can be disassembled and assembled in minutes. So what we have here is an excellent looking Colt special which has all the cachet of the Colt name, a significant Civil War rifle which is in shootable condition (I am selling as an antique under Section 58(2) but if the purchaser wishes to add this to their FAC and proof it then that is their prerogative) The rifle has the original ramrod and the original “US” marked butt plate is fitted. Price includes overnight courier to your door. I always include appropriate research with my firearms.
Interesting Copy of Volcanic pistol. Now this is an interesting piece and is a copy of a Volcanic pistol manufactured for collectors in the past purely for display. The purpose of the pistol is to illustrate the toggle loading mechanism which works and was the mechanism that evolved into the famous Winchester underlever rifle. This is purely for display and is non- functioning. The loading lever moves the toggle mechanism as it should, and you can see how the tubular spring magazine works and eventually evolved into the Winchester tube magazine feed and of course that of other rifles and carbines. This is a solid piece and heavy pistol that must have taken a huge amount of time to manufacture. The top strap is crudely stamped with the New Haven Arms Company and the patent date. The Volcanic Repeating Arms Company was an American company formed in 1855 by partners Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson to develop Walter Hunt's Rocket Ball ammunition and lever action mechanism. Volcanic made an improved version of the Rocket Ball ammunition, and a carbine and pistol version of the lever action gun to fire it. While the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company was short-lived, its descendants, Smith & Wesson and Winchester Repeating Arms Company, became major firearms manufactures. The Volcanic Repeating Arms Company began producing rifles and pistols in early 1856. These weapons used the “Rocket-ball” cartridge that consisted of a bullet with a hollow cavity in the base which contained the powder charge. A priming cap held the powder in place and provided ignition. The ammunition was made in either .31 or .41 calibre and was grossly under powered as muzzle energy was an unimpressive 56 foot pounds. Nevertheless this was an intimidating looking weapon and the precursor to many modern weapons and one of the first self-contained cartridge systems, the type of which is still being experimented with today. The frame of the Volcanic rifle was made of gunmetal, which is an early form of bronze. Softer than iron, gunmetal was easier to work with and would not rust. Pistols in .31 calibre were made in either 4 or 6 inch barrels holding 6 or 10 rounds, respectively. This example has a 6” barrel. The .41 calibre pistol came with either a 6” or 8” barrel carrying 8 or 10 rounds. A Carbine was produced in 3 barrel lengths–16” holding 20 rounds, 20” holding 25 rounds and 24” holding 30 rounds. The ammunition was held in a tubular magazine beneath the barrel that was loaded from the muzzle end by pivoting the loading sleeve. Two advantages the Volcanic had was a rapid rate of fire and its ammunition was waterproof. However the “Rocket-ball” ammunition was too underpowered to be considered a hunting weapon or a man stopper except at very close quarter. In addition, the Volcanic design suffered from problems such as gas leakage from around the breech, multiple charges going off at the same time, and misfires. Misfired rounds would have to be tapped out with a cleaning rod as the gun had no means of extraction as there was no case to extract. Less than 2000 Volcanic pistols were made, and the low survival rate of this iconic weapon puts it into a price category that is beyond most people. This is an opportunity to acquire the next best thing, a copy, and a curiosity at a price 1/20th of what a real Volcanic would cost.
Interesting Double Barreled Pistol Circa 1850 in 41 calibre Although purchased in the USA this good quality double barreled percussion pistol would appear to be of Belgian manufacture although it does not exhibit Liege proofs or any other markings other than simple but pleasing foliate engraving. The lock on the pistol is excellent with a strong main spring and the walnut butt is in very good condition as can be seen. These double barreled pistols can be considered as a transitional self defense weapon and offered a 100% improvement over conventional single barrel pistols and were considerably less expensive than the emerging multiple shot revolvers. An interesting piece.
Interesting Enfield 1853 Pattern Rifle This is an intriguing P53 pattern rifle. Originally sourced in the USA so possibly a Civil War import. The rifle is a commercial pattern that is marked internally on the lock with "SS" which would be the Birmingham gun maker Samuel Sanders. The rifle has had a very neat repair to the fore end stock which was probably a field repair. The rifle has a brass butt plate and original cleaning rod. Birmingham proofs and stamped "25" as usual with other marks under the wood including a barely legible ????Barrel Maker. Also marked X111 on the barrel and the knox. Reasonable some may say good bore with strong grooves and lands. An interesting rifle worthy of research.
Interesting Husqvarna Swedish Cape Gun This gun was sourced in the Mid-West of the USA and no doubt travelled with a Scandinavian immigrant to provide food and defence for his family. This is an interesting Husqvarna Cape gun insofar as it is not chambered in the usual 16 Gauge on the Shotgun barrel but in 20 Gauge. The rifled barrel is chambered in 9.3 mm Mauser. The 20 Gauge smooth bore doesn’t surprise me as the Swedes had a propensity to use a 20 Gauge equivalent solid ball in a rolling block for Moose Hunting. The gun has a Lefaucheu action with two cross levers, one to open for access to the breech and the other to disassemble the gun. This gun has a mirror like smooth bore and an excellent rifled barrel with deep rifling. The hammers are rebounding, an action design originally developed by John Stanton in 1867 This would make an excellent wild boar gun with some history behind it. The wood is excellent and the metal fore end was designed for low maintenance. The gun is tight and mechanically sound and the three rear flip up sights, typical of Cape guns is still extant. The gun balances wonderfully and has a sling point for carrying in the field. The ejectors are manual. An interesting and unusual gun as it is not featured on the excellent skydevaaben list of all Husqvarna civilian models, at least not in 20 Gauge. Feel free to ask for further details.
Interesting Marlin Pump Action Rifle Model 27 25 Rimfire This is a very good and scarce pump action rifle both in the UK and USA. Pump action rifles are unusual in the UK unless deactivated as many are in .22 LR and full bore rifles such as Colt Lightnings were banned. These are licensed in the USA as they are post 1899 so scarce in the UK. This model 27 is in obsolete 25 rimfire and is in very good condition, good bore , nice wood and mechanically perfect and also in take down version. Only issue is a butt chip by the heel, easily fixed and I can quote for this if needed but does not detract from the aesthetics of the rifle. An interesting and scarce firearm seldom seen in the UK.
Interesting Maynard 1st Pattern Rifle Civil War Era circa 1860 Maynard firearms were always held in good repute Private Toby of the 1st Mississippi Infantry stated that his Maynard was "warranted to shoot twelve times a minute, and carry a ball effectually 1600 yards. Nothing to do with Maynard rifle but load her up, turn her North, and pull trigger; if twenty of them don't clean out all Yankeedom, then I'm a liar, that's all." This is an extraordinary firearm and of significant interest. This is a 1st Model Maynard rifle with a rare set trigger and .50” calibre barrel. These guns were the invention of famous dental surgeon and firearms innovator Dr. Edward Maynard. Dr. Maynard is probably best known for his invention of the Maynard Tape Priming System, an automated priming system that utilized a varnished strip of paper with small amounts of fulminate of mercury, similar to a modern day child’s cap gun. The system advanced the roll of primers each time the hammer was cocked, and upon firing, the hammer cut off the spent cap. This system showed such promise and was so well thought of by the US Ordnance Department that the US Government paid Maynard $75,000 for the use of his priming system on the US M-1855 series of arms. In addition to his tape-priming patent (#4,208, issued in 1845), Maynard received a total of 23 US patents related to innovations or improvements to firearms designs. Maynard’s carbine design was an innovative breech-loading firearm, which used a proprietary brass cartridge loaded with powder and a lubricated bullet and used Maynard’s tape priming system for ignition. With the exception of the earlier Pauly cartridge system Maynard made a commercial success of the first viable reloadable brass cartridge and this really puts on a par with any other inventor of the time including Samuel Colt. The guns he first produced were in both carbine and rifle lengths, with 20” and 26” barrels respectively, and were offered in both .35 and .50 calibre. According to arms researcher and author James D McAulay in an excellent “Man at Arms” article that can be found on the Internet, a number of famous (and soon to be famous) Southerners purchased Maynard sporting arms. These men included South Carolina’s Wade Hampton, Georgia senator Robert Toombs and Vice President John Breckenridge of Kentucky; all of who became Confederate Generals during the American Civil War. The initial production goal of the Massachusetts Arms Company had been 5,000 arms. According to McAulay, as of October 1, 1860 the company had sold approximately 1,400 guns and had a total of 3,527 arms in inventory. The inventory was distributed as follows: 326 2nd Quality Arms 459 .50 / 20” / Sporting 676 .50 / 20” / Military 142 .50 / 26” / Sporting 160 .50 / 26” / Military 1,326 .35 / 20” / Sporting 425 .35 / 20” Military 13 .35 / 26” / Military McAulay further notes that approximately 90% of this remaining inventory of 1st Model Maynard rifles and carbines were purchased by southern militia companies between October 1, 1860 and April of 1861. McAulay’s research indicates that the majority of the guns went to the states of Mississippi, Florida and Georgia. According to his figures the guns were dispersed as follows. Florida purchased 1,030 .35 calibre carbines in December 1860. Mississippi purchased 800 guns in December of 1860. 325 .35 carbines, 300 .50 carbines & 175 .35 rifles. Georgia purchased 650 .50 carbines in January & March 1861. While Florida and Mississippi acquired their guns directly from the Massachusetts Arms Company, Georgia purchased their guns in two groups from the firm of W.J. Syms & Brothers of New York City. Syms sold an additional 1,700 Maynard’s between October 1860 and May 1861. It is estimated that all but about 100 of these guns went to southern purchasers. McAulay notes that approximately 800 of these guns went South Carolina and Louisiana. The balance of the estimated 800 “Confederate” sales by Syms was apparently made to Kentucky and Tennessee in April and May of 1861. A substantial number of Confederate regiments were at least partially armed with 1st Model Maynard rifles and carbines during the Civil War, resulting in the guns (in both barrel lengths and calibres) being listed in the 1863 Confederate Ordnance Manual as a standard issue Confederate carbine. Some of the Confederate units armed with the guns included the 1st and 6th Florida Special Battalion of Infantry, 2nd Florida Cavalry, 5th & 9th Georgia Cavalry, Cobb’s Legion of Cavalry (Georgia), 1st Louisiana Cavalry, 11th Louisiana Infantry, 1st & 4th Mississippi Cavalry, 9th, 14th & 15th Mississippi Infantry, 18th North Carolina Infantry, 3rd Tennessee Cavalry, 35th Virginia Cavalry Battalion and the Waccamaw South Carolina Light Artillery. Some 1st Model Maynard’s were also issued to the Confederate ironclad CSS Atlanta. The production of the 1st Model Maynard was brought to an end by a fire at the Massachusetts Arms Company factory in January of 1861. Dr. Maynard proceeded to buy out all of the various partners and owners of the company in 1862 and by 1863 the factory was back in business, producing the 2nd Model Maynard Carbine for the US Ordnance Department. This rifle is marked in two lines on the lower right side of the frame: MAYNARD ARMS CO. / WASHINGTON. It is additionally marked on the lower left side of the frame: MANUFACTURED BY / MASS. ARMS CO. / CHICOPEE FALLS and on the patch box door: MAYNARD PATENTEE / SEP 22 1845 / MAY 27 1851 / JUNE 17 1856. The markings all remain relatively legible, but do show some wear. The rifle is serial number 2478, and is clearly marked with that number 4642 on the bottom of the barrel (concealed by the frame. It also has the military tang sight and fixed foresight. If you look at the photograph of the rifle in the Paul Davies collection it is one of the first 400 and does not have a fixed rear sight and is identical to this rifle in respect of the sights. Subsequently the rifles and carbines were fitted with an additional flip up breach sight and were rifled. The original front sight is present, and has been slightly regulated to adjust the point of aim of the carbine. The bore of the rifle is smooth and in excellent condition and is bright clean. One of the unique features of the 1st Model Maynard rifle was the ability to adjust the headspace of the gun, by adjusting the relationship between the barrel breech and rear of the frame. This was accomplished by the means blocking wedges which could be moved slightly by turning two screws located at the bottom of the frame, forward of the trigger guard. The butt stock is in very good condition and is stamped with the number 442. The stock is solid and free of any breaks, cracks or repairs. The stock is an attractive piece of walnut. The butt stock shows the usual bumps and dings from handling and use of a 154 year old rifle, but shows no heavy abuse or damage. The original paper patent label is still extant in the patch box! Maynard would supply any variation of his firearms to anyone and the enigma of this particular rifle is that it appears to have seen military service as it has a number stamped into the butt but has a sporting set trigger. It has the military tang sight but has a smoothbore barrel and does not have a saddle ring. The Receiver has toned down to a steel grey patina with evidence of fire blue on the triggers and case hardening on the hammer but the barrel has retained most of its original finish, not unusual with Maynard’s . The set trigger was a feature normally found on sporting arms but was also favoured by sharpshooters. The set trigger is pushed forward on cocking which then leaves the main trigger on a hairline break. The Maynard tape mechanism is intact and works perfectly and this was actually adjustable by turning the knurled screw that can be seen on the left hand side of the receiver. The serial number is within the 5000 range of the first model Maynard and it features the patch box that was later dropped. My hypothesis is that this was one of the “sporting arms” in 50 calibre with a 26” barrel that was swept up by the Confederates immediately prior to the Civil War and was used for sharpshooting. This could have been one of the very first rifles and was supplied at a time when muskets were still being purchased and the novelty of this particular firearm would have been the breech loading facility and novel tape primer ignition system which made Maynard both famous and wealthy. Clearly this rifle or technically musket was well maintained as evidenced by the barrel condition and this is an extremely interesting example of a ground breaking firearm that earned a significant reputation during the American Civil War.
Interesting Needham Conversion Rifle for the Fenian Raid 1870 The Needham breech conversion is an interesting breech conversion of a military muzzle loading rifle that is seldom seen in the UK as the conversion was carried out to supply the Fenian Raid. The rifle features a round 40” barrel in .58 calibre centre fire with front bayonet lug sight and rear single leaf sight. The breech has been altered with the Needham breech loading conversion, which opens from the right side when hammer is cocked. The lock is altered with front portion cut away to fit the conversion. The lock is marked “BRIDESBURG” with a US eagle motif forward of hammer and a crisp “1862” on the tail of the lock. The rifle features standard military steel furniture, sling swivels and original steel tulip ramrod. The butt plate tang is sharply stamped “US”. The attractive looking walnut stock has the usual dings associated with a rifle of this age but no major problems however I will point out that it has been cleaned at some time in then past. Complete with its “US” marked bayonet with triangular 18” blade. The bayonet is in good overall condition. The bayonet has also been cleaned and has scattered areas of dark spots and light pitting on blade. The rifle has toned down to an overall mellow grey finish with very light pitting but still very attractive. The rifle is accompanied by an original and rare 58 calibre cartridge that can be deactivated. A total of 5,020 muskets were converted in Trenton, New Jersey by Needham, an English company, for use by the Fenians for a planned Canadian invasion. Needham conversion rifles were involved with this interesting history involving the Fenians an Irish-American secret society. Immediately after the Civil War, the Fenian Brotherhood plotted to invade Canada to pressure England to grant independence to Ireland. The Fenians were an Irish-American group who wanted to put pressure on Great Britain to free Ireland. They conspired to mount an invasion of Canada and occupy some territory in order to force concessions. The Fenians purchased surplus Bridesburg rifle-muskets and sent 600 armed men across the Canadian border from New York in June 1866. The small force briefly captured Fort Erie, but was readily overcome, and the men were sent back to the U.S. Surprisingly, the Fenians were sufficiently well connected politically that they were able to recover their guns along with their freedom to try again. However, by the time the Fenians were considering a second foray across the border in 1867, the British troops in Canada were equipped with Snider conversions of the P1853 Enfield rifle, and the Fenians knew they would be seriously outmatched with their original muzzle-loading Bridesburg muskets. Reportedly, supporters of the Fenians rented space in a Trenton, New Jersey shop, where hired English gunsmiths performed the Needham conversions on 5020 rifle-muskets. The Fenians launched a second invasion in May of 1870 across the Vermont border. The Canadians were forewarned and the Fenians soundly defeated. This time, the guns used in the attack were confiscated by the U.S. Army, along with additional guns that had been stored in Trenton. The army subsequently auctioned off the guns, a large number of which were purchased by the surplus dealer Schuyler, Hartley & Graham. These guns account for the majority of the Needham conversion rifles which occasionally show up for sale. In transit available for delivery next month. This is an attractive example of a very interesting rifle complete with bayonet.
Interesting Stevens Pocket Rifle circa 1888 This is an interesting item! A Stevens New Model Pocket Pistol or Bicycle Rifle in obsolete 32 rimfire calibre. The "rifle" has a detachable butt which has matching serial numbers to the rifle and is in overall good order considering it was manufactured circa 1888. Overall the rifle has much original finish and is pleasing. The rear sight is missing its ladder which often was lost. The rifle is accompanied with a copy of Kenneth Copes excellent book on Stevens Rifles which in my experience is possibly a rarer item than the rifle!
Interesting Triplett and Scott Carbine This Triplett & Scott repeating carbine is a .50 caliber rimfire shoulder arm made by the Meriden Manufacturing Company of Meriden, CT circa 1864 to 1865. The rife was a direct competitor to the Spencer Carbine and is yet another interesting early metallic cartridge firing military long arm. One of only an estimated quantity 5,000 such carbines produced under contract for the State of Kentucky Home Guard Troops. This carbine has a seven-shot magazine tube in the butt. All carbines were delivered after May 1, 1865 and all were contracted for prior to the end of hostilities. Loaded by depressing the latch in frame behind hammer that allows barrel to twist away in circular motion and come in-line with magazine in butt. Firearm took the same rimfire metallic round as the Spencer carbine. The mechanism is a joy and the breech drops quickly with a powerful integrated extractor to eject the spent round. A 30” barrel is secured to the stock via a single barrel band. Barrel bluing has turned to a mellow dark patina overall. Receiver stamped on left plate with “MERIDEN MANFG CO. / MERIDEN, CONN.” beneath hammer. Breech tang marked “TRIPLETT & SCOTT / PATENT DEC. 6, 1864”. Two piece black walnut stock with the shoulder piece This is a very good condition Triplett & Scott repeating rimfire carbine would certainly enhance any Civil War arms collection.
Interesting Victorian Rook Rifle by Braendlin Armoury Braendlin Armoury were a prolific manufacturer from 1860 and were a tenant of Tranter. Many, many prestigious retailers were supplied by Braendlin Armoury who seemed to be very active in the "high end" of sporting martini action rifles. This particular rifle is in 380 CF rook rifle which is easy to load for if you wish to place it on a certificate. The rifle appears to be a modified cadet rifle retailed by BSA who were situated down the road from Braendlin and has a flat top rib and fixed sights, very pointable and fast an interesting rifle. This would fire a heavy low velocity .38 bullet designed to shoot through rook and crow nests with little chance of causing damage in the next village! The rifle has an external cocking indicator and is Australian marked so was either modified after cadet use or part of a modified contract. An interesting piece of history.
Interesting Winchester Model 1885 Low Wall Single Shot Rifle 32-40 calibre This is a rather interesting single shot Model 1885 Winchester Low-Wall in obsolete 32-40 calibre. This rifle was manufactured in 1888 as evidenced by the serial number. The original calibre was 32 long and the purchaser specified the heavier number 2 barrel in 26” instead of the standard 26” number 1 barrel normally supplied. Originally in the 1885 catalogue the 32 long rifle barrel was specified at 24” long. This was later (but contemporaneously) rechambered, lined and stamped for the 32-40 calibre. The rifle has a strong action with a nice two stage trigger release and good bore. The extractor is intact and the wood is good with a nice fit and the original ebony tipped forend. No issues with the wood other than the odd expected pressure dents and scuffs. The rifle is stamped with the Winchester Repeating Arms address on the top flat and the patent date of October 7th 1879 on the lower tang as it should be. The rifle has the correct rear sporting elevating rear slide sight and German silver foresight which was an optional extra. Windage is achieved by drifting the front sight on it brass mounting Tenon. There is some finish but mainly mellowed down to an even patina as can be seen. From John Campbell’s excellent book on the history and analysis of Winchester single shot rifles it is clear that this was a popular variation. Winchester low-walls were always in demand for a variety of uses including hunting and target shooting and can be found in a variety of barrel lengths and calibres. This is a decent example of a very popular rifle.
Italian Boys training rifle \"Carcano\". This scarce carbine is a poignant if not slightly disturbing military collectible from pre-war Italy. This is a blank firing rifle and could never be fired with live ammunition so it does not require a license. I have photographed it with a Styeyr M1886 for scale. Mussolini and the fascists did little to conceal their dreams of expansion and empire for Italy and in order to realise these nationalistic aims, militarisation of Italian society was necessary, and particular emphasis was placed on indoctrination of the country’s youth. To this end, in 1926, after barely four years in power and following Mussolini’s expressed desire to provide pre-military training and to arm Italian youths beginning at a very young age, the fascists established the Opera Nazionale Balilla (ONB) youth organization. The term “Balilla” evoked the memory of a young boy, Giovan Battista Perasso, whose nickname was Balilla, who on December 5, 1746, touched off a popular revolt against the Hapsburg occupiers in Genoa. By December 10, the revolt had managed to free the city from the Austrian troops. The ONB program encompassed boys from six to 18 years of age, organized along military lines, who, depending on their age group, were issued uniforms and weapons of various types ranging from strictly toy weapons to light machine guns. In October 1937, the ONB was replaced by the Gioventù Italiana del Littorio (GIL), which was disbanded in July 1943. Training Carbine In 1931, in response to a request by the ONB, production began of a very faithful blank-firing copy approximately four-fifths the size of the corresponding full-size Carcano moschetto modello 1891, commonly (although actually improperly) referred to as the cavalry carbine both in Italian as well as in English. This carbine was designated the moschetto regolamentare Balilla modello 1891 ridotto (reduced size Model 1891 Balilla regulation carbine) and was also referred to as the moschetto per ONB, or more commonly as the moschetto Balilla. It was ultimately designed to familiarize young boys with the regulation Carcano battle rifle and its proper handling. This is an excellent example and seldom seen in the UK. This is an interesting artefact that would grace any military carbine collection as an item to stimulate conversation!
Iver Johnson This is an attractive Iver Johnson "Smoker No 2” revolver. The revolver is a spur triggered 32 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and does exhibit some wear to the plating with a patch of wear on the barrel and the cylinder but this is restricted to wear and not corrosion or pitting and there is an overall smooth finish to the gun. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as “Saturday Night Specials”. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase “Saturday Night Specials” is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the “Saturday Night Special”. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a “Saturday Night Special”. I now accept credit cards. Now Reduced!
Iver Johnson This is a very decent Iver Johnson "Favorite No 2" in 32 rimfire. Absolutely rock solid timing and lock up and can be disassembled easily. The major part of the nickel plating remains as can be seen and is a very nice looking example of the notorious "Saturday Night Specials"
Iver Johnson 1900 rimfire revolver This is an Iver Johnson "Double Action Model 1900" large frame revolver in obsolete rim fire calibre. Iver Johnson was a U.S. firearms, bicycle, and motorcycle manufacturer from 1871 to 1993. The company shared the same name as its founder, Norwegian-born Iver Johnson (1841–1895). Iver Johnson were prolific manufacturers of small low cost but good quality handguns and eventually became government contractors for rifles and machine guns eventually giving up the manufacture of bicycles. The company has some notoriety insofar as President's William McKinley and Robert Kennedy were assassinated with Iver Johnson Revolvers with an attempt made on President Franklin Roosevelt with one. This revolver is about mint condition as can be seen and has seen very little use and is a perfect example of an Iver Johnson firearm.
James Purdey retailed Tranter Army Revolver circa 1870 This Tranter was retailed by Purdey and is not a conversion it is a model 1868 patent 6 shot army revolver 450 C/F with the long under barrel ejector. You can see this exact revolver illustrated on page 132 in Ron Stewart's excellent book on Tranter where he also comments " an unusual inverted safety catch on the left frame. This is the same 'flat sided hook' safety as fitted to the early Fourth Model percussion revolvers, however its holding screw is fitted slightly below the level where the the firing pin penetrates the frame with the "hook" reaching below the recoil shield to secure the cylinder" This gun marks the transition by Tranter from rimfire to centre-fire and was targeted for British Army Officers. This revolver has an excellent bore, is mechanically perfect and is engraved on the top flat with Purdey's 14.1/2 Oxford Street address which clearly dates it prior to 1882. Quite an important revolver for British collectors with the cachet of Purdey's name behind it.
Japanese Arisaka Rifles I usually have a reasonable stock of Japanese rifles because I think they are underrated and occasionally wrongly maligned. Certainly some of the late Second World War rifles were the subject of austerity measures but their engineering was never in doubt. Lt Arisaka spent time in Europe researching the major manufacturers and left with a design that is ostensibly a Mauser. The rifles are well built and a pleasure to shoot. The 7.7 mm round is comparable to the .303” British and has similar shooting characteristics. In respect to austerity measures these included phasing out the impractical monopods and aircraft sights, using a plain welded dust cover on the safety dust covers and unseasoned wood on the stocks. Engineering quality and tolerances were not compromised. I tend to choose pre War Model 38’s and early War Model 99’s to overcome any issues. The Chrysanthemum symbol on the rifles was erased after surrender and erased rifles outnumber intact rifles so an intact Chrysanthemum would usually indicate a battlefield pick up and “trophy of war”. I source my rifles in the USA so they are veteran “bring backs” from the Pacific Theatre. I only offer rifles with an erased symbol if it is in exceptional condition for shooting and the erasure is neat. During the Second Sino-Japanese War in the 1930s, the Japanese soon found that the 7.7mm cartridge being fired by their Type 92 heavy machine gun in China was superior to the 6.5×50mm cartridge of the Type 38 rifle, necessitating the development of a new weapon to replace the outclassed Type 38. The Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) developed the Type 99 based on the Type 38 rifle but with a calibre of 7.7mm. The Type 99 was produced at nine different arsenals. Seven arsenals were located in Japan, with the other two located at Mukden in China and Jinsen in Korea. The IJA had intended to completely replace the Type 38 with the Type 99 by the end of the war. However, the outbreak of the Pacific war never allowed the army to completely replace the Type 38 and so the IJA used both rifles during the war. Arisaka rifles are substantially increasing in value in the USA where there is a huge collecting and shooting fraternity keen to preserve their heritage and I believe that apart from the pleasure of ownership and shooting them, they are a reasonable investment. Dependent on Arsenal and condition my rifles range from £800 to £1000 delivered to your RFD and I stock bayonets and other accessories. This is an overview of the current rifles illustrated. I can store a rifle without charge for a variation to be processed. Arisaka Rifle 6.5 mm Model 38 Early issue Koishikawa Factory Tokyo. This rifle is clearly a battlefields pick up with some dents and dinks in the woodwork to indicate field use but good appeal. Chrysanthemum intact and British Nitro Proofed. Very good shooting bore and British Nitro Proofed. Arisaka Rifle 6.5 mm Model 38 28th Series Chigusa factory of Nagoya Arsenal Excellent woodwork, British Nitro Proofed, Chrysanthemum intact, bore a little rough but a good shooter. This can be supplied with what appears to be an unissued barrel commensurate with the quality of the woodwork. Arisaka Rifle 7.7 mm Model 99 Short Kokura Arsenal 24th Series Excellent woodwork, good bore, fresh BNP proof marks, aircraft sights with wings, dust cover, Chrysanthemum intact Early 3 screw front band, short cleaning rod, no monopod attached as issued. Arisaka Rifle 7.7 mm Model 99 Short Kokura Arsenal 22nd Series Excellent woodwork, good bore, fresh BNP proof marks, aircraft sights with wings, dust cover, Chrysanthemum neatly sanded. Early 3 screw front band, full length cleaning rod, no monopod attached. Arisaka Rifle 7.7 mm Model 99 Long Arsenal of manufacture Toriimatsu factory of Nogoya Arsenal 4th Series Very good woodwork, some dents and dinks, good bore, fresh BNP proof marks, early 1700 m aircraft sights with wings, Chrysanthemum intact. Early 3 screw front band, full length cleaning rod, no monopod attached as issued. Matching Bolt – unusual! Bayonets Tokyo Kokura Arsenal 1936-1945 National Denki (National Electric) manufacture under the supervision of the Kokura Arsenal. Battle flag is an original flag not a modern reproduction and is available for sale.
Japanese Type 30 Bayonet for Arisaka rifle This is a very good Arisaka Model 30 bayonet in its scabbard with an untouched blade. The bayonet still retains its original varnish on the grips and the makers trademark indicates it was manufactured prewar by the National Denki Company ( National Electric ) under Kokura Arsenal supervision. The scabbard is also in good condition and it would be difficult to better this blade. Please note I comply with VCR legislation and you have to be over 18 to purchase.
Keith Neal Warminster Flintlock Manstoppers! This magnificent pair of substantial flintlock travelling pistols are ex-Keith Neal collection. William Keith Neal (1905-1990) amassed probably the most significant collection of arms in private ownership in Europe of a period of several decades and was regarded as a preeminent authority and author on antique firearms. . At one point he owned more than 2000 firearms including no less than six items from the Cabinet d'Armes of King Louis X111 of France including a remarkable high percentage of the finest recorded privately owned European antique guns. Mr Neal took pride in the fact that he was a "shooter first and a collector afterwards" and is reputed to have fired every gun in his collection at least once , sometimes out of the window of his library! Mr Neal lived near Warminster in Wiltshire and this pair of pistols is reputed to be one of his most regarded possessions because of the local association and he named them his "Warminster Manstoppers" The pistols are of quality and are 20 bore and accompanied with the correct mould and some accessories but in a later relined case. The pistols retain their original deep browning on the twist barrels and have their metal Keith Neal museum tags extant as can be seen in the image of the pistols in-situ in their case. The pistols have swan necked cocks with safety together with semi waterproof pans with captive ramrods and the makers name "Warminster" on the flats. These travelling pistols were probably made by a London maker for the local retail trade as other weapons marked "Warminster" eluded Keith Neal despite years of searching. Despite efforts to retain the collection intact for the nation, the Keith Neal collection was sold by Christies at auction over a period of several years commencing in 1995. A rare opportunity to acquire an interesting pair with outstanding provenance.
Large travelling This is a very nice 26 bore double barrelled percussion travelling pistol by B. Bonnet. Very high quality of manufacture, name under the wood and with a German proof. Top strap is not engraved and judging by the quality this was a trade piece that would have been sold to be stencilled by the retailer. Cocks, locks and has a crisp action and overall a good looking example and large enough almost to fall into the Howdah pistol category!.
Late 15th Century Early 16th Century Signal Mortars This is a small collection of wrought iron signal cannons although a slight inclination on the barrels suggests they may have had more aggressive uses. These were used to signal time and commands. Each has an incuse cross on the side of the touch hole and diameters and lengths vary. These would be circa 1600 and would have been in use until the 18th Century. The three different sizes make an interesting display. Sold as a collection. These are heavy please ask for quotation for foreign shipments.
Lee Arms Red Jacket No 3 Revolver This very nice Lee Arms Red Jacket No 3 revolver is a typical "Saturday Night Special" designed to be carried into town concealed on the person at times when the larger revolvers such as Colt and Remington Army or Navy models were prohibited by local by-laws. This is a very good example with much finish that rotates, cocks and locks.
Lee Arms Red Jacket No 3 Revolver This is another super little Red Jacket No 3 in obsolete 32 Rim fire calibre so no license required. Manufactured circa 1875 these little guns were produced in quantity by the Lee Arms Company of Wilkes Barr Pennsylvania. This particular revolver is in excellent condition, it cocks and locks as well as the day it was made. Negligible nickel loss and the correct bakelite grips. Stamped on the barrel "Red Jacket No 3". A very pleasing little gun. Price includes insured overnight carrier to your door.
Lefaucheux patent M 1858 Military revolver circa 1860 This is a good Lefaucheux style M1858 military revolver, chambered for the 12mm pin fire cartridge, based on a design by Casimir Lefaucheux. It was the first metallic-cartridge revolver adopted by a national government. It was first fielded in 1858 by the French Navy, and though never issued by the French Army, it was used in limited numbers by the French Cavalry during their 1862 deployment to Mexico. Models were also purchased by Spain, Sweden, Italy, Russia, and Norway. Along with those countries, both the U.S. Confederate and Federal forces also used them in the American Civil War. During the American Civil War both sides fielded a wide variety of revolvers, including the M1858. The Federal forces purchased over 12,000 M1858 revolvers, primarily supplying them to cavalry forces in 1862. However, these pin fire revolvers were replaced in service later in the war as more Colt and Remington revolvers became available. Among American troops, the pistol was often referred to as the "French" Tranter". This particular example is “in the white” and with no external markings other than Liege proof marks. The Liege proof house was recognised as having the most rigorous proof testing in Europe, far more extreme than the British proof house at the time. Mechanically this revolver is perfect with a good tight action in both single action and double action. In fact on locked cock there is absolutely no play in the revolver and I seldom encounter modern revolvers which lock with such efficiency! The loading gate which is sometimes missing is extant and has an excellent locking spring. The butt lanyard ring indicates military use and the country of origin would insinuate a Civil War weapon but this cannot be proved. Overall a pleasing representative example of the first military issued revolver to use a metallic cartridge.
Lefaucheux style M1858 military revolver USA Civil War era This is a Lefaucheux style M1858 military revolver, chambered for the 12mm pin fire cartridge, based on a design by Casimir Lefaucheux. It was the first metallic-cartridge revolver adopted by a national government. It was first fielded in 1858 by the French Navy, and though never issued by the French Army, it was used in limited numbers by the French Cavalry during their 1862 deployment to Mexico. Models were also purchased by Spain, Sweden, Italy, Russia, and Norway. Along with those countries, both the U.S. Confederate and Federal forces also used them in the American Civil War. During the American Civil War both sides fielded a wide variety of revolvers, including the M1858. The Federal forces purchased over 12,000 M1858 revolvers, primarily supplying them to cavalry forces in 1862. However, these pin fire revolvers were replaced in service later in the war as more Colt and Remington revolvers became available. Among American troops, the pistol was often referred to as the "French" Tranter". This particular example is “in the white” and with no external markings other than Liege proof marks. The Liege proof house was recognised as having the most rigorous proof testing in Europe, far more extreme than the British proof house at the time. Mechanically this revolver is perfect with a good tight action in both single action and double action. In fact on locked cock there is absolutely no play in the revolver and I seldom encounter modern revolvers which lock with such efficiency! The loading gate which is sometimes missing is extant and has an excellent locking spring. The butt lanyard ring indicates military use and the country of origin would insinuate a Civil War weapon but this cannot be proved. Overall a pleasing representative example of the first military issued revolver to use a metallic cartridge.
London Armoury Company P-1853 Pattern Rifle The London Armoury Company Pattern 1853 probably were the best of the Military P53's and renowned as excellent shooters with the advantage that the parts were readily interchangeable with other P53 rifles as a consequence of quality of manufacture and uniformity. This LAC dated 1863 has solid bands, indented lock and a nice bore , just the thing to put onto a FAC if you wish and bring it back to life. This rifle hasn't been messed with and has the correct ramrod, woodwork is excellent with the exception of somes mall pressure dents on the right hand side of the butt which would steam out if you were fussed but it's not my job to interfere with history! ( see photo ) The rifle has mellowed to an even patina and has all the correct marks you would expect.Original LAC cartouche is still extant which is indicative that the wood has not been sanded or messed with. Sharp screw heads and bands and it looks as if the rifle has never been taken apart. Good shooting bore with strong rifling some shadowing at the end of the barrel but not bad at all. Overall a good example of a rifle pattern that was used in the Crimea and during the US Civil War. An above average example!
London Small Arms Co Martini Henry BSAC provenance Now this is an exciting rifle! If you are looking for a standard Martini Henry these are easy to come by and thousands have entered the market from the IMA Nepalese cache where they were stored for over 100 years and had never been pointed or fired in anger. Great examples admittedly but no real history other than the fact that they are Martini’s made in the day. This however is a little different as it has plenty of history and definitely would have been used in Africa for the purpose it was intended for. If you are looking for history this is it, if you are looking for a rifle with an excellent bore to put onto a FAC this is also it. Why is this rifle so special? Simple, it is an MkII/1 manufactured by LSA Co (London Small Arms Co) which was only made in limited quantities and LSA is reputed to be one of the better makers, and it ended up being issued to the British South Africa Co who definitely saw action and were the backbone of the infamous or famous Jameson Raid. The British South Africa Company (BSAC) was a mercantile company incorporated on 29 October 1889 by a royal charter given by Lord Salisbury, the British prime minister, to Cecil Rhodes. The company was modelled on the East India Company and was expected to annex and then administer territory in south-central Africa, to act as a police force, and develop settlements for European settlers. The charter was initially granted for 25 years, and was extended for another 10 in 1915.It was intended that the BSAC would develop the region without significant cost to the British tax payer. It was therefore given the right to create its own political administration supported by a paramilitary force for protection of settlers against local peoples. Profits from the company, in terms of diamond and gold interests were reinvested in the company to allow it to expand its area of influence. African labour was exploited partially through the application of hut taxes, which required Africans to look for wages. Mashonaland was invaded by a Pioneer Column in 1830, then the Ndebele in Matabeleland. This formed the proto-colony of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). They were stopped from spreading further to the North West by King Leopold’s holdings in Katanga. Instead they appropriated lands which formed Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). (There were failed attempts to also incorporate Botswana and Mozambique.) The BSAC was involved in the Jameson Raid of December 1895, and they faced a rebellion by the Ndebele in 1896 which required the aid of British to quell. A further rising of Ngoni people in Northern Rhodesia was suppressed in 1897-98. The Jameson Raid The bulk of the participants in the Jameson Raid were BSAC troops armed with Martini Rifles and two Maxim machine guns secretly supplied by the British Government. The basic plan was that “Uitlanders” (British immigrants) in Johannesburg would revolt and seize the Boer armoury in Pretoria. Jameson and his force would dash across the border to Johannesburg to "restore order" and with control of Johannesburg would control the gold fields. However Jameson waited and waited for the insurrection to move but in the meantime differences arose within the Reform Committee and between Johannesburg Uitlander reformers regarding the form of government to be adopted after the coup. At a point, certain reformers contacted Jameson to inform him of the difficulties and advised him to stand down. Jameson, with 600 restless men and other pressures, became frustrated by the delays, and, believing that he could spur the reluctant Johannesburg reformers to act, decided to go ahead. He sent a telegram on 29 December 1895 to Rhodes warning him of his intentions - "Unless I hear definitely to the contrary, shall leave to-morrow evening" - and on the very next day sent a further message "Shall leave to-night for the Transvaal". However the transmission of the first telegram was delayed, so that both arrived at the same time on the morning of the 29 December, and by then Jameson's men had cut the telegraph wires and there was no way of recalling him. On 29 December 1895 Jameson's armed column crossed into the Transvaal and headed for Johannesburg. It was hoped that this would be a 3 day dash to Johannesburg before the Boer commandos could mobilise, and would trigger an uprising by the Uitlanders. The British Colonial secretary, Joseph Chamberlain, though sympathetic to the ultimate goals of the Raid, was uncomfortable with the timing of the invasion and remarked that "if this succeeds it will ruin me. I'm going up to London to crush it". He swiftly travelled by train to the Colonial Office, ordering Sir Hercules Robinson, Governor-General of the Cape Colony, to repudiate the actions of Jameson and warned Rhodes that the Company's Charter would be in danger if it were discovered the Cape Prime Minister was involved in the Raid. Chamberlain therefore instructed local British representatives to call on British colonists not to offer any aid to the raiders. Although Jameson's men had cut the telegraph wires to Cape Town, they had failed to cut the telegraph wires to Pretoria (cutting a fence by mistake). Accordingly news of his incursion quickly reached Pretoria and Jameson's armed column was tracked by Transvaal forces from the moment that it crossed the border. The Jameson armed column first encountered resistance very early on 1 January when there was a very brief exchange of fire with a Boer outpost. Around noon the Jameson armed column was around twenty miles further on, at Krugersdorp, where a small force of Boer soldiers had blocked the road to Johannesburg and dug in and prepared defensive positions. Jameson's force spent some hours exchanging fire with the Boers, losing several men and many horses in the skirmish. Towards evening the Jameson armed column withdrew and turned south-east attempting to flank the Boer force. The Boers however tracked the move overnight and on 2 January as the light improved a substantial Boer force with some artillery was waiting for Jameson at Doornkop. The tired Jameson raiders initially exchanged fire with the Boers losing around thirty men before Jameson realized the position was hopeless and surrendered to Commander Piet Cronjé. The raiders were taken to Pretoria and jailed. The Boer government later handed the men over to the British for trial and the British prisoners were returned to London. A few days after the raid, the Kaiser of Germany sent a telegram congratulating President Kruger and the Transvaal government on their success "without the help of friendly powers", alluding to potential support by Germany. When this was disclosed in the British press, it raised a storm of anti-German feeling. Dr Jameson was lionized by the press and London society, inflamed by anti-Boer and anti-German feeling and in a frenzy of jingoism. Jameson was sentenced to 15 months for leading the raid, which he served in Holloway. The Transvaal government was paid almost £1 million in compensation by the British South Africa Company. This rifle has an excellent bore as mentioned, it has two very neat arsenal repairs to the fore end around the rear barrel retaining pin but there are no cracks to the solid walnut woodwork. There are some small dents on the right hand of the receiver and the only conclusion I can reach as to how these occurred is that the rifle must have been thrown to the ground at some time. There is a profusion of military stamps and proof marks, evidence of the LSA cartouche remains on the butt and the Receiver is dated 1888. The Knox is stamped BSA Co in a similar manner to a Webley Mk IV revolver I have in my own collection. The Knox is also stamped SX which signifies that the stronger extractor was added as an enhanced modification. There are no sold out of service or DP marks on the rifle. I have added the correct bayonet and scabbard to the rifle which was refinished and issued to the Nepalese but serves to show how intimidating the rifle is when attached! A real piece of history and if only it could talk!
M-1875 Remington Centre fire revolver - Egyptian Contract This is an extremely fine example of the Remington M-1875 Single Action Army Revolver. The Remington M-1875 is a scarce model and almost the “Cinderella” of the USA revolver world because they are uncommon and when a collector decides he needs (not wants!) one, they are virtually impossible to find in good condition and in this country in obsolete calibre. This model was the first military sized, cartridge revolver to be produced by Remington that was not a conversion of one of their earlier percussion models. The gun was a six shot, single action revolver that competed directly with the Colt Single Action Army. The gun had a fluted cylinder and was produced in three centre fire calibres, .44 Remington, .44 WCF (44-40) and eventually .45 Colt. The majority of the revolvers produced had 7 ½” barrels, although a few were produced with 5 ¾” barrels and are considered very scarce today. The revolvers were produced with both blued and nickel finishes. Oil finished, two-piece walnut grips were standard, but other options were available on special order. Remington produced the M-1875 revolver from 1875 until 1889, with a total production of only between 25,000 and 30,000; a very small production run when compared with Colt’s M-1873 Single Action Army. Remington entered the big-bore military cartridge handgun market with an initial order for 10,000 pieces from the Egyptian government. These guns were all chambered for Remington’s new .44 Remington CF cartridges, a short lived cartridge that was very close to the .44 Colt in dimensions and power and was discontinued in 1895. Later Remington M-1875’s would be produced in the more successful .44-40 and .5 Colt calibres. The Egyptian contract guns were inspected like US military arms, and carried a * mark on the left side of the barrel, forward of the frame and an R sub-inspectors mark on the cylinder and the frame between the cylinder & the barrel. The left grip was also with either an FR or JWR cartouche. Unfortunately for Remington, the big Egyptian order did not pan out and few (if any) of the guns were actually delivered to the Egyptians. The problems arose over Egypt’s failure to pay large balances due on earlier Remington Rolling Block military rifle orders. The end result was that the production of the Egyptian contract guns ended prematurely and the existing guns were apparently sold on the open market to allow Remington to recoup their money. According to most references, these Egyptian contract marked revolvers are quite scarce and demand a significant premium on the collector market today. Despite the overwhelming competition from Colt, Remington did manage to receive a small contract form the US Government in 1883 to deliver 639 nickel plated M-1875’s to the Department of the Interior for use by the Indian Police. Among the luminaries of the era who used the Remington 1875 was infamous outlaw Frank James, who preferred to carry one in.44-40 (the same calibre as his Winchester rifle), noting that it was important to “not confuse your ammunition in a hot fight”. While the Remington M-1875 never achieved the success or sales figures of the Colt, it was none the less one of the important revolvers to see use during the taming of the American West. To this day, its distinctive rib under the barrel brings to mind the Remington percussion army revolvers that it was based upon and makes the gun instantly identifiable in period images. This example of a Remington M-1875 “Army” Revolver is in very fine condition and is one of the scarce Egyptian Contract guns. The gun is faintly marked with a JWR within an oval cartouche on the left grip, and has the sub-inspection “Star” mark on the barrel and an R on the cylinder. The gun is clearly marked on the top of the barrel in a single line: E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. U.S.A. Otherwise the gun is unmarked externally. The serial number 7274 is present on the edge of the left grip frame underneath the grips, on the loading gate and pencilled on both grips. The gun is crisp with great deal of blueing remaining and no rust. The action is perfect and the bore and chambers are mint. It would be difficult to improve on this revolver and would make a fine addition to an advanced collection.
