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The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
SILVER 1813 POCKET WATCH 180.00 GBP LONGINES WD 380.00 GBP TOTAL 727.66 GBP
LONDON METROPOLITAN ARCHIVES 1 Jul 1791 John Wilkins ROYAL AND SUN ALLIANCE INSURANCE GROUP Records INSURED: THE SOCIETY OF KEY BEARERS, GRANTHAM, LINCOLNSHIRE, IN TRUST Grantham LONDON METROPOLITAN ARCHIVES CLC/B/192/F/001/MS11 936/378/585295 CONTENT; Other Property / Occupiers Mentioned: The Market Place, Grantham (John Wilkins gunsmith); Walker Gate, Grantham (Elizabeth Rawlinson shopkeeper); Grantham (Thomas Wilson watchmaker; Mrs Woodford tea dealer) An English Flintlock Boxlock pistol made by Grantham gunmaker John Wilkins between 1810-1826 is on the market for £690.
WW2 binoculars, Lee Enfield sniper CES, with 37 Pattern case , British Army WW2 6x30 British Army binoculars, part of the official CES for the Lee Enfield N0.4T . Graticules to the right lens. Taylor Hobson, 1941. Plus P37 bino pouch by MECo 1941 with broad arrow. With clear optics and individual eye focusing working smoothly. A lovely pair of Service binoculars in excellent condition.
ANNOUNCEMENT - Business Period 16th - 21st August 2016 Dear Collectors, ZMW Militaria is always open for browsing and buying, but I regret that between the 16th - 21st August we will be unable to reply to any e-mails, or post out items purchased. Sorry. After those five days, all will be back to normal. Thank you. Kind regards, Ziggy M. Wesolowski
!!! MORE NEW YEAR SPECIAL DEALS !!! More select items to make New Year 2018 extra special! A full review of the listed items can be found elsewhere on the website. Code: 50501 - Brander & Potts Revenue Flintlock - SOLD Code: 50602 - Large Man-Stopper Pistol By Kavanagh - SOLD Code: 50629 - Signal Cannon By William Parker - £1650 Code: 50665 - Heavy Cavalry Flintlock - £995 Code: 50677 - Scottish Fiscal Officer's Flintlock - SOLD
!!! NEW YEAR SPECIAL DEALS !!! Wishing all our visitors, a Happy New Year. With select items to make New Year 2018 extra special! A full review of the listed items can be found elsewhere on the website. Code: 50411 - Air Ministry 'Time Of Trip' Clock - £SOLD Code: 50297 - As New LNER Railway Guard's Pocket Watch - £295 Code: 50283 - LT Station Master's Pocket Watch - £175 Code: 50431 - VR Metropolitan Police Truncheon - £395 Code: 50677 - WW1 Princess Mary Gift Tin & Christmas Card - £SOLD
"Dawn Patrol" A Sir Douglas Bader Signed Print By Roderick Lovesey This is a limited edition print of the "Dawn Patrol," depicting twoBristol Bulldog biplanes in flight. Limited to 250 prints, this work has been signed in pencil by the renowned artist, Roderick Lovesey, as well as by Sir Douglas Bader. In 1931 Bader was nearly killed when the Bulldog aircraft he was flying, crashed, costing him the loss of his legs. Nevertheless, Bader went on to become one of the RAF's Air Aces, credited with twenty aerial victories, four additional shared victories, six probables, one shared probable and eleven enemy aircraft damaged. The picture is an original Lovesey print, numbered 95 and printed on quality paper. It was professionally glazed and double mounted nearly 30 years ago, on RAF blue card and quality wood frame. The art studio's details can still be found on the back of the picture. Due to the delicate nature of the item, the glass will be carefully removed from the frame and the picture sent un-glazed. Sorry, UK delivery only.
"Gun Artlicles" By Gerry Ford Gerry Ford, an antique gun collector and author with a special interest in the research of arms used by the military, police and other authorities, published many gun related articles in the 1970s, many of which appeared in "Guns Review" magazine. In this publication, "Gun Articles," Ford has gathered more of his original work into a 39 page A4 soft cover booklet, being illustrated with black and white photos of the time. "Gun Articles" contains stories and insights, including an article on, "Young Winston & His Mauser." All in all, a fascinating account, with some repetition of articles from the "Military Pistols" book. "Gun Articles" is a strictly limited publication, personally signed by the author. Price includes UK P&P.
"Superfine Winegartens" Railway Regulator Pocket Watch c.1930 This is not the standard railway regulator made by Winegartens, but rather, it is their Premium Quality example known as the "Superfine Winegartens." Winegartens of 157 Bishopsgate, London, was a renowned supplier of quality timepieces at discounted prices, giving an additional 20 percent off for personnel serving in the Armed Forces, as well as all government agencies. Not surprisingly Railway Companies also benefitted from their patronage and many a railway regulator bearing Winegarten's name exists. However, very few were adjusted for "Superfine" timekeeping as this one is. Looking over this Winegarten's watch it is clear that this example is superior to others. In fact the Cortebert 526 movement used in this watch is the same as those used by Rolex in their military watches…. but this one is even better. Having "3 Adjustments," the movement is capable of delivering precision timekeeping and as is, it is in working order, but it has not been serviced. Furthermore, the watch company have gone to additional lengths to decorate the movement with extra polishing and the application of Geneva stripes to the plates - details only found on the best watches. Fully marked on the heavy duty case with its railway motif, this watch is in a class of its own and will be difficult to improve upon. It is near faultless, with minimal wear and no case damage, just slight scratches to the robust flat crystal. A fabulous example of a "Superfine Winegarten." The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
"The Service Revolver & How To Use It," By Captain C. D. Tracy A fine and clean example of the rare and comprehensive WW1 hardback booklet, written by Captain C. D. Tracy, an expert marksman and army officer serving with the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. This book has perfect blue cloth boards, with intact stitching and spine, showing little sign of handling. Bright pages with minimal discolouration and a retailer's trade label from Parker Hale. No annotations. Appears much better than photographs show. Largely concentrating on the Webley MK VI service revolver, the book covers a range of subjects, including; selecting a revolver, revolver vs. automatic pistol, grip, stance, aiming, trigger pressing, range drill, loading and unloading, firing, maintenance, accessories, close quarter fighting, use in trench warfare, using two pistols at once, ammunition, the Webley MK VI, the Prideaux quick loader, revolver bayonets, lanyards, and firing while on horseback. The book is very well illustrated throughout with numerous photographic plates and diagrams. Captain Charles D. Tracy was, along with Captain J. B. L. Noel, one of the British army's greatest experts on the use of the handgun in First World War trench warfare. Tracy was a student of the gunfighting techniques used in the 'Wild West', and is thought to have been a personal friend of William 'Buffalo Bill' Cody.
*** CANCELLED *** SEE ABOVE FOR ALTERNATIVE VENUE Kempton Park Arms Fair Comes To Bisley. Now in its third year, the ever-popular Kempton Park Classic Arms Fair is teaming up with the NSRA and coming to Bisley on Sunday 23 August. Over 100 traders are expected and PUBLIC ADMISSION IS FREE. I hope to see many of you there. https://www.nsra.co.uk/index.php/news/233-administration/2953-breaking-news-kempton-park-arms-fair-comes-to-bisley
*** LAST ONE *** MOD Survival Knife, c.1999 Originally made by Wilkinson Sword and Joseph Rodgers, these hefty knives are still part of the MOD inventory. Designated by the military as "Survival Knives," they are most useful when chopping branches, splitting logs, prying, levering, digging, gouging, drilling, hammering and generally being the most versatile piece of kit when it comes to shelter building. A Jack-of-all-trades, these knives feature a one-piece full-length, 5mm thick tang and blade edge. Being in untouched condition, this knife comes with a factory dull cutting edge but this can be improved upon if required. Offered as new surplus stock, the knife has a protective black phosphate finish to all the steel parts. Grips are made of resin with heavy-duty steel rivets and the blade is stamped with a NATO stock number, plus broad arrow mark and 1999 date - All presented in a leather sheath, just the same as when first produced in the late 1950's. We had two of these robust 1999 survival knives for sale, plus another earlier example with a wooden grip. Blade length = 7 inches
*** New Year Specials for a Happy 2017 *** To celebrate the arrival of 2017, ZMW Militaria is offering collectors a selection of antique pistols at discounted prices. Prices of our "New Year Specials" also include Domestic Postage... So grab a bargain and have a Happy New Year.
*** PAY SECURELY WITH WORLDPAY *** ZMW Militaria is pleased to announce that WorldPay will now be handling all credit and debit card transactions for this website. This means that our stock of Antique Pistols and Shooting Accoutrements have been restored… With more to follow. Thank you for your patience, custom and continued support. Ziggy M. Wesolowski
*** STOLEN *** WW1 German Artillery Officer's Omega Watch, c.1917 *** STOLEN *** REWARD FOR INFORMATION A rare WW1 military chronograph made by Omega in c.1917. Ranging Telemetres of this pattern were developed to conform to German artillery specifications, with this example coinciding with the introduction of their latest Krupp K16 Kanone in the same year. Artillery Telemetres were calibrated in the rarely encountered measure of Hectometres (hm), which was the German standard used to calculate trajectory distance. In this instance, the Telemetre is capable of measuring out to the limits of the K16 long-range gun. An experienced K16 artillery crew managed to fire around 2 or 3 shells per minute, as these 150mm high explosive projectiles weighed 51Kg each. Firing out to a maximum range of just over 20 kilometres (200hm), these guns are precisely matched to work with this Omega Telemetre: Nothing else other than the massive German Paris Gun existed, but that had a trajectory which lasted 182 seconds! Basically this Omega watch provided the user with a target distance, expressed in Hectometres, with each being the equivalent of approximately 100 meters. The calculation worked on the premiss that the speed of sound, as determined by the time differential between the flash and bang of exploding shells, when measured in dry air of around 20℃, travels at 343 meters per second. Of course these watches were not simple timers, but also provided an artillery officer with a means to monitor the precise moment that his bombardment was to commence, and its duration. Not surprisingly, watches of this quality were very expensive and less of these were made, as opposed to regular stopwatches. Fitted in its original gunmetal case, this Omega watch is in perfect working order throughout and, also in very good cosmetic condition. It shows some wear to the exterior blackened finish, as well as some light damage to the dial. It is otherwise in very original condition, including the glass. Presented on a braided leather strap. Diameter = 50mm
*** ZMW Militaria Notification *** Dear Collectors, Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause, but I am currently unable to process any orders until the 30th July. Although I will still be able to take your calls on the business mobile, my ability to receive and send e-mails will also be affected. Rest assured, it will be business as usual from the 30th - With some exciting new items waiting to be added. Kind regards, Ziggy
***** An Invitation From Antique Gun Gallery ***** Dear Collectors, ZMW Militaria recommends a fellow antique firearms enthusiast and author, Gerry Ford, together with the Antique Gun Gallery. The gallery is currently displaying a variety of antique guns, which you are invited to view, trade or buy. Many of the pieces have been collected by Gerry, the site's Curator. The gallery may be viewed at; www.antiquegungallery.blogspot.co.uk Please take a moment to stop by. Sincerely, Ziggy M. Wesolowski N.B. The Curator has taken a tumble and will be resting on Doctor's orders, which means that your e-mails to the Antique Gun Gallery may take longer to reply too. Sorry. ZMW Militaria wishes Gerry a speedy recovery.
.22 Webley Senior - Birmingham 4 A vintage .22 Webley Senior air pistol, offered in full working order and presented in great condition with sharp profiles, and perfect grips. This pistol comes in a 1945 dated RAF holster.
.22 Webley Senior Air Pistol A classic Webley Senior from my own stock of vintage air pistols. This Webley comes in .22 calibre and is in full working order, with a strong spring, clean barrel with a tight lock, and decent screws. Cosmetically however, it does show some fading and speckling to the blue factory finish, together with age patina and there is also a small loss at the heel of the left grip, but nothing nasty.
.31 Colt Root M1855 Pocket Revolver c.1861 A scarce M1855 Colt Root pocket percussion revolver of the larger and more desirable .31 calibre. Dating to 1861, this revolver is presented in working order and features a clear barrel address and patent details to the fluted cylinder. Furthermore, the grips are undamaged, retaining much original varnish and the nipples are all good, as is the rifled bore. Overall this side-hammer Colt Root is in good aged condition, retaining traces of original blue colours in sheltered areas, with the remaining ironwork toned with pleasant brown and grey patinas. A nice and popular Colt revolver.
.31 Percussion Whitney Pocket Revolver, c.1860 A good 5-shot Whitney Second Model, pocket revolver, c.1860. These full-frame revolvers were a popular alternative to Colt and were carried by both sides during the Civil War. Cosmetically this Whitbey revolver has an attractive salt and pepper patina throughout, yet it remains in generally sharp condition with nice two-piece grips. The action works and the cylinder indexes but the present mainspring is slightly weak, however, the original spring is still present with the pistol.
.31 Rimfire Tipping & Lawden 4 Shot Sharps Patent Repeating Pistol An interesting hideout or back-up pistol patented by Christian Sharps in 1859, but also bearing the Tipping & Lawden name, together with British proof marks. The design incorporates 4 fixed barrels of .31 rimfire calibre, mounted on a frame. An ingenious revolving firing pin then sets off each round independently, every time the pistol is cocked and fired. This pistol is in working order with good grips, however it would originally have been nickel plated in its entirety. The finish is now worn, but traces of the plating remain on the barrels - the frame is largely down to the brass, which was lacquered some while ago. Simulated wood grips with leaf moulding, further enhance this diminutive pistol, which measures only 5½ inches in length. All in all a great obsolete pocket pocket pistols at a reasonable price.
.32 Rimfire Pocket Revolver of Webley Type, c.1870 A good Birmingham gunmaker's pocket revolver of .32 Rimfire, which is an obsolete calibre. This revolver bears strong characteristics of having been made by Webley but it is unsigned and just bears British Patent numbers and Birmingham Proofs. Retaining much of its original blue finish, this 5-shot revolver is in sharp condition and strong working order, featuring a gate-loading mechanism together with a rammer type ejector to the right side of the barrel and presented with a contemporary leather holster.
.320 Eley Break Open Style Revolver & Holster c.1910 Styled on the "Baby Russian" revolver, these small pocket pistols were a popular personal defence weapon of their day. As such, they were carried by many and become a favourite back-up pistol for army officers during WW1. This example shows Belgian proof marks. Offered complete with a contemporary leather service holster, this revolver has much to commend it, as it is mechanically good with a positive lock up in both double and single action - however the trigger return requires attention. In addition, the extractor is fully operational and the revolver when closed up, is tight. It further benefits from having a good bright bore and chambers. Overall the metal surfaces have been reduced to a mottled brown and speckled finish, commensurate with age and handling, whilst the holster is supple and good with signs of some scuffs, blemishes and thread wear near the trigger area. Chambered for the obsolete .320 Eley cartridge, this revolver may be owned without a firearm certificate, but only as a curio or ornament.
.32RF Remington Rider Pocket Revolver, c.1870 A very good Remington Rider Double Action Pocket Revolver with the scarce short barrel. The revolver made c.1870, retains much of its original nickel finish. Presented in full working order, this lovely .32RF calibre revolver represents one of the earliest double-action cartridge pistols to become available to the commercial market - Today, this cartridge is deemed as an "Obsolete Calibre" under UK Law. Overall a very crisp Remington Rider with some thinning to the finish but otherwise retaining much original finish as well as; sharp profiles, clear barrel address, perfect gutta-percha grips, decent screws, bore, and a nickel silver trigger guard. A collector grade example.
.38 Rimfire Colt Model 1849 Pocket Cartridge Conversion Revolver The original Colt Model 1849 Pocket percussion revolvers were a popular choice for the self defence of many a civilian and lawman alike. However, with the development of early metallic cartridges, the percussion era was rapidly phased out by the widespread adoption of the handy new and totally self contained rimfire ammunition. So quickly in fact did metallic cartridges change the face of gun design, that in the 1870s Colt found itself with a large stock pile of percussion revolver parts, which had become to all intents, obsolete. However, thanks to the factory's ingenuity, these parts were utilised to form the basis of the new epoch of revolvers, such as this .38 R/F Colt Model 1849. This Colt Factory converted revolver is in crisp working condition, retaining a good amount of original blueing and case hardening colouring. The function is smooth and faultless, with excellent bore and chambers showing minimal signs of use. Clear stagecoach scene engraving, together with patent dates for 1871 and 1872, plus matching numbers throughout and perfect grips, all go towards this being a suitable collector's piece. A great Colt revolver of which about 6,000 are said to have been made.
.38 Rimfire Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver The original Colt Model 1849 Pocket percussion revolvers were a popular choice for the self-defence of many a civilian and lawman alike. With the development of early metallic cartridges, the percussion era was rapidly phased out by the widespread adoption of the handy new and totally self-contained rimfire ammunition. So quickly in fact did metallic cartridges change the face of gun design, that in the 1870s Colt found itself with a large stock pile of percussion revolver parts, which had become to all intents, obsolete. However, thanks to the factory's ingenuity, these parts were utilised to form the basis of the new epoch of revolvers, such as this .38 RF Colt Model 1849. This Colt Factory converted revolver is in excellent condition, with a crisp working action - smooth and faultless, with good bore and chambers showing minimal signs of use. The revolver also retains a good amount of finish, with vivid case hardening colour and tidy screw heads. A clear and sharp stagecoach scene, matching numbers throughout, plus perfect grips and struck patent dates for 1871 and 1872, all contribute to making this Colt, a suitable collector's piece. A great Colt revolver of which about 6,000 are said to have been made.
.38 Rimfire Remington New Model No. 4, c.1877 The uncommon Remington New Model No.4, is basically a smaller version of the more common Smoot. Made between 1877 to 1878, around 23,000 No.4 revolvers were made. Chambered for the now obsolete .38 rimfire cartridge, the revolver proved popular as a self defence pistol of modest stopping capability and good quality. Typically Remington had to compete against an arms market dominated by Colt, as well as many newer companies offering an array of rimfire revolvers, all keen to supply the eager domestic buyers. Presented in excellent condition, this example has retained most of its original nickel finish and sharp profiles through out. Mechanically crisp, the action is fully working and the revolver benefits from retaining good screws, sharp knurling and clear stamps, making this revolver a choice example. Overall, a collector grade example in excellent condition - better than most. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length =
.38RF Remington New Model No.4 c.1877 Selling on consignment: An uncommon Remington New Model No.4, manufactured between 1877 to 1878, when around 23,000 were made. Chambered for the now obsolete .38 rimfire cartridge, these revolvers proved themselves to be a popular self-defence pistol of modest stopping capability and good quality. Presented in very good condition, this example has retained most of its original nickel finish and sharp profiles throughout. Mechanically crisp, the action is fully working and the revolver benefits from retaining good screws, sharp knurling and clear stamps. Overall, this collector-grade example is in very good condition and better than most. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length =
.41 CF Colt New Line When the Rollin White patent for metallic cartridges firearms manufacture expired (c. 1870) the Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company started working on its own metallic cartridge revolvers (until that it had been practising the so-called Richards-Mason conversions). Thus, after having introduced its first rear-loaders in 1871 (Colt House/Cloverleaf) and 1872 (Colt Open Top), in 1873 Colt launched the Colt Peacemaker along with a new line of pocket revolvers, sorted in five different calibres. Since it was an entirely new line of revolvers this model was called the Colt New Line.[2] Circa 1884-1886, submerged by the competitors' cheaper imitations and refusing to introduce a lower quality among its own firearms, the Colt company dropped the line and ceased production.[2] Calibers[edit] The Colt New Line was chambered and produced as follows.[2] Colt New Line .22 Calibre Revolver: in production from 1873 to 1877 Colt New Line .30 Calibre Revolver: in production from 1874 to 1876 Colt New Line .32 Calibre Revolver: in production from 1873 to 1884 Colt New Line .38 Calibre Revolver: in production from 1874 to 1880 Colt New Line .41 Calibre Revolver: in production from 1874 to 1879 The .22 calibre version was equipped with a 7-shot cylinder. All other four versions of the gun had 5-round cylinders.[2] Specifications (.38 Calibre version)[edit] Production period: 1874 - 1880 Calibre: .38 Weight: 0.84 lbs (0.38 kg) Barrel length: 2.25 in (5.12 cm), 4 in (10.2 cm) Capacity: 5-round cylinder Fire Modes: Single Action Loading Modes: Breech-loading
.41 Colt 1892 Military & Police Revolver
.41 Colt M1873 Single Action Army Revolver, c.1906 Consignment sale: A crisp and original example of an iconic Colt Single Action Army revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 calibre cartridge. Made in 1906, this revolver has matching numbers and is in superb working order with perfect action and strong springs. Cosmetically it shows some signs of carry and general holster wear, with much of the original finish now reduced to a flat dark patina with areas of fading. All markings are clear and the screw heads are sharp, whilst the grips are in very good order with no losses or cracks. Basically, an attractive and solid example for the money. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 11 inches
.41 Colt Model 1877 Thunderer Revolver Selling on consignment: A desirable Colt Model 1877 Thunderer revolver, with sharp profiles and much original case colour and factory blue - Showing some signs of thinning finish to the cylinder and muzzle, which appears to be commensurate to holster carry. Nevertheless, this Thunderer is a tight locking example presented in full working order, with strong springs as well as a full-length extractor rod. All matching serial numbers, good grips, decent screws, good bore and chambers, together with a clear address and patent dates, make this iconic Colt, one for the collector. Barrel length = 4½ inches Overall length = 9 inches
.41 Colt Model 1877 Thunderer Revolver Consignment sale: A good an early Colt Model 1877 Thunderer revolver, with matching numbers dated to 1882. Retaining sharp profiles and a fair amount of original nickel, showing signs of thinning, commensurate with holster carry. Nevertheless, this Thunderer is in full working order with strong springs and a full-length extractor rod. All matching serial numbers, good grips, decent screws, good bore and chambers, together with a clear address and patent dates, make this iconic Colt, one for the collector. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 10 inches
.41 Colt Model 1892 - DA 'New Army & Navy' Revolver When Colt first introduced their modern swing-out cylinder design, they called it the Model 1889 DA [Double Action]. Over the next several years, Colt continued to improve their DA revolvers, which by 1892 had the benefit of having had cylinder stops added… And so, the Model 1892 was born becoming known as the DA 'New Army & Navy.' This Model 1892 is itself a good example of its type, retaining a good proportion of factory blue finish, which is turning russet in part. Mechanically, the revolver functions perfectly, with a good bore and chambers. The grips are of the original hard rubber type with the Colt name embossed and, whilst they are intact, the front corner of the right grip was cracked and well repaired in service, which has withstood the test of time. All in all, this is a fully functioning revolver with signs of honest carry and wear. It may be owned without a certificate as a curio only. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
.41 Colt Model 1892 - DA 'New Army & Navy' Revolver c.1901 When Colt first introduced their modern swing-out cylinder design, they called it the Model 1889 DA [Double Action]. Over the next several years, Colt continued to improve their DA revolvers, which by 1892 had the benefit of having had cylinder stops added to the revolver… And so, the Model 1892 was born becoming known as the DA 'New Army & Navy.' Although known as an Army & Navy model, this name giving was no more than Colt marketing hype, which today serves to confuse collectors. Actually, all production .41 calibre M1892 revolvers were sold to civilians and police authorities, with the US Army and Navy opting to issue their personnel with a .38 calibre version of the same model. Typically, the name of this revolver was later changed to the, "Official Police," in deference to Colt's growing Law Enforcement clientele. This Model 1892 is itself an excellent example of its type, retaining much of the factory blue finish and mechanically, the revolver functions perfectly, with a a very good bore and chambers. The grips are of the original hard rubber type with the Colt name embossed, and they are perfect. Barrel length measures to 4.5 inches. All in all, this is a superior example which should please the collector.