Magnificent Cased 4th Model Tranter revolver. This magnificent 54 Bore 4th model Tranter revolver has possibly never been fired. Its condition is outstanding and it is one of the best examples I have seen. The original vibrant fire blue is still extant on the safety catch and Arbor release as is the overall finish elsewhere. Other than a slight loss through rubbing on one edge of the barrel from where it has laid for 163 years, it is a 95%+ gun. The rubbing could be easily addressed but I prefer to leave history as it stands. The photographs do not do the revolver justice and it looks better in the hand. The mechanism of the revolver is perfect, it cocks and locks as it should and locks and rotates on the half cock for loading. Tranter’s famous “patent oval” is present on the frame and rammer and the gun has Birmingham proof marks as it should. The top strap is vacant of any retail address so it was probably sold direct from the factory to the first owner or sent to a retailer who decided against engraving it with their name, quite unusual as the Victorians were rather good at self-promotion and what better place to advertise your business than on the barrel of one of the most innovative and expensive firearms of the time? The checkering of the grips is sharp and I almost used the word best left to eaters of potato snacks when I describe them but that is an overused superlative in this business. This is an early model based on Tranter’s 1856 patent and would have been manufactured at the earliest 1858 and probably no later than early 1860. We can deduce this from a number of items the most obvious being the “safety hook” feature. This safety locates a pin into a machined hole in the nipple dividing walls and was replaced with a less expensive sliding latch. The other feature is the “S” shaped spring holding the Arbor release button. Of general interest to collectors is that this revolver launched the generic term used ever since for “double action” revolvers, a phrase invented by William Tranter. In his 1856 patent, one of his claims is that he has invented a “three single trigger, double action revolver lock mechanism”. From 1858 Tranters advertisements and his loading sheet highlight the words “double action” in capital letters. The case is fitted with all of the original accessories as issued and their condition is contemporary to the revolver. The bullet tin, lubricating tin, cap tin and powder flasks are vacant. Other accessories include the mould, jag and turnscrews, a most complete set. A wonderful piece of investment quality history and deserving of a prominent place in any revolver collection.
Manhattan Firearms Navy belt revolver in contemporary case. The Manhattan Firearms Company was formed in the early 1850's as a sub contract manufacturer to other established gunsmiths in New York State. In the mid 1850's the company relocated to Newark New Jersey across the Hudson River from New York. Following the move to larger premises they introduced a range of single shot pocket or travelling pistols which sold very well. Based on this success they went on to produce larger calibre belt pistols and a very successful range of pepperbox pistols in larger calibres. In 1858 the patent held by Colt on the revolving cylinder design expired. In company with many other manufacturers such as Remington and Whitney Manhattan commenced manufacturing revolvers. 35,000 .36 calibre 6 shot revolvers almost identical in design to the Colt Navy revolver were produced by 1864 during the Civil War. Most were sold under private contract to individual state Militia units and state raised volunteer regiments many of whom armed themselves at their own expense. Officers were required to purchase their own sidearm. The Civil War ended in 1864 and at this time the US federal government cancelled all major arms contracts. Following the demobilisation of all of the serving conscripted units the government had a large surplus of small arms in store which were placed on the market at "knock down" prices. During this period a great many smaller arms manufacturing companies simply closed down. This particular "Manhattan" we offer is a cased Manhattan Belt Revolver in .36 calibre which was a direct competitor to the Colt Navy Revolver. This is a late model IV so a 5 shot revolver. The case is something of an enigma as it is a high quality English case with screwed top, Brass roundel and key with a lined scroll along the edges, top quality but not American. The revolver is not English proofed and is likely to have been brought back in Victorian times and cased. The case contains the correct powder flask and mould and a number of other accessories. The case has been relined but certainly not recently and has been in a private collection for the past 36 years and is new to the market. The revolver itself is all matching and has a tight lock up with 10 cylinder safety notches which allowed a loaded revolver to be carried with the hammer dropped between the nipples, a feature unique to Manhattan. There is an excellent cylinder scene extant as can be seen from the photographs ( more images available ) and much original varnish on the grips. The revolver has a good bore and no significant defects to report. The revolver has a 6" barrel which was the longest barrel length Manhattan manufactured. Manhattan revolvers are extremely well made and current pricing does not reflect the paucity of good examples available in the market and I would rate them for workmanship in comparison to Colt as being superior. Manhattan Firearms could not compete with the cheaper war surplus pistols flooding the market after the end of the Civil War and went into bankruptcy in 1868. For more information read the seminal work on the subject by Waldo E Nutter - Manhattan Firearms
Manhattan Series IV revolver This is a good .36 calibre Manhattan Series IV Navy. The revolver itself is all matching and has a tight lock up with 10 cylinder safety notches which allowed the revolver to be carried with the hammer dropped between the nipples, a feature unique to Manhattan. Manhattan was a serious competitor to Colt and many people consider them better made than Colt. This one has a six and a half inch barrel, crisp address and good grips. There is no cylinder scene and it has been speculated that this was removed if the revolver had been used in a military capacity. Manhattan firearms went out of business within a couple of years of the end of the Civil War and are scarcer than Colt and Remington.
Marlin 1873 30 cal Rimfire Revolver Marlin XX Standard 1873 Pocket Revolver, .30 rimfire caliber, 5 shot fluted cylinder, marked at top of 3.1/8" round barrel "XX Stndard 1873", marked at left side of barrel "J.M. Marlin New-Haven, CT,U.S.A., Pat. July 1, 1873", nickel plated frame.smooth rosewood grips. The Marlin break open or tip up pocket revolver closely followed the Smith & Wesson patents and were very popular as a secondary arm. This particular example is mechanically sound with good action and decent grips but there is wear on the plating which can be seen. Overall though a nice example and considerably lower priced than a "top end" example. Marlin firearms are becoming more collectible and this would be a good starting point for any collection.
Marlin Model 1881 Underlever Rifle in 40/60 calibre This is an excellent Marlin Model 1881 in obsolete 40/60 calibre. Marlin rifles are becoming increasingly popular and collectible after years of playing "second cousin" to Winchester whose rifles are now becoming very expensive. This fine rifle is all original and has been clearly looked after as it has an excellent shooting bore. The Model 1881 was designed to shoot black powder so excellent bores are hard to find.
Marlin Model 27-S pump action rifle Obsolete calibre pump action rifles are unusual in the UK as full bore pump action rifles have been banned. This is a Marlin Model 27-S take-down in 25 rimfire so obsolete and no license required. For your interest I show a. 25 RF cartridge alongside a standard .22 RF cartridge for comparison and I will enclose an INERT cartridge with the rifle for display purposes. The rifle is a pretty solid untouched example and has some original finish most fading away to a plum brown, a decent bore and tight action. Some little patches of pitting on the barrel as can be seen and someone has carved three little "kill" notches on the butt back in the day, no doubt because it was used for hunting Deer. This rifle has the usual dings seen on a 100 year old rifle that clearly was not bought originally to hang on the wall. The .25 rimfire was an entry level low cost cartridge in its day that was used on deer and other game. The rifle will be sold with some research. This was offered last month without the safety button which has now been received and is fitted. It is very common to find these without the safety button as they served no purpose but I have added the button for the sake of completeness. This rifle was made prior to 1915 from the makers mark on the barrel. An interesting rifle and one of the very few pump action rifles are available to the collector and those that are available are generally .22 LR on Section 1 firearms licenses but this can be owned without a license! I have exhibited this at a number of fairs in the past month and it has been passed by as people assume it is a .22 RF and requires a license.
Marlin Standard 1872 3rd variety revolver in 30 RF This is a very reasonable little Marlin XXX Standard 1872  in 30 RF  calibre marked as such so obsolete calibre.       The revolver is rated as NRA Very Good and it cocks, locks and rotates fine. It has a 3" round ribbed barrel  with Rosewood grips and  fixed sights  -and legible markings including the patent dates and manufacturer, this is the 3rd Variation with a short fluted cylinder and spur trigger  with tip up extraction and manufactured between 1873-1876. The nickel plate has faded evenly exposing a mellow brass finish as can be seen but an attractive looking little Marlin.
Marlin Standard 1872 4th variety revolver in 30 RF This is a Marlin XXX Standard 1872  revolver with 30 RF markings  so obsolete calibre . Revolver condition is NRA Good with a 3" round ribbed barrel  and hard rubber grips with a star motif and correct fixed sights and faint patent markings on side of barrel address, crisp & legible at top of barrel - 4th Variation  Long fluted cylinder tip-up  extraction with a spur trigger - bird's head grip, manufactured between 1873-1876 and mechanically sound. Overall a decent example of a Marlin standard revolver. Low serial number so probably first made in the first year of manufacture in 1872. Fired cases are ejected by removing the cylinder and using the static ejector rod under the barrel. Marlin revolvers are somewhat scarce compared to other manufacturers as their focus was on competing with Winchester for rifles.
Marlin Standard Revolver in NRA Excellent condition Marlin was an innovative company and underestimated by many historians although this is being corrected. Lt Col William S Brophy states in his history of the Marlin Company that they made Baby Buggies (Prams) button hooks, handcuffs and razor blades to survive the chaos of the 19th Century in the USA as well as the firearms we are familiar with. It is likely that the Standard Revolver was developed by the American Standard Tool Company who marketed a similar revolver. This is a single action Nickel plated revolver in 32 calibre with a patented pawl spring mechanism. This revolver can be described as follows. Clean bore, Nickel plating 98%. Marlin 32 Standard 1875 .32 RF Markings - revolver - NRA Excellent - 3" round ribbed barrel - checkered hard rubber grips w/"Star" motif - fixed sight - crisp & legible markings - fluted 5-shot , long cylinder - brass frame - tip-up barrel - spur trigger - bird's head butt - SN 9157 Marlin firearms are escalating in value as other manufacturers such as Winchester keep increasing in value. This as nice as a Marlin standard revolver as you will ever find.
Marlin XXX Model 1872 tip up revolver This is a decent Marlin XXX standard 1872 revolver. The revolver is a spur triggered 30 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and does exhibit some wear to the plating mainly on the cylinder but this is restricted to wear and not corrosion or pitting and there is an overall smooth finish to the gun. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as “Saturday Night Specials”. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase “Saturday Night Specials” is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the “Saturday Night Special”. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a “Saturday Night Special”. I now accept credit cards.
Marlin XXX tip up revolver circa 1875. Decent little Marlin XXX Standard tip up revolver in very scarce 30 RF calibre. This calibre proved very unpopular as it was said it could not perforate a wet overcoat! This brass framed revolver is mechanically sound and an interesting item for Marlin collectors or collectors of pocket pistols.
Martini Henry Sword Bayonet and Scabbard Model 1887 bayonet with fullered blade, these lay undisturbed in a Nepalese Arsenal for nearly a Century. This bayonet has a good scabbard and handle and some pitting on the blade which should polish out.
Matched pair of pocket pistols by H Nock circa 1790. This is a very good pair of matched flintlock turnoff pistols made by Henry Nock of London. A good example of Nock's general trade work the pistol locks are engraved "H Nock" on one side and "London" on the other and exhibit London proof marks. Nock was a prolific inventor and is best known for his formidable multi-barrelled volley guns which were purchased by the Royal Navy and in recent years brought back to public notice by the TV series Sharpe in which Sergeant Harper carries a Nock Volley Gun. There is an interesting and erudite article on Nock and his volley guns in the Gun Report magazine of October 1967.
Matching Arisaka Type 99 Rifle with Chrysanthemum This is an Nagoya arsenal manufactured Model 99 7.7mm calibre short rifle with a Department of control (chief inspector) inspection kana mark. Manufactured later in the war and sometimes erroneously called the “last ditch” rifles by returning GI’s who compared them to earlier rifles the Model 99 was well made. This is an early series 7 rifle that incorporated some economies such as the scrapping of the monopod rest and the impractical aircraft sights. The rear sight on this rifle is the issue sight which is shorter than the earlier aircraft sights. This particular rifle‘s bolt is matched with the receiver which is not common, most that I have seen have been mismatched as a result of armourers working on them. This has a second type safety cover on the bolt which features a series of milled grooves, the very early rifles had a chrysanthemum cover and the later rifles were simple welded. This rifle has many of the features of the earlier rifles including a metal butt plate, and an adjustable rear peep sight adjustable to 1500 metres. At this stage of the war the rifles still had the Shiki or type numbers stamped into the top of the receiver. This particular rifle was probably a battlefield pickup from a fallen Japanese soldier because the royal Chrysanthemum is totally intact. When the war ended it was agreed that the symbol could be ground off to save face by not allowing the surrendered weapons with the royal symbol to be handled by foreigners. This was done mechanically or electrically and all traces of the Chrysanthemum were removed. . The butt of the Arisaka was made in two pieces dove tailed together and towards the end of the war unseasoned wood was used as an expedient and often the butts feature a wide separation gap but this is a nice one that was made with seasoned wood. The bore of the rifle is good and it has been recently proofed (Nov 2013). Overall a very nice untouched example of a classic Japanese Rifle.
Mauser 71/84 Service Rifle 1887 This is a decent Mauser Model 71/84 Imperial German Amberg manufactured bolt action repeating service rifle dated 1887. The rifle exudes character and history and unlike many of these rifles this one has seen action very likely with reservists in the closing months of the Great War. Issue markings on the butt plate read; B76 4 179 which represents the 7th Bayerisches (Bavarian) Reserve Infantrie Regiment, 4 th Kompagnie, Waffe Nr 179. The rifle has an arsenal fitted bolt which does not match the other numbers on the rifle but fit and function are perfect. I guess the armorers 100 years ago were not concerned with collectors who collect rifles as some collect stamps and expect everything matching! The woodwork exhibits some scattered bruising consummate with hard fighting and the bore has nice sharp grooves and lands with a little light frosting but no pitting and may clean better. It retains most of its original barrel finish with a mellow age patina to the “in the white” receiver. My vendor stated that this was a battlefield pick up but as of yet I have no firm provenance to offer although I am pursuing this but this rifle would suit a collector who appreciates fighting rifles and not the unissued mint examples of the 71/84 that are often seen. The calibre is obsolete 11.15 x 60R Mauser and does not require a license to own unlike most Great War Mausers.
Mauser C 96 Large Ring This classic large ring flat or "slab" sided "Broomhandle" Mauser is probably the finest example currently for sale in the UK. Serial number dates it to 1900 around the time of the South African War and the condition is exceptional. I would rate the pistol as 95%+ and nearly mint. There are some slight scuffs on the mirror smooth blue but not dreadful ones. The bore is as one would expect and the grips are about perfect. Photographs literally do not do this pistol justice. There is some pitting or casting inclusions on part of the frame under the grips so to be cautious I would say it may have been refinished although I have had some mixed expert views on this. Under a microscope the stamping does not appear to be polished or worn so if it has been refinished it is an excellent job. If you are interested in this you will know its nomenclature and significance in the development of the Mauser pistol. I am happy to send additional images to serious parties. Within a year of its introduction in 1896, the C96 had been sold to governments and commercially for resale to civilians and individual military officers. The Mauser C96 pistol was also extremely popular with British officers at the time and purchased privately by many of them; numbers were supplied to Westley Richards in the UK for this purpose, although its popularity with the British military had waned by the onset of World War I. As a military sidearm, the pistols saw service in various colonial wars, as well as World War I, the Estonian War of Independence, the Spanish Civil War, the Chinese Civil War and World War II. The C96 also became a staple of Bolshevik Commissars and various warlords and gang leaders in the Russian Civil War, known simply as "the Mauser". Winston Churchill was fond of the Mauser C96 and used one at the Battle of Omdurman and during the Second Boer War; similarly, Lawrence of Arabia carried a Mauser C96 for a period during his time in the Middle East.Indian Revolutionary Ram Prasad Bismil and his partymen used these Mauser Pistols in the historical Kakori train robbery in August 1925. Chinese Communist general Zhu De carried a Mauser C96 during his Nanchang Uprising and later conflicts; his gun (with his name printed on it) can be viewed in the Beijing war museum. Imported and domestic copies of the C96 were used extensively by the Chinese in the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Chinese Civil War, as well as by the Spanish during the Spanish Civil War and the Germans in World War II. Besides the standard 7.63×25mm chambering, C96 pistols were also commonly chambered for 9×19mm Parabellum with a small number also being produced in 9 mm Mauser Export. There was also a Chinese-manufactured model chambered for .45 ACP. Despite the pistol's worldwide popularity and fame, the only nation to use the C96 as the primary service pistol of its military and police was China. The Broomhandle Mauser has become a popular collector's gun. The C96 frequently appears as a "foreign" or "exotic" pistol in a number of films and TV shows, owing to its distinctive and instantly recognisable shape, and for the same reasons and in the same tradition, a C96 was modified to form Han Solo's prop blaster pistol for the Star Wars films. It was popularized in Soviet films as the iconic weapon of the Russian revolution and civil war.
Mauser Model 1871 Single Shot Bolt Action Rifle This rifle is a real untouched “sleeper” and should form the first rifle of any Mauser collection. The Mauser Model 1871 adopted as the Gewehr 71 or Infanterie-Gewehr 71 ("I.G.Mod.71" was stamped on the rifles themselves) was the first rifle model in a distinguished line designed and manufactured by Paul Mauser and Wilhelm Mauser of the Mauser company and later mass-produced at Spandau. During 1870–71 trials with many different rifles took place, with the "M1869 Bavarian Werder" being the Mausers' chief competitor. The Mauser was provisionally adopted at the end of 1871, pending the development of an appropriate safety. It was adopted by the German Empire excluding Bavaria. The action was not based on its predecessor, the Dreyse needle gun which had seen service during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71. The now well recognized Mauser "wing" type safety lever was developed for the Gewehr 71. The Gewehr 71 is a conventional looking bolt action chambered in 11mm using black powder cartridges. The action included only a bolt guide rib as its single locking lug, locking forward of the receiving bridge. This is the original single shot rifle and is scarce as most were converted to the Gewehr 71/84 rifle with a tubular magazine developed by Alfred von Kropatschek which was Germany’s first repeating rifle. This rifle features a plethora of military markings and has a good bore with good mechanics. If you look carefully It would appear that at some time there was a plate attached to the right hand side of the butt which was probably a “trophy of war” plate. It is an astounding fact that some of these rifles were in use and captured in World War One more than 40 years after their introduction. The rifle was adapted by all German States and was a huge success and was even manufactured under license in Great Britain. This is a decent, honest untouched rifle in an obsolete calibre that could be considerably improved should you wish. For every single shot Model 71 you see, you will see 10 Model 71/84 conversions.
Maynard 50 calibre Civil War Carbine Here is a 2nd Model Maynard carbine referred to as the Model 1863. Carbine was widely regarded as one of the best performing and most accurate of all the cavalry arms used during the Civil War. The breech-loading Maynard carbine employed a metallic cartridge and was the invention of New Jersey dentist Edward Maynard who patented his first model carbine in 1851. During the Civil War, the U.S. Ordnance Dept contracted for over 20,000 single shot, percussion, .50 caliber carbines. Produced by the Massachusetts Arms Company of Chicopee, Mass, these carbines were issued to Federal cavalry and the Maynard proved a lightweight, very serviceable, and dependable short arm that saw extensive service in the field. This carbine specimen is in very good original condition. Carbine has a total length of 36 7/8” with a 20” round barrel and no forend. The untouched walnut stock exhibits still bears two light cartouches on left wrist area. Fitted with a sling bar and saddle ring on the left side of the frame, carbine has a folding two-leaf rear sight and a slightly curved iron butt plate. Receiver retains no case colors but has a mix of patina with a patch lightly cleaned to gray-bright. Barrel includes a 5” long octagonal section at the breech with remainder a round barrel. Barrel exterior retains a pleasing, mixed gray / brown patina. Bore is strong and semi-bright with three-groove rifling. Receiver / barrel hinge pin tight with no play in lever. Overall a good example now getting scarce as they are being used extensively in the USA by Civil War re-enactors.
Maynard Civil War Carbine Now this is a rarity in the UK! A 50 calibre Maynard capping breech loading carbine. Edward Maynard invented the tape primer system and was not only a prolific inventor but an acclaimed Dentist who introduced many dentistry techniques including the use of gold for fillings. Maynard's carbine was renowned as pre-eminent for fast loading and accuracy and was more or less the first metallic cartridge to use the expansion of the cartridge to seal the breech. The Cartridges were made of thick brass and reusable. Maynard claimed that the springy walls of his metallic cartridge expanded when fired to form a perfect gas seal at the breech. This solved the erstwhile problem of gas and flame leakage at the breech joint. Up to this time the main concern of metallic cartridges was mainly to expedite loading and making the charge waterproof, which was accomplished to a small degree. Evidently the most important application of the cartridge case had been overlooked. Although not the final word by any means, Maynard's metallic cartridge was simple, efficient and reloadable. During a series of tests conducted in 1859 some of these cases were reloaded and fired as many as 100 times and still were usable. Maynard's invention, one of his many cartridge patents, hastened the end of the percussion period!This carbine was used by both the Confederate forces and the Union. This is a superb example, the best I've seen outside of a Museum. Crisp action, mechanically sound with most original colour and excellent cartouches. Only fault which most won't see but I will point out is a very good arsenal repair on the butt which doesn't detract from the look of the gun as 90% of people would think it was the pattern of the wood. Maynard's guns were made to exacting tolerances and are of superb quality and greatly underestimated as his output was less than the most recognised makes.
Maynard Improved Medium Range 1873 Target Rifle This is an interesting Maynard target rifle in 38-50 Maynard calibre. The rifle features a 32" heavy "bull" target barrel and a reproduction Wm Malcolm 6 power scope. This is interesting in it's own right as it is generally not known that such scopes were used in the Civil War. Many were made by William Malcolm who was born on October 13th 1823 and died July 12th 1890, his workshop being located at Syracuse , New York. Malcolm scopes were all made with a 3/4" tube without an enlarged eyepiece or objective lens and this particular scope has a fine cross hair reticule the narrow field of view being particularly good for target shooting. The optics on the scope are crisp and clear. The rifle also has a Hadley device which was a patented device held in place by two small screws which converted the rifle from centre fire to rim fire as 38 rimfire was also a readily available cartridge. It is surprising to see that this has survived. 38-50 Maynard was renowned for it's accuracy and utilised a thick rim to obdurate the breech and assist in extraction. The barrel has a plum patina and is clean with an excellent bore and the walnut woodwork is very good with an oiled finish as it should be. Steel butt plate denotes quality and the mechanics are perfect. 38-50 calibre was a very popular target round in the 1870-1880's and Maynard was pre-eminent in the production of target rifles but the manufacture of the Maynard rifle involved a lot of hand finishing and in the world of mass production this eventually lead to their demise but were still being used with great success at the beginning of the 20th Century. Maynard paid particular attention to his barrels and rifling and until production stopped in the 1890's were regarded as the finest single shot target rifles money could buy.
Maynard Improved Medium Range 1873 Target Rifle The Maynard rifle is a seldom seen rifle in the UK and if seen is usually in well used condition unlike this good looking rifle. Here we have an improved rifle in 38-50 calibre which features several extra accessories that were supplied to special order. The rifle is fitted with a tang target site ( Maynard ) a flip over foresight and checkering to the walnut stock. An interesting accessory is the spare shotgun barrel in obsolete calibre which could change the rifle from a target rifle to a hunting gun in minutes.accessoryMaynard rifles were renowned for their accuracy and had a unique interchangeable barrel system so you could use a multitude of barrels on the same receiver such as a .22, shotgun, target and hunting barrel. The model 1873 used a cartridge with a stepped rim to seal the breech as can be seen in the photograph. Maynard rifles won many of the important target competitions in the USA between 1870 and 1890 and were produced to a very high quality. This exceptional rifle has good woodwork, much original finish and an excellent bore with crisp mechanics. Dr Edward Maynard was a prolific firearms inventor who is remembered for his taped primer system and latterly his successful Maynard patented rifles. One one considers the scarcity and interest of these rifles compared to say Winchesters, they are very under rated but that is beginning to change. Please feel free to ask any questions. Price includes carriage and a reproduction Maynard catalogue.
Maynard Improved Medium Range 1873 Target Rifle with factory extras. This is an interesting and good example of a Maynard target rifle in 38-50 Maynard calibre. The rifle features a 32" heavy "bull" target barrel, original Maynard tang site and factory extras including checkering and flip over foresight. Maynards were well made and versatile, the barrels on the rifes easily interchange to make a target rifle into a field rifle or even shotgun withing minutes. Edward Maynard was a dentist and held patents on dental equipment as well as firearms and his tape primer was retro fitted to military rifles at the time of the Civil War which made his fortune ( that he lost! ). See my Maynard tape primed pistol to see the mechanism. 38-50 Maynard was renowned for it's accuracy and utilised a thick rim to obdurate the breech and assist in extraction. The barrel has a plum patina and is clean with an excellent bore and the walnut woodwork is very good with an oiled finish as it should be. Steel butt plate denotes quality and the mechanics are perfect. 35-30 calibre was a very popular target round in the 1870-1880's and Maynard was pre-eminent in the production of target rifles but the manufacture of the Maynard rifle involved a lot of hand finishing and in the world of mass production this eventually lead to their demise but were still being used with great success at the beginning of the 20th Century. Maynard paid particular attention to his barrels and rifling and until production stopped in the 1890's were regarded as the finest single shot target rifles money could buy.
Medieval Signal Mortars This is an excellent pair of signal mortars which are well cast and date from the 16th Century. I believe this pair to be German in origin. One measures just over 7" high with a diameter of 2.25" with a 1" bore and the smaller one measures 6" with a 2" diameter and 1" bore. These were used to signal both time and actions in their day. Now they make a great conversation piece, and are heavy enough to be used as door stops! Priced reasonably and an interesting set of very early ordnance.
Military Mausers K98 Various Here is a selection of Military Mauser K98 rifles a Portuguese, two Yugoslavian Mausers, one minty and finally a Columbian K98 chambered in 30/06 to suit the millions of rounds the USA "donated" to the Colombian Government after WW2. Live firing FAC required. I will hold with no storage charge for variations.
Military type Circa 1850 14 bore Percussion Pistol This is a 24 bore percussion pistol similar to a Tower issue but this has contemporary proofs but no Crown so probably made for the export market. Nevertheless a handsome substantial pistol of quality. Barrel length 9" Overall length 15"
Mint Stevens Model 44 Rifle This is an excellent Stevens Model 44 and about as good as can be found. The bore is mint and the original cyanide case hardening on the receiver has hardly worn. Superb action and really nice woodwork. This particular rifle is chambered for obsolete 32 RF long but in the USA this model is often used as a platform for a bench rest rifle which is a relatively easy conversion that would allow the rifle to be shot and put onto a FAC. The rifle will be supplied with an additional excellent 32/40 barrel with a mint bore so this is a very versatile package. Email for more images.
Model 1873 Maynard improved Target/Hunting Rifle The Maynard rifle is a seldom seen rifle in the UK and if seen is usually in well used condition unlike this good looking rifle. Here we have an improved rifle in 38-50 calibre which features several extra accessories that were supplied to special order. The rifle is fitted with a tang target site ( Maynard ) a flip over foresight and checkering to the walnut stock. Maynard rifles were renowned for their accuracy and had a unique interchangeable barrel system so you could use a multitude of barrels on the same receiver such as a .22, shotgun, target and hunting barrel. The model 1873 used a cartridge with a stepped rim to seal the breech as can be seen in the photograph. Maynard rifles won many of the important target competitions in the USA between 1870 and 1890 and were produced to a very high quality. This exceptional rifle has good woodwork, much original finish and an excellent bore with crisp mechanics. Dr Edward Maynard was a prolific firearms inventor who is remembered for his taped primer system and latterly his successful Maynard patented rifles. One one considers the scarcity and interest of these rifles compared to say Winchesters, they are very under rated but that is beginning to change. For those wishing to add this interesting and accurate rifle to their FAC I will supply 20 cases of custom made Maynard Brass manufactured by the Rocky Mountain Cartridge Company. I waited 6 months for these and the week after they arrived learnt that all I needed to do was trim back a Winchester 38/55 case slightly and then drop a washer over the top of it! Please feel free to ask any questions. Price includes carriage and a reproduction Maynard catalogue. SEE THIS AT THE TRAFALGAR BISLEY 20/21ST CLASSIC 28TH (trade)
Moore's patent teat fire revolver This interesting Teat-fire cartridge is a .32 caliber pistol cartridge designed by Daniel Moore and manufactured by Moore and his partner David Williamson for their Pocket Revolver, was produced under both the Moore and National Arms marques by the National Arms Company of Brooklyn, New York in the mid-19th century. The Moore Calibre .32 Teat-fire used a unique cartridge to get around the Rollin White patent owned by Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson, and proved very popular during the Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. The "Teat-fire" cartridges did not have a rim at the back like conventional cartridges, but were rounded at the rear, with a small "teat" that would protrude through a tiny opening in the rear of the cylinder. The priming mixture was contained in the "teat" and when the hammer struck it, the cartridge would fire. Thus, it was akin to a rimfire cartridge, but instead of having priming all the way around the edge of the rim, it is centrally located in the teat. Moore's Calibre .32 Teat-fire Pocket Revolvers proved very popular during the American Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. National Arms produced about 30,000 of the revolvers from 1864 to 1870, when it was acquired by Colt's Manufacturing Company. As can be seen, this particular example has much original finish and cocks and locks perfectly and easily disassembles. There were several interesting revolvers patented at this time that were front loaded to circumnavigate Rollin White’s rear chamber loading patent and along with the Slocum the Moore stands out as one of the few that enjoyed commercial success. Price includes overnight courier.
Moore\'s Belt Revolver a.k.a Moore’s single action belt revolver a.k.a as “The Seven Shooter” This is a very interesting gun on several accounts and offers the discriminating collector rarity, superb craftsmanship an interesting history and an unusual mechanism. Firstly, Smith & Wesson purchased from Rollin White the patent on bored-through cylinders. This practically gave Smith &Wesson a monopoly on cartridge firing revolvers and they pursued their patent rights aggressively. This was reinforced when they won a lawsuit against Moore for infringing this patent. Very few of these revolvers were ever produced, and part of the damages awarded to Smith & Wesson was in respect of Moore putting their name on the barrel and stamping the patent on the cylinder – which was the exact patent Moore had been found guilty of violating! Quite embarrassing and humiliating for Moore! Few guns display this interesting period of firearms manufacturing as well as the Moore’s gun does, especially the ones marked such as this one. Moore revolvers are scarce; Moore revolvers with the Smith and Wesson address are rare! Flayderman suggests a premium of 40% over unmarked revolvers. This very rare revolver was the first commercial revolver that had a swing out cylinder which is released by a button to the rear and side of the hammer. The cylinder swings out sufficiently to the right to allow reloading the 32 calibre rounds into it. The holds seven rounds, another interesting innovation that gave it the nickname the “Seven Shooter”. The Moore was highly prized in the Civil War as it was regarded as reliable and had the benefit of seven shots. Quite a few of these revolvers were known to have been privately purchased by Union Officers and enlisted men during the Civil War and the revolver was only manufactured between 1861 to 1863. These revolvers are rare and seldom seen in this condition, the Moore teat fire revolver that were subsequently introduced to overcome the patent issues being encountered more often by collectors which is another interesting and unusual revolver. Recently the famed Ali Cali collection of Civil War revolvers was sold by Sotheby’s and the sale did not include one of these revolvers although there were multiple offerings of some rare patterns. This gives one an idea of rarity. This particular revolver is marked on top of the 4” barrel "Manufactured for Smith & Wesson by Moore Firearms Company" as referred above. Overall gun is very nice with sharp corners, light markings and nicely engraved brass receiver. There is a high percentage of original silver finish remaining which can be seen and is evenly worn and the revolver has an overall nice patina on the steel barrel with case hardening remaining on the cylinder flats and hammer. The revolver has an excellent functioning action and rotates and locks solidly with a beautiful bore. The ejector rod is extant and these were sometimes lost as they are fully removable. Clearly the gun was looked after and the original walnut grips have the original varnish remaining with no chips and the gun is correct in every detail with little to fault it. This is an opportunity to acquire a significant and attractive looking Civil War revolver in above average condition. See this and my other interesting guns at the Hertsmere Fine Antique Arms Show, Elstree, Sunday June 1st.
Mosin Nagant Rifle This is an early Mosin Nagant with Brass End Cap and Hand Guard clip which is not rare but definitely uncommon in the UK. A couple of years ago I spent a pleasurable couple of hours sifting through literally hundreds of MN's at the main importers and only found this one with the brass ware. Apparently the very early ones were copper, then brass then steel. This is a quality rifle and if you are going to put one on your FAC you might as well have a good one. This is an all matching British Nitro Proofed with a very small proof mark but carries a date of 1932 on the Knox and a post 1928 Izhevsk Arsenal mark as well as the wreathed Hammer and Sickle mark. Woodwork is good and bore has excellent pronounced rifling but is dark and would scrub up. This rifle comes complete with a sling, oil bottle and correct bayonet.
Murdoch Style Scottish Pistol Copy. I don't believe I have ever sold a copy gun in my life but as Scottish pistols are beyond the realms of most of us here is an opportunity to own a decent older copy. This is an iron pistol in the style of Murdoch and is interesting insofar as unlike the modern reproductions that are somewhat "flashy" and decorative, this is a plain iron pistol as would have been issued to the military. Pistols were considered requisite items for the Highland soldier as early as the 1730s. By the 1740s the elegant pistol styles of Christie & Murdoch (armorers of Doune, Stirlingshire) had became the most sought after amongst Highland officers. The unique elements of the Doune pistols were the scroll or rams horn butt, fluted barrels at the breech and the octagonal flared muzzles. This is an interesting piece that costs around £7000 less than the original!
Museum Quality Civil War Maynard Model 1863 Carbine I have sold several Maynard Carbine’s and shoot one myself, but this is the best I have had the pleasure to offer. If you were looking for an outstanding Civil War Carbine in museum condition, this would be it. This a 2nd Model Maynard carbine referred to as the Model 1863. This Carbine was widely regarded as one of the best performing and most accurate of all the cavalry arms used during the Civil War. The breech-loading Maynard carbine employed a metallic cartridge and was the invention of New Jersey dentist Edward Maynard who patented his first model carbine in 1851 and made a fortune with his patented tape primer system which he sold to the US Government ( see my earlier Maynard Carbine). During the Civil War, the U.S. Ordnance Department contracted for over 20,000 single shot, percussion, .50 calibre, and 2nd Model carbines. Produced by the Massachusetts Arms Company of Chicopee, Mass, these carbines were issued to Federal cavalry and the Maynard proved a lightweight, very serviceable and dependable carbine that saw extensive service in the field. The brass cartridge case ( I will supply one) features a small hole where the primer would be in later cartridges. This hole is large enough to allow the flash of the percussion cap to ignite the charge, but too small to allow powder to escape. The cases could be used many, many times and refilled by hand. Maynard correctly deduced that the flexible brass case would obdurate the breech and would not split for reloading. This stunning specimen is a later production carbine with a serial number of 20195 . Carbine has a total length of 36 7/8” with a 20” round barrel and no forend and is in excellent original condition with an untouched black walnut stock. The stock bears two crisp government ‘cartouches’ on the left side near receiver. Fitted with a sling bar and saddle ring on the left side of the breech frame, the carbine has a folding two-leaf rear sight and a slightly curved iron butt plate. Receiver retains considerable case colours. Barrel includes a 5” long octagonal section at the breech with remainder a round barrel. Barrel exterior retains much of its original bluing and wears a pleasing patina overall. Bore is minty-plus, mirror bright with excellent three-groove rifling. Hammer retains its original bluing. Receiver / barrel hinge pin tight and strong with no play in lever operation. All stampings on the frame are sharp and read, “MANUFACTURED BY / MASS. ARMS CO. / CHICOPEE FALLS” in three lines on the obverse side while the reverse side is marked “EDWARD MAYNARD / PATENTEE / MAY 27, 1851 / DEC. 6, 1859” in four lines. Sub-inspector stampings found on the sling bar, rear sight, butt plate and at toe of stock. All gun metal fine to very fine. Carbine exhibits tight, strong mechanics. All frame screws excellent with much bluing. This Second Model Maynard carbine is an excellent original representative Civil War cavalry arm that would enhance any Civil War display or collection. Many more images available.
Native Troops Tower Cavalry Carbine circa the Indian Mutiny This is a good looking British Enfield Tower 1858 Pattern .656" Smooth Bore, Percussion Native Indian Mounted Police & Troops Carbine with Native States Kingdom Of Hyderabad 'NS KOH' Marks, Saddle Bar & Ring. These weapons were issued to Native Indian Mounted Police and troops and were used during the Indian or Sepoy Mutiny 1858-59. This is a decent looking carbine with good wood and an even patina. Nipple protector is intact as is the integral ramrod. Profuse proof and military markings throughout the weapon including a clear Bombay Arsenal cartouche. A nice piece of history and a decent example for a carbine collector.
Netherlands Model 1894 Netherlands Dutch Model 94 Colonial Military 9.4mm calibre six shot revolver with a 4.3 inch hexagon barrel. Double action first issued to the Dutch Colonial Army in 1894 and remained in service until 1945. Built by HEGE. Wood grips retain some checkering, and lanyard ring is still attached. Bore is very clean 9.5/10, and revolver is mechanically sound and cocks and locks tightly with little play. Clearly the revolver has seen service but as typifies the Dutch who are usually very precise, the revolver has been very well cared for and not allowed to deteriorate, all the more remarkable as these were used in the Tropics. The revolver exhibits a dark patina mainly original parkerised finish, with no major pitting. Overall very good condition with good eye appeal. This is an Obsolete calibre and does not require a license and is a good example of a military style revolver that can be sold without castrating it first. Many of these were brought back from the East Indies to the USA by US troops after the Pacific Campaign but are uncommon in the UK.
Nice Stevens New Pocket Rifle circa 1875 The Stevens New Model Pocket Rifle was first issue circa 1875. These interesting rifles were introduced during a recession and were probably manufactured as a batch and then sold over several years. The quantities made were in the low thousands. This is a decent example in obsolete 25 rim fire calibre and mechanically sound with good rosewood grips. If you are interested in Stevens pocket rifles see the excellent work by Kenneth L Cope. Note that this gun has the shoulder stock. An interesting firearm.
Original Japanese This is an authentic Japanese "Rising Sun" silk battle flag that returned from the Pacific Theatre after WW2 and is in outstanding condition. This was acquired on the West Coast of America from a veterans family together with an Arisaka rifle and other items. The Nambu pistol is not for sale and is in the photograph to show scale. There are many reproduction Japanese Flags on the market and care needs to be taken not to buy these as original. This is original with a lifetime money back guarantee.
OTIS SMITH NEW MODEL REVOLVER NRA excellent condition Otis A Smith new model revolver in 32 rimfire calibre manufactured in 1883. The top strap is marked “SMITH’S NEW MODEL” The revolver is in excellent condition as can be seen with the original hard rubber grips featuring the “OAS” logo. It was made by Otis A. Smith of Rockfall, CT.
Otis Smith\'s New Model Revolver circa 1875 This is a an excellent Smith's New Model Revolver in nickel finish and obsolete 32 RF calibre and 3 " barrel. Revolver cocks and locks perfectly and is a very pleasing example of one of the scarcer smaller revolvers. Otis Smith was born in Massachusetts to a Scottish immigrant father in 1836. Prior to 1880, he worked with Ira Johnson making pistols. After purchasing the mill, Smith patented his own designs for pistols and other hardware products, including planes. Otis Smith’s company, referred to as the U.S. Revolver Company and The Otis Smith Manufacturing Company at different times, made the world famous Smith Revolver that is considered one of the guns that “won the west.”
Outstanding Bergmann Model 1896 no 3 Automatic Pistol This is an excellent example of a very early Bergmann Model 1896 Number 3 semi-automatic pistol and is an interesting, some would say iconic, pistol developed at the end of the 19th Century. Theodore Bergman was a pioneer in developing semi-automatic pistols in Europe in the late 1890s and early 1900s right alongside Mauser, Borchardt, Luger and Walther. Bergmann was essentially a financier and a successful entrepreneur and at the age of only 19 became the managing director of the Gaggenau ironworks. The original inventor of the pistol was a Hungarian watchmaker who did nothing with his idea and Bergmann bought the design. The design was perfected by none other than Louis Schmeisser who developed this pistol and the Dreyse pistol which was used in both world wars. Schmeisser also developed the Bergmann machine gun that was extensively used in the First World War. These early commercial pistols are very difficult to find as few were produced. This model was his most successful commercial pistol and has the distinctive flat top bolt and top cover with the thin, lightweight firing pin and the two angled cuts on the right side of the frame. This model has the integral magazine that sits in front of the trigger and loads with stripper clips through the top of the action. The right side of the pistol has oval shaped logo that depicts a "mountain man" holding a pick behind his back with sunrays emanating from behind him. The top of the oval is marked "Gaggenau", and the lower area is marked “V.C.S. Suhl", indicating that these pistols were manufactured by the Schilling Company. Bergmann, along with Borchardt really pioneered self-loading pistols but the advantage Bergmann had compared to Borchardt was that his pistols were smaller and easier to handle with much faster target acquisition. Mauser’s iconic “broomhandle” design was made commercially available in 1896 and this design was considered more robust for military application. Similarly the Borchardt pistol was quickly superceded by the Luger pistol which utilised and enhanced Borchardt’s toggle lock design making the earlier designs obsolete. A variation of the Bergmann pistol was developed by Bergmann and was issued to the Danish army and was in service until WW2. These pistols fired a bottle necked cartridge very similar to the Mauser C96 cartridge. The 6.5mm Bergmann is an unusual centre fire cartridge produced for very early self-loading pocket pistols. The case is bottle-necked and steeply conical, and headspaces on the conical case walls. Early versions were made without any rim or extraction groove; and relied upon blow-back for expulsion of the fired case from the chamber. Later Bergmann pistols provided an extractor requiring a groove which produced a semi-rimmed case On this particular early pistol the serial number "309" is stamped on the right front area of the frame and again on the back side of both grip panels. The left side of the barrel is marked with the bore diameter "278" followed by a "Double Crown/U" proof mark. The lower front edge of the frame is stamped "PATENT/BREVET/S.G.D.G." The upper left side of the frame is also stamped with a small "Double Crown/U" proof. It is fitted with a set of matching walnut chequered grips. The condition of the pistol is NRA very fine with 75% plus of the original blue finish overall with blue loss on the grip straps edges and high spots overall. The walnut grips are also in good plus condition commensurate with the wear on the rest of the pistol. They have good, distinct chequering on both sides showing only minor handling marks and light wear across the tops of the chequering. There is one small chip on the upper right side grip. The smaller pins and screws all retain 90% of their straw colours and the safety retains 95% of its heat blued finish. A very nice all original early example of a Bergmann Number 3 semi-automatic pistol that would be very difficult to improve on. Early Bergmann pistols are becoming difficult to source as there is an increasing demand from collectors and a relatively low survival rate of pre-1900 pistols as they were rapidly replaced with better designs such as Mauser and Luger. As an obsolete calibre this historic pistol can be owned in the UK without a license and would be very difficult to better and an excellent investment.
Outstanding Cased Colt London Navy circa 1855 This is a very good cased Colt Navy Revolver in 36 calibre manufactured in the London factory and stamped as such with British proofs and Colt’s London address. At this level the set would be difficult to better. The gun has a crisp action with a bright bore and much original finish. There is a very good cylinder scene with the silver plating extant on the trigger guard. The set is in the correct British case and contains the correct accessories including a Sykes stamped powder flask. The quality of the accessories is commensurate with the quality of the revolver and this is an exceptional set that has not been “improved” The finish of the revolver is original and rates at 90%. Were it not for some careless but typical marks and a light surface scratch around the wedge, this revolver would increase in value to the sort of money we see Texan millionaires paying in USA Auction Houses. Colt believed that his London factory was the most important expansion of his business because of the potential sales throughout the British Empire and it is said that the examples made in the London factory were superior to those made in the USA factories. To research Colt London revolvers read Rosa’s seminal work “Colonel Colt of London”. Superior finish on Colt London revolvers included domed head screws, better cross hatching on the hammer and enhanced silver plating on the trigger guard. It is little known or advertised that Colt’s British aspirations were destroyed when he was caught smuggling Colt Navy revolvers to Britain’s enemy - Russia at the height of the Crimean War and became persona non grata to the British Government. Colt closed his London factory never to manufacture in the United Kingdom again. This is a very attractive cased London Navy and “ticks all the boxes” with great eye appeal and potential investment value.
Outstanding cased LAC Kerr revolver. This 54 bore Kerr revolver is in its original case as purchased, complete with all accessories including the LAC two band bullet mould, LAC nipple screw, flask, chamois leather bullet pouch with the original Kerr paper label etc. Mechanically perfect the bore is mint and it retains 95%+ finish on the barrel and frame with all correct proof marks and company stamps and engraving. The case is original with the key and the Kerr loading and cleaning label on the inside of the lid. There is a minor patch of rust on the cylinder which matches a mark in the case where the revolver has laid undisturbed for decades but other than that it is a wonderful example.