.41 Colt No.3 Thuer Derringer c.1880 A very good and crisp, London proofed Colt .41 Rimfire No.3 Thuer Derringer. It retains much of its original nickel finish, particularly on the frame but with the barrel showing fading and thining to the plate towards the muzzle. Presented in good working order, the pistol is tight and with the screw heads all retaining much of the factory nitre blue finish. Lovely lacquered grips and a nicely monogrammed backstrap, add interest to this collector grade example. Numbered 17,*** under the grip. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 5 inches
.41 Colt Single Action Army Revolver, c.1905 Selling on consignment: An excellent and totally original example of the Colt Single Action Army revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 calibre. Retaining a good amount of the factory finish and with all serial numbers matching, this iconic Colt SAA revolver dates to 1905. Mechanically the action is as crisp as you could hope to find, with perfect timing and tight lock up on all chambers. Clearly this Colt SAA revolver has seen some use, but has been well cared for resulting in it keeping a very good bore and chambers - No signs of abuse throughout. Basically, a super example and scarce to find this good. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 11 inches
.41RF Colt Cloverleaf Revolver, c.1873 A scarce 4-shot Colt Cloverleaf revolver made, c.1873 and chambered for the obsolete .41 Rimfire cartridge. These were among the first Colt revolvers which could be loaded through the rear of the cylinder. This was retained by a cylinder axis pin, through which the ejector rod ran. Presented in crisp condition, this revolver retains some original blued finish, mainly to the barrel with the remainder showing a good age patina, plus a decent pair of original grips. The action is in full working order, with the cylinder rotating and locking well against a strong spring. Decent screw heads are also evident throughout, matching numbers, clear barrel address and a good bore.
.44 Colt 1860 - Civil War Union Army Issue Revolver Colt's 1860 Army revolver was one of a few pistols that were standard issue to the Union forces, at the time of the American Civil War. As such, there is a great deal of history associated with the military firearms from this era and many of which will have seen action at some point during the conflict. The example offered here bears serial numbers which can be traced through Colt's records, to 1863. Being martially marked, it is not surprising that the cylinder has become mismatched in service, albeit the rest of the gun and wedge, are all showing the same numbers. The cylinder is nevertheless contemporary and likewise dates to 1863. It is possible then that early on in its service this revolver's cylinder must have become lost or inadvertently exchanged with a colleagues, possibly when the soldiers were sat around cleaning their weapons. This was a regular occurrence and given the interchangeability of Colt parts, made no difference to the function of the revolver. Although the finish is now worn, the pistol remains sharp and unmolested, with good angles around the ironwork. Flap holster wear and handling impressions are evident, but the grips are otherwise original and undamaged. Mechanically the action is sound, working crisply with a tight lock up, good cylinders, original nipples and good bore with just light pitting - nothing nasty to report. Clear stampings, deeply impressed barrel address and some evident signs of the cylinder's navy scene are all discernible. Overall this Army Colt is in at least good to very good collectable condition, considering its service history. It will be difficult to find a better example at this price.
.44 Remington New Model Army Percussion Revolver, c.1863 Consignment Sale: A good Remington .44 New Model Army revolver, with martial inspection stamp to the butt. The revolver is in full working order with a positive action, whilst cosmetically the ironwork has generally sharp profiles and brown age patina, with bluing evident in sheltered areas. Overall, a decent original example.
.442 British Bulldog - Webley Type Pocket Revolver An obsolete calibre nickel plated .442 British Bulldog pocket revolver. Made c.1880, this robust revolver is in working order with proper double and single action function and correct cylinder lock up. The pistol is stamped with Liege proof marks. Cosmetically the revolver looks to be in very good condition, having been professionally polished and benefitting from good walnut grips. The rifled bore is good with some frosting and light pitting evident.
.442 Centrefire Webley RIC A .442” Centrefire Webley/Tranter Double Action Revolver, 6” octagonal barrel fitted with a Tranters 1863 patent cartridge ejector lever, six shot cylinder, border line engraved frame, two piece walnut grips. This pattern of revolver preceded their famous R. I. C. design and was produced 1865/70?. In vg cond. With sharp profiles, good grips faded blue finish, good action and bore. A rare collectors gun. £995
.442 Webley No. 2 British Bulldog Revolver c.1875 If the Victorian gentleman required a revolver for self protection, what better choice could there have been than a Webley No. 2 British Bulldog? In its day it was regarded as a dependable man stopper and the nickel plating was of additional benefit that protected the revolver, if it were to be carried in adverse climatic conditions. Overall, this is a desirable nickel plated Webley Bulldog in very good cosmetic condition, retaining most of its original finish with just small areas of plating loss around the muzzle. Otherwise it is in working order, with a smooth action, lock up and positive trigger return. What's more, as it is chambered for the obsolete .442 cartridge, no licence is required provided that it is possessed as an ornament or curio. A desirable revolver signed on the barrel, P. Webley & Son, Birmingham.
.442 Webley RIC Police Constabulary Revolver The No.1 gate loading revolver was Webley's first offering of a double action pistol, which became an immediate success upon its introduction in 1868, following its adoption by the Royal Irish Constabulary, among other police forces - hence the RIC label on the frame. The revolver came in a variety of manstopping calibres and was particularly popular due to its ease of operation together with fast reloading capabilities. Yet perhaps most famously, General George Armstrong Custer was known to have owned a pair of these revolvers, which it is believed he used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. This revolver is chambered for the obsolete .442 calibre and is presented in very good condition, both cosmetically and mechanically. Over all, the revolver has retained much of its original blue finish with other areas showing a dark patina and some speckling. Mechanically though, the revolver function is flawless, with solid lock up, a clean bore and fine chequered grips. In addition, the revolver comes with its original leather holster, which shows some sign of wear and tear.
.442 Webley RIC Revolver - Retailed By James W. Rosier c.1875 The No.1 gate loading revolver was Webley's first offering of a double action pistol, which became an immediate success with many police authorities. It become widely known as the "RIC," following its adoption as the service sidearm of the Royal Irish Constabulary in 1868. Exported worldwide, this popular Webley RIC was imported into Australia and retailed by James W. Rosier of Melbourne, as marked on the top strap. In addition to Webley's serial number, a JR prefixed 5 digit number has also been stamped on the front of the frame. The significance of this number is unknown, but a good proportion of the firearms issued to Australian Police were Webley RIC's. Supplies of the RIC were also shipped to the USA, where the British cartridge became known as the .44 Webley - Even General George Armstrong Custer was known to have owned a pair of these revolvers, which it is believed he carried at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. Chambered for the obsolete .442 calibre this iconic revolver is presented in very good condition. Although much of the original colour has faded and the exposed metal has darkened with age, this remains a sharp and unmolested example, which is mechanically flawless; with solid lock up, very good clean bore and chambers, untouched screw heads and fine chequered grips. All in all, a great example that is rising in value.
.442 Wolverhampton Police Revolver c.1870 Boothroyd's "Directory of British Gunmakers" William James Hill worked in Birmingham, England 1860-97. He was also Vice-Consul for Uruguay 1877-1884, and pinfires were popular in South America. Wolverhampton Police Wolverhampton became a county borough in 1889 and the force also took that title. Wolverhampton County Borough Police was created to serve the people of Wolverhampton and they served under that name from 1848 to 1966. Lt. Col. Gilbert Hogg was hired as the first Chief Constable and reported to a watch committee. The police station and cells eventually moved to the new Town Hall in North Street, entering from Red Lion Street. In the mid-20th century single men’s quarters were established at Penn Hall. In 1966 the Borough Police merged with what was then known as the West Midlands Constabulary. This was later amalgamated to create what we now know as West Midlands Police in 1974. The last Chief Constable was Norman Goodchild, CBE. Although he led a comparatively small force, he was very influential in national police matters.