Outstanding Civil War Whitney Navy Revolver. This is an outstanding example of a revolver that is scarce to find in excellent condition. The revolver has most original colour, sharp edges and good stamping and has a really pleasing appearance. The Whitney Navy is a 6-shot, .36 calibre, single action percussion revolver that was manufactured from the late 1850s through the early 1860s. The revolver went into production after Colt's patent on his revolver mechanism expired in 1857. The first 1,500 or so (aka "1st Model" Whitney Navy revolvers) were manufactured without a loading lever and were of lighter construction than the later 2nd Model revolvers. Between the Whitney desire to improve upon the guns, and the habit of making design changes when parts on hand ran out, both the 1st and 2nd Models were manufactured in a number of different "types" with a clear pattern of evolution that took place throughout their production. Some 33,000 Whitney Navy revolvers were produced during the production run, with many seeing US government use. The US Army acquired 10,587 of the revolvers between 1861 and 1864 and the US Navy purchased an additional 6,226 between 1863 and 1865. The state of New Jersey purchased 920 Whitney Navy revolvers in 1863, but 792 of those guns were subsequently resold to the US Army in 1863 and 1864. Those guns are included in the US Army purchases listed above. A number of Whitney Navy revolvers also appear to have been acquired by the South and saw service during the American Civil War. Some were purchased prior to the outbreak of hostilities, and these guns tend to early production 2nd Model revolvers produced prior to the spring of 1861. A good example is Whitney Navy 3110, which was owned by Confederate cavalry general J.E.B. Stuart, and is now in the collection of the Virginia Historical Society. However, Confederate forces acquired many more Whitney Navy revolvers after the conflict started. These later production guns were no doubt obtained through a combination of capturing weapons and purchasing the guns surreptitiously from secondary retailers rather than Whitney. At least two-dozen Whitney Navy revolvers are known to have been repaired for use by the 4th Virginia "Black Horse" Cavalry, and a handful of identified Whitney Navy revolvers with Confederate provenance exist was well. It is not surprising that the revolver found favour on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, as the robust design with a reinforcing top strap, a solid frame with a screwed in barrel and the simple turn of a wing nut to release the loading lever and cylinder arbor were all significant improvements over the open topped frame and wedge-retained barrel of the Colt design. The popularity of the revolvers in the south is further indicated by the fact that the design was copied by Confederate gunmakers Spiller & Burr and T.W. Cofer, both of whom produced Whitney-like revolvers for the south. The barrel and grip panels show serial number 24984. The serial number is crisply stamped into the woods of the grips along with the initials of the military inspector who inspected the revolver. The loading lever is also stamped with the same number. The top of the octagon barrel is stamped: E WHITNEY N. HAVEN There is some slight marking by the “N” of Haven as can be seen but nothing dreadful. The action of the revolver is mechanically sound and the gun times, indexes and locks-up exactly as it should The bore is in excellent condition. The original novel Whitney arbor pin retention thumbscrew is in place and operates. The small brass trigger guard (correct for this model) has a pleasing aged patina. The original two-piece oil finished walnut grips are present, and are in excellent condition, complete with serial numbers on the inner face as previously mentioned. Overall this is a very good example of a scarce Whitney Navy that was used in the Civil War and truly would be difficult to better. An extremely interesting and important Civil War revolver.
Outstanding collection of bullet moulds many rarities. I am selling a lifelong collection of bullet moulds with some rarities and most in exceptional condition. Here are some of the ones I have catalogued. I would consider selling them as a collection. Please ask for further details. EXCELLENT COLT ARMY 44 CALIBRE 6 GANG MOULD. I HAVE A CHOICE OF 2! BOTH ARE COMPARABLE. COLT DID NOT STAMP HIS NAME ON THESE MOULDS THAT WERE GIVEN WITH EVERY 50 REVOLVERS SOLD AS THIS DID NOT MAKE HIM ANY MORE MONEY. THEY ARE CORRECTLY STAMPED 44H (HOLSTER PISTOL) SEE RAPLEY PAGE 269 CATALOGUE NUMBER #M51 £1000 EACH. SUPERB COLT NAVY MOULD DUAL CAVITY 36 CALIBRE. SEE RAPLEY PAGE 241 CATALOGUE NO #M22 CORRECTLY STAMPED COLTS PATENTS ETC, MUCH FINISH, DIFFICULT TO BETTER. £600.00 28 CALIBRE ROOT SIDE HAMMER MOULD CIRCA 1858. SEE RAPLEY PAGE 245 CATALOGUE NO #M24. £450.00 SCARCE REMINGTON BEALES 31 CALIBRE DUAL CAVITY BULLET MOULD. MADE FOR POCKET PISTOL, VERY CLEAN POSSIBLY UNUSED. £250.00 GOOD BRASS REMINGTON 36 CALIBRE NAVY MOULD CIRCA 1861/1862. EARLY MOULD MANUFACTURED BY REMINGTON IN LLION /NYS. £300.00 VERY GOOD CIVIL WAR ERA REMINGTON 44 CALIBRE ARMY MOULD. NICE CLEAN CONDITION WITH SOME FINISH. £350.00 INTERESTING FRANKFORD ARSENAL GANG MOULD TO PRODUCE BUCK SHOT. £350.00 VERY GOOD COLT 31 CALIBRE POCKET MOULD. RAPLEY PAGE 237 CAT NO #M16 £250.00 RARE COLT BABY DRAGOON 31 CALIBRE CHOICE 2. RAPLEY PAGE 231 CAT NO#M12 £475.525. SUPER COLT ARMY MOULD 44 CAL CIRCA 1860. SEE RAPLEY PAGE 249 CAR NO#M28 £400.00 VERY RARE SMITH & WESSON NO 3 (RUSSIAN) 44 CALIBRE MOULD WITH PRIMER EXTRACTOR. PATENT DATE OCT 3RD 1871. VERY INNOVATIVE. IMPOSSIBLE TO REPLACE. £1000.00
Outstanding Early Adams \"Automatic\" Revolver This is an historically significant and attractive example of an early Adams "automatic" self cocking revolver in 54 bore (44 calibre). These early revolvers were double action that held the advantage of speed as the whole action of cocking and releasing the hammer was undertaken with one pull of the trigger and as a consequence, they were made without a hammer spur. Why need one to foul on uniform or holster in a tight spot when you could fire several rounds in seconds? These revolvers were latterly modified with a rammer as originally the bullets were pushed in by thumb and the bullets had a propensity to fall out which could prove to be an embarrassment at the wrong moment! The absence of the rammer is an immediate indication that it is early and the serial number in the hundreds not thousands confirms this. The revolver has a 6" barrel with the top strap engraved " Deane, Adams & Deane, Makers to HRH Prince Albert, 30 King William St, London Bridge". The frame is engraved Adams Patent No 609" which is actually the serial number not the patent. The revolver has most of its original bluing, tight solid mechanics, good bore and sharp checkering on the grips. The grips contain a compartment for caps and ball.The .436 Deane and Adams was a five-shot percussion (cap-and-ball) revolver with a spurless hammer, and the first revolver with a solid frame. The revolver used a double-action only system in which the external hammer could not be cocked by thumbing it back, like most other pistols of the era, but instead cocked itself when the trigger was pulled. This made it possible to fire the gun much more rapidly than contemporary single-action revolvers, such as the Colt, which had to be cocked before each shot.[2] Deane and Adams' revolver was shown at the Great Exhibition of 1851 and subsequently approved by the British Army's Small Arms Committee in addition to being adopted by the East India Company for use by their cavalry. Orders for the revolver were great enough to prompt the Deane brothers to make Adams a partner in their firm, which became Messrs. Deane, Adams, and Deane An excellent example of a significant English revolver featuring double action “automatic” fire which Adams argued was much faster to discharge than Colt’s revolver. Of course, he was right Revolvers of this quality are not only scarce but compared to their American counterparts of the same quality are hugely undervalued. To an extent, before Tranter become mechanised, these revolvers were ostensibly hand made and pride of workmanship, care and diligence could not compete with Colt’s mass production techniques. An important and attractive revolver.
Outstanding early pre RIC Webley Revolver. This is a beautiful Webley pre-RIC No 3 in .442 Centrefire. The frame is clearly marked with the flying bullet logo but no Webley patent mark or retailer name on the top strap. The hammer has the early flat firing pin but shaped for centrefire. This revolver is very similar to the example on page 167 of the “Webley Solid Frame Revolvers Models RIC, MP and No 5” By Black, David and Michaud. This interesting book theorises that these pre RIC revolvers were designed by notable gunmaker W J Hill who had parts made in Belgium had them assembled in England. This is likely to be a pre-1868 revolver and in all likelihood in the absence of retailer on the top strap, this revolver would have been one of those Webley’s wholesaled to the British Police by Hill who developed his relationship with Webley. The revolvers Webley supplied to Hill were normally unmarked with the exception of Webley’s “flying bullet” logo. Interestingly the cylinder axis pin on this revolver is a design that was patented by William Tranter in July 1862 and Webley made use of it after the patent expired. The cylinder is stamped 42 and there are four incised marks cut on most of the components including screws and the inside of the grips which would indicate the hand fitting of the component parts. As can be seen the revolver has seen use but is in outstanding condition, it has clean cylinder bores and an excellent bore so was well cared for which would tend to indicate professional ownership. The grips are crisp and clean and commensurate with the condition of the rest of the revolver. This is undoubtedly a very rare survivor and would be very difficult to better.
Outstanding Giffard Now I am not considered a Francophile and my use of superlatives is normally restricted to “Good”, “Very Good” or “Excellent” which is the condition of the items I try to stock and of course I am trying to sell them as well so I am not going to stock junk! On this occasion I would describe this item as Wonderful! Why? Simple, it is rare, interesting and in outstanding condition. Giffard was a Frenchman who was related to the famous balloonist family of that name. In the 1880’s the patented Giffard System was widely thought to be the end to Gunpowder and Giffard’s rifle was christened the “Miracle Gun” on the basis that it used a CO2 gas cylinder that could hold 300 shots costing not more than a penny to fill. The Colt Company paid Giffard $200,000 a fortune at the time, for the USA license, presumably to “bury” the technology and the French Government awarded him the Legion of Honour and a prize of 10,000 Francs. The press at the time reported that the gun would eradicate warfare and stamp out the evils of socialism and communism! It did none of these as, in the final analysis, accuracy and velocity depended on a constant delivered pressure and as a result consistency altered between a full charge and a diminished charge. Nevertheless the system is interesting as , apart from the earlier copper reservoir air rifles and pneumatic air canes, this was the first modern pre-charged liquid gas system that is still seen in use today and not a huge amount of difference between some of the latest black plastic rifles being sold and this 100 year + veteran! This particular rifle is in working order and has much original finish as can be seen and has a very nice walnut stock with sharp chequering. The Bakelite Butt pad is still extant and in good condition but with some loss where it has been stood on it but the Balloon Motif is sharp and attractive, Barrel length is 25”, overall length is 41” and the calibre is 8mm. The rifle is complete with the charging equipment and some spares and has clearly seen little use. This is sold as an antique. For a fascinating account and copy articles on the Giffard Rifle see http://www.cinedux.com/the-giffard-co2-rifle.php The superb article is attributed to “Trev’s Air Gun Scrapbook” If you were looking for an exceptional item, this is it and it would be difficult to improve on. The last air weapon I bought for myself was a Webley Hurricane Pistol, new in the box, as a young boy which cost me several months of Saturday Job wages. Given the eye watering value of this rare item which would have cost me several years of Saturday Job wages, I would consider part exchange on this item.
Outstanding Gras Single shot rifle Model 1874 This is an outstanding French Model 1874 Gras rifle as modified in 1880. The Gras rifle was developed by Basile Gras who was an artillery captain. Basically Gras brought the Chassepot rifle which used a combustible cartridge into the metallic cartridge era. The Gras was ostensibly a Chassepot with a new bolt system and extractor. Having just lost the Franco Prussian War and with the Germans having launched their new Mauser 1871 metallic cartridge rifle, France began to make purpose built Gras rifles ( such as this one ) even before all of the Chassepot conversions had been made. The 1880 modification is an update which incorporated a milled groove into the back of the chamber which allowed gas to escape should a cartridge rupture on firing. This was quite an important safety feature given the unreliability of metallic cartridges at this time. What is pleasing about this rifle is that it is such a perfect example as they are normally found in battered condition. This one has an excellent walnut stock and good metalwork and functions flawlessly. The butt features the roundel with the “MI” government ownership initials, the middle of which is made of hard fruit wood which was designed to deter defacement in the event of theft. There is a popular fallacy that this roundel contained holy water to protect the troops (when they were running away?) but this is not true. This rifle is chambered for the obsolete 11mm x 59R cartridge and as such does not require a license to own it. This would be an excellent example for any advanced 19th Century military rifle collection as it would be difficult to improve on it.
Outstanding Henry Deringer \"Peanut\" Pistol. Henry Deringer perfected his famous pocket pistol designs before the US Civil War and manufactured them until his death in 1868. Based on his agents and known inscribed examples, it appears they were especially popular with politicians, bankers, and shopkeepers as well as gamblers and miners in the South and California. This scarce example is virtually identical to the infamous "Peanut" Deringer used by John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. This example dates to the 1850s or 1860s and has the correct genuine Henry rifling. This was effective at short ranges for which these pistols were used. The barrel has a dovetailed German silver front sight, Deringer's classic brown and copper imitation Damascus finish, a German silver banded breech plug with "DERINGER/PHILADELA" on top, "P" flanked by sun burst designs on the upper left, and a notch rear sight on the integral tang. The floral engraved lock has "DERINGER/PHILADELA" near the tail. The wedge escutcheons, flash plate, trigger guard with late pineapple finial, side plate, thumb plate, tear drop inlay, and the nose plate are all also German silver. The escutcheon is engraved in contemporary style. The very short barrel version of this pistol is extremely rare and can be considered the pinnacle of any “Deringer” collection. An outstanding example and difficult to better.
Outstanding Mk 11* Snider rifle and bayonet. This is a really good example of a Snider Mk 11* rifle which was a fresh conversion not affected from the Mk 1* conversion but directly from new stocks of Enfield muzzle loading rifles. This particular example has seen little use if any as can be seen. The rifle has never been messed with or sanded so the original Enfield cartouche is extant and the original finish is mostly intact. There is the odd pressure “dink” on the wood but these could be steamed out. The breech block is in excellent condition with very little evidence of use as can be seen with no erosion around the firing pin or chunks missing from the edges that are often encountered. The lock functions perfectly as does the extractor and the cleaning rod is the original one which was supplied with a squared off jag head. This is quite an important point as these cleaning rods were subsequently replaced with rounded types similar to those provided on the original pattern 1853 Enfield rifles. This would indicate that the rifle was placed in storage and not used which would explain the excellent condition. There is a plethora of inspectors marks on the barrel and the lock and everything that should be there is there and nothing that shouldn’t. This conversion was approved in December 1866 with a list of changes made in May 1867. The rifle has the expected 3 groove R.H Enfield twist and has a 36.5” barrel length with an overall length of 54.25”. This is a very handsome looking Snider in “as found” condition and would be difficult to better. The rifle is accompanied by the correct pattern bayonet and leather scabbard.
Outstanding Remington New Army 44 calibre revolver This is one of the best Remington New Army's in NRA excellent condition that I have seen and one that has been completely unmolested over the past 155 years. The revolver is martially marked with the cartouche of the principal sub inspector of the ordnance department Giles Porter. The revolver also has several of the usual unidentified inspectors marks such as the letter "J" on the frame. The revolver functions today as it did at the time of its manufacture and to better this revolver would take you to a whole new price level. As can be seen there is a large amount of original finish and it is quite frankly as good a representative Remington as can be found.
Outstanding Smith & Wesson Army No 2 revolver 32 rimfire This is a very pleasing revolver with an extraordinary amount of finish remaining. The revolver has a 6" barrel with a 6 shot cylinder, there are no issues with the mechanics which are crisp and tight. The hinge which is recognised as a weak point in these revolvers is perfect and the opening mechanism and lock is extremely tight, evidence that this has not been messed with. The revolver has an excellent bore and the rosewood grips have most of the original varnish extant. During the US Civil War and afterwards the No. 2 was popular with soldiers who sought the reliability of a metallic cartridge handgun. Famed Union cavalry general and Indian fighter George Armstrong Custer owned a pair of these revolvers, and "Wild Bill" Hickock was carrying one when he was killed during an 1874 poker game in Deadwood, Dakota Territory. Over 75,000 Model No. 2 pistols were manufactured between 1861 and 1874. Top strap is named with makers name and Springfield address. It would be difficult to find a better example at this price. This revolver is new to the UK market having been purchased by the previous owner 40 years ago in the USA.
Outstanding Tatham & Egg This is an exceptional Officers double barrelled overcoat pistol by renowned gun maker Henry Tatham. Tatham partnered with Durs Egg and his pistols are regarded as some of the finest manufactured of the time. Manufactured circa 1810-15 this particular pistol has most of the original browning on the octagonal barrel extant and benefits from the original hammers, small parts, and springs. Beautifully detailed engraving with platinum bands and lined touch-holes. The gun features a maker’s plaque “ Tatham London” on the Knox and has “waterproof” pans. The gun is stocked in good quality English walnut finely checkered at the grip with an ornate butt cap. Logs are marked “Tatham”. Barrel length is approximately 3” and bore is 32 bore. Overall an excellent example of a double barrelled flintlock pistol that has been untouched and is in very pleasing order.
Outstanding Vintage Savage Model 99 rifle This is simply a gorgeous vintage Savage Model 99 rifle in 300 Savage calibre and a scarce rifle in the UK and even scarcer in this outstanding condition. The Model 99 was preceded by the Model 1895, which was the first hammerless lever-action rifle produced. The hammerless design was a useful improvement as it reduces the lock time. This allows the rifle to be fired more accurately, because the rifleman's muscular tremors have less time to move the rifle off-aim. A hammerless design is also less likely to jam in brush or clothing. The later Model 1899 and early Model 99 used a rotary magazine to hold the cartridges. The rotating magazine uses a spring-loaded spool with grooves to hold the cartridges. The Savage 1899 took advantage of the spool to include a counter to indicate how many shots are left. The Model 99 continued using this system for many years, until its replacement with a detachable magazine. The rotating magazine design allowed the rifle to be one of the first lever-action rifles to use Spitzer bullets. Previous lever-action rifles used tubular magazines, which placed cartridges of ammunition end to end. The pointed tips of a Spitzer bullet would touch the primer of the cartridge in front of it, possibly causing an accidental discharge. Another novel safety feature was that upon cocking the rifle, a small pin would protrude above the top receiver to indicate the rifle was cocked and ready to fire. This particular rifle, manufactured between the two world wars is chambered in 300 Savage. The original intent of its designers was to offer a cartridge that could approach the ballistics of the .30-06 Springfield, while at the same time using a smaller case that could be cycled through a short-action lever rifle. The performance of this calibre outclassed other contemporary .30 calibre lever-action cartridges including the .30-30 Winchester and .30 Remington. It soon became a popular deer and medium-sized game cartridge among North American hunters, and by mid-century nearly every major US firearms maker offered a .300 Savage chambering in at least one of its rifle models. With its shorter case than the .30-06 it is often said that the 300 Savage was the predecessor of the .308 Winchester, now in universal use. For a rifle at least 80 years old, this rifle is in wonderful condition and grades at NRA excellent. It still exhibits the original case colouring on the lever. The only blemish is a small pressure dent towards the bottom of the butt on the right hand side as can be seen. Although no longer produced it remains highly revered, as it was the foundation from which Arthur Savage built one of America's great gun companies.This particular rifle is extremely accurate and is mechanically flawless with good extraction and the cocking pin extant. The rifle will be supplied with 60 live rounds developed for the rifle, loading data and dies.
Outstanding Webley Mk 2 Target Pistol I don't normally sell air weapons but in this instance I couldn't pass this by. This is a Webley Mk 11 "new target model" in .177 calibre in the original box. The story here is that the person I acquired it from explained that it belonged to his uncle whose own Uncle had given it to him as a gift but his mother would not let him use it. Consequently the gun is in mint condition and I have never seen a better one. This model was only made between 1925 and 1930 and as a consequence is scarcer than some of the other models and in this condition rare. The box is tatty from 90 years of house moves and could do with some attention but it still has the original box of pellets in a box built into the box and it has its original instructions leaflet.The pellets are the original supplied with the gun so are oxidised and the box also contains the original waxed paper packet containing the spare seals supplied with the gun People of an age ( like me) would have owned a Webley and it is an iconic gun that was used hard by their owners. Its a privilege to be able to offer such a great gun.
Outstanding Webley Pryse revolver retailed by John Rigby London This Webley Pryse revolver in calibre 450/455” was retailed by John Rigby & Co and has no serial number and is suspected to be a commissioned presentation piece. The leather case with the Rigby trade label is named to G Smyth Coldstream Guards. He later became a Lieutenant Colonel in the Guards, retired in 1887 and died in 1935. There is some family history accompanying the case and his name and Regiment is engraved on the butt strap of the revolver. He was the last Squire by descent of Heath Hall Yorkshire. His full name was George John Fitzroy Smyth. This is an outstanding looking revolver in 95%+ Condition. The top strap of the barrel is marked with the Rigby name and there are proof marks on the cylinder and frame. The revolver is mechanically perfect and it would be very difficult to find a better example. License required.
Palmer Bolt Action Carbine 1865 The Palmer carbine, manufactured by E.G. Lamson & Co., of Windsor, Vermont, is significant as the first metallic cartridge, bolt-action weapon accepted by the Ordnance Department for issue to the U.S. Army. The Ordnance Department purchased 1,001 Palmer carbines late in the Civil War; the carbines were delivered in June 1865. Blade front and two leaf folding rear sights, with "MM" inspection stamp next to the sight and "Wm PALMER/PATENT/DEC. 22, 1863" near the handle. Casehardened lock and hammer, the former marked "U.S. / E.G LAMSON. &CO. / WINDSOR, VT" ahead of the lock and "1865" behind. Oil finished walnut stock, with one "U" marked barrel band, "MM" inspection marks on the left side near the sling ring and top of comb, script "MM" cartouche on the left stock. BBL: 20 inch round Stock: walnut Gauge: 50 RF Finish: blue/casehardened Grips: Serial Number: NSN The condition of this carbine is excellent and it was probably unissued. There is 90%+ of the original finish, sharp inspectors cartouches and some case hardening visible, superb bore and sound mechanics. Some minor handling marks to the walnut stock but nothing significant. As only 1000 were issued to Cavalry units by the end of the Civil War this is a rare carbine in exceptional condition that is seldom seen and difficult to improve on.
Pattern 1844 Rifled Carbine. Very Good Pattern 1844 rifled carbine, excellent wood and good action. Untouched. Often described as a Yeomanry Carbine. Stamped VR and Tower on lock. Fixed rear sight and captive ramrod as issued. A good example.
Powder Priming Flask circa Seringapatam This is an extremely interesting powder priming flask in the form of a leaping Tiger which would indicate it as being the property of a follower of Tipu Sultan - the "Tiger of Mysore" Tipu Sultan engaged in expansionist attacks against his neighbours. His treatment of his conquered non-Muslim subjects and British prisoners of war is controversial. He remained an implacable enemy of the British East India Company, bringing them into renewed conflict with an attack on British-allied Travancore in 1789. In the Third Anglo-Mysore War, Tipu was forced into a humiliating treaty, losing a number of previously conquered territories, including Malabar and Mangalore. He sent embassies to foreign states, including the Ottoman Empire, Afghanistan and France, in an attempt to rally opposition to the British. In the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War, the combined forces of the British East India Company and the Nizam of Hyderabad defeated Tipu and he was killed on 4 May 1799, while defending his fort of Srirangapatna. This flask is made from bone with a pivoted release mechanism to allow a trickle of fine powder to be decanted when pressed in. The flask is filled by unscrewing the head of the Tiger and the limited size of the receptacle clearly indicates its use as a priming powder dispenser. Overall an interesting and unusual artefact.
Prototype Adams 38 Bore Dragoon type revolver This is a London Armoury Company 38 bore revolver in a Dragoon style that is both single and double action. There is no rammer nor provision for a rammer so this is an early piece. There are also no marks on the revolver with the exception of the LAC initials stamped into the barrel. There are no proof marks which makes one conjecture that this was possibly a prototype although it has seen definite use from the wear on the grips unless they have been replaced. Another theory is that this revolver was made as part of a garniture to accompany a revolving rifle. This is deduced from the shape of the trigger guard which can be seen on Adams and Tranter revolving rifles, the idea being that the gun is gripped by the trigger guard to avoid fingers being blown off if there are any multiple accidental cylinder discharges. This is an interesting and unusual revolver and you probably will never see another one! The Webley automatic pistol is shown only to gauge the size of the LAC.
Qing Dynasty Chinese Bronze arrowheads, Bow and Crossbow. Here we have a small collection of bronze arrowheads I acquired on a trip to China. The smaller arrowheads date from the latter part period of the warring states period 476 to 221 BC. The “Art of War” attributed to Sun Tsu was written in this period. The larger arrowhead is a little later and is representative of the Qing dynasty. Qin Shihuang (259–210 BC) is one of the most famous and controversial figures in Chinese history. Widely known as 'the First Emperor', he forcibly unified China for the first time, prosecuted intellectuals and opponents, abolished feudalism, and standardised philosophy, script, coinage and law. The enormous mausoleum complex he commissioned for himself in Xi'an, Shaanxi, remains an unequalled material representation of his world, providing an almost inexhaustible source of information about the powerful political and symbolic system that was built up around his personality. This mausoleum houses the “Terracotta Army” which was built at the end of the Warring States period. Archery was fundamental to the development of warfare at this time and although the chariot remained a major factor in Chinese warfare long after it went out of fashion in the Middle East. Near the beginning of the Warring States period there is a shift from chariots to massed infantry, possibly associated with the invention of the crossbow. This had two major effects. First it led the dukes to weaken their chariot-riding nobility so they could get direct access to the peasantry who could be drafted as infantry. This change was associated with the shift from aristocratic to bureaucratic government. Second, it led to a massive increase in the scale of warfare. When the Zhou overthrew the Shang at the Battle of Muye they used 45,000 troops and 300 chariots. For the Warring States period the following figures for the military strengths of various states are reported: Qin: 1,000,000 infantry, 1,000 chariots, 10,000 horses; Chu: same numbers; Wei: 200–360,000 infantry, 200,000 spearmen, 100,000 servants, 600 chariots, 5,000 cavalry; Han: 300,000 total; Qi: several hundred thousand; For major battles, the following figures are reported: Battle of Maling: 100,000 killed; Battle of Yique: 240,000 killed; General Bai Qi is said to have been responsible for 890,000 enemy deaths over his career. Many scholars think these numbers are exaggerated (records are inadequate, they are much larger than those from similar societies, soldiers were paid by the number of enemies they killed and the Han dynasty had an interest in exaggerating the bloodiness of the age before China was unified). Regardless of exaggeration, it seems clear that warfare had become excessive during this period. The bloodshed and misery of the Warring States period goes a long way in explaining China's traditional preference for a united throne. These particular arrowheads were acquired in Hubei province and carry a lifetime guarantee of authenticity. There are many fake artefacts manufactured in China and export of genuine artefacts is becoming difficult. All of these arrowheads are contemporary and would pass a Carbon 14 test in respect of age. An interesting collection of artefacts from the period that founded a unified China.
Quality Box lock Percussion Pistol by Williams of London circa 1855 This little pistol in 50 calibre exudes quality and is a typical example of the little pistols carried in the pocket or ladies purses in the first half of the 19th Century. This brass locked turn off barrelled pistol features finely chequered grips and is engraved with the makers name - Williams of London. The trigger springs into place when the hammer is cocked and can then be pushed back after firing. Quite a clever mechanism that stops the trigger from fouling on clothing and a primitive safety feature although I wouldn't want to carry a loaded pistol in my pocket with the hammer resting on the percussion cap! Gunmaker Henry Williams began trading from 3 Little Prescot Street, East London, in 1854. He then moved to 10 Chamber Street in 1861, and was at 4 Wellclose Square by 1872. Business seems to have ceased about 1880. There is a superb repair to the hammer so probably dropped or thrown at sometime and this is difficult to spot and does not impair the tight action. This is reflected in the price. A nice little representative example that would grace any collection.
Rare .38 Rimfire Colt Pocket Police Revolver Conversion This is a rare and desirable Colt model 1862 Police (conversion) revolver with considerable eye appeal. This revolver was manufactured in .38 rimfire calibre with fluted 62-police type cylinder, 4-1/2” barrel, loading gate and recoil shield added, Colt’s patent on left side of frame, serial #490 in its own range. Refer to Flayderman 5B-130. Also refer to the definitive work on the subject -Variations of Colt New Police and Pocket Breech Loading Pistols by Breslin, Pirie, and Price pages 50-54. This revolver shows the scarcer fluted cylinder with rebated back utilising a converted percussion cylinder and original pocket frame and was produced in own serial number range as a cartridge pistol and precedes the New Model Police introduced much later in 1875. The revolver retains approximately 80% original finish fading on areas of the cylinder and barrel with minor discolouration. The edges are crisp, the markings are sharp with a small amount of pitting near the single line address as can be seen. The varnish wood grips are very good with 95% varnish extant. All matching visible serial numbers with the exception of the loading gate which is 390. This is normal with Colt conversions. Tight action and a good bore and as can be seen it has good screws and has not been used as a hammer at any time! A fairly scarce new model breech loading cartridge revolver and rare in this condition and unusual to find in the UK. Colt conversions seem to be the “lost cousins” of the Colt collecting agenda and have a long way to go. Now is the time to collect them as they form an intrinsic part of Colt’s development from cap and ball revolvers to modern self-contained metallic breech loading revolvers. This is new to the UK market having been purchased more than 40 years ago in the USA for a private collection.
Rare 1822 pattern infantry officers sword by Henry Wilkinson An 1822 pattern Infantry Officer's sword 35 ½" overall. 29 ½" straight spear pointed blade with single fuller engraved on both sides with foliage & crowned VR,marked with an extremely early researchable 4 digit serial number and manufactured by Henry Wilkinson of Pall Mall. Most of the gilding on the hilt remains with an excellent condtion leather and bullion wired cover hilt with contemporary buff leather lining to hilt. The sword would benefit from sympathetic cleaning but overall the blade is good. Scabbard has some dents and the frog neck is missing. An early Wilkinson Blade which would date from the China Wars to the Crimean War.
Rare 9mm Browning Long Pistol. Of all of the Webley pistols available for collection, other than the Mars the Model 1909 must certainly be the most elusive of the type. This is a rare pistol and in much better condition than the one I offered earlier this year. The Webley 1909 was short lived and was only manufactured between 1908 and 1922 and only 1694 examples were ever made. This particular pistol was manufactured in December 1914. The pistol was intended for military or police use with a smaller calibre than the service issue .455 calibre but lacked the power needed for its service. The pistol has several important innovative refinements including a grip safety which was replaced on later models with a slide safety, a slide stop which kept the slide open after the last shot was fired and a positive magazine release. Many of these features can be seen on the Colt 1911 government. The slide release is a top button which was intended to be ambidestrous but found little favour with the military inspectors. This particular example is in excellent condition and would rate as NRA fine with more than 85% finish and no internal wear with a superb bore. The hard rubber grips only show slight handling marks. Most of the original vibrant blue is extant and the balance is mellowing to a plum patina. I can consider a lay away and exchanges on this beautiful pistol. Really difficult to better if you want the best and most difficult pistol to find for your Webley collection,
Rare Adams 38 Bore Mould The tailed Adams moulds were short lived as the patented rammer systems made them obsolete. This particular mould is for the massive 38 bore ( .50") calibre large frame revolvers which are uncommon if not rare. The mould still casts perfectly but has seen "honest travel" and has no doubt made hundreds of bullets.
Rare Allen & Wheelock Centre Hammer 32 Rimfire Derringer. This is a handsome looking birds head grip Allen & Wheelock derringer with a 4.5" barrel and is undoubtedly rare. Flayderman states that this model is rarer than the 41 rimfire derringer of which less than 2000 were made. There are different barrel thicknesses and this one is the thick walled version. This has a brass foresight and the thin blued steel rear sight which is often lost on derringers is extant. Thomas in his book on Allen & Wheelock repeats his claim that many models are rare and this must be one of them because it is not featured in his book. The pistol is clean and functions perfectly and has the Allen & Wheelock name and address on the receiver and also has most original varnish on the grips. Derringer prices have been escalating in the USA as they are a hugely fascinating and varied field that had been overlooked. This is an attractive looking pistol and an exellent potential investment.
Rare Allen and Wheelock Single Shot pistol circa 1860. This is a very rare example of an early Allen & Wheelock Centre Hammer Pistol made at the beginning of the Civil War. This pistol is unusually in very nice condition, retaining some traces of its finish and significant varnish on the grips. According to the Flayderman Guide on antique American firearms, there were only 500 to 1,000 units during the early 1860s. The calibre is obsolete .32 Rimfire which had just been introduced for the Smith and Wesson No. 2 Army Revolver in 1861...making this one of the very first cartridge pistols you could buy in the early 1860's. This particular example has the automatic shell ejector which works perfectly. Allen & Wheelock were prolific designers and manufacturers of firearms and in respect to this particular model H H Thomas wrote on page 76 in his standard work “The story of Allen and Wheelock Firearms” published in 1965 that “The pistols mentioned at the top of this chapter (Centre Hammer Single Shot rimfire pistols) are indeed a scarce item. You will attend many collectors meetings without seeing a single specimen”. The pistol is loaded and unloaded by drawing back the hammer and swinging the breech to the right and a clever device attached to the frame is actuated which allows the ejector to move in and out in a slot. There are several variants of this pistol; all are scarce if not rare.
Rare and extraordinary Whitworth Baby Rifle This is a beautiful and rare rifle and possibly only one of 10 extant. This is a Whitworth Hexagonal Bore “Baby” rook rifle with a hexagonal 1/15 twist bore. Its correct designation is a 300 calibre miniature rifle or rook rifle. The rifle exudes quality and the lock plate is engraved with Whitworth’s wheat sheath and coronet coat of arms together with Manchester Ordnance & Rifle Co. The serial number is engraved on the trigger guard tang. The overall length of the rifle is 39” with a 24” barrel which is round and engraved with the Whitworth patent. The rear sight consists of a fixed 50 yard sight with three folding leaves marked 100, 150 and 200. The front sight is a fine barleycorn. The stock is finely figured Walnut and has a pistol grip with fine chequering on the grip and a horn cap with a steel buttplate and vacant silver escutcheon. The forend is also chequered and there is no provision for a ramrod. Lock is marked as described with a bolted safety to half cock. The construction is like a swiss watch with a pull off at about 8 ounces and there is a platinum vent plug. Overall the condition is excellent, and the bore is mint throughout and the overall condition, particularly the chequering indicates very little use. The finish has faded to an even grey patina. Manchester Ordnance and Rifle Company were operating only between 1862 and 1864 which dates the rifle. In total of all calibres and sizes including military only 5500 Whitworth rifles were manufactured, and it is estimated that the survival rate is less than 15%. I have a lot of admiration for Whitworth who was a prolific inventor and true philanthropist. Whitworth allowed free access to his factories and unlike some of his contemporaries like Colt who patented and litigated voraciously if his patents were breeched, Whitworth believed that engineering would liberate humanity and chose to be transparent with his developments. This rifle “ticks” so many boxes, superb quality, novel design and made by a British genius.
Rare and interesting Model 1.1/2 Cased Webley Revolver For the advanced Webley collector this is about as rare a revolver as you could wish to find. This revolver is featured on page 38 of Webley Solid Frame Revolvers Nos 1, 1 1/2, 2, Bull Dogs and Pugs by Joel Black, Homer Ficken and Frank Michaels. In the section "Relative Rarities" to the rear of the book, the model is listed as one of the rarest with only three known in .442 CF. The revolver is contained in its original period oak case with pewter oil bottle, turnscrew and cleaning rod. The revolver has a 4.1/2” octagonal barrel with a 6 shot smooth cylinder with the cylinder axis pin held in place with a thumb screw. There is a left hand curved safety spring to hold the hammer back on half cock for loading without the danger of the hammer dropping. A further refinement is a ejector rod screwed into the butt which is finished with two walnut grips with sharp chequering and diamond escutcheons. There are Birmingham proof marks to the cylinder and a frame proof mark to the right hand side of the frame. The rear of the barrel is marked Webley’s No 1.1/2 442 CF and the left frame also features Webley’s famous flying bullet trademark with the serial number. The condition is very pleasing and is unrestored with a good percentage of original bluing the rest turning plum. Cylinder chambers are excellent and show the original milling marks. The bore is shiny with strong rifling and only minor dull patches towards the muzzle. The trigger guard has some slight distortion and a small crack with armourer's repair that could be improved on. Action, timing and lockup are good. The Webley No 1.1/2 was manufactured following the official acceptance of the Webley RIC No 1 model with the growing popularity of the No 2 pocket revolver series a.k.a the Bulldog series. The 1.1/2 was regarded as a supplementary weapon with some features not present to the other two revolvers. The revolver clearly evolved from the RIC model but has never been seen with RIC markings. The model was short lived with the huge popularity of the emerging “bulldog” series and the officially accepted RIC series. I doubt if I will ever handle a Webley Model 1.1/2 in obsolete .442 CF calibre again and this must rank as one of the true rarities of the Webley series.
Rare and outstanding Twigg Brass Barrelled Blunderbuss Pistol circa 1785. Twigg is a name to conjure with and this is about as interesting an example of Twigg's exquisite work that could be found and would enhance any collection. The pistol not only exudes quality, excellent preservation but has the advantage of rarity. This is a brass barrelled blunderbuss coaching pistol with a 8" swamped barrel to 3 bore that unusually has no barrel rings or a bayonet. The barrel is stamped with private London proof marks as would be expected. The walnut stock is in outstanding condition and the trigger guard exhibits a pineapple finial. This Twigg flintlock has the first form of the Twigg signature used from 1760 to 1770 (Great British Gunmakers 1740 - 1790 The History of John Twigg and the Packington Guns W. Keith Neal & D.H.L. Back plates 183 - 184). However it has a pineapple finial to the trigger guard and a roller on the frizzen spring which suggests a date of 1784 onwards at a time he was using his third signature form (ibid page 132). John Fox Twigg died 23 March 1790 (ibid page 62) and his son took over the business. Either John Fox Twigg reverted to the old form of his signature for his last, non-dueling pistols, or this signature indicates his son's work. It is possible to make a direct comparison to the lock with extant examples such as the fine example held in the Victoria Museum collection in Australia. From the evidence it can be surmised that the pistol was manufactured between 1785 and 1790. John Fox Twigg was born at Grantham, Linconshire, in 1732 and is listed by Heer (1978) as being apprenticed to the Irish Gunmakers, Edward Newton (active 1718-1764), though no dates for the apprenticeship are offered. By 1755, Blackmore (1986) lists Twigg working as a Gunmakers from Angel Ct., Charing Cross until 1760 when he moved to 132 Strand, opposite Catherine St., and continued at this address until 1776. He moved again in 1776, this time to Piccadilly where he remained until 1790. During these 14 years he opened several warehouses; at little Somerset St., in 1771; 30 Cornhill, 1777 and Tower Hill in 1779. His only son, John, was apprenticed in 1786 to Henry Nock, and subsequently inherited his father's business. In 1788 Twigg formed a partnership with his nephew, John Bass (b.1761 - d.1794) although this was cut short by Twigg's death. As Blackmore notes, however, the trade directories are misleading in this respect, and show the business continuing at Piccadilly until 1795. This is a handsome looking investment quality pistol by a prestigious well known maker manufactured at the height of their powers.
Rare Ballard Derringer This is an extremely rare "derringer" and was manufactured circa 1870. Only a couple of thousand were manufactured in both 30 and 41 calibre rimfire. This one is in 41 calibre. These were made with an iron or brass frame and featured a cam extractor. This particular example has lost most finish and the walnut grips exhibit some cracks but nevertheless it is still an attractive looking pistol and an item that is seldom encountered. The manufacturers name is clearly marked on the top strap and it has a decent bore with strong rifling which is uncommon in many black powder derringers.
Rare Cased Cased Webley Service Mk 11 Air Rifle This is a cased pre-war Webley and Scott Service Air Rifle Mk 2 with 3 barrels in .177, .22 and .25 calibre. The .25 barrel dates the set to around 1937 and the production run was small with the rifle's production being suspended during the War. Overall condition is outstanding with most original colour with only a little fading in some spots on the barrels as can be seen. Woodwork is excellent and as usual and as confirmed in Christopher Thrale's excellent work Webley Air Rifles 1925 - 2005 the gun was originally supplied with one barrel with the serial number of the receiver and the other two barrels do not have serial numbers but of course are identical in every respect to the serial numbered barrel. Wood is excellent and the set contains 3 pellet tins, oil bottle and parts leaflet. Unlike many I have seen the horn butt plate is undamaged. The case is in particularly good condition and very clean which is commensurate with the outstanding rifle inside it. Thrale states that the cases were supplied with a red lining but doesn't illustrate a three barrel set and goes on to explain that the cases were ordered by trade retailers to order from Brady's who were the main case manufacturer at the time. The 1500 series serial number and the improved barrel make the rifle a second series release and of course pre-1939. An exceptional set that would be very difficult to improve on. I have not seen a comparable set in the last decade.
Rare Colt 3rd Model London Dragoon This is an interesting and scarce Colt Dragoon with British Proofs that was assembled in Colt's London factory in 1853 and one of only 700 such examples. The story behind the London Dragoon is that Mr Dennet the manager or agent at Colt's Pall Mall office received an enquiry for .44 calibre revolvers and as they were not in production at that time in England, 700 partly made revolvers were quickly shipped in parts and finished and proofed in London. Only 500 were eventually sold and when Colt closed the factory ( after being discovered colluding with the Russians during the Crimean War!! ) the remaining 200 were sent back to the USA to be sold. This is a 3rd model Dragoon and a decent example as can be seen from the photographs and has a good bore, distinct address and proof marks and is mechanically sound. The serial number 437 is stamped on the frame, arbor, butt, cylinder and loading lever. A scarce Dragoon!
Rare Colt Army 1860 Richards Conversion with 2 barrels Of all the variations of Colt revolvers, one of the most interesting is the Richard’s conversion which effectively converted percussion revolvers to fire self-contained metallic cartridges. The was effected by fitting a rear conversion breech plate to the rear of the cylinder approximately 3/8” thick which covers the rear edge of the cylinder. The plate also contains a rebounding firing pin with spring and the right side of the plate is cut away to allow rearward ejection and loading, this cut out is accessed via a gate. The revolver was milled on the right side to accept the ejector case and its shaped arm, that was located in the old loading plunger hole and is secured by a transverse screw. The standard barrel length of the Richards conversion was 8” with a 5.5” barrel available by special order only. Approximately 1200 pistols were converted for the Government in 1871 and fired a 44 centre fire metallic cartridge manufactured by UMC (United Metallic Cartridge Company). The survival rates of Colt conversions is somewhat low because of the introduction of the Single Action Army in 1873 which made them obsolete very quickly. In total no more than 9000 Model Army 1860 revolvers were converted and on the introduction of the Single Action Army, many were sold to South America and Mexico where they were hard used and basically disappeared. I like to offer the unusual and this is somewhat different as it is a Colt Army 1860 Richards’s conversion but with two matching barrels. The revolver is contained in a US Government style holster and the shorter barrel is also contained in a leather holster and the “US” government mark can be just discerned on this. Quite why the special order barrel was added escapes me, possibly the 8” barrel was for field service use and the shorter barrel for whooping it up in town on a Saturday night – who knows! It is remarkable however that they have survived and it must have been the novelty factor that kept them together. As to condition, the revolver is solid and mechanically tight but has the wear of the past 143 years. There are nicks and dents as can be seen, the lettering has worn which is conducive to field polishing and the grips have no varnish. The revolver has mellowed to a grey/plum patina with some finish left in protected areas but has a bright bore with rifling evident in both the 8” barrel and the 5.5” barrel. The revolver cocks, locks and rotates solidly. When on full lock there is literally no lateral play at all and this can be appreciated when you look closely at the ratchet at the rear of the cylinder where there is little wear . Both barrels are stamped with the serial number as is the wedges but there is a completely different serial number under the ejector rod which is normal on all Richards’s military conversions. A faint cartouche can just be discerned on the left hand walnut grip. The loading gate is stamped 6000 which is right in the middle of the Richard’s conversion numbers and the serial numbers on the revolver would indicate that it was produced from a revolver manufactured in 1871. The 8” barrel has the “Colt Pat FA Mfg. Hartford” address and the short barrel has the patent dates and the “Saml Colt New York – USA America” address. Colt used up much of their percussion revolver stock left over from the Civil War in manufacturing these conversions which was a very shrewd financial move but of course it did lead to non- standardisation and there are many variations recorded in the conversion models. The Richard’s conversion was improved by Mason and became the Richards Mason conversion and hybrid revolvers with the different features of both conversions were produced and of course the conversions were offered to anyone who wished to convert their percussion Army or Navy to centre fire. For a study on these interesting revolvers read Dowell and Bruce “Colt Conversions”. Colt delayed the introduction of self-contained cartridges in early years because they were frustrated by Smith and Wesson’s patent that expired in 1869 and their initial entry used up their obsolete percussion revolver stock utilising the loading rammer orifice as the location point for the conversion which needed an ejector. Within two years the Single Action Army with its side barrel ejector rod was being manufactured but the Richard conversion was clearly the predecessor to that design. The value of Colt’s is ever escalating and this is an attractive piece in very good condition and a rare and interesting gun worthy of a place in any collection. More images available on request. See this and other interesting items at the Bristol Arms Fair Holiday Inn Filton Sunday September 7th
Rare David Williamson dual system Derringer .41 calibre. It is speculated that the Moore Patent Firearms Company / National Arms Company produced fewer than 10,000 of these pistols from 1866 – 1870. David Williamson’s design adhered to the aesthetic lines of the original tiny Henry Derringer pistols but he decided to fill a niche market created during the period of transition from ball and percussion cap pistols to those designed to fire metallic cartridges; his derringer would be able to function with both. If .41 rim fire cartridges were not readily available, a reusable metal cartridge adapter allowed the use of loose black powder with a lead ball and a percussion cap. This was ostensibly a “belt and braces” approach to a market that was coming to terms with firearms developments that had experienced more change in the preceding 20 years than the previous 150 years. The pistol requires no adjustments to switch between the ball-and-cap adapter and the .41 rim fire cartridge. During rim fire cartridge ignition, as you would expect, the extended blade firing pin on the hammer strikes the rim of a chambered .41 cartridge. When using the cap-and-ball adapter, the flat of the hammer whacks the percussion cap that is on the nipple of the adapter. The cap nipple, which extends into a hole in the breach when the barrel is closed, keeps the hammer from going forward far enough to damage the extended blade firing pin which otherwise would slam against the adapter’s rim. To load the Williamson Derringer, first pull the hammer back about one quarter of the way until it clicks into its safety position, then push up on the barrel release lever that is on the underside of the pistol (just in front of the trigger guard) and slide the barrel forward. Insert either a .41 rim fire cartridge or the cap-and-ball adapter (after first charging it with ball and powder; it is probably best not to cap the nipple until after the load is in the barrel chamber). Slide the barrel back to the closed position and you are then loaded and ready for a perambulation to the gaming tables! Although this sounds a complicated method of loading, I timed myself for fun and was able to open and “load” in 3 seconds. Outside of specialist collector circles this is a virtually unknown pistol variation and rare particularly in the United Kingdom. The famous or infamous to some, “Wild Bill Hitchcock” carried a Williamson Derringer in his vest pocket and this fact was illustrated in the film “Wild Bill”. It is unusual to find these in good condition and very unusual to find one with an original cap and ball adaptor as most were thrown away as the popularity of metallic cartridges accelerated in the 1879’s and consequently the few examples I have seen over the years either had no adaptor or a modern reproduction fitted. This pistol has the original undamaged adaptor and functions flawlessly. This is an extremely interesting firearm that would enhance any derringer or small handgun collection and will always attract curiosity and interest.
Rare Enfied Royal Irish Constabulary Carbine Scarce RIC Lee Enfield Carbine. This is a scarce carbine in very good condition. Around 10,000 of these were issued to the Royal Irish Constabulary at the turn of the last Century. All of them were repatriated to the mainland in 1920 as scrap to be disposed of. According to records they were disassembled but from those examples that have appeared over the years a number were sold out of service and ended up in private hands. This is such an example and in far superior condition to most of those that have appeared on the market in the past. Lee Enfield Mk1* carbines or Lee Metford cavalry carbines were converted to Enfield rifling; 21 inch barrel, nose cap adapted to take the Pattern 88 knife bayonet. This was achieved by reducing modifying the forend and adding a smooth muzzle sleeve extension. The rifles were fitted with a small six-round magazine and the bolt was modified with a flattened ball. 11,000 were supplied by the War Office as a free issue to the RIC between March 1904 and 1914. The new carbine was first issued to the Reserve Force at Dublin's Phoenix Park Depot in March 1904, before being distributed across the county forces. It replaced the Martini Henry carbine and at the same time replaced the existing long bayonet with the shorter knife pattern. In September 1920 the RIC wrote to the Ministry of Munitions of War to communicate their desire to sell as scrap approximately 10,000 of these carbines, which were to be replaced with the modern SMLE rifle. They were shipped to the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield Lock around November or December 1920, together with around 1.1 million rounds of Mk VI ammunition (ref: National Archives file MUN 4/6028). This particular Royal Irish Constabulary Carbine has a very good bore and is in overall excellent condition with an original sling. The carbine has the original magazine, dust cover and the magazine cut off is extant. The rifle is marked with a plethora of stamps indication, conversion, proof and eventually “sold out of service”. It would be very difficult to find a better example of this carbine. This is a Section 1 firearm and will require a Firearms Certificate for purchase.
Rare Frank Wesson Sporting Rifle 32 calibre first rifle to fire metallic cartridges. This is an interesting and rare rifle to be found in the United Kingdom. Frank Wesson rifles were a series of single-shot rifles manufactured between 1859 and 1888 in Worcester, Massachusetts. Copper rimfire cartridges which contained their own primer were introduced just prior to the American Civil War. Only a few manufacturers came out with guns which could use this ammunition, principally the Henry repeating rifle (cartridge introduced in 1860) and Spencer repeating rifle, but also the Maynard carbine, Frank Wesson and Ballard rifles. The .44 calibre Frank Wesson and Ballard rifles could use the same cartridge as each other, and these cartridges were very close in size to the .44 Henry rimfire. The Frank Wesson rifle was the first breech-loading rifle designed for these metallic cartridges. Frank Wesson (1828-1899) and N.S. Harrington were granted patent 25,926, 'Improvement in Breech-Loading Fire-Arms' in 1859, and Frank Wesson was granted patent 36,925, 'Improvement in Breech-Loading Fire-Arms' in 1862. The 1862 patent added the use of a slotted link to stop the barrel from pivoting too far, which made the gun much easier and quicker to load. The carbine with a 24 inch barrel weighed only 6 pounds, low weight being desirable in a weapon to be carried by cavalry. The 28 and 34 inch barrel models weighing 7 and 8 pounds respectively After the Civil War Frank Wesson rifles continued to be made until 1888. On November 21, 1877, Buffalo Bill, following one of his Wild West shows, competed with Lincoln C. Daniels, a marksman. Both competitors were using new Wesson rifles. Other members in his troupe also used Wesson rifles. The competition was held in Worcester, Massachusetts, were the Wesson factory was located. This is a tip up rifle and is interesting as it has two firing pins, one to fire rimfire cartridges and the other to fire centre fire cartridges. This one is in 32 calibre and both cartridges are obsolete. To change the firing mode a screw on the hammer is loosened and a transfer bar moved, very quick and simple. This is an attractive looking rifle with much original finish and a beautiful maple wood butt. The rifle has a flip up foresight and fixed rear sight and also a tang sight missing the diopter reticule which could be added. Extraction is by a large side bar and is very positive. The Wesson address and patent dates are crisp. The bore on this is leaded and I will clean it but there is rifling evident. An important and interesting rifle and the predecessor of all breech loading metallic cartridge firing rifles.
Rare Green Brothers Breech Loading Carbine by Hollis Reduced! Excellent Green Brothers Breech Loading Carbine in .577" calibre manufactured by Isaac Hollis. This rare rifle was an early bolt action capping breech loading rifle and a competitor to several others such as Westley Richards, Callisher and Terry and Snider. This was developed for British Military trials but arrived too late and faced too much competition although a small quantity was exported. The rifle featured a combustible cartridge ignited by percussion cap. The bolt is easily released for cleaning simply by pushing the trigger forward. A very rare carbine, seldom seen and in very good condition with a plum patina and excellent bore and mechanics.
Rare Greene Under Hammer Capping Breechloading Rifle This is a rare and extraordinary rifle! James Durell Greene called this rifle his "Plug Ugly", it has the distinction of being the first bolt action breech loading rifle purchased by the USA Army and a host of extraordinary features. The most significant feature is that it is forward loaded, the bullet is behind the charge which means that the first shot is blank unless you insert a loose bullet. This allowed the bullet at the rear to seal the breech which was then pushed forward by a plunger within the bolt. The cartridge was detonated from the side by an under hammer percussion cap. Greene also incorporated into the rifle a Lancaster Oval Bore on the basis that it wouldn't foul and would adapt the rifle for muzzle loading should the bolt seize. Another innovation was a compartment in the butt for the cleaning rod which was subsequently adapted for most USA Military rifles. Greene was a prolific inventor and produced the Greene Carbine with a different locking mechanism to this which utilised Maynard tape primers and also a rotary magazine which was then copied in the Krag rifle. The rifle is in excellent condition as can be seen, much original finish, no major problems with woodwork except the usual dings and pressure marks expected on a 150 year old rifle. The bolt action is as tight as the day it was made and the under hammer action is flawless. This is one of only 900 rifles so there is a low survival rate particularly in this condition and is as an interesting rifle as one would ever wish to own. The rifle will be supplied with an extensive and erudite article on the rifle which explains the development and use. Investment quality and a superb and interesting rifle!
Rare Lloyds Patriotic Fund Wound Certificate for TRAFALGAR 1806 This is an extraordinary and rare item that encapsulates history and is both evocative and poignant. The Lloyds Patriotic Fund was established in 1803 to reward the Gallantry of British servicemen and to compensate chosen men for wounds received. This Certificate, dated May 1806, commemorates the award of £10 to Seaman James Burns who served on HMS Africa. The Certificate is signed by James Shaw the Mayor of London at that time. The Battle of Trafalgar needs no narrative from me but the services of HMS Africa might need some reminding. HMS Africa, under the command of Captain Henry Digby, bore a conspicuous part in the Battle of 21st October 1805. The Africa lost sight of the British Fleet the night before and when firing began, found herself broad on the Victory’s port beam and also nearly broad on the port beam of the leading ship of the allied van. Nelson signalled her to make all possible sail but Captain Digby misunderstood his order which was intended to keep him out of danger, as meaning that he had to lose no time in closing with the Enemy! He then made his way along the Franco Spanish van exchanging broadsides with it and bore down on the Spanish 140 gun Santisima Trinidad. Digby assumed that the vessel had surrendered so he sent his First Lieutenant across to take possession of her. When this officer reached the Quarter Deck he learnt that the Spaniard had not actually surrendered and as he was in no position to argue he withdrew, no one, strange to say, attempting to stop him! The Africa then very gallantly brought to action the French 74 gun Intrepide and fought her single handed for 40 minutes until HMS Orion assisted. HMS Africa had her main-topsail yard shot away, and her bowsprit and three lower masts so badly damaged that none of the latter could stand after the action. Her remaining masts and rigging were also damaged and her rigging and sails cut to pieces. Her hull was severely damaged with shots entering below the water line. Her losses in killed and wounded amounted to sixty-two including seven officers. Seaman Burns was indeed fortunate to survive and an award of £10 was a magnificent sum to him representing a year’s salary! The Patriotic Fund also awarded presentation swords and gifts of plate but during the next decade after Trafalgar, pressures on the fund restricted awards to those that needed financial relief as a result of injury or for awards to the dependents of men killed in action. The Lloyds Patriotic Fund is still extant and the oldest surviving charity to support our service men. The Certificate measures 19.5” x 15” overall with an image size of 10” x 14” and is contained in a glazed wooden frame. Seaman Burns’ details are added to the Certificate in copperplate longhand and is signed by the Secretary to the Fund. The Cerificate is in remarkable condition considering it is 208 years old with very little foxing but of course the original ink signatures have browned as a result of iron oxidisation as one would expect. Below is a transcript of the Certificate. Patriotic Fund Lloyds Sir, I am directed by the Committee to inform you that at a General Meeting held this day they voted you the sum of Ten Pounds in consideration of the wound you received in contributing to the signal VICTORY obtained by the British Fleet consisting of 27 Sail of the Line under command of the ever to be honoured and lamented the late Vice Admiral Lord Viscount NELSON over the combined fleets of France and Spain consisting of 33 Sail of the Line , off Cape Trafalgar on the 21st of October last when 19 Sail of the Line were captured from the Enemy and in the words of Vice Admiral Lord COLLINGWOOD who so nobly completed the triumph of the day, “every Individual appeared a HERO on whom the Glory of his Country depended” I am Sir, Your Obedient Servant John Shaw Mayor Mr John Burns Seaman His Majesty's Ship Africa Engraved by E Scriven historical engraver to HRH The Prince of Wales from a drawing by R K Porter
Rare M1870 Vetterli Caribine. The M1870 Vetterli was the Italian service rifle from 1870-1887, when it was gradually replaced with the M1870/87 Italian Vetterli-Vitali variant. The M1870 was a single-shot bolt action rifle chambered for the 10.4mm Vetterli centrefire cartridge, at first loaded with black powder and later with smokeless powder. The M1870 was based upon the M1869 Swiss Vetterli but simplified for economy.
Rare Mannlicher 1893 Swiss Carbine The Swiss 1893 Carbine is a rare rifle and to find one in such outstanding condition is exceptional. The Swiss conducted trials with several rifles including two turn bolt designs by SIG, straight pull designs from Mannlicher and other straight pull designs by Vogelsang and Krauser. Attempts to shorten the Schmitt Rubin were unsuccessful. The rifle is rare as only approximately 7500 were manufactured and many were destroyed in drills where Swiss soldiers smashed them into the ground as hard as they could. The rifle is chambered for the obsolete 7.5mm x 53.5mm Swiss cartridge and weighs 6.8 pounds empty with an overall length of 40” with a barrel length of 21.65”. No provision was made for a bayonet. The rear sight is fixed at 300m with a flip up adjustable sight graduated from 400 m to 1200 m. The bolt and receiver is almost identical to the Austrian M1895 but unlike the Steyr has a detachable box magazine. This particular rifle is in excellent condition and has all matching serial numbers stamped on major components including the detachable box magazine. The stock has never been sanded and there is a crisp cartouche on the butt and the rifle has the original leather sling. There is an old arsenal repair to the heel of the butt no doubt as a result of the aforementioned drill practices of the time. The mechanics are excellent and the rifle disassembles easily and has an unblemished bore. It would be difficult to better this rare rifle.
Rare Marston 3 barreled Pistol. This is a really outstanding example of a scarce three-barrelled derringer by William W. Marston/ William W. Marston was born in England in 1822. He was the son of Stanhope W. Marston, who was a gun maker that immigrated to America sometime prior to the 1840s. Stanhope established himself as a gun maker in New York and produced percussion pepperboxes, as well as single and double barrel pistols, some with swivel breeches. He worked from 1844-1866 and during that time received two US patents (#7,887 in 1851 and #45,712 in 1865) for innovations in firearms design. His son William was naturalized as a citizen on April 8, 1843 and went into the family business, initially working for his father and then going out on his own. William worked from 1844 until he died in 1872, and during that time amassed at least 6 firearms related patents. These included #6,514 in 1849 for a lock design, #7,443 in 1850 for a breech loading firearm and #13,581 in 1855 for a pepperbox. He also received two patents for ammunition designs (#8,956 in 1852 and #40,490 in 1863), the latter of which was for a self-contained metallic cartridge. Some of the most famous and intriguing of his firearms were his line of three-barrel rimfire cartridge pocket pistols. He produced them in both .22 and .32 rimfire, with the majority of the .22s being made with a sliding knife blade along the side of the 3 superimposed barrels. The larger calibre superimposed pistol, such as this example, was manufactured in .32 rimfire, but was made without the knife blade. However, the .32 calibre pistols did include a useful extractor mechanism to remove the spent cartridges. Marston manufactured no more than 3,300 of these 3-barreled “derringers” between 1864 and 1872. They were made with either 3” or 4” barrels. This particular example has extensive original finish on the barrels, very good bores and very crisp stamping on the lock of the makers name and patent dates. This is a very rare pistol and would be difficult to better. As the frames and receivers were manufactured in brass it is unusual to find a good example with the stamping so legible and extant. This pistol will be sold with 3 contemporary inert cartridges, collector’s items in their own right.
Rare Mauser Model Ms 420 target rifle As .22 calibre rifles go this rifle is about as rare as you will find and Jon Speed in his classic work "Mauser Smallbores, Sporting Target & Training Rifles" states "Very few collectors have encountered this model". The rifle was the successor to the model Es 340 N and was fitted with an improved action and a new patented push button magazine release, a rotating safety and adjustable trigger. This later model ( although pre-war ) also features the famous Mauser Banner on the Receiver. This is a nice rifle with a good Mauser Cartouche on the Walnut stock which has no scratches or problems other than some pressure dents which may steam out. The magazine is stamped with the Mauser crest and is usually the first thing to lose and is actually as scarce as the rifle. The butt plate is also in excellent condition and the rifle is very, very accurate. At the time that this rifle was manufactured, target shooting was a huge pastime in Germany and a legitimate excuse for military training. This is about as rare a rifle as you will find compared to the other Mauser models and is in untouched condition and would be difficult to better and would be significant focal point of an advanced small calibre collection. I store without cost for anyone awaiting a variation.
Rare Maynard Revolver Edward Maynard was a prolific inventor and introduced his tape primer system to the USA army very successfully from a commercial point of view. He later went on the design a carbine which realistically was the first breech firearm to use a reloadable brass cartridge case. This developed quickly into the centre fire case we are familiar with today. This is a Maynard Automatic revolved cylinder revolver made in 28 calibre with a 3.5" barrel and is tape primed. The back strap is marked Patent/Jan 2 1855 and the primer door is marked Maynard's Patent 1845. Less than 2000 of these revolvers are known to have been made and the Massachusetts Arms Company that manufactured them was in dispute with Colt and had previously manufactured a hand revolving cylinder to avoid Colts patent. Interestingly the tape primer has only one nipple which fires each of the cylinder chambers in turn which had a firing hole large enough to allow the flame from the nipple to fire the cylinder chamber but small enough to stop the powder from exiting at the rear of the chamber. There is much original finish on the revolver and altogether this is a very interesting and uncommon revolver to be encountered. John Brown of "John Brown's Body" etc fame purchased several hundred Maymard revolvers.
Rare Merrills Carbine Union Issue US Civil War The carbine was a single-shot, percussion, breech loader used mainly by Union cavalry units. It used the .54 calibre Minie balls with paper cartridges which were loaded by lifting the top of the breech lever. The barrels were 22 1/8 inches and round with one-barrel band. Known regiments where the carbines were issued are: • New York 1st, 5th, and 18th • Pennsylvania 11th, 17th, and 18th • New Jersey 1st • Indiana 7th • Wisconsin 1st and 3rd • Kentucky 27th • Delaware 1st This original, breech-loading carbine is one of only some 14,500 weapons produced by H. Merrill of Baltimore, MD. This cavalry weapon is a wartime example of the First Type Merrill carbine in .54 calibre. The first type is easy to identify as it has a brass patch box which was later removed, no doubt to save cost. This example has the brass trigger guard, brass butt plate, single brass barrel band, and brass patch box. Specimen has a 22 1/8” long round barrel with the finish toned down to a pewter grey colour. Bore has strong rifling and is bright towards the chamber but with some modest black powder pitting in the last three quarters that would be worth spending some time in cleaning to improve. The carbine was loaded by pulling back on the flat, cross-hatched tabs, then lifting and pulling back the plunger latch on the top of the receiver and inserting the cartridge. Mechanics are good. Top flat of the breech lever is marked with “J.H. MERRILL BALTO. / PAT. JULY 1858” while its base is marked with serial number 7291. Underside of the lever is clean. Atop the barrel is the three-level rear sight with the “V” cuts graduated for 300 and 500. Marked on the iron lock plate forward of the hammer is the three-line address of “J.H. MERRILL BALTO. / PAT. JULY 1858 / APL. 9 MAY 21-28-61.” Serial number 7291 is stamped behind the hammer. Carbine features a dark walnut stock with one cartouche that can be faintly seen. Stock left side is also fitted with an iron sling bar and sling ring. Stock has no breaks or cracks but shows moderate wear with some small wear loss on the left side of the fore end where it would be held. All brass furniture is toned and has not been cleaned ( thankfully). The butt is stamped with a US with the letter S stamped backwards. This is clearly a mistake, or the stamper was illiterate, volunteer troops were not chosen for their literacy! I am told that it is possible to research who these carbines were issued to. An interesting and scarce US Civil War carbine seldom seen in the UK.
Rare Model 1879 Tranter revolver with provenance This Tranter 1879 was purchased on 24/7/1882 by Evan Hanbury who was born in 1854. He took part in the Egyptian War of 1882 (Gordon) and resided at Braunston Manor House, Rutland. He was the Master of the Cottesmere Foxhounds for 26 years and a JP. His family history that accompanies the gun dates back to 1250! USA revolver expert and author Joel Black is of the opinion that there are less than 20 of these 1879 revolvers extant. I can’t confirm this but would have to say that this is a rare and exceptionally well made revolver. There is a small release catch under the frame that allows you to open the revolver without engaging the star release mechanism so you can keep the cartridges in situ. I believe this is one of the most under rated revolvers of the British series and is quite magnificent. This was retailed by the Army and Navy CSL and is in 450-455 calibre. Evan Hanbury's initials EEH are carved into the top of the rear of the wooden grip. (Small) Ron Stewart states in his book; "This revolver incorporates many features that even today are seen in similar forms on modern revolvers and is an example of the high engineering standards practised by Tranter during his production. Although it is not widely recognised that Tranter produced such revolvers, sufficient exist to demonstrate the major advances made by Tranter as a firearms manufacturer as he adapted from the percussion system to this, the most highly developed of his revolvers" This cased revolver is in exceptional 95%+ condition and the best example I have ever seen.
Rare Norwich Arms revolver with Tiffany grips, This is a Norwich Arms 32 rimfire revolver with a patent date of April 23rd 1858 andit has metal Tiffany grips of a Stag forest scene and is heavily engraved. This is quite rare and a cut above the usual "Saturday Night Specials". These were special order and only a few were made as they were expensive. A rare and significant revolver and virtually impossible to obtain.
Rare Plant\'s revolver USA Civil War Era Another rare and interesting revolver! This is an antique Plant’s Mfg. Co. Revolver, made circa 1864 in New Haven, Connecticut. Makers of revolvers during the American Civil War had three choices: 1) they could take their chances violating the Smith & Wesson owned Rollin White Patent for the concept of a “bored through cylinder” to accept metallic cartridges. Those that did were invariably sued. 2) they could continue to make percussion guns with all of their disadvantages until the Smith and Wesson patent expired. 3) they could invent their own concept that was both an improvement over percussion guns and circumvented the Rollin White Patent. This is the option that Plant’s Mfg Co chose. Plant’s Mfg. Co. was financed and represented by the famed firearms agents Merwin & Bray, hence their name on the top of the barrel which is extant but faint. Their revolver featured a “cup-primed” and front-loading concept, which was among the best attempts to get around S&W’s 12-1/2-year stronghold on cartridge revolvers. Although there was some advertising stating government purchase this is not confirmed but Soldiers were able to privately purchase any firearm for their own use during the Civil War.
Rare Remington Jarmann Swedish Trials Carbine This is a rare and interesting carbine developed by the Swedish army who were experimenting with small calibres as the way forward and parallel to most of Europe. This particular carbine was barelled in 1869 with a 10mm Jarmann barrel which was later manufactured in 12.7mm. Jacob Smith Jarmann designed his first breech-loading rifle—firing cardboard cartridges—in 1838, but this was turned down by the armed forces at the time. The logic was that a rifle capable of firing 13 shots a minute would be impossible to resupply with enough ammunition!! In the 1870s, he stepped down from the daily running of his workshop to work on his newly invented bolt-action rifle. According to the patent, three particulars were considered new and unique with the action he had developed. The Jarmann bolt action rifle met with stiff competition from the Remington patent rolling block rifle but met with some success. This is an interesting and transitional trials carbine in excellent order with a good barrel. If you wish to put this carbine onto a FAC it is relatively straight forward to reload. The rifle has matching serial numbers. In the field it was proposed that these carbines were used by artillery men for close defence and shooting lame horses! You will probably not encounter another example.
Rare Roberts 1867 Conversion of Enfield Rifle For an advanced British Military Rifle collector this interesting rifle is about as unusual and rare as you will ever find. This is a Pattern 1860 2 Band Enfield rifle converted with an extraordinary breech conversion that was developed in competition to the Snider System and the Allin Trapdoor System. The Roberts Conversion System converted a muzzle loading musket to a breech loading cartridge rifle. Union General B.S. Roberts invented the conversion system, which utilised his own .58 Roberts centre fire cartridge. Originally Roberts contracted with the Providence Tool Company to convert Model 1861 and 1865 Springfield muskets. The US Ordnance Bureau did not adopt the Roberts system, but they did sell some to the State of South Carolina. The Providence Tool Company also sold a number of the altered muskets to France. Many of these arms were P-1853 Enfield’s that had likely been in store in New York State Arsenals. The breech loading modification resulted in a significantly weakened wrist area, and many of the guns experienced severe damage during their period of use. As a result Roberts Conversion muskets are quite scarce today, especially British rifles Most 2 band Enfield’s were converted to the Snider system so to find a competitive system is highly unusual. This conversion was made on an Enfield rifle no doubt to promote it to the British Military. There are no British proof marks evident unless they are under the wood but the lock is an issue lock dated 1863. This was more than likely bought as an import for the purpose of experimentation and conversion. The rifle is in excellent condition with much original colour on the conversion which can be simply removed by a side key as illustrated. There is one hairline crack adjacent to this key but other than that the woodwork is very good and evidently the rifle has seen little use which concurs with its prototype status. The side of the breechblock is crisply marked in two lines with “ROBERT’S PATENT/JUN 11 1867” The rack or serial number is stamped into the stock. When I received this rifle I thought that the lock was at fault as it would not open fully. Further research revealed that the rifle had an extraordinary design flaw and that is that the breech block cannot be fully opened to load or unload unless the ramrod is pulled about 3” out of the stock as otherwise it fouls the falling block. I have seen a couple of Springfield conversions over the years in the USA (but never an Enfield) and none of them had the ramrod extant, this probably explains why! A fascinating and seldom seen rifle conversion manufactured at a hugely innovative time in the development of breech loading rifles and one that did not make the grade. I doubt if I will ever see another one and certainly not in this condition with no missing parts.
RARE SAW HANDLED LE PAGE DUELLING PISTOL circa 1840. This is quite an extraordinary saw handled percussion duelling pistol manufactured by Le Page of Paris. The pistol features a 9.5” octagonal barrel with a .50” bore and I am told it was produced for an Admiral. This would not surprise me as the hammers are of the Dolphin type and the elaborate scroll work and gold inlay featuring Dolphins and an anchor are indicative of an order by a client of some wealth. Both the barrel and lock have “Le Page a Paris” inlaid in gold and the butt section of the stock features fish scale checkering. It would appear that this pistol was originally made as one of a pair and is numbered “1”. The Le Page family were Gunmakers to Royalty and the firm was founded in 1717 and despite being Gunmakers to the aristocracy survived two French revolutions. During the first Revolution they distributed guns to the Mob to assist in the storming of the Bastille and consequently were applauded as “true patriots”. Having survived the initial French revolution Le Page then profited by selling arms to the new revolutionary Government despite the fact that he was renowned as the King’s Gunmaker – quite an achievement! This pistol would have been the work of Jean Andre Prosper Henri Le Page (1792-1854) the son of Jean Le Page (1746-1834). During the control of J A P H Le Page, the firm was awarded a silver medal at the Paris Exhibition. The firm supplied guns to Napoleon and were recognised as leading makers in France with several patents. Le Page was not noted for making Saw Handled pistols as this was a popular English design and this is the first Le Page saw handled pistol I have ever seen. The quality of Le Page firearms is superb and to this day is recognised by the fact that several companies make copies which are very popular. This is an opportunity to acquire a rare example from a renowned maker.
Rare Springfield Chaffee Reece Bolt Action Rifle 1884 The Chaffee Reece rifle was a significant prototype rifle that was developed in the USA to offer a multiple shot rifle to increase the rate of fire possible with the adopted single shot Springfield Trapdoor Rifle. In 1882 a Board of Ordnance committee was formed to evaluate potential candidates for a magazine fed rifle that should be acquired in sufficient numbers to see field trials. Over 50 arms were submitted and saw initial testing, and the board found that the submitted designs from Lee, Chaffee-Reece and Hotchkiss were the most promising. The result was the acquisition and field-testing of the US M-1882 Lee Magazine Rifle, the US M-1882 Chaffee-Reece Magazine Rifle and the 3rd Model Hotchkiss Rifle. 750 each of the Lee and the Hotchkiss rifles were obtained for field trials, and 753 of Chaffee-Reece Rifles manufactured by Springfield Arsenal for field trials. The Colt Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company had produced the original Chaffee-Reece test rifle, but when Colt was approached to manufacture the arms for field trials, the Ordnance Board was quoted the astronomical price of $150.00 per rifle (about $3,800.00 per rifle at 2015 prices)! Additionally, Colt would only produce 200 of the rifles, not the required 750. As a result, the Ordnance Board approached the Springfield Arsenal to produce the Chaffee-Reece design. Springfield modified equipment on hand, left over from the manufacture of the experimental M-1871 Ward Burton Rifle, and produced 753 US M-1871 Chaffee-Reece Rifles at a price of $56.28 about 1/3 of what Colt had bid to produce them! The Chaffee-Reece was a bolt-action, magazine fed rifle, chambered for the 45-70 Government cartridge. The rifle held 6 cartridges in the magazine tube in the buttstock and one in the chamber. The magazine was loaded through a trap in the butt, and the bolt had to be open to release the pressure on the feed device to allow it to open. Rather than a spring feed magazine, the Chaffee-Reece design used a ratcheting cartridge feeder that pushed a new cartridge forward each time the bolt was worked. A small lever, mounted on the forward right side of the receiver activated a magazine cut-off, which allowed the rifle to be fired as a single shot rifle. This held the contents of the magazine in reserve for rapid fire when necessary. The 9 pound, 9 ounce rifle (empty weight) had a 27 7/8” long blued barrel, secured by two spring retained, solid barrel bands. The upper band held a sling swivel and a stacking swivel, with the lower swivel being mounted on the trigger guard bow. The adjustable, long-range rear sight was of the US M-1879 pattern (as used on the M-1879 Trapdoor), but was graduated for the ballistics of the Chaffee-Reece and was marked C-R on the left side. All of the metal was blued, with a case hardened receiver that had a smoky blackish-gray color and a bright bolt. The front sight doubled as a bayonet lug for an angular socket bayonet. The guns were marked on the receiver US – SPRINGFIELD – 1884., and at the breech with the usual V / P / (EAGLE HEAD) proof marks. The guns were not serial numbered. The stock was marked with an inspectors’ cartouche at the upper right corner of the reverse buttstock, with the inspectors’ initials over the date 1884. A P (within a circle) firing proof was struck behind the trigger guard in the stock. The Chaffee-Reece rifles entered field service for testing in late 1884 and was met with generally negative reviews. 95 reports on the rifles were received from the field during the trials, with only 14 of the reports reflecting that the Chaffee-Reece was superior to the current Trapdoor system or the other 2 magazine rifles then being tested. The rifles saw service with elements of US 8th, 9th, 14th, 15th , 19th, 23rd & 25th Infantry, as well as the 1st US Artillery. Although some of the reports lauded the magazine system of the rifle and some commended its accuracy, most reports were not positive. By the end of the first quarter of 1886, the Chaffee-Reece rifles were returned to the Ordnance Department stores and were replaced by US M-1884 Trapdoor rifles. Over the next couple of decades the stocks of Chaffee-Reece rifles were sold off, with functional rifles being sold for less than 10% of what the guns had originally cost. Many of the guns had damaged stocks or were not functional, and these guns were sold at scrap metal prices. This is an excellent example of the US M-1882 Chaffee-Reece Magazine Rifle and would be difficult to better. The rifle is 100% complete, correct and original. The top left edge of the receiver is clearly marked in a single line: US – SPRINGFIELD – 1884.. The left barrel breech area is crisply marked: V / P / (EAGLE HEAD). The stock is full-length, solid and free of any breaks or repairs. The stock is clearly and crisply marked at the upper rear of the reverse butt with an inspection cartouche that reads: SWP /1884. “SWP” were the initials of Springfield Armory’s Master Armorer Samuel W. Porter. Porter had gone to work at Springfield in 1856 as a toolmaker, and rose to the position of Master Armorer in 1879 (replacing the famous Erskine S Allin) and remained in that position until his death in 1894. The cartouche is appropriately dated 1884, as all Chaffee-Reece rifles should be. The Springfield P (within a circle) firing proof is stamped clearly in the wood behind the trigger guard. The stock does show the expected scattered light bumps,scuffs, dings and handling marks, but is free of any significant wear and shows no signs of abuse. The stock still retains the large majority of its original military oiled finish, with a lovely open grain showing that has never been sanded. There is a very good bore and the rifle functions as it should. This is a rifle that is considered scarce in the USA and would have to be considered as rare in the UK particularly in this outstanding condition. This rifle requires a Firearms Certificate to own it and the price includes delivery to your RFD. The rifle will be supplied with a stock of 45/70 cases.
Rare Square Back Trigger Guard Colt Navy This is a very good example of a very early square back trigger guard Colt Navy revolver manufactured in 36 calibre. In Patrick Swayze's excellent Tome titled "51 Colt Navies published in 1967 he states The design of the square back trigger guard was probably made with the question of appearance alone in mind, for it certainly does not does not seem to have any useful or practical value. In fact, it would seem that such a design would be highly impractical because of the chances of the pointed rear of the trigger guard proper becoming fouled in the holster, or pocket, from which it was being drawn. The square back design is attributed to Colonel Talcot of the Ordnance Department of the U.S. Army, who seemed to have a fondness of the symmetry and beauty of the design. Since Colonel Talcot had much to do with the purchase of handguns for U. S. Army - a potential purchase of some size - Sam Colt was certainly one to cater to the whims of those who could help him sell his handguns; so the square back trigger guard it was! The story is that when Colonel Talcot was convicted by a court(s) martial, Colt immediately discontinued his production of the square back design and changed to the small rounded trigger guard. This particular revolver has an excellent bore, and is mechanically sound with all matching serial numbers on the arbour, rammer, butt, frame and cylinder. The wedge has a different number but is contemporary and with a number close to the revolver. The action is tight and although the finish is faded away there is some silver plating extant in protected areas. The revolver has a strong mainspring and cocks and locks perfectly, the latch spring on the rammer is particularly tight. There is evidence of the cylinder safety stops and they have not been totally worn away as is often seen. My view is this was a working gun that was well looked after by the state of the bore and I would say that it could have been issued to some official body. There is an inspectors stamp "G" below the frame serial number stamp. The 7.5" barrel is roll stamped with the early address "-Address Saml Colt -New-York City-" The I of the city is extant and this indicates an early revolver as this eventually wore out and examples stamped C TY are not unusual. The brass square back trigger guard indicates it is one of less than 1000 manufactured and given survival rates is a difficult Colt to find for any collection. Expect to pay at least 50% more for an example with any original finish left. A desirable revolver.
Rare Swedish Husqvarna Model 1862 Rifle Husqvarna was founded in 1689 and has some history! Amongst collectors and shooters they are well known as manufacturing the model 1867 ( Gever Modell 1867) rifle which was manufactured using the Remington Rolling Block patent. The chosen calibre was 12.17 mm as they Swedes had 30,000 brand new model 1860 muzzle loading rifles stockpiled in this calibre. By far the majority of these muzzle loaders were converted to breech loading and the original rifles are seldom seen. Some missed the modernisation process and I have seen them "sporterised" for hunting but seldom do you see an original untouched rifle and certainly not in this condition. This is comparable in many ways to the Enfield Pattern 1853 and shoots as well. This example dated 1862 has an excellent bore with good rifling and good woodwork. The rifle is mechanically perfect. Overall it would be difficult to improve on this rifle and certainly not easy to find another..
Rare Tranter This is a Tranter “Eureka” Tranter patent side opening rook rifle in 297/250 obsolete calibre. The rifle was regarded by Stewart in his seminal work on Tranter as being rare with a very low production and very few being noted. The condition of this rifle is very good, possible old refinish but "back in the day", no major flaws, excellent walnut stock and fire blue nitre finish still evident on the opening lever and the trigger. The flip up leaf rear sight calibrated to 100 yards is extant which is nice because this was a vulnerable part and is often missing on rifles. No wear on the nickel but the blacking has some rubbing wear where the rifle was held in the left hand on the barrel in the absence of a forend. The bore on the rifle is very good, no pitting and the mechanics are good. I no longer use the adjective “crisp” as everyone else seems to now use this as a superlative so let’s just say it works as well as the day it was made. Given the overall condition of the plating and woodwork I would say that if I owned this rifle I think I would have it professionally re-blacked to bring it back to 100% condition. This rifle is forendless as are most Tranter rook rifles and Stewart explains that the Eureka is occasionally seen like a large version of Tranter Brothers single shot pistols. The Eureka is a version of the Little Monarch but without the engraving. I have seen very few over the years and they are seen in both factory nickel and blued finishes. I have seen both round and octagonal barrels. Stewart also mentions that these were sold by the Army and Navy CSL and this rifle is stamped as such on the top of the barrel. The makers name and the calibre is also stamped on the rifle. The barrel is 26” long, overall length is 41” and the LOP is 14”. There is not a lot that Stewart has to say about them in his book because he explains that there have been so very few noted. Overall an impressive looking and rare rifle that would enhance any collection I doubt if I will ever handle another one.
Rare Tranter Developmental revolver This is an extremely interesting development 5 shot pocket revolver model by William Tranter. It is not featured in Stewart's excellent book on Tranter nor is there an image in Berk's book. Passing mention is made in Stewart's book to 5 shot development revolvers and he describes a revolver without a ejection rod. This revolver was manufactured in obsolete 320 British Calibre which was discontinued by 1900 in favour of more effective calibres. It features William Tranter's patent mark and his initials WT stamped on the frame. It has Birmingham proof marks. Overall in excellent condition both mechanical and cosmetic with much original finish, some finish loss and light storage pitting with nothing significant and a good bore. It is notable from the 1868 models by an absence of an ejector rod either on the body or in the butt. There are no screws for an ejector system and the butt screw is the original screw. Another feature is the slightly different frame to the mass produced models. Overall a very interesting and rare addition to any British revolver collection.
Rare Type 18 Japanese Murata Rifle circa 1885 Murata This is an exceptional and rare rifle seldom encountered in the United Kingdom and is the predecessor of the famous Arisaka Rifle Series. This particular rifle is a Murata type 18 which is actually the second in the series, the first being the type 13. Type 18 actually represents the fact that the rifle was developed in the 18th year of the Dynasty and was not the 18th Model to be manufactured. This is a single shot rifle in above average condition and has very good woodwork with perfect mechanics and a sound bore. The original Murata was basically a French Chassepot rifle converted with a Murata bolt but this second variant is purely a Japanese manufactured rifle. The Kanzi on the left side of the receiver translates as “Great Nippon Empire, Murata Rifle” and those on the right “ Meiji 18th year”. The knox features a crisp stamp of the Imperial Chrysanthemum symbol. The clearing rod and extractor is extant and there is one small contemporary armourers repair to the wood on the side of the stock. Manufacture commenced in 1885 and was undertaken using machine tools ordered from Winchester USA, Winchesters designers made several suggestions to improve on the first model which had been prone to stock failure and many of these suggestions were incorporated including lengthening the tang so it could be secured by two screws not one, and the relocation of the locking lugs rear screw. The timing of the rifle was not exactly opportune as by 1886 the value of single shot rifles had been virtually eliminated by the introduction of multiple shot magazine rifles. Consequently the rifle was only manufactured at the Tokyo Arsenal for 4 years when it was superceded by a rifle with a multiple shot tubular magazine. As a consequence of low production numbers and from a country that had not yet fully opened its borders, examples are scarce if not rare. This is an iconic rifle and would form an excellent exhibit for any advanced 19th Century Military Rifle Collection. Obsolete calibre no license required for collecting purposes.
Rare Webley Solid frame No 1 .577 This is, quite frankly, the rarest revolver I had had the privilege to offer. Webley collectors will instantly recognise it as the Webley No 1 solid frame .577 calibre “Man stopper” revolver. This huge revolver was made in limited quantities and is extremely rare and would be the pinnacle of any Webley collection. According to Gordon Bruce and Christian Reinhart in their outstanding book on Webley, only a handful of examples are known and only one of them is marked Webley. Bruce and Reinhart explain that these revolvers were manufactured between 1867 and 1870 and were all from the same source but unmarked. This revolver is identical to one on page 55 in the book I refer to. It is generally considered that these were supplied in the “white” to retailers to be finished and engraved. This splendid looking example has only one serial number – “14” stamped on the trigger and London proof marks so clearly it was supplied to a London retailer. The “Man stopper” was the .500 Smith and Wesson Magnum of its day but was not popular because the huge .577 boxer round was uncomfortable to shoot. Reloading was also slow as the cylinder had to be removed from the frame along with a back plate which secured the cartridges in place. I show the revolver disassembled to show the back plate and also the revolver next to a full sized Webley .450" British Bulldog for size comparison. This particular revolver is toned with an even patina, mechanically sound with good grips. There is light even pitting on the cylinder which does not detract from its attractiveness. The revolver is accompanied by its original cleaning rod which in itself is a rarity, and one inert round. I doubt if I will ever handle another of these extremely rare revolvers. I will consider part exchange and trades on this item.
Rare Werder Model 1869 This massive and rare pistol is the Werder pistol model 1869 in obsolete 11.5 mm calibre. This was an infantry and light cavalry falling block pistol, invented by Johann Ludwig Werder in Bavaria and based on his rifle design of 1868. It was one of the first centre fire pistols to be adopted for use by a European military force. Although it was originally known as the \"Bavarian Lightning pistol\" because of its rate of fire, the Werder pistol proved too heavy for practical use. The rate of fire was said to be 20 rounds a minute and it occurred to me that this was not so bad but the pistol was introduced just as self-contained metallic cartridge revolvers were gaining immense popularity. For pure interest I considered that I was sheltering behind my horse and using either a revolver with a loading gate and this pistol and timed myself loading it. The conclusion that I reached was that if an enemy was advancing and you had a cool head, the Werder would outshoot the revolver every time in respect of speed of loading once you achieved proficiency with it. With typical Teutonic efficiency the pistol is stamped with a plethora of matching serial numbers on every part easily or not so easily reached including screw heads and inside of the trigger guard. There is some original colour but mostly mellowed to a plum platina, the cavalry cartouches are still evident on the butt and the screws are all clean and not messed with. To fire the pistol the “hammer” on the right of the frame is pulled back and the trigger pulled. The front trigger is then pressed with the trigger finger and the Martini style breech then opens with some violence to extract the spent cartridge ready for reloading. You can easily see that this form of pistol would later evolve into the modern “slab” sided automatic pistols such as the Bergmann and Mauser C96. I have only ever seen two of these pistols in my life, the other one being sold by me last month! A very interesting and rare martial firearm that really is anachronistic for its time.
Rare Werder Model 1869 Pistol . This massive and rare pistol is the Werder pistol model 1869 in obsolete 11.5 mm calibre. This was an infantry and light cavalry falling block pistol, invented by Johann Ludwig Werder in Bavaria and based on his rifle design of 1868. It was one of the first centre fire pistols to be adopted for use by a European military force. This pistol was introduced during the transition from percussion pistols to self-contained metallic cartridges and in interesting on many levels. Although it was originally known as the "Bavarian Lightning pistol" because of its rate of fire, the Werder pistol proved too heavy for practical use. The rate of fire was said to be 20 rounds a minute and it occurred to me that this was quite ambitious. For pure interest I considered that I was sheltering behind my horse and using either a revolver with a loading gate and this pistol and timed myself loading it. The conclusion that I reached was that if an enemy was advancing and you had a cool head, the Werder would outshoot the revolver every time in respect of speed of loading once you achieved proficiency with it. With typical Teutonic efficiency the pistol is stamped with a plethora of matching serial numbers on every part easily or not so easily reached including screw heads and inside of the trigger guard. There is some original colour but mostly mellowed to a plum platina, the cavalry cartouches are still evident on the butt and the screws are all clean and not messed with. The bore is clean and the mechanics are excellent. To fire the pistol the hammer on the right of the frame is pulled back and the trigger pulled. The front trigger is then pressed with the trigger finger and the Martini style breech then opens with some violence to extract the spent cartridge ready for reloading. You can easily see that this form of pistol would later evolve into the modern slab sided automatic pistols such as the Bergmann and Mauser C96. This is only the third Werder I have offered for sale in forty years. A very interesting and rare martial firearm that really is anachronistic for its time.