.50-70” New York State Remington rolling block service rifle. GENERALLY: The Danes elected to license the Remington design for manufacture in Denmark at the Copenhagen arsenal, which they did in fairly large quantity. The Danish model first utilized a rimfire cartridge and that stayed in service well into the smokeless era. However, with the adoption of the 8mm M1889 Krag-Jorgensen the need to update or abandon the Remington became acute. In 1896 they were withdrawn from infantry service, converted to centerfire cartridge and issued to coast and fortress artillerymen. At that time a new much longer rear ladder sight was also fitted to the rifles. After World War II a large quantity were sold surplus back to the US where these type first entered civilian hands, being misleadingly sold in large quantity as .45-70 Rolling blocks! PHOTO: The rifle shown is a M1867/96 Danish Remington Rolling Block, having been converted to centerfire and having the extrodinarily long backsight leaf . DISTINGUISHING CHARECTERISTICS: Have we mentioned the long backsight leaf? At 3 1/4 inches it's quite long :). Left receiver flat is stamped with a Crown over the royal cypher over the marks M-1867. The right receiver wall is generally bare and the upper tang is marked Kjobenhavns Toihuus 18xx (Copenhagen Arsenal date of manufacture). Centerfire converted rifles chamber a cartridge near to the US Govt. .45-70, the 11.7x51R, a bit shorter and a bit larger. A .45-70 will function but will expand at the base and may overcrimp at the neck, not safe conditions. The rimfire cartridge was somewhat shorter but usable in the converted rifles. In fact, after conversion, the rifle could fire either rimfire or centerfire ammunition. See bottom picture, below, for more details. As mentioned in the general text above, the Danish model first utilized a rimfire cartridge which stayed in service well into the smokeless era. This created a potential compatibility problem, rimfire cartridges won't fire in a certral fire rifle, and center-fire cartridges won't operate in a rimfire rifle. WELL ...... if you look carefully above, you will see that the breech block of the Danish Remington Rolling Block has TWO firing pin holes, one for center fire and one at the bottom of the breech block face for rimfire. The firing pin is fairly easily reversible, for use of the rifle with whatever (rimfire or central fire) ammunition is available. *************************************************************************** Here’s my other Remington rolling block – The .50-70 Caliber Remington Rolling Block as issued to the New York State Militia. After the Civil War, with more than enough firearms in inventory, the Regular US Army wasn’t enthusiastic about purchasing new designs. As the era of the muzzle loading rifle came to an end, the Feds were more interested in converting their existing stocks to breach loaders. When the Army finally decided to adopt a new breach loader, several models were tested, and in spite of the high performance of the rolling block, the Army went with an in-house design very much like the conversions. New York, however, was not bound by what the Regulars did, and so ordered 15,000 Rolling Blocks, with a follow up order of an additional 4,500 a couple years later. The Remington Rolling Block would serve New York until the 1890s, and one source indicates rolling blocks served with NY Militiamen deployed out West during the Indian Wars. The New York rolling blocks had some special features. For one thing, the state specified these had to have a half-cock safety. What really stands out though is the rifle’s exaggeratedly long hammer spur and large side located breach block lever – both with shield shaped cross hatched thumb grips. I guess New Yorkers had fat fingers. The rifle is marked with patent dates on the top tang of the rifle (alas too pitted to read on my example) and the stock bears the inspectors cartouche (also alas, it’s too light to read the initials on mine). Mine is also marked 18 and H on the back of the butt plate – I assume that’s a rack number meaning rifle number 18 in Company H. The rifle came with a model 1887 sling. Although that would also be correct for this rifle at the end of its use, I already had a sling like that on another rifle. I replaced it with another vintage sling designed like military slings of the 1860s and 70s. I’m not sure if that’s 100% correct, but it is period and looks good. As usual, I’ll describe the bayonet in my next post. The rifle is chambered for the .50-70 cartridge, which meant a .50 caliber bullet using 70 grains of powder. This cartridge was developed for the Regular Army in 1866 and replaced by the .45-70 cartridge in 1873. Too bad New York didn’t get the memo in time for the 1872 rifle. I took this rifle to the range with 20 rounds of ammo and found out I had the ultra-rare version of the NY Rolling block that shoots around corners! Actually after a few shots without hitting paper, I examined the bore and saw a silvery mound on one side of the bore a fraction of an inch down the muzzle. A chunk of corrosion exists there that is barely noticed when the bore is clean – but it’s apparently just enough to nick the side of the cast bullet as it passes and throw it off of its intended path. Each following shot builds up lead there until it’s obvious what’s going on. I’ve been considering trying to polish that corrosion smooth with a Dremel tool, but I doubt this old veteran will ever have acceptable accuracy unless the barrel is relined (won’t do it) or counter-bored (might consider it). WARNING: Many vintage firearms are unsafe to shoot and I do not advise shooting them since I do not know the specific firearm that may be involved or its condition. The rifle itself has the NY militia features, as had been mentioned: 50-70 caliber, the high hammer spur and the breachblock spur protrudes to the right side horizontally, the checkering on both in done in the shape of a shield, and the gun goes back into half-cock when the breachblock is closed. All are NY state militia features but I believe Remington at some point, I want to say the 1880s, offered this pattern in their catalog as well. I believe true NY State Militia rolling blocks will have the patent dates on the wrist ending in 1871, since the original 15,000 were ordered in 1871 and another 4,500 in 1873. The 1871 date at least seems to be a tell tale that it is not a later commercial gun and was part of the original batch. In addition there may be cartouches that mark it, the "SNY" on the right side, "HSH" on the left, and "PRB" on the wrist. Mine just has the HSH as far as I can tell. And most seem to have some alpha-numeric markings on the stock, presumed to be unit markings. 50-70” New York State Militia issue Remington rolling block service rifle to the 3rd SEP Co (3rd Separate Company) of the 22nd regiment. Remington large action fitted with New York State pattern extended hammer tang and block opening lever for use with gloved hands is equipped with the unique half cock safety fitted only to these NY issue rifles. The tang roll engraved with Remington’s ILION N.Y. address over patent dates. Walnut stock fitted with regulation pattern iron furniture including three spring retained barrel bands is stamped to the left front of the butt with US military inspection stamp and to the top of the comb 3D SEP Co. with 22 to the butt plate tang for issue to the 3rd separate company of the 22nd New York State militia regiment. Five groove rifled barrel fitted with ladder rear sight graduated to 1000 yards with clearing rod to the underside and fore sight / bayonet stud to the muzzle. Chambered for the then standard US .50-70” military round the New York issue Remington’s are fitted with a unique safety feature which drops the hammer to half cock when the block is opened requiring the user to re cock the gun before firing. A feature that must have been at best irritating if the rifle were used in action when the users would have a lot more to think about than operating an automatic safety on their rifle! None the less the rifles saw long service with the State Militia who in the end were never called upon to fight in any major actions during the period the Remington’s were on issue, and the extended hammer and block levers certainly made the rifles easy to operate in the cold New York winters, even when wearing gloves or mittens. In good condition with excellent bore and mechanics. A nice sharp stock and much finish to the metal work turning to blue / brown with age. A nice example of one of the rarest and most collectable of the military Remington’s to a famous volunteer regiment.
.577 Three Band Mark II** Snider Rifle By Barnett, c.1870 The Snider system was originally adopted by the British Army in 1866 as a means of converting their arsenal of 3 band Enfield muzzle loaders, into modern cartridge firing rifles. Although the army rifles were replaced in 1874 by the Martini Henry, the Snider continued to be produced and supplied to Volunteer and Colonial Forces as well as seeing Constabulary usage. This Snider Mark II** was made by Barnett of London c.1870. As is, it is a superb rifle that shows minimal signs of service wear and a pristine bore. A genuinely sharp example that retains clear markings and excellent woodwork. Presented in full working order, complete with its nipple protector.
10 Smith Rifle Cartridge Cases (New) An unused pack of ten .50\" cartridge cases for the Smith rifle. These are close copies of the early guttapercha rubber cases, which subject to licence can be reloaded multiple times just as with the originals. Made from a flexible synthetic material, these modern case demonstrate how the cap-in-breech technology functioned. These come from a shooting man who obtained them from Dixie Gun Works USA, in packs of ten. I have two packs for sale.
100 Year Old Metropolitan Police Issue Whistle - Unissued Stock A seemingly unissued example of a genuine 100 year old Metropolitan Police numbered whistle. Made from solid nickel silver, this whistle is presented in a sleepy untouched condition, with all body stamps being good and sharp. This Hudson made whistle still retains its original tunic chain and when blown, produces a very loud dual tone sound. Police whistles were first introduced in 1884 and were used by constables to summon assistance, in the days before police radio. A fine example of a police whistle that will be difficult to improve upon.
11 mm French Officer Modele 1874 "Shooting Award" Revolver The Model 1874 French Officer's 11mm Ordnance revolver is a pretty scarce military pistol, but rarer still are the ones that were given to Officer's as Shooting Awards: Highly sought after, this is one of those "Shooting Awards" made by the gunmaker Lamure & Gidrol (pre 1896), as signed to the front of the cylinder. St. Etienne's details are also variously repeated on the revolver, but, as these became the personal property of the winning top officer, no military property marks were added - Hence these revolvers have a different, or civilian serial number range and no ordnance stamps, as well as the absence of the "M1874" designation to the barrel. This is all normal. Of course, these revolvers were still chambered for the military round. Of course these officer grade revolvers left L&G with an exceptional factory blued finish and fit, which has survived over much of the surface area of this example. The action is also superb, with tight lock up and a good mirror bore showing just minor pitting. A distinguishing and unique feature of these revolvers was the presence of a brass plaque, inlet into the raised oval within the grip. This would originally have been engraved with the recipient's details, so the obvious removal of his name is a significant factor, which was likely done during WW2 - Probably to protect the identity of the owner and their family. Looking over this revolver, it is apparent that it shows some signs of service use and also tool marking to the exterior of the cylinder, which has resulted in some flattening and damage to the flutes all around, as shown (additional Hi Res images are available on request.) However, the revolver was never converted to fire from half moon clips, which is an important point to establishing that it remains an obsolete 11mm calibre revolver. As such, it may be owned as an antique curio under UK Law. Overall a rare and very desirable variant of the French Officer's M1874. To purchase this, or any obsolete calibre pistol from ZMW Militaria, you must be over 18 years of age with no legal bar. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