Remington 1858 New Model Police Revolver All of the smaller Remington Revolvers are scare in their original state as so many were converted to rimfire cartridges. This particular model is the Remington New Model Police revolver in .36 calibre and is a five-shot revolver. The octagonal barrel has some original finish left and is stamped “Patented Sept. 14 1858, March 17, 1863. E Remington & Sons. IIion, New York U.S.A New Model” on the top flat. The revolver is mechanically fine and locks and cocks well and has an extremely strong main spring. The grips are good and there are some traces of the original nickel finish extant on the trigger guard. These revolvers were manufactured between 1863 and 1873 and it is known that less than 17,000 were made. Compared to the several hundred thousand pocket Colt’s that were manufactured this is a relatively low figure particularly when you consider potential survival rates. This is a very good example of a scarce revolver and the last image shows the comparison in size with the smaller pocket spur trigger revolver I recently sold.
Remington 1871 Rolling Block Pistol Here we have a very decent Remington 1871 pistol in 50 Calibre (Obsolete)at a reasonable price for this scarce pistol. Good mechanics with reasonable bore and woodwork. Quite an extraordinary pistol when one considers the considerable competition at the time! Designed to be a "manstopper" with no frills and virtually undamageable this pistol has laid in a drawer for the past 50 years. The inert 50 calibre round will be supplied with the pistol and I can send this to your door at cost only.
Remington Elliot 4 shot vest pistol. Remington Elliot pistols are interesting and feature a rotary mounted firing pin that rotates to fire each cylinder in turn. They are fired by pushing the ring forwards and then backwards to depress the rear trigger. This is an excellent example, used but looked after. Many of these little pistols are found with broken or damaged linkages from the trigger to the firing pin but this one works perfectly. It also has a decent rifled bore and many do not because of the corrosive nature of the primers used. This is overall a very good example with crisp address and patent dates extant.
Remington Model 1871 .50 Here is another 1871 Remington Rolling Block Pistol in obsolete 50 calibre Remington centrefire - a real manstopper! It is hard to know exactly why Remington made rolling block pistols when they did, since revolvers were so well established. Probably they were already tooled up for rolling block rifles, so making pistols didn’t require an additional investment. Remington revolver sales were in a slump, because from 1855 to 1871 Smith & Wesson had effectively tied up manufacture of advanced cartridge revolvers by licensing the Rollin White patent that covered any cylinder drilled through from end to end. Remington had only percussion pistols on offer during those years. The 1871 pistol was modified from earlier versions by moving the trigger and trigger guard forward and adding a spur to the grip to assist in controlling recoil. A firing pin retractor was also added. This pistol was commonly called the "Army and Navy". Manufactured circa 1872 to 1888 with a total production of approximately 6,000, with approximately 5,000 sold to the U.S. government. The pistol has an 8" blue barrel, case hardened frame with the distinctive 'hump' or spur on the back strap, the trigger is niter blue hammer and breech block bright. The left side of the frame is marked "REMINGTON'S ILION N.Y. U.S. A. / PAT MAY 3D NOV 15TH 1864 APRIL 17TH 1866" and stamped with a "P" and "S" below and ahead of the marking. The pistol is mounted with a smooth walnut forearm and one piece smooth grip with a boxed script "C.R.S." inspection cartouche on the left. There are no major blemish's , a reasonable bore, crisp mechanics and some evidence of case hardening left with a nice blue black trigger. Overall mottled patina as can be seen with a plum barrel. Not quite museum quality but at the better end of these very scarce pistols. The screw heads indicate it has not been messed with and the extractor is intact which is often missing. These pistols are underestimated and are an interesting diversion from the revolvers that were dominant at this time.
Remington Model 1879 Rolling Block Rifle Another great Argentine rolling block , mint bore and crisp mechanics from the reneged Argentine contract. Arsenal refinished as all of the hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, there is one small good arsenal repair to the wood but no cracks or other defects. Bought at the right price so less expensive than my other example.
Remington Model 1879 Rolling Block Rifle Another excellent Argentine rolling block rifle, about mint bore and crisp mechanics from the reneged Argentine contract. Argentina purchased several thousand of these rifles but in mid contract decided to purchase Mauser bolt action rifles and did not take delivery. As these were not used in anger they are generally in excellent condition having been stored for more than 100 years until the Bannerman company found them. Arsenal refinished as the entire hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, there is one small good arsenal repair to the wood on the right side of the forend but no cracks or other defects. The rifle has the Argentina 1879 EN stamp on the Knox and original cleaning rod. Should you wish to put this onto a FAC reloading equipment is available.
Remington Model 1879 Rolling Block Rifle I have sold many Remington Model 1879 Argentine rolling blocks as they are usually found in great condition as they were generally not issued because the Argentinian government reneged on their contract so they went into storage for 100 years until the US gun dealer Bannerman found them. They are fun to shoot ( on a FAC ) and dies and brass are readily available. They always seem to have excellent bores as does this example but this one is unusual insofar as it has a rack or issue number on the side of the knox so has likely seen service. The rifle has a good walnut stock and a substantial Werndl type rear sight. Overall a very nice example. The Remington rolling block was literally the Kalashnikov of the 19th Century and were sold everywhere. Obsolete calibre no license required.
Remington Model 1888 Deringer The Remington Model 95 is a double-barrel pocket pistol commonly recognised as a derringer. The design was little changed during a production run of nearly 70 years through several financial reorganisations of the manufacturer causing repeating serial number sequences. Guns were offered with engraving or plain blued or nickel-plated finish with grips of metal, walnut, rosewood, hard rubber, ivory or pearl. The earliest production had no extractors and have E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. stamped on the right side of the barrel and ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12, 1865 stamped on the left side of the barrel. These inscriptions were swapped to opposite sides of the barrel when extractors were added in 1869. In 1880, the inscription was changed to E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12th 1865,and placed atop the barrel rib. The barrel rib top inscription changed to REMINGTON ARMS CO. ILION N.Y. in 1888 and again to REMINGTON ARMS U.M.C. CO. ILION, N.Y.in 1910 This particular example is the pattern introduced in 1888 identified by the inscription on the top rib. This is a very good example and lacks the inherent faults often seen which is cracked and repaired hinges which this example does not suffer from. This is a blued pistol that has mellowed to a nice dark plum patina as can be seen and with excellent grips. There appears to be more nickel plated pistols extant than blued pistols. A very attractive and handsome looking example of an iconic gun reputed to be favoured by gamblers and “loose” women as they are very easily concealed.
Remington Model 1903=A3 Rifle WW2 issue. This is a very clean example of a Remington made Model 1903-A3 Springfield rifle manufactured in May 1944. Although the model 1903 was officially replaced by the M1 Garand in 1939 the US army was expanding rapidly and although production focused on semi-automatic rifles it was decided to continue manufacturing bolt action rifles for issue to the army. Two manufacturers , Remington and Smith Corona were chosen to manufacture a simplified version of the 1903 and Remington inherited the Springfield Armory machinery. The rifled had a modified peep sight and were parkerised. This is a typical example that has seen little but some service towards the end of the War. Recently imported and proofed the price includes carriage to your RFD as this is a Section 1 Firearm.
Remington Model 95 1888 Derringer. The Remington Model 95 is a double-barrel pocket pistol commonly recognised as a derringer. The design was little changed during a production run of nearly 70 years through several financial reorganisations of the manufacturer causing repeating serial number sequences. Guns were offered with engraving or plain blued or nickel-plated finish with grips of metal, walnut, rosewood, hard rubber, ivory or pearl. The earliest production had no extractors and have E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. stamped on the right side of the barrel and ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12, 1865 stamped on the left side of the barrel. These inscriptions were swapped to opposite sides of the barrel when extractors were added in 1869. In 1880, the inscription was changed to E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12th 1865,and placed atop the barrel rib. The barrel rib top inscription changed to REMINGTON ARMS CO. ILION N.Y. in 1888 and again to REMINGTON ARMS U.M.C. CO. ILION, N.Y.in 1910 This particular example is the pattern introduced in 1888 identified by the inscription on the top rib. This is a very good example and lacks some of the inherent faults often seen. The bore is clean which is good as the .41 rimfire cartridge used was notorious for creating corrosion in the barrels if not cleaned because of their high mercury content. I have seen many excellent looking pistols with awful bores. Another issue is cracked and repaired hinges which this example does not suffer from. This is a nickel plated pistol with more than 90% of the finish extant as can be seen and with excellent grips. A very attractive and handsome looking example of an iconic gun reputed to be favoured by gamblers and “loose” women as they are very easily concealed.
Remington New Model Army Revolver circa US Civil War This is a decent Remington New Model Army in .44 calibre. These are sometimes referred to as the pattern 1858 but they were not actually manufactured and sold until 1861. Although there is little finish remaining this revolver is tight and has a good bore. The 1858 patent address on the top of the barrel is clear and legible and the revolver disassembles easily. The grips are good as can be seen. If I wanted one of these to put on to a FAC this would probably be the one. There were three progressive models made by Remington at this time, the Remington-Beal’s Army & Navy (1860–1862), the 1861 Army & Navy (1862–1863), and the New Model Army & Navy (1863–1875). The three models are nearly identical in size and appearance. Subtle but noticeable differences in hammers, loading levers, and cylinders help identify each model. The 1861 Remington actually transitioned into New Model appearance by late 1862, slowly transforming throughout 1862, due to continual improvement suggestions from the U. S. Ordnance Department. The Remington revolver owes its durability to the “top strap”, solid-frame design. The design is stronger and less prone to frame stretching than the Colt revolvers of the same era. The internal lock work of the Remington is somewhat simpler in construction. While the Colt employs separate screws for the hand and trigger, those components share the same through-frame screw in the Remington design. The Remington Army models were popular revolvers in the Civil War and in the excellent book “Civil War Revolvers – Myth vs Reality” by Peter Schiffers, the Remington Army proved to be the most reliable and accurate of all of the revolvers tested and out-performed the Colt in every aspect of the testing. The Remington revolver was a mainstay during the Civil War and this is a decent example of a revolver that was used but looked after.
Remington No 4 Rifle This is a Remington No 4 take down rifle or "Buggy Gun" in .32 Rimfire (Obsolete) calibre. These guns were the USA equivalent of our Rook and Rabbit Rifles and were used both as working tools and as a light rifle to introduce young people to shooting. This particular example is in good condition and features a lever action take down to allow the rifle to be disassembled in seconds. The rifle has a decent bore and good woodwork and is mechanically sound. An interesting rifle.
Remington No 4 Rifle This is a fine example of a Remington No 4 take down rifle or "Buggy Gun" in .32 rim fire calibre. (Obsolete)These guns were the USA equivalent of our Rook and Rabbit Rifles and were used both as working tools and as a light rifle to introduce young people to shooting. This particular example is in good condition and features a lever action take down to allow the rifle to be disassembled in seconds. A very pleasing example with crisp stamping, nice finish and reasonable bore and mechanically sound. As a result of the escalating prices of Winchesters, manufacturers such as Remington are increasing in popularity with a commensurate increase in value. An interesting rifle.
Remington No 4 takedown rifle. This is a fine example of a Remington No 4 take down rifle or "Buggy Gun" in .32 rim fire calibre which is an obsolete calibre. These guns were the USA equivalent of our Rook and Rabbit Rifles and were used both as working tools and as a light rifle to introduce young people to shooting. This particular example is in good condition and features a lever action take down to allow the rifle to be disassembled in seconds. A very pleasing example with crisp stamping, nice finish and good bore and mechanically sound. The extractor is still present on this rifle and this always needs to be confirmed as many go missing. As a result of the escalating prices of Winchesters, manufacturers such as Remington are increasing in popularity with a commensurate increase in value. An interesting rifle and one that would be difficult to improve on.
Remington Rolling Block Rifle 1879 pattern Another stunning Argentine rolling block rifle, excellent bore with crisp mechanics and very nice walnut stock from the reneged Argentine contract. Argentina purchased several thousand of these rifles but in mid contract decided to purchase Mauser bolt action rifles and did not take delivery. As these were not used in anger they are generally in excellent condition having been stored for nearly 100 years until the Bannerman company found them.This is Arsenal refinished as the entire hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, The rifle has the Argentina 1879 EN stamp on the Knox, three line Remington patent dates on the tang and original cleaning rod. Should you wish to put this onto a FAC reloading equipment is available. This is the only Remington rolling block rifle contract made with an octagonal knox and also the only rifle with a substantial Werndel type rear sight that is excellent in every respect. Altogether as good a rolling block that you could find.
Remington Rolling Block Rifle 1879 pattern Another great Argentine rolling block rifle, very good bore with crisp mechanics and very nice dark walnut stock from the reneged Argentine contract. Argentina purchased several thousand of these rifles but in mid contract decided to purchase Mauser bolt action rifles and did not take delivery. As these were not used in anger they are generally in excellent condition having been stored for nearly 100 years until the Bannerman company found them.This is Arsenal refinished as the entire hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, The rifle has the three line Remington patent dates on the tang and original cleaning rod. Should you wish to put this onto a FAC reloading equipment is available. This is the only Remington rolling block rifle contract made with an octagonal knox and also the only rifle with a substantial Werndel type rear sight that is excellent in every respect. Altogether as good a rolling block that you could find.
Remington Rolling Block Rifle 1879 pattern Another excellent Argentine rolling block rifle in obsolete 43 Spanish Calibre, about mint bore and crisp mechanics from the reneged Argentine contract. Argentina purchased several thousand of these rifles but in mid contract decided to purchase Mauser bolt action rifles and did not take delivery. As these were not used in anger they are generally in excellent condition having been stored for more than 100 years until the Bannerman company found them. Arsenal refinished as the entire hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection, excellent walnut stock with no cracks or other defects. The rifle has the Argentina 1879 EN stamp on the Knox and original cleaning rod. Should you wish to put this onto a FAC reloading equipment is available.
Remington Rolling Block Rifle Circa 1870 This is an interesting rifle that needs additional research. From studying George Layman's excellent book on the subject I believe it formed part of the Greek/Venezuelan contract that ended up in France during the Franco Prussian War. I have not cast the chamber but can see that it is not 43 Spanish calibre which is a shouldered case as this chamber is a straight case so it is either 43 Reformado or 42 Russian Berdan. Each cartridge fits the barrel but the smaller Russian bullet is less accurate. For an excellent and erudite article on the 43 Spanish rolling block see the article by David Thombs and Stephen Barrett in the Journal of Historical Breechloading Smallarms Association Volume 4 no 4. The rifle has a small crown stamped into the rear of the barrel near the knox and a small "H" on the left hand side of the receiver. There is also a barely discernible "H" scratched into the wrist of the butt. The mechanical action of the rifle is strong and the bore has very strong rifling with minor pitting. There is overall light surface pitting as can be seen from the photographs on the bands, sight and receiver but the rifle still looks attractive and the barrel surfaces are clean and the rifle is fully functional. The tang has the USA Remington patent dates and there are no cracks or repairs in the wood. it is what it is which is a military rifle 140 years old that has no doubt been in several conflicts around the world. This rifle really needs some further research.
Remington Vest Pocket Pistol Circa 1870 This rare little Remington vest pistol was invented by William H Elliot and is alternatively known as an Elliot's pattern or saw handle pistol because of the shape of the butt. The pistols were made in blued, silver or nickel finishes. The pistol is unusual insofar as the hammer obdurates the breech when it falls and you drop down a gate to load it. You can see the beginnings of the famous Remington breech block action emerging in this diminutive pistol. Although the handle looks uncomfortable it is actually a very comfortable pistol to hold and the ergonomics are superb. Between 1865 and 1888 less than 20,000 of these pistols were made. The pistol is stamped with the makers name and patent date on top of the breech. This particular pistol is in 41 rim fire calibre and recent research has shown that this had formidable stopping power at close range. The actions is tight and as it should be. All in all a scarce, if not rare little pistol that would make a good addition to a Derringer collection.
RFC/ RAF Flying Helmet Medal Log Book Group RFC items are becoming uncommon as the interest in collecting increases. This is an unusual and interesting group for several reasons. The group and artefacts belonged to an American who travelled to Canada before the USA entered the war to enlist as a volunteer pilot. His logbook contains several hundred hours of flying at various Canadian aerodromes including the school of aerial combat and as on many occasions his passenger was a cadet, this intimates that he was so good he became an instructor and as a result, his own skill defeated his rationale to join up which was to fight. The enigma of the group is that his medals are named to the CASC not the RFC or the RAF but the group is accompanied by a letter of provenance from a direct descendant that was written more than 20 years ago which explains his story. The Spalding Flying helmet is in excellent condition, clean and with no damage and typical for the period. The flying googles also look good but are marred by the rubber seal having hardened with some losses. The flying log is in good condition and legible but has some pages torn out at the very end. The group also has two photographs a CRAF bullion cap badge , Overseas volunteer badge of the 113 Lethbridge Highlanders and the Great War and Victory Medal is named to Pte W H McKeigan CASC. These medals would have been his only entitlement. The letter of provenance was written by the wife of William Mc Keigan's son. A very nice flying helmet and log book and worthy of research.
Rifles and Volunteer Corps - Llewellyn Jewitt F.S.A 101 p.p card covers, illustrated. An extremely rare pamphlet which features the drill, practise and weapons of the Voluntary Rifle Corps. The work contains a huge amount of scarce data on rifles, revolvers and blades and how to use them and was intended to promote the Volunteers at a time when there were grave concerns about the intent of the French. Jewitt maintained that "no Englishmen can call himself patriotic unless he had a rifle in the home". This work is rare and seldom seen and an excellent read, the content forgiving the fact there are some peripheral losses to the cover which can be seen, is completely intact.
Rogers & Spencer Revolver The Rogers & Spencer Percussion Revolver was originally manufactured in Willowvale, NY about 1863-65. In January 1865, the United States government contracted with Rogers & Spencer for 5,000 of the solid frame pistols. Delivery on the contract was made too late for war service, and the entire lot was sold as scrap to Francis Bannerman and Son in 1901. Bannerman then sold the pistols throughout the first quarter of the 20th Century. Many original Rogers & Spencer revolvers are seen today in excellent condition as is this one. The Rogers and Spencer Army Model Revolver was actually an improvement of earlier pistols produced by the firm - the Pettingill and Freeman revolvers. The Pettingills were produced in the late 1850's and early 1860's, and were double action revolvers. The Pettingills were ahead of their time, being designed as hammerless pistols, which were popular in the last decade of the 19th Century, but certainly too avant garde for Army purchasers. The Navy Model was a .34 caliber, of which less than 1,000 were produced. The Army Model was a .44 caliber, and only about 3,400 were produced in the early 1860's. The Freeman Army Model Revolver was a solid frame .44 caliber pistol with a round 7 1/2" barrel, of which 2,000 are believed to have been produced in 1863-64, and in appearance the Freeman resembles a Starr Revolver. The Rogers & Spencer is an improved Freeman, with a less severe grip style, a heavier frame and a stronger octagon barrel of identical 7 1/2" length. This particular Rogers & Spencer has a high degree of original finish left and considerable original varnish on the grips. Rotates, cocks and locks and the bore is excellent. These revolvers are favoured today by black powder shooters for the superb grips and excellent mechanics. Overall this is a great looking revolver and better than most.
Sam Brown Holster set suitable for Webley service revolver This is a classic "Sam Brown" officers holster set comprising of belt,shoulder straps, and of course holster. This is an original World War one accessory circa 1915.
Scarce 1st Model Bacon Revolver circa 1859. The Bacon Arms Company was established by Thomas K Baker (1813-1873) in 1859. Baker was a machinist. Bacon manufactured parts at first for another well-known gun maker, Ethan Allen, before establishing his first company between 1847 and 1850. The production was small and total employees never exceeded about fifteen, and it failed around 1856. In 1859 the second company was born, Bacon Manufacturing Company. Before forming this company Bacon had been employed by Manhattan Firearms Company, and they promptly sued him for doing so, but the suit was dropped. Bacon manufactured until 1863 when he was forced out of the company by a major shareholder and the company continued manufacturing under the Bacon title until 1868 and eventually evolved into the famous Hopkins and Allen Company. This particular revolver is a good example of Bacon's first model which was called the "Excelsior" pistol. It has similarities to the well-made Manhattan revolver insofar as it has a removable side plate for cleaning and maintenance and very similar engraving. Manhattan employed patented safety stops which Bacon did not use and the latch holding the rammer in place was a Bacon innovation. These revolvers were made in 31 calibre only and it is estimated that under 1000 were manufactured. The serial number of this revolver is only number 80 so probably manufactured in the first batch. This example is mechanically perfect with strong springs and excellent indexing and '4 click' lock up with a 4" barrel. This revolver would have undoubtedly been used in the Civil War. This is an interesting and quality built revolver that is quite scarce to find in this condition.
Scarce 2nd Model Bacon Revolver circa 1862 The Bacon Arms Company was established by Thomas K Baker (1813-1873) in 1859. Baker was a machinist. Bacon manufactured parts at first for another well-known gun maker, Ethan Allen, before establishing his first company between 1847 and 1850. The production was small and total employees never exceeded about fifteen, and it failed around 1856. In 1859 the second company was born, Bacon Manufacturing Company. Before forming this company Bacon had been employed by Manhattan Firearms Company, and they promptly sued him for doing so, but the suit was dropped. Bacon manufactured until 1863 when he was forced out of the company by a major shareholder and the company continued manufacturing under the Bacon title until 1868 and eventually evolved into the famous Hopkins and Allen Company. This particular revolver is a good example of Bacon’s second model that can be differentiated from the first model by the semi fluted cylinder. It also has similarities to the well-made Manhattan revolver insofar as it has a removable side plate for cleaning and maintenance and very similar engraving on the side frame. Manhattan employed patented safety stops which Bacon did not use and the latch holding the rammer in place was a Bacon innovation. These revolvers were made in 31 calibre only and it is estimated that around 3000 were manufactured but only 1500 retailed and marked by Bacon, the balance being sold by other manufacturers. The serial number of this revolver is number 174 so manufactured early enough to have seen Civil War use. This example is mechanically perfect with strong springs and excellent indexing and '4 click' lock up with a 4" barrel. This is an interesting and quality built revolver that is quite scarce to find in this condition.
Scarce Allen & Wheelock centre hammer 32 rimfire Derringer This is a scarce Allen & Wheelock 32 rimfire centre hammer derringer in obsolete calibre and in NRA very good condition. This side opening single shot pistol was manufactured in the early 1860's and the quantity manufactured has been estimated by Flaydermann as between 500 and 1000. To find one in such good condition is unusual. The pistol has excellent walnut grips exhibiting original varnish and has the makers name stamped on the side of the receiver. Mechanically perfect the pistol can be opened on the half cock. A really nice representative example of an early Allen & Wheelock centre hammer derringer.
Scarce Clements 8 Shot revolver in Velodog calibre This is an interesting little pocket pistol manufactured by C Clements of Liege. The revolver is in obsolete Velodog calibre and revolvers of this type were typically issued to Postmen and Government Officials for self defence, literally to protect them from dogs who had a propensity to attack cyclists as cycling was a new phenomena at this time! Velodog revolvers can be quickly differentiated from 22 calibre revolvers by their elongated cylinders which are significantly longer than that needed to chamber 22 cartridges. This particular revolver is scarce in respect of the fact that it actually has 8 chambers so our intrepid postman could have dealt with a pack of dogs if necessary! This particular revolver is in quite good shape with a good bore and is mechanically sound. It rotates, cocks and locks solidly in double and single action. From the condition of the engraving and the grips it has had little use and has much original finish but has suffered from poor storage so there is some surface pitting on the flat of an edge of the cylinder as can be seen in the photograph and although the loading chamber cover is present the spring is slack. This revolver could easily be restored and improved but in any event is a pleasing example. Clements was a quality and prolific manufacturer based in Liege who is probably better known for his small semi automatic pistol which he patented at the turn of the 20 Century. The Liege proof was renowned as being a considerably greater test for a weapon than their British contemporary test. An interesting piece and seldom encountered.
Scarce Colt London Dragoon 3rd Model This is an interesting and scarce Colt Dragoon with British Proofs that was assembled in Colt's London factory in 1853 and one of only 700 such examples. The story behind the London Dragoon is that Mr Dennet the manager or agent at Colt's Pall Mall office received an enquiry for .44 calibre revolvers and as they were not in production at that time in England, 700 partly made revolvers were quickly shipped in parts and finished and proofed in London. Only 500 were eventually sold and when Colt closed the factory ( after being discovered colluding with the Russians during the Crimean War!! ) the remaining 200 were sent back to the USA to be sold. This is a 3rd model Dragoon and a decent example as can be seen from the photographs and has a good bore, distinct address and proof marks and is mechanically sound. A scarce Dragoon!
Scarce French Carabinier's Cuirass circa Waterloo This is an excellent Cuirass or Breastplate for an enlisted man that would have been used during the Peninsular Wars up until the Battle of Waterloo. This particular example is bright steel with brass lining rivets and is stamped with the mark of " DOBELLAER" on the right shoulder facing .Dobellaer was renowned for the supply of armour to both cavalry and line troops. The breastplate has been solidly hit with a musket ball which didn't penetrate so would have been fired at maximum range or with a short charge but the result would have certainly knocked the wearer off his feet or horse! There is another less significant musket ball or trial strike and one of the flattened top shoulder rivets is missing on the left shoulder facing but this does not detract from the piece as the four top rivets were flattened to avoid impeding the cross over straps. The original internal support loop is still extant which is unusual. Overall dimensions are approximately 14.5" x 14.5" and this would fit a chest size up to about 44" very comfortably. This was sourced in the United Kingdom and it was known that many hundreds were brought back as souvenirs after Waterloo. Annectodally it is said that British troops boiled their soup and stew in captured Cuirass's after Waterloo! This particular piece is new to the market and an excellent and handsome looking example of the Napoleonic era comparable to the modern ballistic vest. This item would enhance any Peninsular Wars Collection.
Scarce Lincoln Jeffries Air Pistol This is a very good example of a Lincoln Jeffries .177 Air Pistol in a pleasing later display case complete with a contemporary dated box of air pellets, a cleaning rod and a laminated sheet illustrating George Lincoln Jeffries patent. The pistol was based on the action of the Lincoln Jeffries Air Rifle which is more often encountered and can be considered scarce. Manufactured between 1921 and 1930 it is considered that there were only around 1500 manufactured. Although effective it was considered ungainly compared to other manufacturer's pistols and couldn't compete with Webley. Nevertheless an important British Air Weapon.
Scarce Model 1842 percussion musket with Lovell clasp. The first muskets fitted with percussion locks were manufactured for the British Army in 1838. This musket was made up of parts that originally were manufactured for flintlock rifles and were fitted with a hammer and nipple. A fire at the Tower of London destroyed the parts and this stimulated the production of the 1842 pattern using new parts specifically for the production of this musket. It can be said that the 1842 Musket was the first purpose built rifle produced for the British Army and its inadequacies in respect of accuracy lead to the development of the P1851 and then the iconic P1853 used both in the Crimean War and the US Civil War. The musket when fitted with a bayonet weighed approximately 11.1/2 pounds, the bore was .753 inch and the barrel 39 inches long which, when fitted with the bayonet increased the overall length to a formidable 6 foot long. The musket is fitted with a block rear sight calibrated for 150 yards but a hit at this distance would have been more luck than judgement. This musket is a handsome looking example with a lock by the renowned lock maker Joseph Brazier and is complete with its Lovell Bayonet catch. The lock works fine and there are no cracks in the walnut stock but some shrinkage around the brass butt plate and some erosion around the lock plate as can be seen. The ramrod is also present. Overall a good representative example of a significant development in British Military Firearms issue. These are quite difficult rifles to source.
Scarce Model 1865 Carbine 35 Maynard Calibre Good Model 1865 Maynard Carbine in 35 Calibre, More information to follow.
Scarce Model 1867 Norwegian Kammerladen Rifle The Norwegian Kammerlader is an unusual and scarce rifle to be found today in it’s Military rimfire conversion configuration. The Kammerlader, or "chamber loader", was the first Norwegian breech-loading rifle, and among the very first breech loaders adopted for use by an armed force anywhere in the world. A single-shot black-powder rifle, the kammerlader was operated with a crank mounted on the side of the receiver. This made it much quicker and easier to load than the weapons previously used. Kammerladers quickly gained a reputation for being fast and accurate rifles and would have been a deadly weapon against massed ranks of infantry. The kammerlader was introduced in 1842, and it is thought that about 40,000 were manufactured until about 1870. While the first flintlock breech-loading rifles, such as the Ferguson, were launched decades before 1842 Norway was among the first European countries to introduce breech loaders on a large scale throughout its army and navy, although the United States had been the first in the world with the M1819 Hall rifle. ( See my example for sale) The Kammerladers were manufactured in several different models, and most models were at some point modified in some way or other. From 1842, until the Remington M1867 was approved in 1867, more than 40,000 Kammerladers in more than 80 different models were manufactured. In 1860 the calibre was reduced again, to four Swedish Liner, or about 11.77 mm. When some of the Kammerladers were modified to rimfire after 1867, this meant that the barrels had to be bored out to 12.17 mm to accept the new cartridge. During a military sharpshooting competition held in Belgium in 1861, the Kammerlader was proven to be among the most accurate military long arms in Europe. The Norwegian rifles were shown to be accurate to a range of about 1 km (0.6 mi), which is quite an achievement even by today's standards. After the introduction of the Remington M1867 and its rimfire cartridge in 1867, the Norwegian Army and the Royal Norwegian Navy decided to convert some of the stock of Kammerladers into rim fire rifles. There were two designs used for the modification: Landmarks and Lund’s. Neither can be considered completely successful, but both were cheaper, and quicker, than manufacturing new M1867s. It seems that the Norwegian Army preferred the Lund, while the Landmark was the option of choice for the Royal Norwegian Navy. For the Lund conversion, the chamber was replaced with a breechblock, and an extractor was mounted on the left side of the receiver. A chamber fitting the 12.17 x 44 mm rimfire cartridge was milled out of the rear part of the barrel. The right side of the receiver was lowered 6 mm and the bottom plate exchanged from a brass plate to a steel plate with a track for the extractor. The firing pin was curved to allow the hammer to strike it. This particular rifle is a Lund conversion and is an extremely scarce rifle to find as most were scrapped after the introduction of the Remington Army Rolling Block rifle in 1867. This rifle is mechanically sound with a good mechanism, no missing parts and good walnut stock with no cracks but plenty of evidence of use with the usual pressure dents and scratches. It is rare to find these converted rifles in any condition but this one is very good for the issue. Another interesting rifle.
Scarce model 1870 Comblain falling block rifle This is a rare find in the UK and is a Comblain falling block rifle as issued to the Brazilian Army in the 1870’s. This rifle was clearly issued as can be seen by the woodwork but the mechanical action is fine and it has not been messed with. The original cartouche is extant on the butt as seen in the photograph. The bore is clean with very heavy rifling. The M1870 Belgian Comblain was a falling-block rifle invented by Hubert-Joseph Comblain of Liège, Belgium and produced in several variants known as the Brazilian, Chilean or Belgian Comblain. The Brazilian models are easily identified by having a shorter breech than the Belgium models and have a shrouded hammer with screws on the left hand side of the receiver. W.W Greener wrote in Modern breechloaders: sporting and military in 1871 (page 214): "This rifle is called No.2, to distinguish it from the first Comblain, which is a modification of the Snider principle. The Comblain no 2 has the vertical sliding block and guard lever of the Sharp rifle; but the arrangement for exploding the cartridge is different. The mechanism of the lock is fixed in the breech block, which consists of the ordinary main-spring acting upon a tumbler by a swivel. The tumbler and striker are made in one piece; the scear and trigger are also in one piece . By depressing the lever the breech block is brought down, the cartridge-case extracted and the rifle is cocked. A fresh cartridge being inserted, and the lever returned, the rifle is ready for firing. Comblain Breech block. The hinge screw can be removed without the aid of a turnscrew, which arrangement allows the breech block and lock to be taken out for the purpose of cleaning. The breech arrangement is strong and simple. It is used by the Belgian volunteers,and has been severely tested both at Liege and Wimbledon." There is an 82 page article on Comblain rifles in the 2004 Gun Report magazine which ran over 4 issues and a book on the subject published by Jonathan Kirton in 2106. These are interesting rifles and deserve a place in history alongside many of the better known single shot rifles of the time such as Martini, Snider, Remington and Albini.
Scarce Webley Mark 1 .177 Air Rifle circa 1925 Webley Mark 1 air rifles are scarce if not rare and particularly in this condition. The rifle was only manufactured between 1925 and 1932 and the quantity manufactured was only circa 1500. This rifle’s serial number is under 500 so a relatively early one. In his excellent book Webley Air Rifles 1925 – 2005, Christopher Thrale makes the point that the rifle was handmade and consequently there are considerable variations. This particular rifle was electro etched and this finish was notorious for fading and rubbing and whilst the famous Webley flying bullet logo is visible on the breech block and the patent dates are visible these are faded as can be seen. This particular rifle features a whole trigger guard as some had a hole for a trigger adjustment screw as seen on the Mark 1 air pistol. Overall condition of this scarce rifle is excellent and it has wonderful eye appeal. There is a tiny heel repair on the butt and I am not 100% convinced it is a repair as it could be ink but I will bring it to attention. The rest of the wood is good; metalwork is fine with much original finish and no pitting. This small rifle was no match for the larger BSA and was replaced with the popular Service Mark 2 rifle. This rifle would be the pride of any serious Webley air weapons collection and is seldom encountered.
Set of 4 Orme Shooting Prints of Early 19th Century Shoots This is a set of early 19th Century Shooting Prints which I assume are a Facsimile of Orme’s Collection of British Field Sports Illustrated published in 1807 by Edward Orme that appeared in only one edition. I cannot see that they would be original so describe and sell them as high quality facsimiles although they are at least 60 years old. I could only discern if they were original if I break open the frames. The prints depict Snipe, Duck, Partridge and Grouse shooting. This is the description of them on the basis that they are facsimiles. Printed by W. S. Cowell Ltd, Suffolk England (no reference on prints) Publisher of Facsimiles: Charles Traylen, Antiquarian Book Seller Medium: Printed in eight colours by offset lithograph as an exact facsimile that is exquisite. Printed on heavy, light cream stock Circa of facsimile: 1955-1957 Size: Sheet: 21 ¾” x 17 ½” Image: Approximate 17 ¾” x 12 ¾” Overall size 22.1/2” x 18” Condition: Prints Excellent, Frames dusty very minor knocks some internal loose dust on one image. The light copy attributes such as printer to His Majesty etc. are perfectly legible on the prints but not discernible on my photographs. Prints are bright and clean and on some images are reflections on the glass which are not evident on the print particularly on the Grouse shooting print. On the partridge shooting print the white circle obscuring part of a tree is a black powder cloud and not a flaw! These are interesting objects of curiosity from a bygone age and capture the moments perfectly. Substitute modern breech loaders and a Barbour jacket for the muzzle loaders and top hats and you have images of a shooting heritage that has endured for more than 200 years. Long may this remain! This set would enhance any home or gunroom. Price includes overnight courier. Add a thousand pounds to my price if they prove original!
Sharps Capping Breech Loading Rifle USA Civil War Era Sharps Civil War Era capping breech loading rifle. This is a very decent example of a scarce rifle that achieved legendary status during the US Civil War and was the origin of the term “Sharpshooter”. This particular example has an excellent bore, good woodwork and functions flawlessly. The production of these rifles was limited because of the high cost so any extant examples are scarce. The military Sharps rifle was a falling block rifle used during and after the American Civil War in multiple variations. Along with being able to use a standard percussion cap, the first pattern Sharps had a fairly unusual pellet primer feed. This was a device which held a stack of pelleted primers and flipped one over the nipple each time the trigger was pulled and the hammer fell - making it much easier to fire a Sharps from horseback than a gun employing individually loaded percussion caps. The Sharps Rifle was produced by the Sharps Rifle Manufacturing Company in Hartford, Connecticut. It was used in the Civil War by multiple Union units, most famously by the U.S. Army Marksman, known popularly as "Berdan's Sharpshooters" in honour of their leader Hiram Berdan. The Sharps made a superior sniper weapon of greater accuracy than the more commonly issued muzzle-loading rifled muskets. This was due mainly to the higher rate of fire of the breech loading mechanism and superior quality of manufacture, as well as the ease of which it could be reloaded from a kneeling or prone position. At this time however, many officers were distrustful of breech-loading weapons on the grounds that they would encourage men to waste ammunition. In addition, the Sharps Rifle was expensive to manufacture (three times the cost of a muzzle-loading Springfield rifle) and so only 11,000 of the Model 1859s were produced. Most were unissued or given to sharpshooters, but the 13th Pennsylvania Reserves (which still carried the old-fashioned designation of a "rifle regiment") carried them until being mustered out in 1864. This is a very good example of a very sought after rifle.
Slocum Sliding Cylinder Revolver The "Slocum" revolver manufactured by the Brooklyn Arms company was an interesting revolver developed to avoid the Smith & Wesson Rollin White patent on bored through cylinders. In advertisements of the time it was advertised as being "easier than any other revolver to load in the dark". I think this takes a little imagination to believe!. Brooklyn Arms seemed to specialise in oddball revolvers to avoid patent litigation and this is probably the oddest of them all but yet an interesting design that sold in thousands. Less than 10,000 Slocum revolvers were manufactured from 1863 to 1864. It is a 5 shot, .32 caliber, rim fire front (side) loader. It has a 3" round barrel, a brass frame with a blued barrel and cylinder. It is 9½" overall. It has a spur trigger, irregularly shaped bag-like handle with 2 piece walnut grips, much original varnish remaining. It is of unique design with individual chambers in the form of sliding tubes within cut-outs on the cylinder. At half cock the cylinder rotates freely and on moving a small lever, the chambers slide forward, one at a time, over a fixed rod on the right side to expose, load and eject. The barrel marking is "B. A. Co. PATENT APRIL 14, 1863", on the top, in a single line. The serial number "8421" is stamped on the bottom front of the frame. Slocum revolvers are found silver and nickel plated, plain brass and with a variety of engraving which would indicate that "specials" were made to order. This particular revolver has superb bluing and this appears to be original, the top barrel engraving showing crisp and clear. There is an up and coming article on these revolvers in the next few months in a collectors journal. A fine revolver.
Smith and Wesson Model 1.1/2 revolver civil war era Civil War era Smith & Wesson model 1.1/2 in 32 rimfire. Mechanically sound and solid example, some external pitting as can be seen but a decent example for the money.
Snider Mark 11 riflle Unlike the Snider Mk 111 which was manufactured from scratch, the Mk 11 was manufactured by adapting the best of stock of the pattern P1853 and P1858 rifles with a Snider breech. Firing a massive .577" lead bullet from a brass cartridge case the Snider bridged the gap between muzzle loading and metallic breech loading rifles of which the Martini-Henry found acceptance in a relatively short time. This particular rifle was converted by B.S.A and has a good bore but the evidence of military use is clear, this one didn't stay at home in a reserves barracks!
Snider Mark 11 riflle This is a very decent Snider Mk11* not the best I have sold but a good example nevertheless. Good bore and good walnut stock with no cracks and in good condition with the exception of a small chip next to the butt plate ( could be easily filled) No major pitting and complete with original ramrod. This is not a Khyber pass copy but a British rifle with the appropriate British proofs and a good feature regarding provenance is that the butt plate has regiment stamps namely " 1 IB 8R 894 " 8r could be interpreted as the Kings Regiment or the Punjab regiment both who served in India and the lock plate indicates the rifle was issued to Colonial troops. This rifle has seen honest travel and could be improved on. Lock plate is dated 1862 but the conversion to Snider was made in 1867 as evidences by the proofs and date on the barrel. Brass ware has not been cleaned and is as found. Price includes overnight courier to your door.
Snider Short Rifle - Portuguese Contract This is an excellent Snider Rifle marked 1878 with an FA stamp indicating it was one of only 1200 manufactured and shipped to Portugal. At this time the British Army were adopting the Martini Henry rifle but Snider's were still being manufactured and exported all over the world. This rifle is mechanically excellent with a good bore and nice breach , no damage or repairs to the woodwork and as nice an example of a Snider short rifle as you would possibly see.
Snider Short Rifle Mk III This is a Snider Short Rifle or "Sergeants issue" with an Enfield lock dated 1860. The rifle is new to the market and has resided in a farm house for at least 125 years. Remarkably the rifle is completely untouched and has not been cleaned. Bore has strong rifling and is shootable but there is some pitting. The Stock has a contemporary crack on the left hand side which is not going anywhere and has some surface grime that needs cleaning. My customers know I will not touch anything to improve, that is down to the new owner. This is an Enfield Rifle whose numbers did not reach 5 figures and is a nice looking example. Mechanics are fine and cocks and locks well with a good let off and the breech chamber has none of the dinks and dents you usually see with a well used Snider, this has not been well used nor abused. There is a little metal rose behind the tang which I am researching as it looks like a pattern mark and I have not seen this before on a rifle. It looks as if it is a designation and not decoration. As with the Snider long rifle the MkIII short rifle was of new manufacture and not a refinished P53 and the barrel was marked "steel" designating its superiority and strength. With the new locking mechanism the breach of the rifle was stamped with the 'III' identification mark as would be normally expected, and was initially named 'Improved Action 1868'. The cleaning rod is round headed as issue. Pattern approval date: January 13th 1867 Price included TNT courier to your door.
Soper Rifle This is an excellent Soper rifle and one of the finest I\'ve seen. Bore is excellent and mechanics are perfect. Chambered for 450 Soper this is an obsolete calibre rifle. Reputed to be one of the fastest shooting rifles of it\'s time assisted by the rifle firing from a falling block, Sgt Warwick of the Berkshire Volunteers shot 60 shots in 60 seconds with a Soper rifle at the 1870 Olympia Exhibition. Soper was marred by bad luck and timing and there was a possibility at one time that this rifle could have replaced the Martini rifle by the British Army had Soper supplied an example early enough and made different business arrangements. See following an article from \"The Engineer\". It would appear that the author had partisan interest elsewhere! The Soper Rifle The Engineer, 13 December 1867 The rifle invented by Mr. W. Soper, of Reading, and illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, was one of the number sent for the recent competition at Woolwich, and was rejected on the ground of \"complication of breech arrangement.\" In this rifle the breech-piece is formed of a block of steel R, working freely up and down in a vertical slot at the rear of the barrel, and secured to a lever fixed at the bottom of the lock, which is placed in the center of the stock. The striker J is mounted inside the breech-piece, and works easily without any spring. The cock is also secured to the breech lever in such a manner that the breech-piece and cock are worked simultaneously. The attachment is effected by the swivel H, furnished with a projection and recess for working the extractor L, so that the one movement of drawing down the lever opens the breech, cocks the piece, and throws out the cartridge case. The trigger A is mounted on the lever, and has no connection with the sear E until the breech is placed home, and thus the rifle cannot be fired until the safety catch B is pressed. For cleaning purposes the lock and breech-piece can be removed by withdrawing a couple of screws. Fig. 3 shows a section of the rifling, the calibre being that of the service rifle. The trials of this rifle at Woolwich were satisfactory. For rapidity twelve rounds were fired in thirty-nine seconds with three mis-fires; the mean deviation of eight shots fired for accuracy from a shoulder rest at 500 yards, with Boxer cartridges, No. 3 pattern, was 2.30ft. Many excellent results have also since been obtained. Nevertheless we cannot but agree with the committee that the mechanism of the breech and lock is too complicated for a purely military weapon, and, moreover, that they were perfectly correct in doubting the value of the safety catch as a substitute of the ordinary half-cock. Mr. Soper has expended a great deal of ingenuity, and has produced a weapon which gives good results, but we think it cannot be denied that it is unsuitable for the use of the soldier. Breech-loaders V. Muzzle-loaders The Engineer, 6 August 1869 On Saturday, July 31st, a very interesting competition took place in the presence of Major Sir C.S.Paul Hunter, Bart., between Corporal Bainbridge and fourteen picked men of the battalion using long Enfield rifles and three men using the Soper direct-action breech-loader. The targets were similar to those for the file firing, but only half the usual size. Distance; 200 yards; time, three minutes. Each party to fire as rapidly as they please. The scores were as follows:- Enfield Rifles: 1st squad of five men, 84 points; 2nd squad of five men, 94 points; 3rd squad of five men, 94 points; total, 272. Soper’s breech-loader: Sergeant Soper, 140; Private Warrick, 138; Sergeant Gostage, 110; total, 388. Majority in favour of breech-loader, 116 points. It will thus be seen that two men with the breech-loader scored six points more than the fifteen men with the Enfield. Private Warrick having fired eighteen shots the first minute, twenty one the second, and seventeen the third, making a total of fifty-six shots in the three minutes; and Sergeant Soper having scored five bull’s-eyes before a single shot was got off by the squad opposed to him.
Spandau GEW 88 Rifle The Gewehr 88 (commonly called the Model 1888 Commission Rifle) was a late 19th century German bolt action rifle, adopted in 1888. The invention of smokeless powder in the late 19th century immediately rendered all of the large-bore black powder rifles then in use obsolete. To keep pace with the French (who had adopted smokeless powder "small bore" ammunition for their Lebel Model 1886 rifle) the Germans adopted the Gewehr 88 using its own new M/88 cartridge, which was also designed by the German Rifle Commission. The rifle was one of many weapons in the arms race between the Germanic states and France, and with Europe in general. There was also a carbine version, the Karabiner 88. Later models were updated (Gewehr 88/05 and Gewehr 88/14) and would go on to serve in World War I to a limited degree. Unlike many of the rifles before and after, it was not developed by Mauser but the Arms Commission, and Mauser was one of the few major arms manufacturers in Germany that did not produce Gewehr 88s This particular rifle was manufactured by Spandau Arsenal in 1890 and is stamped "S" to indicate that it was manufactured to take the new S Patronen cartridge which was loaded with a new 8.20 mm (.323 in) 9.9 g (154 gr) spitzer bullet and more powerful double-base smokeless powder. The United States military followed a similar chambering modernization process from 30-03 to 30-06 Springfield. The rifle has a plethera of unit markings and was nitro proofed by the Birmingham proof House in 2013. This was the forerunner to the Gew 98 and the Mauser K98. This is a nice looking example with a good shooting bore of a rifle that is now getting scarce. The bayonet is not sold with this rifle and is shown for interest only. This is a Section One Firearm.
Spectacular Daw Revolver. This Daw patent revolver is of the highest quality and condition and was sourced from the estate of an English revolver connoisseur who had collected revolvers for more than 60 years and had a predilection for Daw revolvers. This 54 bore example is mechanically perfect and still retains most of its colour. I doubt if this revolver could be bettered. George H. Daw first went into the firearms manufacturing and retailing business in 1851 as a partner in Witton, Daw & Company, located at 82 Old Broad Street in London. John Sergeant Witton had established himself as a London Gunmakers in 1835 and had worked under his own name until this partnership was established. In 1853 the firm moved to a new location at 57 Threadneedle Street, and in 1854 was renamed Witton & Daw, dropping the “& Co”. In 1860 George Daw took over the firm, changing the name to George Henry Daw (or simply G.H. Daw) and operating under that name 1880, when it was changed to G.H. Daw & Co. The firm remained in business in a number of locations through at least 1889, and may have remained active as late as 1892, but it is not clear if this “Daw Gun Company” had originated with original Daw business. Daw is probably most famous, although rarely remembered for, the introduction of modern “Boxer Primed” centrefire ammunition to Great Britain in 1861. Daw acquired the British patent rights to the French patent of Francois Schneider, whose design had been further improved by Clement Pottet. Unfortunately, the French patentees did not keep their patent rights in force in France, thus removing any protection that Daw had acquired by buying their rights for patent in England. He was sued by Eley Brothers, the largest ammunition manufacturer in England, and it was found that since the French rights no longer protected the patentees, they had no rights to sell to Daw, leaving him with no protection in England. Although Daw lost his case (and his investment in the patent rights), he was still directly responsible for bringing easily reloadable, modern centre fire ammunition to England. Daw’s greatest financial successes in the gun making business would come in the post-percussion era, with his manufacture of high quality cartridge revolvers, rifles and shotguns. An interesting and spectacular classic English revolver.
Spencer of London 20 bore travelling pistol, Good travelling double barrelled 20 bore travelling pistol by Spencer of London. Excellent condition with most original condition. Crisp locks and good bore. A real manstopper !
Splendid Manhattan Arms Company Navy Revolver 36 calibre. This is one of the nicest Manhattan Arms Company revolvers it has been my privilege to offer. The Manhattan Arms Company revolvers were ostensibly copies of Colt revolvers but with improvements. The Manhattan revolvers featured a positive lug safety stop that engaged the hammer between cylinders unlike the Colt safety pins that could slip or wear. The cylinder scenes are normally better than Colt as they had perfected cold roll stamping to a fine art. This revolver is a 5 shot Series IV model .36 calibre pocket revolver with the desirable 6.5" barrel featuring a superb cylinder scene, great mechanics and clean bore. The revolver has some remaining colour in spots and very crisp edges that have never been polished and much of the original varnish on the grips is extant. This is a splendid example of a revolver that was used in the USA Civil War and well thought of. Although underestimated for years, the Manhattan revolvers are rapidly gaining recognition and values are accelerating. A lovely example for any collection that would be difficult to better. The Manhattan Fire Arms Manufacturing Co. was founded by a group of New Jersey businessmen in 1856. Their goal was to take advantage of Colt's patent for revolving firearms that was due to expire in 1857. The founders hired Thomas Bacon to become the Superintendent of Manufacturing. Manufacturing began in Norwich, Connecticut and in 1859 moved to Newark, New Jersey. Thomas Bacon remained in Norwich and started his own firearms company. During their existence, Manhattan Firearms produced approximately 175,000 pistols. Only Colt, Remington, and Winchester produced more guns during this era in which included the Civil War. While waiting for Colt's patent to expire, Manhattan first made copies of American firearms that no longer had patent protection. These included pepper boxes and various single-shot designs. Shortly thereafter, they turned their attention to making Colt-style revolvers in both the .31 calibre Pocket and .36 calibre Navy styles. Manhattan patented an extra set of cylinder safety notches on these models. Manhattans can be easily identified by the many notches on their cylinders as demonstrated by this example. After the Civil War, Manhattan production primarily consisted of a copy of the Smith & Wesson .22 calibre cartridge revolver and a single-shot boot pistol under the name "HERO". Manhattan changed its name in 1868 to American Standard Tool Company and began to market industrial tools as well as firearms. American Standard Tool closed during the financial panic of 1873.Manhattan Firearms also manufactured guns under the trade names "Hero", "London Pistol Company", and "American Standard Tool". To learn about Manhattan Firearms read the book by Waldo E Nutter ( Who wouldn't buy a book by an author named Waldo Nutter!)
Springfield Trapdoor 45/70 original mould This is a very good condition mould for a Springfield Government issue "Trapdoor" rifle marked 45/70 Gov. The bullet is of the postler design and has two lubricating cannelures. Cast weight is 405 gn. Ignore the bullet in the photograph, this was cast in a cold mould for curiosity hence the frosting. An essential accoutrement for a vintage Trapdoor.
Starr Double Action Revolver Civil War issue. The Starr revolver was advanced and ahead of its time when introduced at the start of the US Civil War. The first revolvers issued to the US Federal Army were double action and employed a unique "lifting lever" to cock the hammer and revolve the cylinder. Eben T. Starr obtained his initial patent in 1856 and the patent date is stamped on both sides of the revolver. In his patent Starr claimed two unique features to his design: a “lifter lever” which looks exactly like a traditional revolver trigger and a real sear-releasing trigger which is the triangular-looking metal projection at the rear of the trigger guard. In short, pulling the trigger-looking "lifter lever" of a Starr double action revolver only rotates the cylinder and brings the hammer to full cock. In fact, you must use the "lifter lever." You cannot thumb cock the hammer of a double-action Starr. In reality there are many similarities in design to the British Adams "automatic" or self- cocking revolver. At the point of raising the hammer, you have a choice to make. You can either continue pulling back the lifter lever until it contacts the small, projecting trigger at the rear of the trigger guard and fires the piece, or you can remove your finger from the lifter lever and place your finger behind the lifter lever and directly on the little, projecting trigger and fire the piece. You cannot simply pull back the hammer of a double action Starr revolver like a conventional single action revolver, the lifting lever has to be used in a deliberate manner. Starr also mortised the top frame of the revolver and this gave the revolver incredible robustness and durability and was the predecessor of modern top break revolvers. The top breaking frame secured by one large knurled cross screw allowed rapid disassembly of the firearm for cleaning and maintenance and also for loading spare cylinders. The elaborate cocking mechanism however frustrated Federal troops who were used to pulling back the hammers of single action Colt and Remington Army revolvers and the government asked Starr to manufacture his revolver in single action which I am sure he considered being a retrograde step but he did comply. More than 32,000 single action .44 Starr revolvers were then manufactured which together with the 23,000 double action revolvers such as this example, made Starr the third most popular revolver in the Civil war the most popular revolvers being Colt and Remington. Starr also manufactured a popular carbine. I usually pass Starr revolvers by because they are often seen with badly pitted bores even if the exterior looks good. I could not pass this one by as it has a perfect bore, sharp and mirror bright and functions as it was originally made. Clearly it was cherished as a "shooting iron" and someone took the trouble to clean and maintain it after shooting. The revolver cocks and locks fine and is mechanically sound. If I wanted to shoot a Civil War revolver this would probably be the one. The overall condition of the revolver is excellent as can be seen from the photographs, there are no messed up screws or "later editions". The revolver has several matching serial numbers. There are several military acceptance marks and three crisp cartouches on the walnut grips. There is a considerable level of original finish making this one of the best I've handled. The Starr was considered the workhorse revolver of the Federal Army and was well made, better I consider than Colt or Remington. This is a quintessential Civil War Sidearm that has much eye appeal and has clearly seen action but was subsequently looked after. A good piece.
Starr Single Action Revolver USA Civil War This is a very good Starr single action revolver that was undoubtedly used in the American Civil War by Federal forces. The revolver cocks and locks properly and is a handsome example of one of the “workhorses” used in one of the most dreadful conflicts in relatively modern history. Although there is no original finish, the revolver has an even patina that has mellowed over time. Starr revolvers were the third-most popular handguns purchased for use by Federal military forces. The earlier double-action Model 1858 Army Revolver, with its six-inch barrel, was later replaced by the less expensive single-action Model 1863 Army Revolver, with its eight-inch barrel. Approximately 32,000 Model 1863 revolvers were manufactured between 1863 and 1865. Of these, about 25,000 were purchased under contract by the U.S. government. The Starr’s were the only American-made revolver produced during the Civil War that was available in both single- and double-action models. It is reported that the Federal Army put pressure on Starr to manufacture a single action revolver as it was felt that the double action revolver was too prone to stoppages and failure. The serial number of this revolver is 29150 and the fact that it was a Martial issue is evidenced by the Inspectors initials that are still discernible on the walnut grips. This six-shot, single-action revolver has an eight-inch round barrel rifled with six grooves, a cylinder 1 7/8 inches long, weighs three pounds, has a total length of 13 3/4 inches. Its cylinder is removed in the same manner as in the double-action Starr’s. This is easy to accomplish by removing the large screw on the right hand side of the lock plate. It is stamped on the right side of its frame "STARR'S PATENT JAN 15, 1856." and on the left side of its frame "STARR. ARMS. Co. NEW. YORK" with the serial number stamped on the cylinder. This is an iconic revolver that would be an essential part of any USA Civil War arms collection.
Stevens 25-20 Single shot target rifle The Stevens Arms company was established in 1864 by Joshua Stevens. As these rifles are uncommon in the UK, here is some history particularly in relation to this superb rifle. Of interest is the fact that Stevens introduced the ubiquitous .22 LR cartridge. Beginning in 1880, the company began making falling block rifles. These, though less well known than Ballard or Winchester firearms, were of comparable quality. They were priced lower than those of Ballard or Winchester, making the Stevens' falling block models competitive in the marketplace. Under names like Favorite, Little Scout, Crack Shot, and Marksman, Stevens sold millions of reliable single-shots. The total number of single-shot firearms manufactured by the company exceeded 3.5 million by 1892. In addition, in 1887, Stevens developed the .22 LR round, which served as an introductory caliber for children for decades, as well as being very popular for plinking, as well as varmint and target shooting. The .22LR cartridge was available beginning in 1888, in the #1, #2, #9, and #10 break-top rifles, and in their New Model Pocket and Bicycle rifles. The .22 LR would outperform other Stevens rounds, such as the .25 Stevens and .25 Stevens Short, designed as competitors, and offered in models such as the lever action single-shot Favorite (produced between 1894 and 1935) and the Crack Shot #15 (introduced in 1900) As several manufacturers would later do with other wildcats, Stevens adopted the .25-20, developed by Francis J. Rabbeth in 1882. The unpopularity of the bottlenecked case led Stevens to develop the .25-21 in 1897. Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry, the .21-21 Stevens was essentially a shortened version of the company's own .25-25 of 1895 This particular rifle is chambered and stamped 25-20 and is exceptionally accurate. The rifle is shown with an example cartridge and these are available and reloadable should you wish to place this antique obsolete calibre on a Firearms Certificate. This rifle has a mint bore, virtually all its original finish, case hardening on the receiver, correct tang site and is just overall a splendid rifle and virtually impossible to better.
Stevens Crack Shot Take Down Rifle This is another outstanding Stevens take down rifle in obsolete 32 short calibre. This is the model known as the "Crack Shot" and was the equivalent of a British Rook and Rabbit rifle but was also used for hunting deer as it was an inexpensive cartridge. This may sound irresponsible to us but it is reckoned that more deer were short with .22 RF in the USA at the turn of the last century than any other cartridge which begins to make .32 calibres positively humane! This particular rifle is in outstanding condition and features a reasonable bore, excellent woodwork and undamaged butt plate.There is a large amount of the original case colour remaining on the receiver as can be seen. It is unusual to find these "crack shots" in such exemplary condition. The rifle can be taken down in seconds and unlike the other rifles in this series, this rifle has a manual extractor lever that can be seen on the right hand side of the receiver. Stevens Arms was founded by Joshua Stevens with help from backers W.B. Fay and James Taylor in Chicopee Falls, MA, in 1864 as J. Stevens & Co. Their earliest product was a tip-up action single shot pistol. In that same year, the company produced a tip-up shotgun with approximately 24 gauge as the cartridge (.66" in diameter and 2.45" long). Business was slow into 1870, when Stevens occupied a converted grist mill and had just sixty employees. The 1873 Panic had a further negative impact on sales. By 1876 the company had recovered to the extent that it was then manufacturing twice the number of shotguns as it had been prior to that year. In 1886, the company was reorganized and incorporated as J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. The business was able to grow steadily with tool manufacturing and sales now accounting for the bulk of the business output, Beginning in 1880, the company began making falling block rifles. These, though less well known than Ballard or Winchester firearms, were of comparable quality. They were priced lower than those of Ballard or Winchester, making the Stevens' falling block models competitive in the marketplace. Under names like Favorite such as this rifle, Little Scout, Crack Shot, and Marksman, Stevens sold millions of reliable single-shots. The total number of single-shot firearms manufactured by the company exceeded 3.5 million by 1892. In addition, in 1887, Stevens developed the .22 LR round, which served as an introductory calibre for children for decades, as well as being very popular for plinking, as well as varmint and target shooting. The .22LR cartridge was available beginning in 1888, in the #1, #2, #9, and #10 break-top rifles, and in their New Model Pocket and Bicycle rifles. The .22 LR would outperform other Stevens rounds, such as the .25 Stevens and .25 Stevens Short, designed as competitors, and offered in models such as the lever action single-shot Favorite (produced between 1894 and 1935) and the Crack Shot #15 (introduced in 1900). This is an outstanding rifle and would make an excellent choice addition to any Rook and Rabbit rifle collection. Price includes door to door insured courier.
Stevens Favourite Rifle in 25 Stevens Calibre. Another really good example of a Stevens Favourite or Boys rifle in 25 Stevens Calibre. Good Bore, wood and metalwork and difficult to better this pleasing looking little rifle. I will include an inert 25 Stevens calibre round for display purposes.This is a take down rifle and disassembles in seconds.
Stevens Model 44 series Target Rifle with optional long barrel Stevens Arms was founded by Joshua Stevens with help from backers W.B. Fay and James Taylor in Chicopee Falls, MA, in 1864 as J. Stevens & Co. Their earliest product was a tip-up action single shot pistol. Business was slow into 1870, when it occupied a converted grist mill and had just sixty employees. The 1873 Panic had a further negative impact on sales. By 1876 the company had recovered to the extent that it was then manufacturing twice the number of shotguns as it had been prior to that year. In 1886, the company was reorganized and incorporated as J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. The business was able to grow steadily with tool manufacturing and sales now accounting for the bulk of the business output. Beginning in 1880, the company began making falling block rifles. These, though less well known than Ballard or Winchester firearms, were of comparable quality. They were priced lower than those of Ballard or Winchester, making the Stevens' falling block models competitive in the marketplace. Under names like Favourite, Little Scout, Crack Shot, and Marksman, Stevens sold millions of reliable single-shots. The total number of single-shot firearms manufactured by the company exceeded 3.5 million by 1892. In addition, in 1887, Stevens developed the .22 LR round which served as an introductory calibre for children for decades, as well as being very popular for plinking, as well as varmint and target shooting. The .22LR cartridge was available beginning in 1888, in the #1, #2, #9, and #10 break-top rifles, and in their New Model Pocket and Bicycle rifles. The .22 LR would outperform other Stevens rounds, such as the .25 Stevens and .25 Stevens Short, designed as competitors, and offered in models such as the lever action single-shot Favourite (produced between 1894 and 1935) and the Crack Shot #15 (introduced in 1900). As several manufacturers would later do with other wildcats, Stevens adopted the .25-20, developed by Francis J. Rabbeth in 1882. The unpopularity of the bottlenecked case led Stevens to develop the .25-21 in 1897. Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry, the .21-21 Stevens was essentially a shortened version of the company's own .25-25 of 1895 (This is an odd reversal of the relationship of the .38 S&W Special to the .357 Magnum.) The .25-25 would be used in Stevens' model 44 and the model 44½ rifles manufactured from 1903. This particular rifle is a series 44 target rifle in 25/20 centre fire calibre and has a 34.1/2” barrel which is the longest barrel Stevens ever manufactured and is seldom encountered. The rifle is fitted with a contemporary Marble tang site and is in excellent condition with a good bore. Should you wish to place this on firearms certificate ammunition is available. You can see examples of the round on one of the photographs and I would be happy to supply an inert round to a collector who did not wish to shoot the rifle. Stevens and Taylor was bought out in 1896 by I.H. Page, who was one of the new partners and the bookkeeper. Page led the company to significant growth, such that by 1902 Stevens had 900 employees and was considered one of the top sporting firearms manufacturers in the world. In 1915, Stevens led the U.S. arms business in target and small game guns. Stevens’ military productions and offerings were generally limited to prototypes in an attempt to garner military contracts. I have other Stevens in stock and can supply breech blocks for centre fire conversion to license holders.
Stevens New Pocket Rifle circa 1870 In Kenneth Cope’s excellent book on Steven pistols and pocket rifles he states that Joshua Stevens lived and worked amongst the greatest names in guns including Colt, Whitney, the Allens, the Warners the Wessons and many others. Stevens was not primarily an inventor but a toolmaker and was credited with many patents and improvements in gun making and he was highly prized by many arms companies. He was also an astute business man and started a company with only two products at a particularly bad time in history for gun making at the end of the Civil War which went on to become one of the largest gun makers in America eventually evolving into the Savage Arms Company. Many generalise in naming Stevens pistols as “tip ups” but in reality Stevens only made one model classified as a “tip up” and sixteen other variants that varied in quality and purpose. This particular pistol is a medium frame New Model Pocket Rifle with a 10” part octagon barrel and is chambered in 32 rimfire. The pistol has walnut grips and a clean bore and is stamped with the makers name and a patent date of 1864. I can supply an inert round with the pistol for display purposes. The pistol is in NRA very good condition with most of the nickel plating remaining as can be seen with a small patch of nickel loss on the left hand side of the receiver plate. These pistols have a female dovetail in the butt to facilitate the fitting of a wire stock to allow off shoulder shooting. All Stevens pistols have either nickel plated brass receivers and blue barrels or have a fully blued finish. Some were made with silver plating but none were made in unplated brass or were wholly nickelled such pistols have either been stripped or fully plated at a later date.
Stevens New Pocket Rifle circa 1872 This is a seldom encountered Stevens New Model Pocket Rifle First Issue model in 32 calibre. These interesting little "rifles" were only manufactured for three years between 1872 and 1875 and although it reported that 8000 were manufactured this is unlikely because of the recession and business slump in America at the time. This model was manufactured with a heavier frame than the first model which allowed it to handle a heavier cartridge such as the .32 calibre long and short. The New Model Pocket rifle was fitted with a shoulder stock which slotted into a groove in the butt and was numbered to the gun as this one is. The pistol was made in several barrel lengths and this is the longest barrel length made which is 18” long. This is an attractive little pistol with much original finish remaining and a good bore. The grips are rosewood and in good order. The Shoulder stock has literally no nickel remaining so this was either never there to start with or had been deliberately removed. The manufacturers name, address and patent dates are crisply stamped into the side of the receiver. There are numerous Stevens rifles and pistols to collect and their history and use is a fascinating subject. For further details see the excellent book “Stevens pistols and pocket rifles” by Kenneth L Cope.
Stevens offhand target pistol model 35 in 25 Stevens rimfire. In Kenneth Cope’s excellent book on Steven pistols and pocket rifles he states that Joshua Stevens lived and worked among the greatest names in guns including Colt, Whitney, the Allens, the Warners the Wessons and many others. Stevens was not primarily an inventor but a toolmaker and was credited with many patents and improvements in gun making and he was highly prized by many arms companies. He was also an astute business man and started a company with only two products at a particularly bad time in history for gun making at the end of the Civil War which went on to become one of the largest gun makers in America eventually evolving into the Savage Arms Company. Many generalise in naming Stevens pistols as “tip ups” but in reality Stevens only made one model classified as a “tip up” and sixteen other variants that varied in quality and purpose. This pistol is a “gem” with superb bluing, good bore and grips and absolutely tight action seeing little use. I have seldom seen a better Stevens. This particular model is the “Offhand target no 35” and production is estimated at only 35,000. The pistol has a 6” barrel, walnut grips with a nickel plated receiver and blued barrel. The pistol has a bead front sight and an elevation adjustable rear sight. It was manufactured between 1907 and 1916 and these models are sometimes passed off as the ultra rare Gould no 37 pistol but these were only made up to serial number 25,000 and as this pistol has a serial number past 25,000 it is definitely a model 35. The pistol was manufactured in 25 Stevens rimfire, now obsolete and highly collectible and I can supply an inert round with the pistol for display purposes. The pistol is in NRA “excellent “condition with 95% of the nickel plating remaining as can be seen and I doubt if it could be bettered. All Stevens pistols have either nickel plated brass receivers and blue barrels or have a fully blued finish. Some were made with silver plating but none were made in unplated brass or were wholly nickelled such pistols have either been stripped or fully plated at a later date. This is an interesting pistol of quality seldom seen for sale in the United Kingdom.
Stevens take down 1894 This is a Stevens Model 1894 4 screw sideplate take down rifle with a patent date of 1894 in 25- Stevens calibre. Stevens rifles are not uncommon as they were a prolific manufacturer but now becoming very popular. All of the removable side plate models are scarce. This one is completely untouched as found. The rifle cocks and fires and the take down is fine but the loading lever spring is slack and needs tightening or replacing and these parts are available. There is a small chip out of the heel of the butt but everything is there and with a little work it could be a nice example of a scarce little rifle.
Steyr Model 1886 Straight Pull Rifle Mannlicher Model 1886 rifles are scarce in obsolete 11.15mm x 55R calibre as smaller calibre rifles became popular very quickly and most of these rifles are encountered in 8mm calibre. The OEWG mark on the knox indicates they were made by Steyr. I have a choice of two rifles, one rifle is in "the white" and the other in a black parkerised finish for tropical use. One rifle has a sling and one has the safety removed which is commonplace. I know where there is a supply of these if needed. Both rifles can be shipped direct. The Repeating Rifle Model M1895, better known as the Mannlicher M1895 rifle is a bolt-action rifle, designed by Ferdinand Ritter von Mannlicher that used a refined version of his revolutionary straight-pull action bolt. It was nicknamed the Ruck-Zu(rü)ck (German slang for "back and forth") by Landser (a German term for "troops"). The M1895 is unusual in employing a straight-pull bolt action, as opposed to the more common rotating bolt-handle of other rifles. It consequently renowned for combining a high rate of fire (around 30–35 rounds per minute) with reliability and sturdiness, although this requires decent care and maintenance with an extractor that is vulnerable to breakage due to a lack of primary extraction. It was initially adopted and employed by the Austro-Hungarian Army throughout World War I, and retained post-war by both the Austrian and Hungarian armies. The main foreign user was Bulgaria, which, starting in 1903, acquired large numbers and continued using them throughout both world wars. After Austria-Hungary's defeat in World War I, many were given to other Balkan states as war reparations. Numbers of these rifles also saw use in World War II, particularly by second line, reservist, and partisan units in Romania, Yugoslavia, Italy, and to lesser degree, Germany. Post war many were sold as cheap surplus, with some finding their way to the hands of African guerrillas in the 1970s and many more being exported to the United States as sporting and collectible firearms. The M1895 bolt also served as an almost exact template for the ill-fated Canadian M1905 Ross rifle, though the later M1910 used a complicated interrupted-thread instead of two solid lugs. These are interesting 19th Century rifles. Obsolete calibre no license required.
Steyr Model 1895 Straight Pull Rifle ( Deactivated) The Repeating Rifle Model M1895, better known as the Mannlicher M1895 rifle is a bolt-action rifle, designed by Ferdinand Ritter von Mannlicher that used a refined version of his revolutionary straight-pull action bolt. It was nicknamed the Ruck-Zu(rü)ck (German slang for "back and forth") by Landser (a German term for "troops"). The M1895 is unusual in employing a straight-pull bolt action, as opposed to the more common rotating bolt-handle of other rifles. It consequently renowned for combining a high rate of fire (around 30–35 rounds per minute) with reliability and sturdiness, although this requires decent care and maintenance with an extractor that is vulnerable to breakage due to a lack of primary extraction. It was initially adopted and employed by the Austro-Hungarian Army throughout World War I, and retained post-war by both the Austrian and Hungarian armies. The main foreign user was Bulgaria, which, starting in 1903, acquired large numbers and continued using them throughout both world wars. After Austria-Hungary's defeat in World War I, many were given to other Balkan states as war reparations. Numbers of these rifles also saw use in World War II, particularly by second line, reservist, and partisan units in Romania, Yugoslavia, Italy, and to lesser degree, Germany. Post war many were sold as cheap surplus, with some finding their way to the hands of African guerrillas in the 1970s and many more being exported to the United States as sporting and collectible firearms. The M1895 bolt also served as an almost exact template for the ill-fated Canadian M1905 Ross rifle, though the later M1910 used a complicated interrupted-thread instead of two solid lugs. This particular rifle was originally manufactured by Steyr in 8mm x 50mmR but has been deactivated (pre 1995) and can be owned without a license as a collectible object. The rifle can be cocked and fired and stripped and is in excellent condition as can be seen from the photographs. I do not sell many deactivated weapons by choice but this came in and is an earlier deactivation and has the benefit of being exhibited without a license.
Stunning Enfield Snider Carbine dated 1870. This is a stunning five groove Enfield Snider Carbine dated 1870, the first year of issue. A real sleeper that has not been messed with. This is a Mark 111 with a steel marked barrel and improved breech lock and from the condition of the breech shoe and bore has seen very little action. There is considerable finish in the breech and the extractor is tight. The Carbine has much original finish and remarkably has the original cleaning rods extant in the butt housing as can be seen. Woodwork is excellent and the original Enfield ink cartouche is prominent as can be seen so the stock has not been cleaned. These Carbines were considered "pointable and accurate" and the 600 yard graduated rear sight was no optimistic fantasy and the rate of fire of dismounted cavalry using the Snider was formidable. This is a true Snider Carbine, not a conversion, it has no provision on the trigger guard for a snap cap chain and the large sling ring behind the trigger guard. The carbine has a plethora of WD stamps and proof marks including the cleaning rod and it has clearly been salted away to mature with decorum. I dare say the wood could be enhanced by steaming and oiling and it could be restored to museum quality but that's for someone else to decide. A decent honest carbine and as good as you will find.
STUNNING H W MORTIMER FLINTLOCK SAW-HANDLED DUELING PISTOL. Circa 1800. The name H W Mortimer really does not need any introduction from me. This is one of the finest pistols it has ever been my pleasure to handle and it exudes quality. This 67 calibre pistol has a 10″ Browned London twist straight octagonal barrel stamped with London Gunmakers proofs on bottom flat and engraved “H. W. Mortimer & Co. London GUN-MAKERS, To His MAJESTY.” on top flat, with through dovetailed barleycorn front sight. Patent breech has gold lined touch hole. Flower engraved breech iron has integral filed rear sight followed by Mortimer’s mark superbly executed into the metal. Case hardened lock with flat pan, and bridled friction frizzen, has serpentine chamfered cock. Cock and plate have engraved borders with radiant sprays of scroll. Gold escutcheon engraved “H. W. Mortimer & Co London” is inlaid in front of cock. Lock attaches with front fork and single pin through silver escutcheon. Trigger plate is mounted with blued set trigger. Charcoal blued trigger guard with single spur has stylized pineapple finial. Excellent walnut saw handled stock extends to muzzle and attaches to barrel with a key. Blued steel beaded ramrod pipe and thimble are nicely filed, and hold greenheart horn tipped ramrod. Stock is cleanly sculpted and has diamond wrap-around checkering with border at grip. The barrel retains nearly all of its original browning with dramatic definition to pattern as can be seen from the photographs. The bore is bright and clean and overall the pistol is in remarkable condition for an artefact that is more than 200 years old. Saw backed pistols are interesting in their own right and command high values but top grade examples from a pre-eminent maker such as Mortimer are seldom seen. Photographs simply do not do this pistol justice.
Super Marlin Model 1892 32/40 Calibre. This is an excellent Marlin Model 1892 sporting rifle with the scarce half octagonal half round barrel. The model 1892 was the solid frame cousin to the Marlin Model 1897 which went on to become the Model 39 which is still being manufactured today. This rifle is in obsolete 32/40 calibre with a bright bore and tight mechanics. Good woodwork and a pleasing patina and much original finish. One small patch of light pitting externally on the barrel where it was probably leaning against a dado rail but you need to look for it. The rifle is fitted with a tang sight and covered foresight adjustable for windage. One of the most attractive Marlins I’ve had for a while.
Superb 1st model Civil War Joslyn Carbine This superb Joslyn carbine is a First Model 1862 that used an innovative pivoting breechblock system invented and patented by Massachusetts gun designer Benjamin Franklin Joslyn in 1855. Under a June 1862 government contract, his firm, the Joslyn Fire Arms Company of Stonington, Connecticut, produced his first rimfire model carbine designated the Model 1862. Designed for field use with Federal horse soldiers, the Joslyn carbine fired a standard rimfire cartridge of .52 calibre. Joslyn’s unique loading arrangement consisted of lifting up the breechblock tab or hook, pivoting the breechblock to the left and then inserting the round. A hook-type friction latch for the breechblock and the exposed firing pin extension were characteristics of the Model 1862 Joslyn. An iteration of this type of breech block can be seen in the Werndl rifle and carbine produced in Europe after the Civil War. This particular carbine is in excellent condition and exhibits a pleasing appearance with a fine walnut stock and all brass mounted furniture, including the trigger guard, barrel band and butt plate. Carbine bears serial 3109 on top of the breechblock and on all matching components. All gunmetal wears a pleasing dark grey-coloured patina. The flat, casehardened lock plate is sharply stamped forward of the hammer with a sharp “JOSLYN FIREARMS Co / STONINGTON/ CONN”. Top surface of the hinged breechblock exhibits clean patent stampings “B.F. JOSLYN’S PATENT / OCTOBER 8TH, 1861 / JUNE 1862 / 3109”. The bore is excellent as is the wood fit to metal and there are outstanding military cartouches extant. The easy way to differentiate between the rare first model and the commoner second model is that the first model has brass furniture. Most of these carbines were converted to centre fire after the Civil War and had extensive use in the Indian Wars. It is uncommon to find an unconverted first model and for a collector of Civil War Carbines it would be difficult to improve on this outstanding carbine.
Superb and rare cased Military Webley Longspur Revolver A SUPERB CASED 48-BORE JAMES WEBLEY PATENT 'LONGSPUR' (THIRD MODEL) FIVE-SHOT SINGLE-ACTION PERCUSSION REVOLVER RETAILED BY WEBLEY, SERIAL NO. 1374, CIRCA 1854 With blued octagonal sighted barrel muzzle and cut with three groove rifling, blued barrel wedge, case-hardened cylinder engraved with a band of foliage at the front edge and numbered from one to five, border and scroll engraved blued frame signed 'WEBLEY'S PATENT' within a ribbon on the large shaped inspection plate, case-hardened scroll engraved hammer and rammer, the former with chequered spur and the latter with blued retaining-clip, blued border engraved serial numbered grip-strap signed 'BY HER MAJESTY'S ROYAL LETTERS PATENT', blued border and scroll engraved trigger-guard and butt-cap, the latter with lanyard ring, and well figured chequered walnut grips, retaining most of its original finish throughout. Birmingham proof marks, in original fitted military oak case lined in green baize with accessories including a fine Dixon flask, a brass single-cavity 'WD' bullet mould, a combined loading rod and worm with attachable jag, Japanned percussion cap tin with Joyce label, and ivory handled turn-screw and nipple-wrench, original cloth bag of cast bullets and lubricating paste. the exterior with vacant shaped brass escutcheon and brass corner protectors. The revolver is in fine mechanical order and a complete set of accessories is present. The lanyard ring and military style case would indicate a military purchase. At this time British Officers were required to purchase their own sidearms and this revolver was manufactured at the time of the Crimean War. The bluing is vibrant and contemporary. There is some loss of silver plating on the grip strap and one side plate as indicated and there are two burns on the lid of the case that my gunsmith says could be restored. The flask has some dents but not evident when present in the case. Overall a very attractive, rare and handsome looking set and an iconic revolver for a classic revolver collector. The Longspur was short lived as the hammer although aesthetic was prone to damage which rendered the revolver inoperable as a single action mechanism.
Superb Cased Colt 1878 revolver with provenance Probably the finest Colt 1878 available in the UK today, this revolver has provenance, a Colt Factory Letter and is quite exceptional. The revolver is chambered in 476 Eley, a popular British calibre at the time and the revolver was sold to a British Army Officer who later distinguished himself. This particular Colt was sent in a batch of 12 revolvers to London on May 10th 1887 and this batch suffered some slight surface rust as a result of the tin soldered container they were shipped in leaking. Colt's agent at the Pall Mall office (Frederick van Oppen) had the batch refinished in England by a London Gunmaker so technically this is a refinished gun although refinished in 1887! This is well documented in Don Wilkinson's book on the Colt 1878 on pages 344-347. I have never seen such a nice example. The gun was sold to Captain G Makin of the Kings Royal Rifles ( Leather Case named to him ) who had a distinguished career and earned a medal with three battle clasps in the Boer War including the Defence of Ladysmith and Laings Nek and was made a MVO. ( Member of the Victorian Order). Sadly he was killed in 1918 during the Great War. The case also contains the original shipping label to Makin. Rock Island sold a nice one of these uncased in December for $10,550 but of course it lacked any provenance such as this example. The revolver is simply vibrant with a beautiful finish, perfect grips and flawless action. Quite simply the best. I can arrange viewing at various Arms fairs such as Birmingham by appointment to Section 7 collector license holders only. Private sale FAC to FAC.
Superb Cased Colt London Navy Revolver. This is a very good cased Colt Navy Revolver in 36 calibre manufactured in the London factory and stamped as such with British proofs. At this level the set would be difficult to better. The gun has a crisp action with a bright bore and much original finish. There is a very good cylinder scene with the silver plating extant on the trigger guard. The set is in the correct British case and contains the correct accessories including a Colt Navy stamped powder flask. The quality of the accessories is commensurate with the quality of the revolver and this is an exceptional set that has not been “improved”. Colt believed that his London factory was the most important expansion of his business because of the potential sales throughout the British Empire and it is said that the examples made in the London factory were superior to those made in the USA factories. To research Colt London revolvers read Rosa’s seminal work – Colonel Colt of London. Superior finish on Colt London revolvers included domed head screws, better cross hatching on the hammer and enhanced silver plating on the trigger guard. It is little known or advertised that Colt’s British aspirations were destroyed when he was caught smuggling Colt Navy revolvers to Britain’s enemy - Russia at the height of the Crimean War and became persona non grata to the British Government. Colt closed his London factory never to manufacture in the United Kingdom again.
Superb Fordham and Wadsworth This is a beautiful little Forehand & WadSworth "Russian 32" model in obsolete 32 RF calibre. This revolver is in near NRA Excellent condition and would be difficult to improve on. Mechanically perfect I doubt if it was ever fired. These little revolvers are escalating in value as collectors appreciate their true worth in American history and the quality of manufacture. The price of this revolver includes a pistol glove and courier delivery to your door. No license required.
Superb Martial Peabody Centrefire Rifle This is an extraordinarily beautiful rifle and the finest looking Peabody I have seen for a long time. The rifle rates at over 90% and has all of the original case hardening on the receiver extant and the fine walnut stock is unblemished and still exhibits the original military inspector’s cartouche so clearly this stock has never dealt with anything more than a cloth. The bore of the rifle rates 100% and is shiny with pronounced rifling and the mechanics are perfect. The original cleaning rod still accompanies the rifle and this is a difficult item to replace if lost. The stamping of the manufacturer is clear and the rear sight is as issued. This is not the usual rim fire rifle normally encountered but is chambered for 43 Spanish centrefire calibre. I do not believe this rifle was ever shot in anger and is as issued! There is a very fine small hairline crack at the top of the receiver which looks more like a scratch and I believe that this rifle could have been rejected on final military inspection hence its outstanding condition. I would not advocate firing this rifle if it were to be added to a firearms certificate unless it was proofed. Nevertheless as an example of a pivotal rifle in firearms development that ostensibly set the path for the immensely popular Martini Action series this is a wonderful example to enhance any advanced collection. The Peabody action was an early form of breech loading firearm action, where the heavy breechblock tilted downwards across a bolt mounted in the rear of the breechblock, operated by a lever under the rifle. The Peabody action most often used an external hammer to fire the cartridge as illustrated with this example. The Peabody action was developed by Henry O. Peabody from Boston, Massachusetts, and was first patented on July 22, 1862. While the Peabody was not perfected in time for the American Civil War, a few were entered in the trials of 1864 with favourable reports. Peabody carbines and rifles were made by the Providence Tool Company, Providence, Rhode Island; c. 1866–1871. The total production was, 112,000 for all models. Calibres were: .45 Peabody rim fire; .45-70 Government; .50 rim fire; 50-70; .433 Spanish; 10.4 mm rim fire Swiss. Barrel length carbine 20", rifle 33". Finish: Receiver casehardened, barrel blued, iron mountings, walnut stock. The majority of Peabody's production was for foreign contracts, they were adopted by the militaries of Canada (3,000 pieces), Switzerland (15,000), France (33,000) Romania, Mexico and Spain during the later 1860s. In the United States, Connecticut purchased c. 1871–72, 2.000 Spanish Model rifles, Massachusetts 2,941 rifles and South Carolina purchased c. 1877 350. Peabody rifles were used in the Fenian Raids in Canada in the 1870’s and were purchased for use as late as 1919 by the Liberian Government from the US Army as military surplus! This rifle was sourced in the USA so was presumably originally manufactured for one of the US contracts as referred to above, confirmed by the US inspection marks. A fine rifle.
Superb Nicolas Dispatches of Nelson 7 volumes fine binding Book Description: Publisher Henry Colburn 1844-46, London, 1844. Hard Cover. Book Condition: Very Good. 2nd Edition with expanded letters from recent earlier publication. Beautiful set of books Probably the best ever seen on Ebay and certainly one of the best sets available. Iconic work for the Nelson Collector and I doubt they could be bettered. This edition is enhanced with additional material and preface from the 1st edition published some months earlier which is of particular interest to the Nelson academic. 7 Volumes, 8vo., each 22cm x14cm (5.75Ó x 8.75Ó), (l), 509; xxviii, 495; xxxvi, 527; xxxi, 542 ; xxiv, 523; xxxv, 502 ; xxxii, 424, (addenda) ccxc. Skillfully rebound 30 years ago. Original period type leather covers, and elaborately bound in gilt-ruled half navy calfskin. Gilt-ruled spine compartments with ornate gilt-tooled embellishments. Gilt-tooled raised bands. Red and antique style green morocco labels. Volume number and author title direct to green leather spine labels. Beautiful matching marbled edges and end sheets, marbled half boards. Illustrated with folding maps, facsimile letters, frontis portrait, etc. Previous owners armorial bookplate on each volume , first volume dedicated from William Stirling to John Elphinstone Erskine. (see photo 6 ) Generally very tight and bright but some various scattered occasional foxing throughout but as usual related to plates, otherwise a beautiful seven volume set in outstanding condition. I have owned several sets over 30 years but this is the best I have owned and seen. Volume V11 has some faint water staining to margins on first quarter of book but not affecting content. See photograph of worst aspect of this. Cowie 144: "This is the standard work of reference for Nelson's correspondence and the principal source from which his biographers have drawn (and still do draw) their material. It contains some 3,500 letters, including what are now the Nelson and Bridport Papers at the British Library, but not the Nelson Papers at the Nelson Museum, Monmouth.". A beautiful set that could not be bettered. Additional images on request.
Superb Nock Howdah/Travelling Double Barrel Pistol Excellent H Nock Double Barrelled Travelling Pistol This is a mahogany cased double barrelled travelling pistol by Henry Nock which started life as a flintlock pistol but was expertly and expensively converted to percussion firing by Witton and Daw and is presented in its Witton and Daw case with original trade label and complimented by its accessories. The quality of this piece is excellent with wonderful 7" brown Damascus steel barrels, original case hardening and perfect lock mechanisms. The bore of the pistol measures at .57" so approximately 24 bore and the case contains the correct ball mould to suit but also a small leather pouch of swan shot so clearly the original owner meant business and this would have been an intimidating piece to face! Other accessories include a powder flask, additional cleaning rod, oil bottle, turn screw and original box of percussion caps Both locks function perfectly and are marked H Nock while the top rib bears the engraving "H NOCK LONDON MAKER to his MAJESTY". Bores are perfect. The grip has an un-engraved silver escutcheon and the case a similarly un-engraved brass plaque. The case also contains an 1803 Halfpenny coin which could indicate the manufacturing date and I am told has been with the case since living memory. This is a top of the range pistol by a pre-eminent maker and worthy of any collection as it offers an interesting piece in exceptional condition by a superior maker that exhibits the transition between flintlock and percussion with an expert conversion that cannot be criticised on quality. Nock was a prolific inventor and is best known for his formidable multi-barrelled volley guns which were purchased by the Royal Navy and in recent years brought back to public notice by the TV series Sharpe in which Sergeant Harper carries a Nock Volley Gun. There is an interesting and erudite article on Nock and his volley guns in the Gun Report magazine of October 1967 and I would be pleased to make a copy for the purchaser of this pistol if interested. Nocks volley gun also formed part of the arsenal of HMS Pandora when she sailed in pursuit of the mutineers of HMS Bounty in 1791. Howard Blackmore stated that Nock never made an inferior military or civilian gun and his contribution to the advance of gun making in general has sadly been considerably overlooked, MacDonald Hastings in his book, English Sporting Guns, pages 8 and 9, supports the enthusiasm of Blackmore , stating: 'HENRY NOCK of London, with his patent (No. 1598) of April 25, 1787, achieved a breakthrough. Prior to his patent, the plug was a solid lump of metal. When the flint sparked the powder in the pan, the flame spurting into the touch hole ignited only a corner of the charge . . . In NOCK's gun, . . . the priming powder fired in the middle of the charge. Guns shot harder and quicker . . . it was from NOCK's patent that gun invention leapt forward.” Another common word we use today in respect of firearms is the 'Knox form' which is a derivative from 'Nocks Form' another of Henry Nock's patented inventions. Here is a very limited biography of this pre-eminent gun maker. Henry Nock, Gun maker, London (1741-1804) Henry Nock opened business in London in 1772, appearing in the rate books for 1772 as a gunlock smith at Mount Pleasant, London. In April 1775 he formed a partnership with fellow gun makers, William Jover and John Green, to sell firearms made under English Patent No.1095 from 83 Long Acre. By 1779 he had moved to the Whitechapel district and appears at Castle Alley in Whitechapel the following year, 1780. That same year he designed and produced 7-barrelled guns for the Board of Ordnance and followed it up with a screw less lock (1786), a wall piece (1788), the Duke of Richmond's musket (1792), Royal House Artillery pistol (1793) and a cavalry carbine and pistol in 1796. From 1784 until his death in 1804 he was based at 10 Ludgate Street, with factories at Moses and Aaron Alley, 27 Goulston Street and 9 Castle Alley, Whitechapel. Across the same period he had a shooting ground at Clowters Gardens behind St. George's Church, on Blackfriar's Road. During these years he took out his own patent, English Patent No. 1598 in 1787 for an improved breech design. Shortly after moving into the Whitechapel district, Nock made a set of gauges for the Gunmakers Company Proof House in 1781, but shortly afterwards severed his ties with the Company by purchasing his freedom in 1784. This move reflected the sentiments of many gun makers who worked outside the Company's control over London's inner city area. Blackmore (1986) describes the situation: 'To the west extending along Fleet Street to the Strand and Charing Cross, and north to Long Acre and Holborn, were new generations of master gun makers who had served their time elsewhere and had no traditions of service with the City Companies.' From 1771 until 1804 Nock was a contractor to the Board of Ordnance and from 1777 until a year before his death, he was a contractor to the East India Company for the supply of arms. In July 1778 the Gunmakers' Company, after having argued that the loss of income was in part due to the lack of a Livery, petitioned the Lord Mayor and the Aldermen and were successful. As a result, the Gunmakers Company took its place in the social life of the City and played its part in its business and politics, including the election of Aldermen and the Lord Mayor. Obviously attracted by the newly found status in being attached to the Company, Nock took Livery in 1795 and rose through the ranks to become Assistant in 1792 to finally Master in 1802. He died in 1804 and was succeeded by his foreman and son-in-law, James Wilkinson (d.1849). James Wilkinson is the Wilkinson behind the famous Wilkinson Sword company who also retailed guns. Absolutely superlative quality.This gun was probably not fired as a flintlock as it retains too much case hardening and original colour.