11mm Danish Model 1867 Remington Rolling Block Rifle A 11mm Danish Model 1867 Remington Rolling Block Service Rifle, 33” barrel, ladder sight, bayonet lug at muzzle, 2-piece iron mounted walnut stock, 3 spring retained barrel bands. Denmark was the first country to place a large-scale order with Remington for the Rolling Block rifle 42,000 in total. The cartridge the 11.7 X 51R developed as a joint venture between Remington and the Danish Government, first designed as a Rimfire round, but later produced in centrefire. It was Denmark’s large order with Remington that inspired both Sweden and Norway to also adopt this rifle. Denmark in 1870 obtained licensing rights from Remington and produced Rolling Block rifles in the national armoury. In 1872 Denmark changed the 55 ignition system from Rimfire to centrefire, an ingenious modification was made to the breechblocks allowing the guns to use either ammunitions. This specimen has that feature and was one of those made under licence in the Copenhagen Arsenal and fully Danish Ordnance marked. In very good condition, with excellent bore. £950 An 11mm Danish Model 1867 Remington Rolling Block Service Rifle, 33” barrel, ladder sight, bayonet lug at the muzzle, 2-piece iron mounted walnut stock, 3 spring retained barrel bands. Denmark was the first country to place a large-scale order with Remington for the Rolling Block rifle 42,000 in total. The cartridge the 11.7 X 51R developed as a joint venture between Remington and the Danish Government, first designed as a Rimfire round, but later produced in centrefire. It was Denmark’s large order with Remington that inspired both Sweden and Norway to also adopt this rifle. Denmark in 1870 obtained licensing rights from Remington and produced Rolling Block rifles in the national armoury. In 1872 Denmark changed the ignition system from Rimfire to centrefire, an ingenious modification was made to the breechblocks allowing the guns to use either ammunition. This specimen has that feature and was one of those made under licence in the Copenhagen Arsenal and fully Danish Ordnance marked. In very good condition, with an excellent bore. £950
11mm French M1873 Service Revolver c.1882 Consignment Sale: An very good Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne revolver as issued to the French army until 1887. Made by the Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne, this untouched example is dated to 1882. Widely used during the First World War, these robust revolvers remained in service to reserve units during WW2 and many were carried by the French Resistance. Overall this revolver, chambered for the obsolete 11 mm cartridge, is in perfect working order with a good bore and chambers. Untouched, it retains its original factory polished, with light age discolouration. All matching, this is a good example for the collector who likes their pistols to be in unspoilt condition. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
11mm French Model 1873 Revolver & Holster Selling on Consignment: An excellent Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne revolver as issued to the French army until 1887. Made by the Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne, this untouched example is dated to 1880. Widely used during the First World War, these robust revolvers remained in service to reserve units during WW2 and many were carried by the French Resistance. Overall this revolver, chambered for the obsolete 11 mm cartridge, is in perfect working order with an excellent bore and chambers. Untouched, it even retains its original and very rare holster, together with part of its braided leather lanyard. The holster itself is also in excellent condition - no dry or cracked leather and firm stitching throughout. All matching, this is a difficult to find set that has remained together. Definitely one for the collector who likes their pistols to be in the best unspoilt condition. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
11mm French Model 1874 Officer's Revolver, c.1876 Introduced as the Model 1874 for Officer issue, this revolver is an upgrade based on the regular Model 1873 that had been adopted earlier by the French military, for standard issue. Being a more refined pistol, with polished blue finish, a lighter fluted cylinder and featuring an overall improved trigger action, it is estimated that only 10 percent of the total Chamelot Delvigne revolvers produced at St. Etienne were of this "Officer" class. Presented in very good condition overall, having retained its sharp profiles and showing no signs of abuse, this revolver still has much original blue finish, with the rest of the surface having nicely darkened to give an attractive plum brown colour. Offered in full working order with good bore and chambers, the revolver benefits from a smooth working action and, as it is chambered for the obsolete 11mm cartridge, it may be owned as a curio without a certificate. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
120 Bore Adams Percussion Revolver 120 Bore Adams Percussion Revolver Details to follow
120b Spencer Side-by-Side Pocket Pistol, c.1835 An interesting quality pistol by Spencer, c.1835, with an unusual side-by-side barrel arrangement. This makes for a stout, hand filling and short barrelled pocket pistol, which is signed with just the gunmaker's last name and, "London." All engraving is sharp, with plenty of detailed decoration all around. The pistol is nevertheless kept compact by having twin retractable triggers, which drop down upon cocking. Double hammers also allow for a rapid follow up shot, with no need to rotate any barrel. Thomas Spencer is recorded as working from premises at Mile End, Old Town, in 1819 and moving to, 34 Duke Street, Southwark, in 1841. Cosmetically the pistol is in good condition, generally sharp with minor dints and marks. The action is fully working, complete with sliding safeties. All woodwork is intact and the bag shaped butt fits well to the surrounding metal work. Overall, a good example of an interesting 2-shot pistol design of about 120 bore. Barrel length = 1½ inches Overall length = 6 inches
14th Regiment Of Foot Pistol By Ketland & Co. A large regimentally marked pistol, made by Ketland & Co., attributed to the 14th Regiment of Foot. Most likely once part of a garniture of small arms, the double barrels of this pistol are consecutively numbered, "8" and "9," which would have made these a costly item, probably purchased by an officer of substance or by his family, likely commemorating the appointment of a commission. For the researchers, the pistol is further marked in entwined script, with the owner's initials. First established by T. Ketland, the firm changed its name to Ketland & Co. in 1778, and continued until 1821 when the business went bankrupt. However, in 1802 the firm of W. Ketland was also formed, which continued until 1831. The 14th Regiment of Foot have a long and illustrious military history, which sees them serving in North America, throughout the American War of Independence. Significantly depleted by 1776, a group of officers were despatched to England to mount a recruiting campaign, whilst the able infantry men who they left behind were posted to reinforce other Regiments. In 1782 their title changed to become, the 14th (Bedfordshire) Regiment. During the French Revolutionary Wars the 14th fought at the Battles of Lille and Famars. In 1795 the 14th returned to the West Indies for 8 years taking part in the bloodless invasion of Trinidad. Meanwhile a second battalion was raised in 1804, which took part in the unsuccessful Walcheren Expedition of 1809 during the War of the Fifth Coalition and were also at the Battle of Waterloo. Overall this double barrelled flintlock, with its oversized and scalloped bulbous grip, was designed for a secure hold. It is in excellent condition, with sharp profiles and clear markings. Offered in full working order with turn-off barrels, the pistol shows no signs of restoration or abuse. A pistol for the collector and researcher.
15th October 2017 - Kempton Vintage & Classic Arms Fair We are delighted to support the 2nd Kempton Vintage & Classic Arms Fair - Including antique and obsolete firearms. Sunday 15th October 2017 Gates Open: 9.30am to 3.30pm Admission: £5 Trade Enquiries to Peter Binfield e-mail; binners57@gmail.com
16 Bore Constabulary Pattern Overcoat Pistol, c.1820 A London proofed pistol of constabulary pattern, identical to the flintlocks issued to Bow Street detectives, c.1820. Constabulary pistols were often built to a price - Devoid of the frippery of other commercial models, these pistols were nevertheless quality arms but with a basic, no-nonsense, industrial finish. To this end the gunmaker has still used a Damascus twist barrel but the lock is plain and unsigned. It is however loaded with the kind of features associated with the best pistols of the day: A semi-waterproof pan; reinforced cock; bolted lock; a roller frizzen and a captive ramrod. Designed to be carried in an overcoat pocket, this 16 bore (.65" calibre) man-stopper would have been a top choice for the authority who requested it. Presented in full working order, the lock is strong with good springs throughout. The walnut stock is also free from repair, just with some minor knocks and service wear. Signs of age wear, frosting to iron parts and light pitting. Overall, an original constabulary pattern flintlock in sleepy condition.
1799 Pattern Light Dragoon Flintlock Pistol A good and interesting example of a 1799 Pattern Light Dragoon pistol, with military proofs. Interestingly this Napoleonic era pistol has been additionally marked with the quartered heart of the United East India Company, suggesting that the pistol saw extended service in various campaigns. Typically then, this pistol has been through the wars and not surprisingly it has sustained some loss to the woodwork around the tail of the lock. Yet despite this, this flintlock retains much character as an honest example of a military pistol. Overall this flintlock is still solid and holding strong in full working order, with all the ironwork having a good dark age patina to it - Likewise the walnut furniture has a rich age colour. The pistol also benefits from having retained what may probably be its original rammer. All in all a respectable example of a military issue Light Dragoon, at a low price.
17th September 2017 - Birmingham Arms Fair We're looking forward to attending the Birmingham Arms Fair, where there is something for every taste to be found. Hope to meet you there.
1827 Truncheon George IV Regency Wooden Painted Police Truncheon, black painted, with GR Crown, 1827, 20 ½ inches long (52 cms)
1829 - 1979 Metropolitan Police Commemorative Medal On the 150th Anniversary of the Metropolitan Police, The Tower Mint marked the occasion by producing a limited number of medals, each marked with the year 1829 - 1979. In relief the medal shows the image of the Peeler, with top hat and long coat, as well as the more modern image on the London Bobby, turned in to face the symbolic crest of the MP. This crest is rarely depicted in such fine detail these days and uses the Lion and Unicorn heraldic imagery to show the police in their role as servants not only to the crown, but also of the common people, as depicted by the pavement upon which they walk. Whist on the obverse, the Brunswick Star, that is the helmet badge of the Constable, is likewise captured in fine detail. Packed with symbolism, the medal is presented in pristine condition, with just a hint of age related bloom, having been retained in its original box all these years - totally untouched. The accompanying care instruction paper is also present and the complete ensemble is in as new condition throughout.
1842 Pattern Lancer's Percussion Pistol By Parker Field & Sons Based on the 1842 Pattern Lancer's pistol, this 50 Bore large sidearm is not a regulation military pistol. The absence of any ordnance marking suggests that it was most probably used by a Constabulary operating a mounted horse patrol, or by the Prison Service. This percussion pistol is in very good 'untouched' condition, with a strong working action stamped to the maker, "Parker Field & Sons." All the furniture is undamaged and the iron work shows only light signs of storage wear and age mottled patina. Overall the pistol measures with a 9 inch long barrel.
1851 Adams 54 Bore Double Action Revolver For the Great Exhibition of 1851, Adams introduced a double action only revolver, which became a popular choice among British Army officers, especially during the Crimean War. To supply the demand for the 54 bore percussion revolver many English, as well as Belgian manufactures, received a licence to produce revolvers to Adams’ design. As such, variations began to appear. This revolver is double action only, as the early Adams 1851 version was. However, it has a side mounted rammer, which is not always seen on the early pieces. Furthermore, what is unusual is that this revolver appears to have never been stamped with any maker’s or retailer's details, or marks of any kind. It certainly has not been refurbished as it retains a fair percentage of original blue finish, with the remainder of the piece having a dark frosted plum brown patina to the metal work. Certainly, many pistols exported to America are known to have been sent without proof, which may explain this piece. Overall, the pistol is in working order but there are some minor bumps as shown and several nipples show evidence of having been struck by the hammer. The trigger, during deliberate slow operation, may sometimes requires a negligible forward nudge to aid the trigger return fully – otherwise for the most part, the action works and the cylinder rotates counter clockwise, with the hammer rising and falling as it should. At the point of firing, the cylinder does have slight rotational movement. Yet despite these typical signs of ageing, this unattributed Adams 1851 revolver has its redeeming features: good undamaged grips; original finish; strong mainspring; adjustable foresight and a military lanyard ring.