Superb Remington model 1871 Army .50 calibre pistol Here is another superb 1871 Remington Rolling Block Pistol in obsolete 50 calibre Remington centrefire and in the top 5% of quality attainable. It is hard to know exactly why Remington made rolling block pistols when they did, since revolvers were so well established. Probably they were already tooled up for rolling block rifles, so making pistols didn’t require an additional investment. Remington revolver sales were in a slump, because from 1855 to 1871 Smith & Wesson had effectively tied up manufacture of advanced cartridge revolvers by licensing the Rollin White patent that covered any cylinder drilled through from end to end. Remington had only percussion pistols on offer during those years. The 1871 pistol was modified from earlier versions by moving the trigger and trigger guard forward and adding a spur to the grip to assist in controlling recoil. A firing pin retractor was also added. This pistol was commonly called the "Army and Navy". Manufactured circa 1872 to 1888 with a total production of approximately 6,000, with approximately 5,000 sold to the U.S. government. The pistol has an 8" blue barrel, casehardened frame with the distinctive 'hump' or spur on the back strap, the trigger is niter blue and bright hammer and breech block. The left side of the frame is marked "REMINGTON'S ILION N.Y. U.S.A. / PAT MAY 3D NOV 15TH 1864 APRIL 17TH 1866" and stamped with a "P" and "S" below and ahead of the marking. The pistol is mounted with a smooth walnut forearm and one piece smooth grip with a boxed script "C.R.S." inspection cartouche on the left. This pistol really is at the top end of the condition scale with evidence of case hardening, sharp inspectors cartouche, even toning and a super bore. From the breach plate it was evidently little used if at all and the screw heads indicate it has not been messed with. These pistols are underestimated and are an interesting diversion from the revolvers that were dominant at this time. This is the best Remington 1871 Army I have handled to date and would be difficult to improve on.
Superb Sea Service Flintlock Pistol pattern 1801 ex-Neale collection The 1801 pattern Sea Service Pistol is an iconic firearm and evocative in respect of its link to Nelson’s Navy as dramatized by the novels of C S Forester’s Horatio Hornblower and Patrick O’Brien’s Captain Jack Aubrey. This was the weapon of last resort and was designed for close quarter work and when discharged was discarded or more often than not used as a lethal club capable of dashing a man’s brains out. The Sea Service flintlock pistol evolved between 1756 and 1815 and this pistol can be dated to the pinnacle of its perfection. These pistols are highly collectible and I have seen good pistols, bad pistols and quite frankly fake pistols offered for sale. This particular superb example has the provenance of being sold by Christies from the William “Keith” Neal collection and is accompanied by Keith Neal’s museum tag and was illustrated in the Christies catalogue so provenance is irrefutable. Keith Neal’s motto is appropriate “Truth will conquer”. Keith Neal was an author and the Doyen of British Firearms collectors and lived in Warminster. It is reputed that he never bought a gun that he did not fire and often through his library window to the consternation of passers-by! His collection was so extensive that efforts were made to preserve it for the Nation but these failed and such was the quantum of the collection that Christie’s and others sold it off over several years. This particular pistol was one of several sold at the 2001 auction and raised the highest price of £1528 compared to the others so clearly was a superior example. It was catalogued thus; A .56 Flintlock Pattern 1801 Sea Service Pistol Early 19th Century Similar to the seven preceding lots, the lock struck below the pan with the number '2' crowned, the stock stamped with storekeeper's mark, Ordnance obsolete/sale marks, and the letter 'M' below the side-plate, small King's proof marks, locksmith's mark WEH 19¼in. (48.8cm.) From the photographs illustrating the lock removed and the lock inlet on the carcase it can be seen that this is a 100% original pistol and not a “put together” or Indian copy. This is a significant investment for anybody and this is why I have detailed both the interior and exterior of the lock and also reveal the condition of the hardwood stock which is sometimes repaired with filler! This pistol is crisp, complete and exhibits untouched cartouches that have not been “improved” with sandpaper! This is an exceptional and exquisite piece and as one of my long term customers often reminds me “there isn’t going to be any more” and if you are looking for an excellent investment quality Sea Service Flintlock pistol with irrefutable provenance that will always have an edge over pistols without provenance –this is the one!
Superb Snider Model 11** Converted Rifle This is a super looking Snider Mark 11** which features all of the final modifications that were installed on converted P53 rifles before the purpose built Mark 111 was introduced.. You probably know all of this but I will repeat some of the features. These rifles were converted from muzzle loading P1853 rifles that were the backbone of both the Crimean War and exported to the USA and used in their Civil War. The major refinement on these rifles was the cupped indented hammers which helped secure the breech against blowback. This particular rifle was issued to a Canadian regiment at the time of the Fenian raids and has a distinct “DC” Dominion of Canada cartouche and a regimental number on the brass butt plate. This one was converted with a BSA lock on a LAC frame. LAC were renowned for quality of build and rifling. This rifle is quite superb with very little if any use and has never been touched. Metal to wood fit is great, all cartouches are present and the lock is crisp. The walnut stock has distinctive “Tiger Stripes” and this accentuates the quality of the wood. Most of the original finish remains and the breech block has none of the nicks and dents associated with use and there is no erosion around the firing pin. The nipple protector and chain is still extant and overall the quality and finish exceeds 90%. This is a prime rifle and if I wanted another Snider for my collection this would be the one I would choose. I doubt if I will find a better one than this one.
Superb Webley RIC style revolver circa 1885 This little revolver was manufactured in Belgium and is basically a copy of the Webley but in comparison, of superior manufacture. It falls into the category of "constabulary" issues and is complete with its original service holster. The condition is outstanding with most original finish and it cocks and locks as tightly as the day it was made, in fact I doubt if it was ever fired except for proof. The proof is Belgium and the standard at the time was in excess of British Proof. Much of the British Gun trade in the 19th century relied on Belgium made components and indeed some "British" makes were actually made in Belgium but proofed for the British Retail trade and stamped with the retailers name in the UK. There were a number of excellent manufacturers who exported Globally and this is a revolver made by one of them. Based on a Webley RIC the revolver has a fluted "chapel" cylinder, rebounding hammer and an additional safety catch to lock the hammer. The loading gate is extant and has a tight spring. As a type example it is one of the finest I have seen and clearly was issued, cleaned and locked away for the past 140 years. The word "crisp" is done to death in this industry and I would seldom use it but in this instance it merits the accolade, "tight" would probably be a better description. The calibre is 320 British which is an obsolete calibre benefiting from Section 58(2) of the Firearms Act as amended and can be possessed as an object of curiosity as an antique if you meet VCRA 2006 requirements for ownership. The calibre is clearly marked on the frame. In my parlance this is a "keeper" and I doubt if it could be bettered. A superb little revolver.
Swedish Remington Patent Rolling Block This is a rolling block rifle manufactured in Sweden under license from Remington. Obsolete calibre (12.7mm) sporting rifle with excellent bore and mechanics. Many of these rifles were made by converting original muzzle loading barrels that had seen no service. A very good example.
Sykes No 3 Capping Tool This is a very good Sykes No 3 percussion capping tool in untouched condition. Mechanically sound the Sykes patented capping tool was designed to assist in putting the percussion cap onto a nipple without danger of slipping because of cold or oversized fingers. The tool was springloaded and as each cap was deposited a new cap was presented for use. This was an innovative step in assisting the loading of muzzle loaded firearms and they are now becoming scarce. This is a pleasing example.
Tate Flintlock Blunderbuss This is a superb flintlock Blunderbuss with spring loaded bayonet manufactured by Tate. In outstanding condition this is a typical example of a coaching blunderbuss the non-ferrous barrel being indicative of application.With 14 inch brass barrel with 2 bore belled muzzle and mounted with a spring bayonet above, iron tang with bayonet release catch, Tate signed flat bevelled lock with stepped tail, safety-catch and figured walnut full stock with chequered wrist. A blunderbuss is an evocative item for any collection and if you wanted just one example this would be it. Bryan Tate was based in Louth and operated from a shop next to the Mason's Arms Hotel in the Cornmarket. The view and proof marks on the barrel are Birmingham and are the post 1813 type according to Appendix D in British Military Firearms by Blackmore. Bryan Tate died in December 1841 aged 85. His son, Richard, was also a gunmaker with a shop in Butcher Market. Richard moved to Horncastle in about 1847 and opened a shop next to the Admiral Rodney Hotel. It is possible, but not proven, that this type of blunderbuss was used by the guards on the Louth to London coach in the 1800's.
Tatham Over and Under Officers Flintlock Pistol This is an exceptional Officers double barrelled overcoat pistol by renowned gun maker Henry Tatham. Tatham partnered with Durs Egg and his pistols are regarded as some of the finest manufactured of the time. Manufactured circa 1810-15 this particular pistol has most of the original browning on the octagonal barrel extant and benefits from the original hammers, small parts, and springs. Beautifully detailed engraving with platinum bands and lined touch-holes. The gun features a maker’s plaque “ Tatham London” on the Knox and has “waterproof” pans. The gun is stocked in good quality English walnut finely checkered at the grip with an ornate butt cap. Logs are marked “Tatham”. Barrel length is approximately 3” and bore is 32 bore. Overall an excellent example of a double barrelled flintlock pistol that has been untouched and is in very pleasing order.
Taylerson The Revolver 1865-1888 Taylerson's trilogy on revolvers has proved essential reading for revolver collectors for generations. This is a pivitol work as it covers the transition from percussion to self contained cartridges and variants. Excellent line drawings and profuse photographic plates with an index this was first published in 1966. I generally have Taylerson's works in stock and they vary in condition. This particular example is not mint but very good with no losses and original dust jacket.
Taylerson The Revolver 1889-1914 This was the third and last book in Taylerson's Revolver series and covers a rapid period of evolution in revolvers up until World War One to include Webley, Tranter, Smith & Wesson and Colt amongst others. This is a scarce book in any condition but this copy is very good with the exception of fading to the dust cover spine. This is a particularly nice example and was a publishers review copy with their card tipped in Price includes postage in the UK.
The Naval Pocket Book 1907 Published to be privately purchased by Officers this little work is truly encyclopaedic and has 966 pages + 6 advertising pages featuring the Edwardian Navy, its ships, weapons and customs. Clean and bright internally slight crease on cover board.
The Rifle and how to use it - Hans Busk Hans Busk was a leading light in the Volunteer Rifle Movement during the 1850's and 1860's. The rifle and how to use it is his classic work on the subject of rifle shooting and rifles. This book contains Busk's opinion on a variety of rifles , all of the most significant of the day including Whitworth, Westley Richards, Terry, Green, Lancaster, Jacobs and Enfield to name a few. There is extensive reference to shooting techniques, rifle drill and practice. Essential reading for the muzzle loader and Victorian rifle collector. This book has been handsomely rebound in quarter calf and marbled boards and the contents are clean and tight. 225 pp + 9.
Thomas Boss for Akrill Percussion Shotgun This is a Thomas Boss for E Akrill Hammer Gun. Barrels marked Boss and the Lock Akrill. A quality gun in its time it features a wrist safety and platinum lined percussion nipples. Akrill was based in the North East of England. The gun has tight locks, original ramrod, undamaged stock as can be seen and is a handsome looking piece.
Thomas Horsley Hammer Gun This is a superb 12 gauge 28" barrelled hammer gun manufactured by Horsely of York and features a patent wrist safety device. David Baker has kindly confirmed that the gun was commissioned in 1874 for the Honourable Lawrence Dundas, Marquis of Zetand and his biographical details are as below. Created 1st Marquess of Zetland 22/8/1892. A strong Liberal at first, Laurence subsequently joined the Conservative Party and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland. He was extremely popular in Ireland due to his strong sympathies, genial disposition and generosity. Indeed when his tenure of office expired and he left Dublin Castle there was genuine regret amongst the Irish people. Laurence was also a keen sportsman and was closely connected with horse racing. He was elected a member of the Jockey Club. The following is an extract from a newspaper of the time, The cutting was amongst the Zetland Archives at Northallerton Record Office, N. Yorkshire. "Hope told a flattering tale to those who conjured up visions of the reform of Dublin Castle. The Vice-royalty is not to be abolished, neither is it to be committed to the care of a Royal Prince. Lord Londonderry's official shoes have gone a begging, like Cinderella's slipper, with the result that they are to be filled by Lord Zetland, an amateur politician and of whom the best that can be said is that he is a sturdy fox-hunting squire. A safe seat in the saddle does not necessarily mean a bed of roses at Dublin Castle. Perhaps Lord Zetland would have been popular in the rollicking days of "Tom Burke of Ours," but the Ireland of the novelist is not the Ireland of to-day" It is interesting to note that the newspapers of the time could be as unkind as today and I wonder whether the journalist was made to eat humble pie as Lord Zetland proved him wrong on all counts! Newspaper clipping amongst the Zetland Archives at Northallerton. Photograph taken at the Golden Wedding celebrations of the Marquis and Marchioness of Zetland. August 1921 Portrait of the 1st Marquess of Zetland. Collection of the Marquess of Zetland, Aske, Richmond. By kind permission of the Marquess of Zetland Nottingham Evening Post, 11/3/1929 - STATESMAN & SPORTSMAN SUDDEN DEATH OF MARQUIS ZETLAND. COLLAPSED AFTER CHAPEL SERVICE. The Marquis of Zetland died suddenly at Aske Hall, Richmond (Yorkshire), this morning, at the age of 85. He attended chapel last night in his usual health, but collapsed and died in a few hours. The Marquis was sometimes spoken of as the sportsman-statesman. As a Dundas, he was head of a distinguished Scottish family, with a tradition for public service. To this tradition he was true. Many years of his long life he gave to public work. Not a few he devoted to sporting interests. Born on August 16th, 1844. Lawrence was the first Marquis and third Earl of Zetland the fourth Baron Dundas, and the fifth baronet. It was his work as Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland that the earldom was raised to marquisate in 1892, the title being Marquis of Zetland and Earl of Ronaldshay, in the county of Orkney and Shetland. It is related that Lord Zetland once created a sensation when, as Viceroy, he went on an official tour along the western coast of Ireland, attired in fisherman's oilskins and sou'wester. Until he became too old to ride hunting was his chief hobby. He was for years Master of the Zetland Hounds, and owned a good portion of the country over they hunted. A clever fisherman, he once landed with fly a Tay salmon which scaled 55lbs. Just before his 84th birthday he set off for Perthshire, where he proved that, despite his years, he had lost none of his skill with the rod. When he was no longer able to follow deer stalking—another of his favourite sports Lord Zetland made over his fine Ross-shire forest to Lord Ronaldshay, his son and heir. A great lover of horses, his carriages were in pre motor days amongst the best appointed in London. Lord Zetland was popular personage in the Richmond division of Yorkshire, where he had his seat, Aske. He was twice Mayor of Richmond, and represented that constituency in Parliament as a Liberal in 1872-3. The marquis paid a pretty tribute to his wife during their golden wedding celebrations in 192. He said he had not succeeded in winning the Derby. He had won other prizes, but the best one, and the one which brought him the greatest happiness, was the one he gained on his wedding day in August, 1871. He was a Lord in Waiting to Queen Victoria in 1880 till 1892, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, from 1889-1892. HIS TURF SUCCESSES. As a sportsman and follower of the Turf the marquis followed in the steps of his predecessor, the owner of Voltigeur, Vedette, and other equine celebrities, which made the famous Aske spots so popular, particularly in Yorkshire The racing relics at Aske Hall, in Yorkshire, as well as at the famous town house in Arlington-street, are rich with Doncaster Cups for besides winning it in 1850 with Voltigeur, the famous red-spotted livery was carried successfully in that historic race in successive years by Fandango in 1856, and 1857 and 1859 by the Guineas winner, Vedette. Then, at a year's interval, came a fifth at Sabreun. On the death of his trainer, Joseph Enoch, the latter's son, Harry, took charge of the late peer's horses and turned out many good winners but subsequently Lord George Dundas the younger son of the marquis became trainer to his father. Lord George at first had his stables' at Richmond in Yorkshire, but in 1912 migrated to Newmarket, and several good horses have at various times passed through his hands. Included among these was Pomme de Terre, which won over £14,000 in stakes. Another useful animal to carry the Aske livery was Dynamo, which made some mark as a two year old, winning five races in succession in the North of England, but the hopes he raised of developing into a really high-class performer were only partially realised. He was a Knight of Grace of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem and Provincial Grand Master of the Freemasons in the North Riding and East Riding of Yorkshire. A Privy Councillor, he was a Knight of the Thistle. His ancestor, Lawrence Dundas, created a baronet in 1762, was Commissary-General and contractor to the army. Lord Zetland married in 1871 Lady Lilian Selina Elizabeth Lumley, daughter of the ninth Earl of Scarborough. They had two sons and two daughters. This gun requires a Section 2 Shotgun Certificate to transfer.
Thomas Turner Best Quality Military Small Bore Rifle This is a Thomas Turner "small bore" military match rifle in .451" Calibre and a true shooters rifle. Thomas Turner was one of the most successful and innovative gun makers and designers in Great Britain during the 19th Century. Born in 1805, Turner had a wonderfully successful career in Birmingham as a gun maker, operating in the trade from 1834-1890. The family business continued on until the 1900’s! During his tenure at the helm of the business, Turner received multiple English patents for everything from rifling that would not foul, to breech plugs and long-range sites. During the mid-1860’s he produced a line of very successful small bore (.451) target rifles that were as accurate and well received as the Whitworth & Kerr rifles. Turner was also a founding member of the Birmingham Small Arms Trade organization, which was located at Steelhouse lane in Birmingham from 1854-1878. This was a group of the 20 most prominent Birmingham gun makers on the list of British War Department list of contractors, based in Birmingham. The group was formed during the Crimean War to provide mutual support and share contacts for military arms. This was the first true organization of what had always been a number of cottage industry gun makers in the Birmingham region. These same 20 makers also launched the The Birmingham Small Arms Trade Company, LTD in 1861, with the goal of cooperatively being able to produce military small arms on the interchangeable parts principle, as was being done by the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield Lock (RSAF) and the London Armoury Company. Thomas Tuner was the 2nd largest shareholder in the company, with 95 shares of its stock. Only Joseph Swinburn held more shares, with 110. Turner was one of the four “old contractors” to the British War Department (which also included Swinburn, Hollis & Sheath and Tipping & Lawden), and was involved with the building of every pattern of British military arm in the mid 19th Century, often producing the prototypes in his workshop. He also served as the President of the BSAT for a time, and during the American Civil War delivered thousands of Enfield pattern musket on contract to both CS and US buyers. Rifles of this quality were often used by sharpshooters. The rifle has a wonderful full length "volunteer" walnut stock and the bore is excellent. Turner's patented bore was supposed to reduce fouling and increase accuracy which was endorsed by many of the leading shooters of the day which achieved a similar status for Turner's rifle as his competitors Whitworth and Kerr. The rifle is obviously of first rate quality and features an indented lock. The actual action and trigger let-off is superb. The rifle has been well looked after and is featured with a later fitted Rex Holbrook Sight which is complete in its original box with elements. I am told that the rifle was regularly shot to 1000 yards with good grouping with a paper patched 530 grain bullet. The bolster for the tang site on the wrist of the rifle has been screwed without relieving the woodwork so this could be easily removed if required. The front leaf of the redundant rear sight has either been removed or was never fitted as there is no location for the leaf pins and there are two platinum lined leaf sights in-situ. The sling swivel points are original to the rifle but the actual swing attachments look like a later addition for convenience and can be easily changed for older ones if required. The ramrod is original and a nice touch is that the brass end is keyed, again indicative of quality. The engraving on the lock plate is crisp as can be seen and "Turners Patent" is stamped on top of the barrel. The rifle also features a Turner Patent breech block.The chequering of the wood is nice and crisp and there are no cracks or missing wood to report.Bluing is fading to a plum patina. This rifle would have been a serious contender on Century range in the 1860's and will still hold its own 150 years later. A quintessential English .451 target rifle of quality that would enhance any collection.
Thomas Turner Hammer Gun Thomas Turner was a prolific gunmaker and renowned for his target rifles and shotguns. Here we have a very interesting and fine hammer shotgun with Turner's 1864 patented bottom opening device as described in the excellent work "British Shotguns". The shotgun is nitro-proofed and has recently had a major overhaul and tightening and the original 28" barrels have been re-sleeved and would make an excellent game gun. The gun has a 16" stock with very nice wood and crisp chequering. This is not a shotgun that you would encounter very often with this opening mechanism which I found simple and fast. SG2 Shotgun Certificate required.
Thomas Turner Private Purchase 2 band Snider Rifle .577 This is an excellent example of a scarce 2 band Snider commonly referred to as the "Sergeant's pattern" as they were issued to Sergeant's in Line Regiments. They were also purchased for use in Volunteer Rifle Corps and this one is most definitely an Officers private purchase. The use by the Volunteers is confirmed by the bayonet bar and the Crown on the lock. This is an exceptional rifle and features an indented lock and Turners patent rifling which was designed to assist in low fouling and enhanced accuracy. Unlike the conventional 3 groove Snider Carbine rifling the Turner patented rifling has multiple grooves with a tight spiral which become straight towards the end of the muzzle. This rifle has a 31" barrel with an overall length of 49" and the stock is as good as you can get - no cracks or erosion and no-one has attempted to "improve" it with sandpaper! The Thomas Turner cartouche is still extant on the butt. This is clearly a quality rifle, excellent walnut and a silver inlaid name plate in the wrist with the initials I I C D engraved. The finish of the barrel is as new and possibly an early refinish as the skill to achieve this is not so common these days but the condition of the lock plate is mint so possibly I am being over cautious. The lock is stamped with Thomas Turner's castle trademark which was only used on best guns and is dated 1869. The action is perfect with an indented lock with a smooth crisp let off and the chamber and breech block does not exhibit the usual dents and abrasions normally seen. It is still possible to view the serial number on the breech block which is identical to the serial number on the bayonet bar. The rifle exhibits Birmingham proof marks for 25 bore (.577") and three references to Sniders patent. I doubt if this rifle has been fired very often. As usual in life nothing is perfect and there is some pitting about 4 " from the muzzle in the otherwise perfect bore. This would have been caused by careless cleaning when the cleaning rod was not pulled all of the way out of the muzzle. The pitting is far enough from the muzzle end to suggest that if you wanted to put this onto a firearms certificate it would not effect the accuracy as the bullet would have travelled 27" by that time. The cleaning rod is the original rod with a screwed end and the thread is clear and the rod locates perfectly. The rear ladder sight has the somewhat ambitous 1200 yards addition added to the top of the ladder which was done at the time the charge of the cartridge was increased and was a standard enhancement. A handsome looking rifle that would be difficult to improve on. Additional images available.
Tranter 4th Model 38 Bore Revolver Tranter's 4th model revolver is instantly recognisable by the horn or spur behind the trigger. This particular revolver is in the massive 38 bore ( 0.50" ) calibre which is scarce. In Wolfgang Berks excellent book on Tranter he lists less than 10% of his registered revolvers as being 38 bore, most being 54 bore. After the Indian Mutiny there was considerable favour in larger calibres as many Colt's in .36" calibre proved innefectual. This revolver is complete in an original case that has been later relined and has a number of accessories including an original flask and Joyce percussion cap tin with contents. The revolver is 5 shot as it had to be because of the size of the chambers and can be fired in double and single action. The 4th model was an improvement on Tranter's 1856 patent and featured a patent rammer, the aforementioned trigger spur and a larger frame. The reason that there is a low survival rate of these large revolvers is that the heavy frame made it very suitable for conversion to self contained cartridges and the majority were converted. Overall there is much original finish with evidence of a very early refinish, mechanics are sound and the gun cocks and locks. The bore is good with pronounced rifling. This revolver was retailed by Wilkinson of Pall Mall who were renowned military outfitters, officers of the day being responsible for providing their own sidearms. Many thousands of Tranter's revolvers were exported to both sides of the American Civil War and used in virtually every conflict by officers of the British Army and Navy for several decades. I can provide a suitable Wilkinson label if required.
Tranter 54 bore bullet mould Tranter 54 bore mould with Tranter's trade mark. As good as you can find.
Tranter 54 Bore Third Model Double Trigger Revolver This particular revolver was acquired in the USA and is the finest example I have seen in 20 years. The finish is superb and the revolver is mechanically perfect with a perfect lock up and crisp let off. The bluing is a deep lustrous heat blue and there is much case hardening bloom on the cylinder with sharp chequered grips. The only blemish I can find is a small area of shadowing internally on the rifled bore. Altogether an impressive revolver which would merit a case and pride of place in a British revolver collection.
Tranter Model 1879 Revolver Tranter’s Model 1879 Army top breaking revolver could probably be described as the pinnacle of his illustrious career. The revolver was patented under British Patent No 2855 of 14th July 1879 which protected his front hinging top break revolver featuring his breech release and closing arrangement and also protection for his new extractor, rebounding hammer with safety feature and an extractor release system. The extractor release system allows the extractor to be removed for cleaning in seconds and the rebounding hammer safety paralleled the popular safety system of hammer shotguns that had been extant for at least 10 years previously. This revolver incorporates many features that are still seen today in modern revolvers and is a testimony to his engineering skills and foresight. This particular revolver has a 6" standard barrel, good bore and much original finish and is in .450 CF Calibre. The revolver is mechanically perfect with good wooden grips and overall is an excellent example of this revolver which is now sadly considered as scarce and seldom encountered. Many of these revolvers, a direct competitor to Webley, were sold by private purchase to British Army Officers who were required to provide their own sidearm; this particular revolver was retailed by the famous firm of Cogswell & Harrison of 14 New Bond Street London as evidenced by the engraving on the top strap. Full historical notes regarding the development of the revolver will accompany the revolver on sale.
Tranter revolver in original lipfire configuration. This is a very decent Tranter revolver with British proof marks in 32 lip fire calibre. Lip fire cartridges were short lived and quickly replaced with the conventional rimfire cartridges that can be recognised today. The majority of lip fire revolvers were converted by milling the rear of the cylinder to remove the indentations that were necessary to house the "lip" of the lip fire cartridge to house either conventional rim fire cartridges or centre fire cartridges. It is uncommon to find these revolvers that have not been converted in the 1870's. This particular revolver is in very good condition with some original finish and was retailed by the well known retailer E M Reilly of Oxford Street London. An interesting and scarce collectible revolver.
Tranter second model two trigger revolver in excellent condition. This is the nicest Tranter two trigger 54 bore revolver I have seen for some time. Contained in an Adams contemporary case the revolver has a fine bore good foliate engraving and a large amount of original finish. The revolver was retailed by Thomas Fletcher of Gloucester as evidenced by the engraving on the top strap and the roundel on the lid of the case states that it was once owned by Capt Bayley 83rd Light Infantry. The revolver is mechanically perfect and has Tranter's stamp on the rammer, trigger and frame. I will supply additional research on the revolver. I am also listing the correct Tranter mould which would suit the revolver but does not fit this case. This revolver is suitable to be added to a firearms certificate.
Turn off percussion pistol by Egg circa 1830 Good 50 Bore Turn off Boxlock percussion pistol with a 3.5" barrel signed D Egg. The pistol functions perfectly with a strong mainspring. Fine chequered grips with vacant silver escutcheon. Durs Egg was a celebrated London Gunmaker, working between 1770 and 1834 holding the Royal Warrant of the Prince Regent, later George 1V. From 1834 a descendant D I Egg carried on the business until 1865.
Turn off pocket pistol Well made little pocket pistol in approximately 46 bore. What distinguishes this pistol is that the grips are slightly larger than most and more ornate with 2 inlaid silver escutheons. Turn off barrel and Birmingham proof, action works and nipple is clear. This gun is circa 1850 but were being advertised as late as 1889! A decent little pistol at a price considerably less than I have seen on the market. Price includes UK carriage.
Ultra rare Allen & Wheelock 8 In H H Thomas’ book “The Story of Allen & Wheelock Firearms” he states that their lip fire revolvers are rarer than Colt Dragoons and Colt Patterson’s. I wouldn’t disagree with him as I have sold three Colt Dragoons in recent times, three Webley Fosbery’s and a host of other scarce and interesting guns but never an Allen & Wheelock lip fire Navy Revolver. I have seen odd examples but never with an 8" barrel and usually they have been converted to fire rimfire cartridges. This revolver is regarded by most collectors as a martial arm as there is evidence it was used during the American Civil War and, although no government contract can be found it is known that the Government bought them on the open market. This particular example is in exceptional condition. The finish has mellowed to an even patina and other than some very minor scuffs it is as manufactured with a tight action and with original varnish on the grips. The manufacture of these extraordinary revolvers was short lived because of the patent infringement litigation commenced by Smith and Wesson against Allen and Wheelock. It is interesting to note that this revolver, which used a metallic cartridge, was developed and sold before Allen and Wheelock’s martial percussion revolvers and had it not have been for the patent litigation could have been very popular and made in larger quantities. It is estimated that no more than 250 of the first type and 500 of the second type were made and survival rates are low. A significant reason that there are so few surviving lip fire revolvers is that on the expiration of the Rollin White patent, which opened the market to rear loaded cylinders, many were machined to remove a fraction from the rear of the cylinder to allow the more common rim fire cartridges to be used which were cheaper than lip fire cartridges. I will explain this in further detail later. Examples of lip fire cartridges are rare, there are photographs in some specialist books and I will gladly send images to the purchaser. The unloading rammer or ejector rod is a work of engineering genius. It is released with a latch on the trigger guard as it forms part of the guard and then fall down and outwards whilst simultaneously moving the ejector rod outwards to benefit from an internal screw and ratchet to enhance pressure. It is difficult to articulate how this works but it is very clever and of great interest. When Allen & Wheelock ceased manufacturing these revolvers to produce percussion muzzle loading revolvers, this same extraction system was utilised as the rammer. That this is a rare revolver cannot be doubted particularly in its outstanding condition. What makes it rarer is that the 8” barrel is not listed in Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Arms although Flayderman has the usual caveats that not all variations have been recorded. What is highly interesting about this piece is that the Worcester Mass address and patent dates are missing and in fact on examination with an electron microscope were never there. This leads me to believe that the manufacture preceded the patent and litigation and was no doubt one of the pre-production prototypes that was not issued which would explain the condition which is untouched. Had the revolver been issued after the Rollin White patent had expired it would have probably been machined as explained below. The maker’s name “Allen and Wheelock” is clearly stamped on the left hand side of the barrel and there is a serial number on the reverse of the cylinder where it should be but nothing else. It is straight forward to conclude from the lack of definitive information in both Thomas and Flayderman that this is one rare revolver! Ethan Allen was granted a patent in September 1861 for his .44 calibre lip fire revolver. As this is more than a year since his patent on the lip fire cartridge, it is possible that lip fire revolvers were produced in late 1860 or early 1861. As many incomplete revolvers and parts would have been in existence at the time of the 'cease and desist' court order from the patent infringement in 1863, this inventory was kept and these revolvers were reintroduced when the White patent expired in 1869 until the parts stocks were depleted. All of the Allen and Wheelock lip fire revolvers were single-action. Many of the lip fire weapons were converted to rim fire with the simple machining/removal of just a small amount on the rear face of the cylinder as supplies of the ill-fated lip fire cartridge dwindled. While it is not known for certain, some of these conversions may have occurred at the factory, especially for those assembled in or after 1869. Others were converted by any number of gunsmiths around the country. It should be noted that the Army model was the first 'large bore' (more than .40 calibre) cartridge revolver, and remained so until the Remington cartridge conversions of the model 1858 appeared in 1868 - soon followed by the cartridge-designed Smith & Wesson Model 3 in 1869. Similarly, the Navy model was the only .36 calibre cartridge revolver until the similar conversion of Colt models 1851, 1861 & 1862 following the expiry of the Rollin White patent. Allen and Wheelock were prolific and innovative makers of quality and it would be difficult to form a complete collection. This revolver would be the pinnacle of any Allen and Wheelock collection.
Unique Dual Ignition Shotgun by Jones circa 1830 In the world of gun collecting the word “unique” is often used for something rare or uncommon. There is no such thing as “quite or very unique” it is either one of a kind or it is not! It is unusual to be able to say that you own a unique gun but that is what I believe this is. This is an extraordinary and rare shotgun that was made circa 1830 with a dual ignition system so can be regarded as the epitome of transitional firearms. The lock features both percussion nipples and a flintlock these can be selected to fire flintlock, percussion or both by moving an interrupter switch which can isolate the platinum lined touch hole in the flash pan. Overall length is 45" with a barrel length of 29" with a bore measuring .6" so approximately 20 bore. The bores are bright and the walls of the barrels are thick enough to hazard a guess that the gun was also intended for use with solid ball. This is not a conversion; this is a custom made bespoke dual ignition firearm. Locks are marked "Jones" and the overall quality is excellent with good engraving, brass rope frame to the lock and silver pineapple finial adorning the trigger guard. There is one small contemporary repair to the butt which was clearly made during its short working life but not a significant detraction to the overall appearance of the gun. I assume that the gun was made for somebody who intended travelling overseas at the time it was made and who was concerned that he would not be able to purchase percussion caps overseas. The retention key or wedge that holds the barrels into the stock is equipped with a lanyard ring which is a novel idea and very sensible because the loss of this essential item in the field would have been disastrous. The locks are signed Jones and there is a silver escutcheon marked “CJ” which leads one to believe that the maker was Charles Frederick Jones. Charles Frederick Jones was the son of John Jones of Manor Row, Tower Hill (an armourer in the Hudson's Bay Company from 1785-1793). Charles was born in about 1800, and in 1814 was apprenticed to John Mason. He became a Freeman of the Gun maker’s Company (by patrimony?) in 1822. He was recorded in business at "Near the Helmet", St Katherine's, as a gun and pistol maker in 1822, and it seems his brother, Frederick William, joined him soon after the business was established. He was not recorded again until 1829 when, probably in addition to the St Katherine's premises, he had an address in Pennington Street, Ratcliff Highway. At this time his brother left to set up his own business. In 1831 he opened a factory in Birmingham at 16 Whittall Street. In 1832 he was recorded at 26 St James's Street. On 7 March 1833 he patented a percussion lock with a cock, tumbler and trigger made in a single curved piece (concentric sears and triggers), and a waterproof sliding cover (No. 6394 in the UK but also patented France), and on 12 June 1833 an improvement with separate triggers and sears (No. 6436). The caps of these Jones patent guns fitted on to the hammer noses and had the fulminate on the outside. This system was called centre-fire, and they struck the nipple and ignited the powder in the chamber. I dare say that this gun is a derivative of Jones’ work on the waterproof sliding cover which developed into the sliding interruption switch on his dual ignition shotgun. In 1838 Charles Jones described himself as a "Patent and General Gun maker", and later as a gun manufacturer. At about this time the firm had a shop at 32 Cockspur Street. There is no record of the firm in London after 1845, and the Birmingham factory may have closed in 1843, but Charles Jones was a member of the Acadamie de L'Industrie de France and the firm may have traded after 1845. Jones advertised that he was Gun maker to HRH the Prince Albert ( as did many others as the Prince was an avid hunter) Renowned British Gunsmith Peter Dyson believes the brass bolsters were fitted because the maker was worried about sideways expansion if both methods of ignition were used simultaneously. Peter stated that in his 50 plus years in the gun trade including his time as a Gunsmith at the Royal Armouries in Leeds, he has never seen another of these dual ignition weapons. This has not been seen on the market for decades and as a rare and possibly unique item I doubt if it will appear again for many years. A rare and significant Gun that could be the pinnacle of an advanced collection of sporting shotguns.
Unknown Mexican Wars Era Flintlock Conversion This huge pistol was purchased in Texas some 40 years ago by a collector and is typical of the large calibre pistols used by both the Mexican Army and the Americans. These were converted from flintlock to percussion and were converted from numerous flintlocks including French Model 1822 pistols that this one is very similar to. The pistol has a strong lock and the ramrod is extant. There are no visible marks and the pistol merits further research.
Untouched Mk 111 Snider Carbine ex- New Zealand. This can really only be described as a “sleeper”. Completely untouched this Mk 111 Snider Carbine exhibits a plethora of military markings that indicate its use in New Zealand and a manufactured date of 1869 would suggest use towards the end of the Maori Wars. The .577” 19.5” barrel has the correct rear sight, ordnance and M.T marks and the breech is marked NZ111 87 (also marked on the stock behind the tang). The breech has the later spring loaded catch and the flat style hammer. The lock plate is dated 1869 and marked ENFIELD. The metalwork has a dark patina and the solid woodwork has the side nail cups for the sight cover removed as is usual. There is a good mark between the lock screws that is RBY T 45 and F.T.& M.T on the butt. There is brass furniture that is marked on the heal WD ARROW Y/BCK/273. There are numerous proof marks and sold out of service marks and the barrel is marked STEEL to differentiate between modified weapons. The really nice thing about the carbine is that it has a good bore and the butt trap contains the original two piece clearing rods which are a considerably rare find in their own right. This is a carbine that has seen significant service and is completely untouched and could be considerably improved.
Unusual Alligator Hunting Howdah Pistol Set. This is one of the most unusual items I have ever offered and I have offered a few! This is an alligator hunting Howdah pistol set. In the past I have seen several Vampire hunting sets but never an alligator hunting set! I sold this several years ago to a customer who has now changed his collecting interests and it has never been on the open market to my knowledge. Effectively it is a double barrel Howdah pistol with all accessories, mould, Hawksley Flask, turn screws etc. The calibre is stated as 12 mm and it is Liege proofed and of high quality. The Liege proof was significantly more severe than British proofs and when you see the size of the lead balls this pistol needed it. The case has brass corners that I suspect were added later as there is some rubbing and it might look better if smaller corners were added. The lid has a stuffed Alligator Head with glass eyes and is quite a , dare I say it, bizarre conversation piece. I am told it originated in Louisiana and I am not sure if I can export this but will look into it if asked. An unusual item but of significant quality. An item for the collector who thought he had everything, but didn't!
Unusual Brevette Webley Longspur 54 bore revolver. This is an interesting cased Brevette Longspur 54 bore revolver with some unusual features. The cylinder release is similar to a Comblain quick release and the barrel is located with a fixed wedge but can be disassembled in seconds by depressing the lever under the barrel which is not a loading lever. An Adams style loading lever is in-situ on the barrel. The barrel is 6.5" long and the overall length of the revolver is 13". An advantage over the Webley Longspur is that the revolver can also be fired double action. The maker is Dupree and the revolver is stamped with Liege proofs and the serial number 1181.Dupree was registered in the Warne district of Liege and there is some information available on the Littlegun website and a very similar revolver is featured in Myatt's book on handguns. Many Webley and Adams frames were manufactured in Belgium The vendor told me that the case was discovered in an antique shop in the 1960's and when picked up the bottom fell out of it! The accessories are original and accompanied the revolver but the case was restored and the revolver professionally refinished by a leading London Maker as the underside had stained with the damp hence the price for an exceptionally rare and interesting item.
Unusual Late 18th Century Early 19th Century Paper Mache Hunting Theme Sun Shades We try to offer the unusual as this is more fun! Here we have a pair of Paper Mache Ladies Sun Screens with Naive Hunting Scenes. At this time ladies cosmetics considered of a volatile cocktail of grease, arsenic and lead and was likely to run in the sun and in any case a pale complexion was considered desirable. These sun shades on a walnut handle would have been used to shade a ladies face from the sun or to no doubt hide her blushes just prior to swooning! Swooning being a popular event in those days being brought on by both theatrical vogue and the ladies having the air squeezed out of their lungs by their corsets. I am pretty certain that this pair hasn't seen daylight in more than a hundred years and they suffer from the ingrained dust and tobacco smoke of that time but fortunately considering they are a card based material, no water damage, insect or rodent attack which is quite remarkable. These are oil on panel and would probably restore wonderfully to their former glory but this is a challenge for someone else. With the hunting and dog theme these are certain to be of interest to many and an object seldom encountered in Shooting. circles as a result of their vulnerable nature. I have not seen the like before and probably won't again so an interesting acquisition for the collector who thought they had everything.
Unusual Shattuck swing out cylinder pocket revolver. The Shattuck pocket revolver is seldom encountered as it was manufactured in very limited quantities and was one of the first revolvers with a swing out revolver ever produced in the USA. Patented on Nov 4, 1879, it was manufactured in rather small quantities by CS Shattuck of Hatfield, Mass. The cylinder shaft is attached by a screw under the barrel. By activating a locking cam on the right side of the frame behind the cylinder, the rear part of the cylinder comes free, allowing it to swing out to the right for loading. This is an excellent example in obsolete 32 calibre with virtually intact plating and crisp stamping with good Gutta-Percha grips. This is an interesting revolver that would grace any revolver collection.
Unusual Underhammer Belgium Pistol This is clearly a high quality made pistol. The top is stamped Brevet d'invention sans gar'te du Gouv.t which basically means invention without a patent. It is quite a hand cannon and there is an attachment point for a shoulder stock which could have been screwed in. This pistol was made in circa 1840 .
US Arms Company Co US Arms Company manufactured a range of pocket revolvers loosely based on the Smith & Wesson patents. This particular revolver is in 32 rim fire calibre and index's, cocks and locks tightly. Grips are very nice and the finish although faded is even. Overall an attractive little gun.
US Arms No 32 Revolver Circa 1878 The US Arms Co aka The United States Arms Company were fairly short lived and were extant between 1874 and 1878 and were based in Brooklyn New York. This well made 6 shot solid framed nickel plated revolver was manufactured in .32 rim fire ( now obsolete ) and was an ideal close quarter defence weapon. Forget what you hear about small calibres, there were more deer and cattle shot with .22 LR than anything else in the early 1900's. This particular revolver indexes, cocks and locks perfectly, nothing wrong with this one! There is a wide range of 32 rim fire revolvers available to collect and this one would be a good start or enhancement to any collection.
US Arms No 38 revolver This is a good looking US Arms No 38 revolver. The revolver is a spur triggered 38 Calibre RF revolver which cocks, locks and rotates perfectly. Mechanically sound the revolver is nickel plated and is in virtually mint state. The revolver looks better than the macro photographs as it is difficult to photograph the nickel finish. The revolver has good grips, a very strong mainspring and disassembles easily. The problem with the revolver is that some pilgrim decided to file off the hammer spur to deactivate it! This is hardly needed because the ammunition is unobtainable but it might have happened in the distant past. You cannot see this unless you cock the hammer and most wouldn't notice assuming there may be a transfer bar but this is what it is and is reflected in the price for a very attractive looking revolver. The spur could be added back by TIG welding but the revolver looks good anyway so why mess with it. This revolver belongs to the genre of firearms which became known as “Saturday Night Specials”. This is somewhat of a misnomer as these days the phrase “Saturday Night Specials” is synonymous with mass produced poor quality guns but the history is somewhat different. Shortly after the Civil War gun control began to rear its head and many States introduced Laws that only allowed the carrying of large pistols such as the Army & Navy Models. This was a deliberate policy to ensure that only the affluent could carry firearms and that firearms would be restricted from entering the ownership of the newly freed Black population or the poorer White settlers. In certain settlements the law was further refined by local Bylaws to restrict the wearing of firearms on a Saturday night when much of the local trouble was caused. Wyatt Earp is known for introducing such laws. To circumnavigate the law, smaller pocket pistols were carried as these were easily concealable and equally as deadly in close combat as their larger counterparts and this is the origin of the “Saturday Night Special”. Many famous makers such as Smith & Wesson and Marlin produced such guns and these were of reasonable and often high quality. Fanciful names were given to the guns such as the Dictator, Smoker, American Bulldog, Devil, Red Jacket etc. Many of them were extremely short lived in the face of extreme competition and are now a scarce and interesting link to those times. An interesting collection can be made of these little revolvers and prices of secondary manufacturers of US arms are increasing as the home market begins to appreciate the significance of these arms. This is a typical example of a “Saturday Night Special”. I now accept credit cards.
US Arms revolver hidden in book! This is a US Arms Co Model 38 pocket revolver in 38 rimfire calibre. US Arms were a prolific maker of small handguns of some quality. The makers name is stamped on the barrel as is the model on the top strap. The walnut grips are in good condition as can be seen. The revolver is profusely engraved. The main spring is very strong and although the revolver cocks and locks it does sometimes take some effort to ensure the hammer locks. An interesting decorative piece. The revolver is cased in a "book" that would have been no doubt hidden on a book shelf to give unwanted visitors an unpleasant surprise. The leather bound book is contemporary to the revolver and contains some empty rimfire cases. The spine is a little distressed but could be glued if you wish. Overall an interesting and curious vintage firearm manufactured in the mid 1880's.