1851 Adams 54B Self-Cocking Percussion Revolver Consignment sale: In Britain, the Adams was the favourite revolver among military men due to its ability to fire rapidly with each pull of the trigger. Unlike the Colt, the Adams did not need to be cocked between shots and, its larger man-stopping bore made it the number one choice during the outbreak of the Crimean War. This example is one of the earlier Adams revolvers made c.1851. Retailed and signed by Henry Egg of Piccadilly London, this revolver was among the first of its kind, so it had no provision for a rammer but most likely, would originally have come with a spare cylinder for rapid reloading. Presented in good cosmetic condition, with light salt and pepper finish and perfect grips, this revolver is in excellent working order with strong springs and correct indexing throughout. As such, this revolver is a good representative piece of this Adams revolver. Barrel length = 6¼ inches Overall length = 11½ inches
1854 Transport Corps Issue Sea Service Pistol *** My thanks to a colleague who helped me with gaps in my knowledge on Crimean War history *** A good percussion pistol with its lock signed by Blake & Co. London and dated, 1854. This commercial pistol is a modified Tower pattern, that is attributed to the Transport Corps, a paramilitary organisation that predates the Land Transport Corps. The history of the civilian Transport Corps stems from the Crimean War, after inadequate supply lines failed to deliver the much needed provisions from the port of Balaclava to Sevastapol. Much of what did get through only became possible through the efforts of businessmen who helped organise a civilian supply agency (the Commissariat), which was a non-military service that also came under the control of the Treasury. Together they appointed Commissariat-General Filder to oversee matters, as he was also attached to the British Expeditionary Force. The 1854 Transport Corps came about at a much needed time during the Crimean War but it seems that through the midst of time, its legacy has been somewhat overlooked. Of course, within months the military Land Transport Corps was formed by Royal Warrant in 24 Jan 1855. No doubt the civilian aid that was forthcoming, was much appreciated and the personnel likely worked alongside the LTC, although their role was non-combatant. As such, they could not be armed by the War Office but they were nevertheless issued with Treasury sponsored arms for their personal protection. Typically the men of the Transport Corps were ex soldiers and matelots and so the arms that were issued to them, while they came from commercial gun trade stock, were of a pattern familiar to the men entrusted to carry them. True to British officialdom, after receiving the commercial proofs, this pistol underwent government inspection and acceptance, at which point the two Crown \"T.C.\" marks were struck into the furniture, denoting their provenance. Offered in working order and with a strong action, this pistol is in solid condition with good walnut furniture where only the ironwork has overall surface pitting, resulting in its speckled appearance. An interesting historic example.
1856 Beaumont Adams 54 Bore Percussion Revolver In 1856, a British Army officer, Lieutenant Frederick Beaumont of the Royal Engineers, patented improvements to the Adams revolver. These new features now allowed the Adams revolver to be fired in both single or double action manner. This was the first true double-action system and the revolver saw widespread acceptance, including with the British Army. This particular percussion revolver was made by the London Armoury Company, which was established just days before Beaumont's patents had been finalised. Robert Adams was also the primary and many of the revolvers made were supplied to the Confederacy during the US Civil War. In fact, once the war ended, the LAC could only manage do stay in business for one more year, before closing in 1866. This Beaumont Adams revolver bears a clear LAC stamp and visible proof marks, however the pistol is totally devoid of all its original finish, being evenly pitted along its entire surface. Nevertheless, the revolver is functioning with good springs and bore, and is complete with good grips. All in all, a pleasing and complete example of this much sought after revolver at a bargain price.
1863 Springfield Trapdoor .50-70 Rifle Model 1870 Selling on consignment: An excellent, untouched and crisp 1863 dated Springfield rifle, bearing martial marks and armoury stamps indicating a conversion to a \"Model 1870\" Trapdoor rifle, which was issued to the New Jersey State Militia. This rifle is clearly stamped with both US government marks and inspector\'s initials, as well as having \"N.J.\" issue and rack numbers on its perfect furniture. Overall It is presented in collecrtor grade condition, with a fully working and strong action, as well as a mint bore. With an honest dark age patina to the ironwork, this example has not been messed with and even the screws are generally unturned. Difficult to find a better example.
1885 T Division - Hammersmith - Metropolitan Police Issue Whistle Following their successful trials conducted on Hounslow Heath, Hudsons' police whistles were originally supplied in 1884. As such, this whistle is among the first of the "Police Calls" to have been made specifically for the Metropolitan Police. It is also documented in archives that this Victorian whistle, numbered 524, was delivered to Hammersmith Police Station in 1885, which was then part of T Division, as is Chiswick, Richmond, Hounslow and surrounding areas. Very few police whistles have survived in this wonderful condition, especially when you realise that they were worn overtly, hanging down the front of the constable's tunic, with the whistle tucked behind the belt buckle. As such, they were prone to be easily dented, or even crushed during scuffles. The example on offer was handmade and individually tested. If it was accepted, as this one clearly was, it was stamped with the crown B1 inspector's mark to the top ring - an issue number would also then be engraved on the body. Over the years most of these whistles were refurbished and modernised. New mouthpieces, top rings and repairs were common place, however this example is in its original condition just as when it was first issued, showing only minor service wear and light age patina. A rare whistle in a condition that would be difficult to improve upon.
1885 T Division Metropolitan Police Issue Whistle Following their successful trials conducted on Hounslow Heath, Hudsons' police whistles were first supplied to the Metropolitan Police in 1884. As such, this whistle was among the first of the "Police Calls" to have been made and this early "498" issue number is documented to have been delivered to Hammersmith Police Station in 1885, which was then part of T Division, as is Chiswick, Richmond, Hounslow and surrounding areas. Interestingly, this whistle was acquired from a family house in Chiswick. Very few police whistles have survived in this wonderful condition, especially when you realise that they were first worn overtly, hanging down the front of the constable's tunic, with the whistle tucked behind the belt buckle. As such, they were prone to be easily dented, or even crushed during scuffles. The rare example on offer here, is made of nickel silver and comes in its original form. Most early MP whistles have had their mouthpieces changed, top rings replaced or their diaphragms repaired, but this one has survived in near perfect condition. It even bears its original, crowned B1 acceptance mark, stamped on the top ring by the examining inspector. A rare whistle presented in a condition that would be difficult to improve upon.
1887 Brass Hudsons Whistle - Jack The Ripper Era This lovely "The Metropolitan" police style whistle was made by Hudsons of Birmingham, at a time of high demand by both police constabularies and the general public alike. This brass whistle was handmade in 1887, during Jack the Ripper's reign of terror. This whistle was also among the last to be made at the factory sited at 131 Barr Street in Birmingham. The whistle is itself dent free and in loud working order however, judging by this whistle's lack of nickel finish, it must have been carried extensively. It has not been polished and retains sharp profiles and well executed engraving.
1887 Nickel Silver Hudsons Whistle - Jack The Ripper Era This is a superb example of a Victorian handmade whistle of police style, made by Hudsons of Birmingham. This whistle comes in excellent collector grade condition, having retained much of its original nickel finish. Dating from the Victorian era, as evidenced from the factory address of, 131 Barr Street, this whistle can be more precisely dated to 1887, due to its classic elongated top loop likewise. Presented in very good condition, free from any damage, the whistle is in full working order.
1891 Pattern Sergeant's .303 Rifle 'Reflector' Bore Viewer This bore viewer is an early example of the 1891 Pattern, which was made for .303 rifles. The brass body has been ordnance inspected and stamped with good clear issue marking, whilst internally the reflector mirror is both bright and intact - generally showing little overall sign of use. Originally these tools were issued at a ratio of one, to every twenty rifles. Typically the NCOs would use them to inspect the cleanliness of the soldiers' rifle bores. An excellent example of an early 1891 bore viewer.
1905 Barrel Length: 21.65 inches Overall Length: 40 inches Weight: 6.8 lbs empty Chambering - 7.5x53.5 Swiss Velocity - 1835 fps Capacity - 6 rd detachable box magazine Total Production: 7750 Manufacture Dates: 1895 (-1900?) by SIG, Neuhausen 1896-1905 by Eidgenössische Waffenfabrik, Bern When the Swiss attempted to create a cavalry carbine for their 7.5 round, they made several attempts to shorten the 1889 Schmidt-Rubin. The most interesting attempt include a folding wooden stock , which feature a large hinge in the buttstock. However, due to the length and weakness of the 89 action, none of these attempts were successful. The 1893 Carbine remained in production, until 1905, when it was replaced by the Schmidt-Rubin Model 1905 Short Rifle. Today, Model 1893 Carbines are rare. Many were destroyed during drills, where Swiss soldiers smashed the buttstocks of the 1893 against the ground as hard as they could. This, combined with the small number produced (7750), results in price tags that usually range in the $700-900 range, depending on condition and matching parts numbers. Production dates of the 1893 Note: These Figures do not include the 4250 produced by SIG Year No. Produced Serial #'s 1896 250 4251-4500 1897 250 4501-4750 1898 250 4751-5000 1899 250 5001-5250 1900 400 5251-5650 1901 500 5651-6150 1902 500 6151-6650 1903 500 6651-7150 1904 300 7151-7450 1905 300 7451-7750 Model 1899/1900 short rifle[edit] The model 1899/1900 short rifle was an answer to a call for a short rifle that would replace the unpopular Model 1893 Manlicher straight pull action Carbine. The 99/00 short rifle was meant to be used by the artillery and other rear echelon troops. Design began February 27 1900, and production began in 1901 and lasted for 10 years (18,750 were made). This short rifle was spread to: fortress troops, artillery men, bicycle troops, and balloon companies. The model 99/00 short rifle can be fitted with Model 1889/92 bayonet and the Model 1906 bayonet. Most of the 99/00 and later 1905 short rifles were converted to model K11 carbines when the GP11 cartridge was adopted. Very few unconverted rifles exist today.[1] Model 1911 carbine ("K11")[edit] The Swiss at some point realized that its support troops, cavalry, and certain other units required a shorter rifle than what was currently available and so designed the Model 1911 carbine. The Swiss 1911 carbine being smaller, lighter and still lethally accurate, it became a favorite of the Swiss Army and its popularity contributed to the design of its successor the K31. Production of the K11 included conversion of the model 1900 and 1905 short rifles to the newer specifications of the carbine. For this reason the earlier short rifles are rarely found in their original state. The K11 was the last of the Vogelsgang/Rebholz rifles to be produced.
1914 Bradford City Police Gold Filled Pocket Watch Presented to Police Constable Fuller of the Bradford City Police in July 1914, this Waltham pocket watch must have been a prestigious accolade to have been given, marking his farewell from the force. The gold filled pocket watch is in working order and showing signs of careful pocket carry over the years. There are some areas of rubbing, most notably around the high edges and around the winding crown, as well as the odd mark from pocket carry. Nevertheless, over all it is apparent that PC Fuller must have cherished his gift. A very nice example of a quality Waltham pocket watch - not serviced, but still keeping time. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1921 British Army Binocular Case A very clean, possibly unissued, British Army binocular case. The case shows little sign of use and the leather shoulder strap appears to have never been attached to the case. Marked on the lid with a military broad arrow and dated, \"1921\" the case was made by \"Wray London\". All the stitching is intact and the leather is good, but it might benefit from a light polish overall.
1930s London Transport Station Master's Record Pocket Watch A rare heavy duty LT issue pocket watch, used by station guards on London's Tube network. In 1933 when the LTPB (London Transport Passenger Board) was initially established, the organisation became known simply as London Transport. Typically watches used by any railway employees needed to be robust simply to deal with all the day to day knocks sustained in use. Such watches also required a hermetic case to seal the delicate movement from ingress of a dirt and basically led a hard life. So, to find an example this good is very rare indeed. The case shows signs of extended service use, but it is free of the dents normally found on railway timepieces. Only the glass crystal shows the many scratches and knocks from daily use. However, this is an original crystal that is some 4mm thick, which was required to withstand the bumps, whilst protecting the dial from damage. Mechanically the watch is in excellent order, keeping time and operating well, despite not having been serviced. However, I am advised that this watch did undergo cleaning some 5 years ago. Nevertheless, that does not amount to a Premium Service guarantee. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1930s London Transport Station Master's Record Pocket Watch A rare heavy duty LT issue pocket watch, used by station guards on London's Tube network. In 1933 when the LTPB (London Transport Passenger Board) was initially established, the organisation became known simply as London Transport. Typically watches used by any railway employees needed to be robust simply to deal with all the day to day knocks sustained in use. Such watches also required a hermetic case to seal the delicate movement from ingress of a dirt and basically led a hard life. So, to find an example this good is very rare indeed. The case shows signs of extended service use, but it is free of the dents normally found on railway timepieces. Only the glass crystal shows the many scratches and knocks from daily use. However, this is an original crystal that is some 4mm thick, which was required to withstand the bumps, whilst protecting the dial from damage. Mechanically the watch is in excellent order, keeping time and operating well, despite not having been serviced. However, I am advised that this watch did undergo cleaning some 5 years ago. Nevertheless, that does not amount to a Premium Service guarantee. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1936 Polish Army Issue Zenith Pocket Watch This pre WW2 Polish Army issue Zenith pocket watch is a true survivor, presented in fabulous and original condition throughout. These rare military watches were marked on the inside of the case back cover,"1936r," which indicates the year of issue - where the "r" relates to the Polish word "rok," and translated this means "year." Both the case and dial also have the M.S. Wojsk legend. This is short for, "Ministerstwo Spraw Wojskowych," which is the Polish equivalent of the Ministry of Defence. The dial also gives the Warsaw agent's name as, "Z. Jeznacki." Most frequently these watches have suffered a tough life, so to find an example of a Polish Army Zenith in this unusually fine condition, complete with a perfect dial, with no nasty dents, showing only minor signs of service wear and a nice mellow age patina, is very rare indeed - All serial numbers are matching as well. The watch movement is in full working order, having benefitted from a Premium Service in the past few years. However as with all vintage timepieces, routine servicing needs to be considered if the watch is to be used as a regular timepiece. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1938 RAF Pilot Issue Split Chronograph Pocket Stop Watch A rare opportunity to acquire a fine Air Ministry split chronograph timer, as first issued to RAF pilots pre WW2. This watch is in fact issue dated to 1938 and is of larger proportions than most timers, measuring 60mm in diameter, which made it comfortable to operate in an open cockpit with gloved hands. Of course with the onset of war, these premier stop watches supplied by Lemania, were quickly superseded by what were more basic timers of the day. Presented in untouched and totally original condition, this stop watch, with its dual sweeping seconds hands, is capable of timing two simultaneous events, thanks to its ingenious and complicated rattrapante system, which may be run either in tandem or independently as desired by the pilot. The watch is in good working and fully operational order, with all functions working crisply - however the watch has not been serviced. An optional Premium Service package is available for this timepiece. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1938 Royal Air Force Mess Room Fusee Clock A pre WW2 RAF fusee mantelpiece clock made by Elliott - having the movement dated to 1938. These much sought after 8 day clocks, served in officers' Mess Rooms at RAF stations. This example has a good and unrestored oak case, which is in excellent condition, having a rich and well figured grain. It is free from damage and repair, although a latch was fitted at some point to the clock's back door panel. The clock retains its original and unrestored silvered dial, as well as having genuine spade and poker hands. Furthermore, the brass bezel has not been polished, so it has retained much of its gilt finish, albeit a little speckled with age. When placed on a level surface, these chain driven and robustly built clocks, are more than capable of delivering accurate timekeeping.
1939 Dated Air Ministry Stop Watch A rare, early WW2 stopwatch by Lemania, bearing Air Ministry marks and an issue date of 1939. The watch is in very good condition and working order, with only the original celluloid crystal showing some signs of age. The dial itself remains in excellent condition, as shown, and the movement looks factory fresh. This watch can be guaranteed to have been in service during the Battle of Britain.
1939 Dated WW2 Hudson Military Whistle Here's a great example of a Hudson Metropolitan whistle, made for military service and dated, "1939." Its condition is excellent, with just slight signs of service wear and no nasty dents.
1940 Air Ministry Escape Whistle in Issue Box This is an outstanding and totally original, mint in box RAF aircrew escape whistle. Please note, this is NOT a modern reproduction Thunderer but a genuine wartime, "sterile" whistle: If you don't know, wartime whistles differed from the modern repros as the originals did not have Hudsons' details on the mouthpiece - Repros do. Cosmetically this escape whistle is as new, with no dings, dents, or loss of chrome finish. It is perfect and comes in the equally original Air Ministry, 1940 dated carton.
1940s Civilian Omega Wristwatch This scarce military-inspired Omega wristwatch was made in 1947 and, essentially, it's a civilian version of the WWW (Dirty Dozen) watch that was issued to the British Army. Despite being a virtual clone for the military version, the obvious difference is the dial with its silvered/white finish and lack of broad arrow. Featuring a steel waterproof case in their design of this watch, Omega has opted to use their legendary 30T2 movement in the production of this big 35mm watch. A less noticeable difference is their use of removable spring bars, which gives people a choice in the kind of strap or bracelet they may wish to wear. As is, this watch comes with a new quality leather strap. Mechanically the watch is in fine condition, with a bright copperplate finish covering the movement, which is running well and keeping time. Given its 74 years old, this Omega shows only minor signs of its age, which make it a very attractive timepiece for daily use. A Premium Service with a 12-month warranty can be requested for this wristwatch.
1940s Military Inspired Helvetia Wristwatch It is not entirely surprising that after WW2, a trend existed among watch companies to produce many military inspired timepieces. Perhaps they found that ex soldiers were drawn to a "look" that they had become accustom too during the war. This Helvetia wristwatch is a typical postwar product… but untypically it has survived in excellent original condition, with most of its factory finish remaining intact. The movement too looks absolutely pristine. Many allied and axis soldiers would have been familiar and possibly were issued with Helvetia watches during the conflict. They were a high grade maker who sadly is no longer in business. Presented in working order, but not serviced, complete with a later Vietnam war issue green watch band. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
1944 Ibberson General Service Pocket Knife George Ibberson & Co. were a family business, whose origins in the cutlery trade are believed to have started in 1700. They are a popular company among collectors, perhaps best known for their Special Forces issue knife of WW2. Those knives were marked "C.O.S.D.," which is an acronym for the, "Combined Operations Stores Depot," who ordered the gravity knife for issue to its frogmen, operating within demolition teams in 1944. All that aside, this version is however the General Service pattern, also dated for issue in that same year, presumably being manufactured in anticipation of D-Day. Presented in excellent condition, this knife is one of the best examples that I have owned, appearing to be little used. With no damage and clear markings, the knife is a superb item. The name of George Ibberson can still be found on modern knives, but since 1983 the company became part of "The Egginton Group."
1944 Key Penknife A good WW2-era penknife made by Richards, in the form of a key. It incorporates a 1944 dated Farthing coin. In good condition.
1944 Military Issue Pocket Knife By Wilson A good late war exigency issue pocket knife, manufactured by Wilson in preparation for D-Day and dated 1944. Complete with undamaged grip scales, screwdriver, blade and can opener. Overall showing service wear, but remains a serviceable piece of kit.
1953 Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Watch By Ingersoll Made in Great Britain, original Ingersoll pocket watches from the 1953 Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, are becoming harder to find in untouched condition, as this one is. Some of the features associated with this collector grade timepiece are unique and include; the chain bow shaped as the Queen's Coronation Crown, polychrome dial, gilt baton hands and the heraldic depiction of the Royal Coat of Arms engraved on the case back. Without one of these important attributes, these watches' lose much in value - however, this example is 100% original and in excellent undamaged condition throughout - plus working order! A scarce piece that will be difficult to improve upon, with no wear or dents.
1956 Air Ministry Omega - RAF Pilot's Issue Watch During WW2 RAF pilots were issued with Swiss Mark VII wristwatches that had white dials and inferior grade alloy cases. This was not exactly what the Air Ministry wanted for their pilots, but under the limitations imposed on Switzerland as a neutral country, only non-war-critical timepieces could be traded out to combating nations. The situation was complex, but somehow Omega still managed to supply the Allies with a significant number of watches equipped with this high grade 30T2SC movements. By 1948 many of the earlier Mark VII RAF watches were now in storage, as they no longer met current specification. When the specifications were revised the Air Ministry were responsible for the creation of the fabled Mark XI. Consequently orders for a new supply of wristwatch began to arrive and in 1953, this included stock from Omega. These were all fine timepieces, but in reality they were not only expensive, but they offered no significant advantage in improved timekeeping above and beyond those watches previously issued - they just looked very different. In 1956 then, in response to a need to make financial cuts, the Air Ministry decided to utilise many of the redundant WW2 stock of Mark VII's, and so they had their own watchmakers refurbish the surplus timepieces and bring them up to date, ready for reissue in the jet age, refurbished with new dials and cases. This here is an original example of one of the 1956 Air Ministry refurbished Omega pilot's watches. As such, it is in excellent condition complete with its excellent wartime movement, that had its white dial repainted in-house to the black configuration and its original hands were then coated in a luminous compound for contrast. A special steel waterproof case was also manufactured for these and the whole reassembled with shock proofing added in accordance with new specification. All in all, whilst a good number of these 1956 Air Ministry watches were produced, they nevertheless remain a rare variant having had an extended military heritage. Offered in good Air Ministry "Original" condition throughout and excellent working order. Complete with NATO strap. Recommended Premium Service with 12 months warranty offered for this watch for only £90
1960s American Railway Pocket Watch An interesting railroad styled pocket watch made for the American market, depicting a diesel locomotive travelling at speed. The overall general style of this Hallmark signed pocket watch is faithful to the railroad watch designs made earlier by the likes of Hamilton, Waltham and Elgin. Made in the 1960s, this watch features a screw back and front case with a clear and bold dial layout. The 17 jewel movement is of good quality and proper working order, but the watch has not been serviced - Nevertheless the watch is keeping time. Overall a pleasant railway watch.
1970s Vintage Stop Watch - New Old Stock Most old stop watches just start, stop and reset, however this Presta watch is a little different. This Swiss watch starts, stops and if necessary, can be restarted before being stopped again and reset… or restarted. Amazingly this pilot's stop watch with its totalising timer, is in absolutely new condition, despite being 40 years old. It is fully functioning and a great useable tool, even in the age of quartz. It does not appear to have ever been opened and retains the remains of a manufacturer's label on the case back.
1988 US Military Hamilton Wristwatch Made by Hamilton for the US Armed Forces, this military wristwatch was issued at a time of Special Forces operations in the Persian Gulf. These actions were called to protect American registered oil tankers and later USN warships, from Iraqi and Iranian attacks. Two years on, the hostilities led to the First Gulf War. But it was not all about the Middle East in 1988, as the US military were also much involved in emergency operations in Honduras, as well as in Panama. Hamilton watches have been supplied to the US military since WW1, but from the 1960s, they were assembled and serviced in the US Virgin Islands using Swiss movements. This business arrangement allowed Hamilton to meet the "Buy American" laws concerning government procurement, whilst also keeping the cost of their products within military budget. It is an excellent military timepiece, which is in full working order and keeping time, although it has not been serviced. Fortunately the spares situation for this vintage watch is not a problem, meaning that this watch can continue to provide service for many years to come. A classic military wristwatch at a very budget price, including a US issue strap.