US Cased Cased Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver This is a good early example of a Colt Model 1849 pocket pistol in 31 calibre in its original case with accessories. The Colt pocket pistol was the largest selling pistol in the 1800’s a record that was not to be surpassed by the later single army colt revolver until 1912. The revolver cocks and locks as it should with very little play. The cylinder scene is visible and all numbers match. The serial number is in the 213000 range which according to Jordan and Watts seminal work on the Colt Pocket 1849 dates it to 1862. Frames were stamped 31 cal from around serial number 230000 to differentiate the 1849 from the newly introduce .36 calibre Pocket Navy. The case is an American case with flat hinges and contains the correct Colt stamped mould and American Eagle embossed powder flask with a correct period US cap tin. This is a Civil War era revolver and thousands of these were purchased privately as back up weapons and were still in use during the 1870’s. The lining of the case is original green velvet and there is an old crack in the lid. One compartment contains a quantity of lead balls that from their oxidation were probably cast in the 1860’s. Overall a decent example of an iconic revolver and a true piece of history.
USA Civiil War Era Sharps Model 1863 Carbine This is an interesting and handsome Sharps straight breech 52 calibre model 1863 carbine. Why interesting? Several reasons, the first is that it remains in the original percussion calibre and hasn’t been converted to a metallic cartridge as most were. The second reason is that someone has put a Lyman tang sight on the wrist and a later foresight so clearly some enthusiast in the past has enjoyed shooting this capping breech loader. The carbine is stamped on the side of the receiver “C.SHARPS PAT OCT 5TH 1852”. The bore is very good with very sharp rifling and of course it is mechanically sound. The Sharps system was acclaimed by both sides in the US Civil War as being robust and efficient. The complete breech block drops out in seconds for cleaning by simply releasing the lever pin by turning and pulling out the lever on the right hand side of the receiver. The wood is American Walnut and this has been lightly varnished. There is some case colouring extant and the rest of the metal has toned down to a mellow patina. Personally I would remove the tang sight which is a £200 accessory in its own right and replace the foresight with a contemporary sight and you would substantially increase the value of the carbine. The carbine version was very popular with the cavalry of both the Union and Confederate armies and was issued in much larger numbers than other carbines of the war and was top in production in front of the Spencer or Burnside carbine. The falling block action lent itself to conversion to the new metallic cartridges developed in the late 1860s, and many of these converted carbines in .50-70 Government were used during the Indian Wars in the decades immediately following the Civil War. Unlike the Sharps rifle, the carbine was very popular and almost 90,000 were produced. By 1863, it was the most common weapon carried by Union cavalry regiments, although in 1864 many were replaced by 7-shot Spencer carbines. See my excellent Spencer Carbine on this site.
USA Martini Henry Peabody Variant 1874 This rifle is not what it initially appears to be when you look closely! This is not a Mark 1 Martini Henry manufactured in Britain but a scarce Peabody Martini manufactured in the USA for the Turkish Army. The Turks wanted an exact copy of the British Martini, hence the similarity but there are some differences that stand out. The rifle is missing the Mk1 and Crowned VR stamps and has a safety catch forward of the trigger. The most significant difference is that the Turkish rifle is chambered for it’s own unique cartridge, the 11.3 x 59R which is often referred to as the .45 Turkish. This is an early rifle and is an 1874 Type A model with a serial number of F32. It was manufactured by the Providence Tool Company. The Ottoman Empire was a significant military force in the 19th Century and these Martini derivatives were replaced by Mauser Bolt Action Rifles and most were scrapped. They were still in use during WW1 but Turkey being on the wrong side of the Armistice having allied to Axis forces ensured that remaining stockpiles were destroyed. There is significant research information available about these interesting rifles and this one would make a good addition to a Martini collection. As can be seem the wood is decent, and the bore has good rifling. The rifle is mechanically sound and works flawlessly. A scarce and interesting rifle.
Velodog revolver with inert round. The Velo-Dog was a pocket revolver originally created in France by Charles-François Galand in the late 19th century as a defense for cyclists against dog attacks. The name is a portmanteau of "velocipede" and "dog". Later model Velo-Dog type made by HDH (model name: Lincoln-Bossu). Surviving examples vary considerably in appearance, but have certain features in common. The hammer is shrouded to avoid its snagging on clothing, so the weapon is double action only. All have short barrels and originally fired the 5.75 mm (.22 calibre) Velo-dog cartridge, although many of the Velo-Dogs produced after 1900 accepted .22 LR or .25 ACP rounds. Another feature on many late models Velo-Dogs is the lack of a trigger guard, and a trigger that folds into the body of the weapon when not in use. For the more humane, there were cartridges loaded with cayenne pepper or dust. The original revolver uses the 5.75mm Velo-dog cartridge, a centrefire 5.5 mm (nominally 5.75) cartridge slightly less powerful than the 22 Long Rifle, using a jacketed bullet. This particular revolver cocks and shoots double action perfectly and is mechanically sound. There is some surface pitting as can be seen but it does look a reasonable example. I will supply an INERT round with this revolver for display purposes. The price includes overnight courier as I no longer will ship by Royal Mail as it is unsafe.
Very Good 17th Century Irish Powder Horn Dublin Castle It's not often that I can use the "unique" word as there is no such thing as very or nearly unique, it is or it isn't! In this case I can say with some certainty that the Mr Muddock who had his name engraved on his flask probably didn't have another one. Here we have a flattened cow horn powder flask finely engraved J Muddock Castel Yarde Dublin 1685. 1685 was a significant year in Irish history. Trouble started in 1685 when Charles II, King of England, died and was succeeded by James II, a Catholic. The native Irish, almost 100% Catholic, rejoiced at this turn of events as they believed King James would restore their lands to them. They therefore gave him their wholehearted support. The powerful nobles in England, who were predominantly Protestant, were not about to lose their power without a fight so they invited William of Orange to come to England to be their king. He happily accepted their offer and the rest as we know is history! 17th Century powder flasks are uncommon and those with the possibility of provenance more so. A 327 year old powder flask with some certainty of provenance is uncommon. I do not know who J ( possibly T) Muddock was but the date was certainly significant for him. These artefacts would make a fascinating research project as Muddock is not the commonest of names and probably evolved into Murdoch. Was he a Rebel or a Royalist? Research may determine this. Please note the plain flask has been sold.
Very Good Arisaka Type 99 7.7mm Rifle This is a very nice, shootable and collectible Arisaka Model 99 short rifle. The Model 99 superceded the Model 38 in 1939 and became the "workhorse" of the Japanese Army. This is an early one from the Kokura arsenal and is particularly nice as the Receiver and Bolt Rear Cover Royal Chrysanthemum marks haven't been defaced as most are. This rifle was originally issued with "aircraft wings" on the rear sight to shoot the rifle at aircraft but these were often removed as being totally impracticable. There was also a wire monopod and this was often removed. Both parts are available and replaceable. The rifle stock was made in 2 pieces and on most of the later type 99's and 38's unseasoned wood was used but this rifle was made at the height of the Japanese military might and workmanship and materials were excellent so there is no huge separation crack to be seen on the butt. This rifle will be supplied with its accompanying bayonet and scabbard and this in itself is a very nice piece of militaria as the blade has not been messed with in any way and is in excellent condition. I will also supply 20 rounds of factory new ammunition to get you started ( FAC holders only ). For an Arisaka that has seen action this is as good as it gets. I can courier to your RFD for £15.00. I am happy to store if a variation needs to be applied for. Note the rifle has its cleaning rod, this was removed when it was re-proofed this month and I forgot to replace it. The new British Nitro Proof mark is quite discreet and under the barrel.
Very Good BSA Martini Cadet rifle This is an excellent Martini Cadet rifle in .310 obsolete calibre. I have handled dozens of these over the years and this is a good one I would consider keeping for myself. Lots of original colour, unadulterated and with an original sling. The slings didn't last if they were used heavily. A lot better than most and becoming scarce. I bought this from a chap in the USA who bought it in the 1960's and never fired it as he could not find ammunition and didn't reload. One of the better ones. The Martini Cadet is a centre fire single-shot rifle produced in the United Kingdom by BSA and W.W. Greener for the use of Australian military Cadets. Based on a miniature version of the Martini–Henry it was internally different. Chambered for the .310 Cadet also known as the .310 Greener, they were also sold to the public as the BSA No.4, 4a, 4b and 5 in other calibres like the .297/230 and .22 rim fire.
Very Good Colt Colt Navy Revolver Manufactured 1863. This 36 calibre percussion Colt Navy revolver has matching serial numbers on the barrel, frame, cylinder, wedge, butt strap and arbor which dates manufacture to 1863.The Navy was Colt's most popular model at the time and supplied to both the Civilian and Military market. This revolver would have been supplied at the height of the US Civil War. The condition of the revolver is excellent, the lock up is as tight as the day it was made, bore is clean and sharp and all edges are sharp with no damaged screws as can be seen. There is a little colour left on the loading rammer and evidence of silver plate on the trigger guard. The cylinder scene is completely extant and I would hypothesise that the cylinder was rolled at the start of the use of new roll dies which periodically wore out. Fortunately for a revolver in this condition no collector or dealer has attempted to "improve" it by re-bluing it. Grips are excellent and special order with most varnish remaining. The address on the top strap is Col Sam Colt's New York address. Other than the finish described the rest of the revolver has toned down to a mellow plum grey. If you are looking for an excellent and fully functioning example of Colt's most iconic revolver and without paying a crazy price this might be the one for you.
Very Good early 19th Century Coach Gun by Theophilus Richards This is a handsome looking coach gun or blunderbuss with spring bayonet manufactured by Theophilus Richards who was a quality English Gun maker located at the “Royal Patent Waterproof Gun Manufactory” on 33 High Street, Birmingham, England from 1818 to 1833. Theophilus Richards is recorded as the father of the renowned Gun maker William Wesley Richards.c.1810. This particular gun was manufactured early in his career and has a beautiful mellow patina. The walnut stock is virtually unblemished, no cracks or major problems, the 13” barrel is a nominal 3 bore with a swamped muzzle opening out to a 2 bore for fast loading. The makers name is clearly stamped on top of the barrel and lock and the proof marks are clear and evident just after the knox. The spring mechanism of the bayonet works perfectly which allows the bayonet to swing out viciously and lock in place. The lock has an extremely strong spring and locks on the half and full cock. There are little marks of quality such as pineapple finial on the brass trigger guard and the original ramrod is of ebony with a worm screw for unloading. The stock is finished with a brass butt plate as you would expect for a gun to be used in all weathers. As coach guns go, this is a very nice example that would be difficult to better. I have seen more ornate guns but this is a solid working tool that was made for arduous and extended service and as such is in a remarkable state of preservation and this handsome looking gun would enhance any English flintlock collection. I will also consider part exchange on any of my stock.
Very Good Greener Police Shotgun in obsolete calibre. The Greener Mk 111 Police Gun is not a rare shotgun by any stretch of the imagination as tens of thousands of them were manufactured by the Birmingham Company of Greener to be issued to native police forces throughout the British Empire. The Government sought a simplistic weapon that could be easily maintained but was a single shot of limited range should that weapon ever be turned against the Government that had issued them. Another innovation was the fact that the cartridge that the gun fired was unique to that weapon and these could only be procured from official sources. The cartridge is a shouldered brass case necked down to 14 bore with an unusual primer system that could only be fired with the modified firing pin system that had been incorporated into the Martini action that had served British Forces admirably in the previous Century The firing pin of the shotgun was modified so that it could only be used with these unusual cartridges. Instead of a normal needle shaped firing pin, the new pin on this shotgun was shaped like a trident, with the outer two prongs longer than the middle prong. The base of the new cartridge has a deep circular groove around the primer cap. The reason for this groove is so that the two outer prongs fit into the groove and the shorter middle prong can strike the primer of the cartridge. Therefore, the Mark-III shotgun could not use any other ammunition, except for this type of cartridge. If any other cartridge was used, the two longer outer prongs of the striker would strike the base of the cartridge first and prevent the shorter middle prong from striking the primer. In addition a normal cartridge will not fit the chamber and allow the action to close. Note the photographs of an inert round that illustrates the system. The barrel is protected by a full wooden stock which ended with a steel nose cap so theoretically the gun could be rested on the end of the barrel without damage to the muzzle. A lot of thought went into this weapon to make it fool proof and robust. By far, the largest number of these was issued to Egyptian forces and these were stamped in Farsi and were hard used. It is very unusual to see these in outstanding condition. The difficulty in obtaining 14 gauge Greener cartridges made the weapon totally unsuitable for resale after being withdrawn from service so most were destroyed with the bulk of those that survived being rechambered for the ubiquitous 12 gauge cartridge. It is very uncommon to find one of these shotguns in the original obsolete Greener calibre, which can be held without a license, in good condition. This one is in outstanding condition for the model and would grace any shotgun collection and can be held as an object of curiosity without a license. The shotgun has clearly seen service issue and has a rack or issue number cartouche on the butt but it has survived in excellent condition. An interesting gun and difficult to find in this condition.
Very Good Japanese Arisaka Model 38 Rifle This is a superb Type 38 Arisaka Rifle in 6.5mm calibre. Originally designed in 1905 by Captain Kijiro Nambu (of later handgun fame) this was the mainstay of the Imperial Japanese Army and one of the strongest military bolt action rifles adopted by a major country. It features a modified Mauser action and chromed barrel with a rear sight calibrated to 2400 metres. Captain, later General Nambu, reduced the Mauser action to components that were extremely reliable, functional and cost effective. The authors of Japanese Military Rifles consider this rifle to be his most significant contribution to Japanese ordnance. This particular rifle is in excellent condition and was a battlefield pickup from a fallen Japanese soldier because the royal Chrysanthemum is still intact. When the war ended it was agreed that the symbol could be ground off to save face by not allowing the surrendered weapons with the royal symbol to be handled by foreigners. This was done mechanically or electrically and all traces of the Chrysanthemum were removed. The rifle was made in the Koishikawa (Tokyo) Arsenal later renamed the Kokura Arsenal. It is complete with the correct cleaning rod and an unusually good stock as these were hard used and not given up easily. This is an early rifle as identified by the serial number, inverted “V” foresight without guards and the extended tang projection on the Chrysanthemum rear bolt safety cover. There is every possibility that this rifle was used in the second Sino-Japanese war when Japan invaded China but it originated in the USA where it was brought back from the Pacific theatre. The rifle is an outstanding example and has a good shooting bore and was recently proofed (November 2013). It would be difficult to find a better example.
Very Good Marlin Model 27 Pump Action Rifle in 25 RF Calibre. Marlin patented their model 27 in 1890 at the same time as Winchester introduced their famous model 1890 rifle in direct competition. This rifle is chambered in 25 rim fire an obsolete calibre. These are scarce rifles in the UK and the USA and Marlin's are quickly surpassing Winchesters in popularity as Winchester prices are increasing beyond the reach of many collectors. This particular rifle is a solid example with no flaws and mechanically excellent with good wood. Marlin 27 rifles had an excellent reputation for quality and were well built. This particular rifle is a take down and it should be noticed that the safety button is extant. These rifles are often find with this missing as they are a screw in component. A handsome looking rifle that would enhance any collection.
Very Good Model 1879 Rolling Block Carbine Another great Argentine rolling block ,this one the scarcer Carbine , super bore and crisp mechanics from the reneged Argentine contract. Very old Arsenal refinished as all of the hoard was and a good example to enhance any collection. Carbine has clear Remington patent dates on the tang and the saddle ring. An interesting rolling block.
Very Good Model 1884 Springfield Trapdoor Rifle This is a quite stunning looking Model 1884 Springfield military issue rifle in 45/70 calibre. The rifle has the correct Buffington Sights and by this stage of manufacture had reached the height of its refinement. This particular rifle is unit marked to the Massachusetts Infantry which was actually an artillery detail that saw action in the Spanish American War. It is possible to research these rifles and determine where and to whom it was issued to. The extractor works perfectly and it has a fine bore. It would be difficult to better this rifle. The rifle requires a suitably endorsed FAC but I will store without charge if a variation is needed.
Very Good Pattern 1844 Cavalry Carbine Handsome looking cavalry carbine with captive rammer, rifled barrel and walnut stock with no cracks. Mechanically sound and overall a decent example. More details to follow but you probably know what this is!
VERY GOOD REMINGTON POCKET REVOLVER CIRCA 1860 VERY GOOD REMINGTON NEW MODEL .31 CAL POCKET REVOLVER circa 1860 100% original 5 shot with 3 ¼” octagon barrel addressed “PATENTED SEPT. 1858/E. REMINGTON & SONS ILION, N.Y. U.S.A. on top flat. These little revolvers are far scarcer than the larger Army models as many were converted to cartridge in the late 1860’s. This revolver is mechanically sound with the original grips and overall a very pleasing example.
Very Good Webley Cased British Bulldog in .442 Calibre This is a very good Webley No 2 British Bulldog revolver housed in a nice contemporary Webley case with correct accessories. This revolver is correctly stamped Webley’s No 2 442 CF with the famous flying bullet logo and the 2.3/8” barrel is stamped P.Webley & Son, London and Birmingham. The revolver is mechanically perfect and has considerable areas of original finish extant. This particular revolver is featured on pages 94 & 95 of Joel Black, Homer Ficken and Frank Michaels’ book “Webley Solid Frame revolvers” with excellent images. Provenance ex-Roger Michaud collection.
Very Good Winchester Model 1887 Shotgun A handsome shotgun. The Model 1887 was the first truly successful repeating shotgun. Its lever-action design was chosen at the behest of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, best known at the time as manufacturers of lever-action firearms such as the Winchester model 1873. Designer John Browning suggested that a pump-action would be much more appropriate for a repeating shotgun, but Winchester management's position was that, at the time, the company was known as a "lever-action firearm company", and felt that their new shotgun must also be a lever-action for reasons of brand recognition. Browning responded by designing a breech-loading, rolling block lever-action. To Winchester's credit, however, they later introduced a Browning designed pump-action shotgun known as the Model 1893 (an early production version of the model 1897), after the introduction of smokeless powder. Shotgun cartridges at the time used black powder as a propellant, and so the Model 1887 shotgun was designed and chambered for less powerful black powder cartridge. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder cartridges. This is an excellent 10 gauge example of this model with a good walnut stock, good stamping and reasonable barrel. The barrel rates an acceptable 7/10 thanks to black powder shooting, the stamping is crisp and not buffed.Unlike many, this one has the original steel butt plate. A decent tight nice looking gun, mechanically sound and at the right price. Possible old refinish but if so a good job and engraving does not show buffing. An iconic shot gun. This is an obsolete calibre and can be held without a license.
Victorian Rook Rifle by P Webley & Sons Very nice Rook rifle by P Webley and Sons London in 360 Rook calibre. Decent shooting bore and very good woodwork. Slight pitting in one small external area of barrel, leaf sights intact and excellent mechanics. Could be considerably improved but a completely untouched "sleeper" from an iconic quality maker.
Vintage Greener GP 12 Bore Shotgun This is a Greener Single Shot GP or “General Purpose” 12 bore take down shotgun which was the mainstay of gamekeepers and rough shooters in Great Britain until the 1960’s and is still a useful gun today. The gun is based on the Martini action which is a strong box-like action, designed by Friederich von Martini of Switzerland that lends itself to the manufacture of robust single shot weapons. It has a falling block that is lowered for loading by a lever that also cocks the striker ready to fire. The last portion of downward movement of the breech block causes the ejector to rotate on its axis pin and thus move the spent cartridge case from the chamber (far enough to be removed by the fingers). A shotgun variant known as the Greener Police Gun or the Greener Prison Shotgun was chambered in a special round that would make the weapon theoretically useless to anyone who stole it. In reality a paper wrap around a 16 bore cartridge overcame this obstacle. This particular gun is in decent order as can be seen with a good bore and would make a useful farm gun, rough shooters gun or cheap first venture into owning a shotgun with a bit of history behind it.
W H Monks Snider Rook Rifle Now this is a splendid little rifle and seldom seen. A W H Monks of Chester Rook & Rabbit rifle in obsolete 380 Long Rifle. The rifle is in excellent condition with a super bore and nice tight Snider pattern breach. Most rich deep bluing remains and there is no fault with the wood work. The rifle handles nicely and has the original flip up rear sight extant which has a beautiful royal blue finish as does the foresight. The lock has the "Sniders patent" mark stamped on it as it should. All in all a very desirable rifle and I want one except my wife won't let me keep it as this is stock!
Webley This British Bulldog revolver "surfaced" in the USA where large numbers of them were sold in the 1880's as a viable and less expensive sidearm than the Colt's, Remington's and Smith & Wessons. Chambered in .450 CF this revolver with its short barrel was easily concealable but was very effective at close range. This particular revolver is in exceptional condition and is contained in its later relined case. The bore is bright with deep rifling and the action is crisp and tight with good clean grips. The finish has mellowed to a plum brown patina overall. There are several excellent books on the generic "Bulldog" which together with the shotgun was reputed to be the gun that really did "Win the West" and this Webley Bulldog with its flying bullet logo could be said to be the quintessential example and in this condition would be difficult to find better. This revolver will require a Section 7(1) or 7(3) Firearms license to purchase.
WEBLEY 5 SHOT 442 C/F BRITISH BULLDOG REVOLVER IRISH RETAILER. This is a scarce 5 shot Webley No 2 British Bulldog revolver in 442 C/F. This revolver was manufactured for and retailed for W. Kavanagh of Dame St Dublin. The revolver is stamped with Webley’s famous “flying bullet” trademark logo and the calibre. The retailer’s name is also stamped on the top flat of the barrel with the address on the side. Typically of revolvers manufactured for the Irish market by Webley the revolver has extra-long semi bird head walnut grips. The revolver is profusely engraved with a small scroll pattern on the side panels, trigger guard and cylinder. The revolver cocks and locks solidly in both double and single action and the loading gate is extant. The revolver has some traces of the original finish that has toned down evenly and is visually very pleasing. Overall this is a very good example of a classical Webley revolver that does not appear often on the market.
Webley Bentley Style120 Bore Rimfire Pocket Revolver This is a Bentley pattern rim fire revolver in approximately 120 bore. The carving of the grips would seem to be indicative of Belgian Manufacure but it does not have Liege proofs but Birmingham view marks- Curious! The revolver is double action only and cocks and index's fine with a decent bore and nice grips. At some time the last 1/16" tip of the firing pin has been chipped off but this is the only real detrimental observation I can make. All in all it looks an attractive little revolver with the finish faded down nicely with no surface rust or pitting. This really is a transitional piece and could even have been a percussion conversion. There were thousands of Bentley style revolvers made in this period but unfortunately many did not survive.
Webley Fosbery Automatic Revolver The Webley Fosbery Automatic Revolver really needs no introduction. Invented by Colonel G V Fosbery in the closing years of the 19th Century the revolver was almost a hybrid weapon. Webley-Fosbery revolver used recoil energy generated by each discharge, to rotate the cylinder and cock the hammer for next shot. To be able to do so, it had a two-part frame. Bottom part consisted of a grip with trigger unit, and has rails on its upper surface. The upper frame, which held the cylinder and tip-down barrel, as well as hammer unit, as able to recoil on the lower frame rails against a spring. Upon recoil, a special stud, fixed on the lower frame, followed the zig-zag tracks in the cylinder to rotate it and index next loaded chamber with the barrel. At the same moment, hammer was cocked. Once all ammunition in the cylinder was expended, revolver was reloaded by pushing on the barrel lock release and swinging the barrel down on its hinge, thus tipping the rear of the cylinder up. This movement activated the automatic extractor which pulled empty cases out of cylinder chambers simultaneously. Once cylinder was emptied, fresh cartridges were loaded (either one by one or all at once, by using a Prideaux or similar speed loader reloading device), then barrel was swung up and locked. After reloading, revolver could be fired either by double action pull on the trigger, or by manual cocking of the hammer with subsequent single-action trigger pull. Webley-Fosbery revolvers were unusual in respect of the fact that they were also fitted with manual safety levers, located on the left side of the grip frame. The revolver is then carried "cocked and locked" and a small brass plate with the word "safety" is exposed. This particular revolver is featured in Dowell's classic work on Webley's on page 77 and was manufactured in 1903. Bore is excellent, colour is fading and there is a small thin crack on the right grip that is not noticeable. Mechanics are excellent and overall it is a very pleasing and rare revolver. Suitable for both Section 7(1) and Section 7(3) ownership.
Webley Fosbery with provenance to multiple gallantry recipient. Colonel Charles Howard Dawes DSO MVO Webley Fosbery Revolver Calibre .455 serial number 980. Of Kelston, Camberley, Surrey Born Lucknow India 31st August 1871. Served in West Yorkshire Regiment and later in the 3rd Punjab Cavalry 1895 (Later 23rd Cavalry). Served on North West Frontier of India and Tirah 1897 (Medal and 3 bars) in charge of Kings Indian Orderly Officers (MVO 1913 – Member of the Royal Victorian Order). Served in Mesopotamia in the Great War and was appointed Brigade Major 6th Cavalry in July 1915 and was present at the Battles of Ctesiphon, retreat to Kut and Ali-el-Garbi. Present at Battles of Shaik Saad, Waadi, Hannah and Dujoulah (Awarded Distinguished Service Order for Gallantry) Operations on Euphrates October 1918 (mentioned in despatches) on the Tigris, Battle of Huwaish (Bar to DSO awarded) Afghan War 1919 (mentioned in despatches). Promoted to Colonel in 1921 and retired in 1922 having served his Country for 27 years most of which in hostile territory and being awarded Gallantry awards on 4 separate occasions in addition to the Royal Victorian Order and several campaign medals. Colonel Dawes was the son of Major General William Harrington Hawes BSC who served throughout the Indian Mutiny at Lucknow and Cammpore and died in 1899. Webley records show that the revolver was purchased by Mrs Dawes for him on December 30th 1903. This is an early revolver serial number 980 and is illustrated on page 77 of Gordon Bruce’s book “Webley & Scott Automatic Pistols”. Ex Eddie Shoebridge Collection (New Zealand) Mechanically perfect, much original finish marked as retailed by the CRS (Co-operative Retail Society) on the top strap. British Officers were obliged to purchase their own side arms and the CRS were a main outfitter who would supply anything from weapons to camp beds and travelling military desks. Pleasing looking revolver considering it was actually carried by a serving officer who was no stranger to combat. There were only 1000 Model 1901 revolvers manufactured and survival rates are estimated at no more than 10%. It is uncommon to find revolvers with provenance but to find one that was undoubtedly carried in action by an officer who was a Cavalry man and recipient of four gallantry awards is exceptional. An outstanding historical artefact. Private sale from my collection FAC to FAC. Please note that in the UK you will need an edorsed FAC to possess. Please note that I do not deactivate or deal in deacctivated firearms.
Webley Mark 6 Holster Circa 1916 An original and excellent condition brown leather WW1 holster for the Webley Mk.VI .455" Service Revolver. It has a large rear belt loop with original brass fittings. All leather, brass fittings and stitching are intact and in excellent condition. This would be a difficult holster to better.
Webley Mark 6 Revolver dated 1916 To say the Webley Mark 6 revolver was the mainstay of the British Army's Officer Corp in World War One would be an understatement. This iconic revolver is dated 1916 and in excellent condition. I doubt if it could be improved on. I now accept credit cards.
Webley Mk1 Air Pistol This is a good working Webley Mk 1 Air pistol in .177 calibre. A good example of an iconic British Air Pistol to start a collection with.
Webley Model WG 1892 This is a Webley model WG or Webley Government model 1892 that is sometimes erroneously referred to as the "Webley Green". Other than the famous Fosbery, the early 1892 with it's classic "Church Steeple" cylinder is probably the most desirable model in the series and now an extremely scarce model. Apart from our countries scandalous destruction of most of these to placate the gutter press, whatever survived is now earnestly collected particularly in the USA where the importance and quality of Webley has created a demand that outstrips supply. This particular model has a high degree of original finish left, a good bore and excellent hard rubber grips. The revolver was marketed by the Army and Navy CSL as marked on the top rib of the barrel and it also is stamped with Webley's flying bullet and the model number. This has a 6" barrel and usually would have been a private purchase by an officer as side arms had to be purchased individually. This is a break open revolver with automatic extraction and the action is smooth and crisp. Overall a thoroughly good example of this interesting revolver and seldom seen today. I will hold for variations at no charge. I now accept credit cards.
Webley WG 1892 This is an excellent 6 shot break open, automatic extraction, WG Army model in 455/476 calibre retailed by the Army and Navy CSL as stamped on the top rib. The revolver has a good bore, much original finish and is mechanically sound. The WG was highly regarded for both accuracy and quality and were the side arm of choice of many Officers in the British Army. Now becoming scarce this is an example that would be difficult to better. I can hold without cost for a variation.
Werndl Carbine Model 1878 Please see my notes on the Werndl rifle. This is a good model 1878 Carbine with the later internal hammer, modified lock and breech. Good stock and mechanically sound, an interesting Carbine that was still in use by secondary troops during WW1.
Westley Richards Cadet Rifle 310 calibre Decent Martini Cadet by Westley Richards, good shooting bore and reasonable woodwork as can be seen. Completely untouched and could be significantly improved. Great fun to shoot and very accurate if put on a Firearms Certificate but sold as an antique Section 58(2). Now becoming very scarce as the Australian sources have now dried up as a result of Draconian Gun Laws.
William Richards 10 Bore Hammer Gun This is a good 10 bore hammer gun manufactured by William Richards ( Not to be confused with Westley Richards ) complete with its leather travelling case. Birmingham proofed with 30" barrels LOP is 14". Barrels are marked W.Richards London Laminated Steel. From the barrel measurements this gun has seen little use and there is that much "meat" around the chamber and barrels it could probably be re-chambered for 8 bore! This is a heavy gun! The overall condition of the gun is good with some very nice engraving on the locks.This is a top opener with a Doll's Head, best described as - A rib extension on a break-open gun, ending in a circular or semi-circular shape in plan (resembling the head of a doll), mating into a similarly-shaped recess in the top of the receiver, designed to resist the tendency of the barrels to pull away from the standing breech when firing. Because an action's centerpoint of flexing when firing is at the base of the standing breech, not at the hinge pin, a passive doll's head extension makes an effective extra fastener, even without additional mechanical locks operated by the opening lever. Clearly this was incorporated as this was manufactured as a large bore gun expected to fire heavy loads, probably for Goose Shooting. The butt pad is bakelite of the era featuring an interesting hunting scene of red deer. There is one minor flaw and that is that the escutcheon on the underside of the wrist has been removed, probably as it was a previous metal and sold in austere times or possibly because a previous owner wanted to remain anonymous and remove his initials. More photographs available to serious parties. Overall a pleasing looking gun.
Winchester 1887 10 gauge lever action shotgun. The Model 1887 was the first truly successful repeating shotgun. Its lever-action design was chosen at the behest of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, best known at the time as manufacturers of lever-action firearms such as the Winchester model 1873. Designer John Browning suggested that a pump-action would be much more appropriate for a repeating shotgun, but Winchester management's position was that, at the time, the company was known as a "lever-action firearm company", and felt that their new shotgun must also be a lever-action for reasons of brand recognition. Browning responded by designing a breech-loading, rolling block lever-action. To Winchester's credit, however, they later introduced a Browning designed pump-action shotgun known as the Model 1893 (an early production version of the model 1897), after the introduction of smokeless powder. Shotgun cartridges at the time used black powder as a propellant, and so the Model 1887 shotgun was designed and chambered for less powerful black powder cartridge. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder cartridges. This is an excellent 10 gauge example of this model with a good walnut stock, good stamping and reasonable barrel. The barrel rates an acceptable 7/10 thanks to black powder shooting, the stamping is crisp and not buffed. A decent tight nice looking gun, mechanically sound and at the right price. Possibly refinished but if so a good job and engraving does not show buffing. An iconic shot gun. This is an obsolete calibre and can be held without a license.
Winchester 1887/1901 10 Gauge Lever Shotgun The Winchester 1901 is basically an 1887 with some small improvements. John Moses Browning anticipated the demise of the Lever Action Shotgun as soon as Winchester introduced their 1897 pump action shotgun and he was not wrong! Only 14,600 examples of the 1901 were manufactured between 1901 and 1917, an insignificant number for Winchester. This particular shotgun in 10 bore short obsolete, has been untouched. The action is fine and there is much original bluing on the receiver but the barrel has seen much better days but the scarcity would make it a good refurbishment project. A well travelled but honest gun the only real flaw is a discolouration ring towards the end of the barrel which is not a bulge and there is no obvious annular internal damage. This could be hidden with a decent bluing job but that is down to the new owner to decide. Barrel lengths of 1901's are stated as 20" and 30" and this is right in between at 25" but looks right. Despite the wear it is an attractive looking shotgun and a real conversation piece!
Winchester 1887/1901 10 Gauge Lever Shotgun This is a super nice Winchester 1901 Shotgun. The model 1901 was basically a redesign on the earlier 1887 model. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder shot shells, and so a redesign resulted in the stronger Winchester Model 1901, 10-gauge only, to handle the advent of the more powerful smokeless powder. No 12-gauge chambering was offered, as Winchester did not want the Model 1901 to compete with their successful 12-gauge Model 1897 pump-action shotgun. Other distinguishing characteristics of the Model 1901 are: a two piece lever the Winchester trademark stamp was moved to the upper tang, behind the hammer serial numbers between 64,856 and 79,455 This particular shotgun can be dated to 1913 and would have been one of the last ones manufactured. This is about as good a 1901 I have seen and would be considered scarce in the USA but rare in the UK. A fine looking weapon which would enhance any collection.
Winchester 1897 16 Gauge take down model This is a decent Winchester Model 1897 in 16 gauge full choke. Designed by the famous American firearms inventor John Moses Browning and introduced in November 1897 it has been used by hunters, police and the military since its introduction. In World War One it was used with a shortened barrel as a trench gun and has the distinction that the German government made diplomatic overtures to the US government to abandon it as an "inhumane" weapon as it caused unnecessary suffering! Part of the German argument was that it could be “slam fired” so if you kept the trigger depressed it would shoot as fast as you could cycle it. Pot calling the kettle black if you ask me! This shotgun has not been restricted so is a Section One firearm but can be restricted to be purchased on a shotgun license. All 16 Gauge Winchester 1897’s were made as a take down version but the number manufactured were only a fraction of the number produced in 12 Gauge. This particular gun is tight, cycles fine and is well in proof and appears to have had an earlier re-black (in my opinion) that is attractive as can be seen from the photographs. The factory stamping is clear and bright so there was no sanding to take away pitting if there ever was any. The take down functions flawlessly with no erosion to the interrupted threads so it assembles and disassembles easily. This particular gun has a 24” barrel with full choke. The serial number dates the gun to being manufactured in 1910 so it is 105 years old! I have a customer who successfully shoots this model at game but it would equally suit a Western Shooter or of course a Winchester collector. This is quite a scarce shotgun in the UK. Eventually the 1897 was superceded by the Model 12 with an internal hammer and I was told by an old timer whose father was a Winchester sales representative in the early 1900’s that this was because Winchester were getting sued by people not mounting the gun properly and pinching their hand on the action what it was pulled back. This is the reason why so many Winchester 1897’s have the butt plate cut off and a thick rubber replacement pad added to increase the length of pull. To find untouched 1897’s is getting more difficult as un-butchered examples are avidly collected. A scarce gun.
Winchester Model 1885 \"High Wall\" in 32-40 calibre. This is a very good Winchester Model 1885 “High Wall” single shot rifle in obsolete 32-40 calibre. This rifle was manufactured in 1888 as evidenced by its serial number and an original tang sight is attached to the tang. The rifle operates flawlessly and has a 29” barrel with a good bore and I am told is very accurate. It was previously held on a firearms certificate but I am selling this as a collectible rifle and it has been removed from the previous owner’s certificate and reclassified as an antique. The rifle is stamped with the patent date of October 7th 1879 on the bottom tang, and with the two-line Winchester Repeating Arms address on the top flat of the barrel. The extractor is extant and there are no major flaws or blemishes. In 1883, Thomas G. Bennett, Vice-President and General Manager of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, travelled to Ogden and negotiated the purchase of the single-shot design, as well as the prototype of what would become the Model 1886 lever-action – the beginning of the fruitful 20-year Winchester–Browning collaboration. Winchester's engineers made some improvements to Browning's design, including angling the block at six degrees to create a positive breech seal, and released the rifle as the Model 1885. Two popular models were made, the so-called Low Wall which showed an exposed hammer, firing less powerful cartridges, and the so-called High Wall for stronger cartridges whose steel frame covered most of the firing hammer when viewed from the side; but both were officially marketed by Winchester as the Single Shot Rifle. It was produced principally to satisfy the demands of the growing sport of long-range "Match Shooting", which opened at Creedmoor, New York, on June 21, 1872. Target/Match shooting was extremely popular in the US from about 1871 until about 1917, enjoying a status similar to golf today. From John Campbell’s excellent book on the history and analysis of Winchester single shot rifles it is clear that this was a popular variation. Winchester High-Walls were always in demand for a variety of uses including hunting and target shooting and can be found in a variety of barrel lengths and calibres. This is a decent example of a very popular rifle. An excellent manufacturer and an investment quality iconic firearm requiring no license to own. An international antique and there aren’t going to be any more!
Winchester Model 1892 rifle year of manufacture 1894 This is a very good Winchester model 1892 in 44/40 calibre. The Winchester Model 1892 was a lever-action repeating rifle designed by John Browning as a smaller, lighter version of his large-frame Model 1886, and which replaced the Model 1873 as the company's lever-action for pistol-calibre rounds such as the .44-40 When asked by Winchester to design an improved lever action to compete with a recent Marlin offering, John Browning said he would have the prototype completed in under a month or it would be free. Within 2 weeks, Browning had a functioning prototype of the 92. for the rifle vary and some are custom-chambered. The original rounds were the .32-20, .38-40, and .44-40 Winchester centrefire rounds, followed in 1895 by the new .25-20 This particular rifle has a 26” barrel , good mechanics and excellent bore, ideal for the Cowboy shooter who would prefer a lighter rifle than a large frame Winchester. This rifle was recently proofed but given the venerable age of the rifle I elected to black powder proof which will be fine for Cowboy loads. The serial number reveals that the rifle was manufactured in 1894. The original finish has faded but to an even attractive tone and there is no pitting to the barrel either externally or internally. The walnut stock is very good with no notable defects. A decent and historical rifle that covers practical shooting and an iconic investment. This is a Section 1 firearm and will require a Firearms Certificate to purchase. I will store at no charge for variations to be applied for.
Winchester Model 1897 Shotguns. I seldom feature licensed guns on this website but Winchester 1897 shotguns are interesting and collectible and are an exception to this rule. All of these Winchester 1897’s are recently proofed but in their original magazine capacity which will require a Section 1 authority or Firearms Certificate to possess but I can arrange to have any of them professionally restricted and a proof house limitation certificate issued to allow them to be held on a standard shotgun certificate.
Winchester Model 1901 10 Gauge Shotguns obsolete calibre. I have two Winchester 1901 shotguns in stock, more details to follow but both have their original steel butt plates and have not been cut down. Mechanically sound, one was made in 1902 and the other in 1906.
Winchester Model 1901 Lever Action Shotgun. I like these shotguns and go out of my way to find them. This particular example is untouched and in excellent condition with most of the original finish, good bore and nice woodwork. Full 32" in barrel in 10 gauge with a Hawkins recoil pad. This shotgun is untouched and not messed with. The Hawkins pad was a factory option and from the aged condition it is probably contemporary with the gun. The only cosmetic fault I can find is a stain on the left hand side of the receiver which could possibly be dealt with by some cleverer than myself but this gun is "as is" and I don't propose to "enhance" it. Many of these Winchesters are found with pitted barrels and breaches because the early models fired black powder cartridges and were a ranch tool and often simply stood in a corner after shooting supper or a Coyote. The 10 gauges seem to be more prevalent to corrosion because the usual 12 gauge cleaning brush wouldn't touch the walls of these big boys. The model 1901 was basically a redesign on the earlier 1887 model. Both 10 and 12-gauge models were offered in the Model 1887. It was soon realized that the action on the M1887 was not strong enough to handle early smokeless powder shot shells, and so a redesign resulted in the stronger Winchester Model 1901, 10-gauge only, to handle the advent of the more powerful smokeless powder. No 12-gauge chambering was offered, as Winchester did not want the Model 1901 to compete with their successful 12-gauge Model 1897 pump-action shotgun. Other distinguishing characteristics of the Model 1901 are: a two piece lever the Winchester trademark stamp was moved to the upper tang, behind the hammer serial numbers between 64,856 and 79,455 This particular shotgun can be dated to 1902 and would have been one of the first ones manufactured. As with my previous 1901 this is about as good a 1901 I have seen and would be considered scarce in the USA but rare in the UK. A fine looking weapon which would enhance any collection.
Wonderful US Civil War Le Mat This is about as good as it gets for a Civil War firearms collector. A British proofed Le Mat revolver with Civil War provenance. This unique sidearm was also known as the "Grape Shot Revolver." It was developed in New Orleans in 1856 by Jean Alexander Le Mat, whose manufacturing effort was backed by P. G. T. Beauregard, who became a general in the Confederate Army. Fewer than 100 were made by John Krider of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1859, including the first 25 prototypes. It is estimated that 2,900 were produced in Liege, Belgium and Paris, France. The European made pistols were shipped through Birmingham, England, where they were proof marked as this example is. Approximately 900 revolvers were shipped to the Confederate Army and 600 to the Confederate Navy through Bermuda to avoid the Southern Naval Blockade. The distinguishing characteristic of LeMat's revolver is that its 9-shot cylinder revolves around a separate central barrel of larger calibre than the chambers in the cylinder proper. The central barrel is smooth-bore and can function as a short-barrelled shotgun (hence the name "Grape Shot Revolver") with the shooter selecting whether to fire from the cylinder or the smooth-bore barrel by flipping a lever on the end of the hammer. Flipping the lever up caused the movable striker to fall upon the primer set directly under the hammer, discharging the lower barrel, while leaving it in the standard position would fire the chambers in the cylinder, much like any other revolver Notice the photographs of the revolver hammer in the up position for the main cylinder and then in the down position for firing the shotgun barrel. This is a scarce late Paris made LeMat revolver with British proofs and is one of the few with the "M" inspector`s cartouche which is thought to stand for the Confederate Naval inspector William Henry Murdaugh. William Albaugh and Ed Simmons in their text Confederate Handguns list six known SNs with the "Murdaugh" cartouche. All these guns are in a similar serial range to this gun with few exceptions (SNs 2014-2494). This particular gun has the serial number 2431. It is believed that there are approximately 12 of these inspected revolvers extant. This is an exceptional piece and is contained in the original holster which literally “fits is like a glove�. The holster evidences a faint CSA cartouche which is discernible to the human eye but I have trouble photographing it. The holster is probably rarer than the revolver. The revolver cocks and locks perfectly and is tight and sound. The inspectors mark is a little worn but evident on the cylinder. The revolver shows overall wear to the grips and metalwork but there is little pitting and the metal has evolved to an even mellow patina. A true investment in history.
Zoli Reproduction Zuoave Rifle in .58 This is a reproduction Springfield "Zouave" rifle in outstanding condition. Original rifles are often found in excellent condition but cost thousands of pounds. This is an opportunity to own a virtually exact replica and shoot it without worrying about damaging an antique. The rifle has few marks, all the original case hardening and a spare nipple in the patch pouch. Clearly this has been well looked after from new. Numerous Zouave regiments were organized from soldiers of the United States of America who adopted the name and the North African–inspired uniforms during the American Civil War.[17] The Union army had more than 70 volunteer Zouave regiments throughout the conflict, while the Confederates fielded about 25 Zouave companies.[18] A feature of some American zouave units, at least in the opening stages of the American Civil War was the light infantry tactics and drill they employed. Zouaves "utilised light infantry tactics that emphasised open-order formations, with several feet between soldiers, rather than the customary close order, with its characteristic 'touch of elbows.' They moved at double time, rather than marching at a stately cadence, and they lay on their backs to load their rifles rather than standing to do so. To fire they rolled prone and sometimes rose on one knee." Arguably the most famous Union Zouave regiments were from New York and Pennsylvania: the 5th New York Volunteer Infantry, "Duryee's Zouaves" (after its first colonel, Abram Duryee), the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, "Collis's Zouaves" (after their colonel, Charles H. T. Collis) and the 11th New York Volunteer Infantry, "Fire Zouaves". The 11th New York was initially led by Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth, until his death in 1861. The 11th New York was badly mauled during the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861 as it acted as the rear guard for the retreating Army of the Potomac. The 5th New York was considered one of the elite units of the Army of the Potomac and was only one of two volunteer regiments brigaded with the regular division commanded by George Sykes. At the Second Battle of Bull Run, the 5th New York, along with another Zouave regiment, the 10th New York "National Zouaves", held off the flanking attack of James Longstreet's Corps for ten crucial minutes before it was overrun. The 5th New York thus suffered the highest percentage of casualties in the shortest amount of time of any unit in the Civil War (of 525 men, approximately 120 were killed and 330 were wounded in less than 10 minutes).