1988 US Military Hamilton Wristwatch 2019 New Year Special Made by Hamilton for the US Armed Forces, this military wristwatch was issued at a time of Special Forces operations in the Persian Gulf. These actions were called to protect American registered oil tankers and later USN warships, from Iraqi and Iranian attacks. Two years on, the hostilities led to the First Gulf War. But it was not all about the Middle East in 1988, as the US military were also much involved in emergency operations in Honduras, as well as in Panama. Hamilton watches have been supplied to the US military since WW1, but from the 1960s, they were assembled and serviced in the US Virgin Islands using Swiss movements. This business arrangement allowed Hamilton to meet the "Buy American" laws concerning government procurement, whilst also keeping the cost of their products within military budget. It is an excellent military timepiece, which is in full working order and keeping time, although it has not been serviced. Fortunately the spares situation for this vintage watch is not a problem, meaning that this watch can continue to provide service for many years to come. A classic military wristwatch at a very budget price, including a US issue strap.
19th November 2017 - Birmingham Arms Fair We're looking forward to attending the Birmingham Arms Fair, where there is always something of interest waiting to be discovered. Hope to meet you there.
1W.O.R. - Canadian Expeditionary Force - Ross Bayonet, c.1914 Shortly after the outbreak of WW1, the Canadian government assembled a military force at Camp Valcartier in Quebec, destined for England. This became the original Canadian Expeditionary Force, which by the end of the war numbered 260 battalions. However, these very first troops were the ones that formed the 1st Battalion, of the 1st Brigade, of the 1st Canadian Division - Their unit was named the, 1st Western Ontario Regiment. As such, this Pattern 1911 Ross Bayonet Mk II, can be attributed to being one of their issue blades, clearly marked with the Canadian broad arrow and "1WOR" stamp on the grip. The 1st Western Ontario Regiment went on to fight at Ypres in 1915. Presented in excellent and untouched condition, this bayonet is fully marked, complete with its original leather scabbard, likewise in excellent order.
1W.O.R. - Canadian Expeditionary Force - Ross Bayonet, c.1914 2019 New Year Special Shortly after the outbreak of WW1, the Canadian government assembled a military force at Camp Valcartier in Quebec, destined for England. This became the original Canadian Expeditionary Force, which by the end of the war numbered 260 battalions. However, these very first troops were the ones that formed the 1st Battalion, of the 1st Brigade, of the 1st Canadian Division - Their unit was named the, 1st Western Ontario Regiment. As such, this Pattern 1911 Ross Bayonet Mk II, can be attributed to being one of their issue blades, clearly marked with the Canadian broad arrow and "1WOR" stamp on the grip. The 1st Western Ontario Regiment went on to fight at Ypres in 1915. Presented in excellent and untouched condition, this bayonet is fully marked, complete with its original leather scabbard, likewise in excellent order.
2 Brass Bullet Moulds + 3 Wad & Patch Cutters Selling on consignment: A group of vintage and modern shooting accessories consisting of 2 brass .44 and 54 Bore moulds, as well as 3 iron wad & patch cutters variously marked, "Made in England," "Priory," 11/16, 3/4 and 1/2. All in very good and useable condition.
2 May 2021 Kempton Park Arms Fair We'll be exhibiting at Kempton Park on 2 May 2021. Hope to see you all again.
2 Police Lanterns Two Police Lanterns, three stack chimney “Bullseye” lantern, Hiatt & Co Birmingham, 19cms high and a two stack chimney, with “Bullseye” lens, 20 cms high, both with wicks, lamps are in fair to good used condition (2 items)
250 Warranted Percussion Gun Caps Tin A large "Warranted" percussion cap tin variously marked as well as labeled, "250 No.16s Foil Covered Percussion Gun Caps." Offered in very good condition, with most of the original trade label remaining. Posting the tin is not a problem, however the few remaining caps cannot be sent mailed. If required, they will be available for collection. Diameter = 2⅛ inches Height = 1½ inches
28B Rifled Pocket Pistol By Barratt, c.1835 A scarce rifled pocket percussion pistol made, c.1835 and marked on the barrel, "Barratt & Son." This engraving is now worn, commensurate with a pistol that has been carried, but all functions are solid and it remains in working order with good nipple. The attractively engraved brass body has a slim profile, thanks to the feature of the drop down trigger and the chequered bag shaped grips are a good fit, being damage free with a vacant silver cartouche. Overall an attractive self defence pistol. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7 inches
2x New MOD Issue Security Padlock Two vintage, new old stock military issue padlocks by Squire and ACE. Both are fully marked with NATO stock numbers, dates, etc., and come supplied with 2 keys each. The ACE padlock is still wrapped and unused but it does have has some minor surface corrosion spots from long term storage.
2x WW2 37 Pattern Webbing Extension Straps Two pairs (4 pieces) of 37 pattern webbing extension straps. These are all in good condition, showing little signs of use. One set is clearly dated 1941 and bears the broad arrow, while the second set is indistinctly marked. The price includes postage.
3 Military Pocket Knives TO CLEAR - 3 general service pocket knives, they are all military marked. The examples made by Rowbotham and Thompson are both in good order but the one marked Rodgers has a defective slip joint, however, they are all functional knives with decent blade profiles. The Thompson knife is the one on the left in the first image and on the right in the second image. All knives are EDC compliant.
3 Police Lanterns Three Police Bullseye Lanterns, 2 x one stack examples and 1 x two stack example, all in generally good condition, complete with wicks, one folding handle loose (3 items)
3 RAF Cloth Flying Helmets TO CLEAR - 3 RAF cloth flying helmets. Generally good with no tears but with storage grime and signs of service wear. One size 4 and two, size 3.
3 Vintage 12 Bore Snap Caps 3 vintage nickel-plated shotgun snap caps. In good working order with some wear from use.
3-Shot Manhattan .30 Percussion Pepperbox Pistol, c.1856 A crisp and sleepy example of a rare and desirable, 3-Shot percussion pepperbox pistol, made by the Manhattan Firearms Manufacturing Company of New York. With less than 1000 of these smaller gambler's pistols produced in the late 1850's, this one is numbered, 612, inside the trigger guard bow. Reduced in profile by having fewer shots and by virtue of having no automatic indexing mechanism, the slim tri-barrel assembly had to be turned by hand, firing by means of a self-cocking hammer operated by the squeeze of the trigger. Marked to the barrels as, "Cast Steel," this pepperbox was eminently concealable, designed to be carried unobtrusively about the person. With a strong working action, good nipples, sharp marking, perfect grips and an overall dark age patina, this type of pistol is very rarely seen in any condition. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 6½ inches
37 Pattern Bren Gun Spares Webbing A good item of military \"1953\" dated 37 pattern webbing, marked to the front, \"MALLET, SPARE PARTS, BREN .303 M.G. MK I\". Complete with carry strap.
38 Bore Percussion Back-Action Belt Pistol, c.1840 A good 38 bore percussion pistol of compact proportions, designed to be worn on the belt hook. Featuring a captive ramrod and bead foresight, this pistol would have made a handy self defence piece. Cosmetically this pistol is in very good condition, retaining much original finish and sharp profiles throughout. The back-action lock is unsigned, but does have a good level of engraved decoration as well as a strong functioning action. Overall an attractive belt pistol of utilitarian form. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overal length = 8.5 inches
38 Bore War Department Beaumont Adams Revolver. c.1855 A massive and fine WD marked Beaumont Adams percussion revolver of 38 Bore, that saw service with the Victoria Police Force. Typically, these British revolvers saw extensive service during the Australian gold-rush years, which makes this unmolested example a valuable specimen for the collector to study. Remaining in sharp and possibly unfired condition, this revolver has well struck War Department stamps together with a clear inspector's acceptance mark to the butt, as well as an inventory number. Overall the revolver shows no real sign of use and as such, it has a mint bore and the most solid lock-up that could be wished for. When these British Government Adams revolvers were eventually replaced by Colts, conveniently supplied by an Australian gunsmith, the arms underwent a process of decommissioning resulting in their police provenance being erased, yet, enough of the original marking remains to confirm this revolver's heritage - Plus, all British WD marks remain clear. Large areas of original bluing remain throughout, plus all the nipples and screw heads are generally untouched, as are the checkered grips, which make this a great example for the collector.
3818A Bulova Code = Year L8 = 1958 L9 = 1959 M0 = 1960 M1 = 1961 M2 = 1962
3rd September 2017 - Bristol Antique Arms Fair We will be trading at the Bristol Fine Antique Arms Fair on the 3rd September and look forward to meeting our customers... At the Holiday Inn, Bristol-Finton, BS16 1QX
4 Civil Defence Arm Bands TO CLEAR - 4 Civil Defence yellow arm bands, marked, variously maker marked and stamped with the broad arrow and date. They are basically unused.
4 Stop Watches Split WW1 RN SID CWC 1981 ASDIC
40 Bore Italian Sash Pistol By Foliata, c.1740 Selling on consignment: An original and unusual small sized Italian flintlock pistol from the early to mid 18th Century, signed by the maker "Foliata." Proportioned for discreet carry, this flintlock has all the features that are associated with larger refined gentleman's guns of the period, but the whole has been scaled down for unobtrusive wear around a belly-band sash. The beautifully striped and undamaged woodwork features deeply chiselled and relieved decoration in European style, which is enhanced by attractive brass fittings, including a facetted long-eared butt cap and pierced side plate. Its lightly curved lock, with a swan neck cock, benefits from having a curled frizzen, which reduces the risk of snagging upon drawing and inadvertently spilling the primer. It is all fully signed and in working order, with strong springs throughout. Overall an early decorated flintlock in very good condition, with signs of age but otherwise undamaged. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
40 Bore Percussion Pistol By Westley Richards, c.1850 This gentleman's percussion pistol was made by Westley Richards, c.1850. Typical of this gunmaker, this pocket sized 40 bore pistol is of fine quality, made with superb attention to detail throughout. With such attentiveness to the gunmaker's art, Westley Richards became a popular supplier of arms to the wealthy: Numbered on the trigger guard tang, this pistol could be researched against existing company records. The sighted and browned Damascus barrel is fully signed, "Westley Richards, 170 New Bond Street London." A platinum breech line and vent, together with fine foliate engraving over much of the pistol, exude superior gunmaking skill. Fully functioning, the bolted lock has a silky smooth action, working correctly against strong springs, housed in a walnut stock with a cap 'n' ball trap in the butt, plus a swivelling ramrod. A fine and compact percussion pistol. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 6.5 inches
50 Bore First Model Tranter Revolver, c.1853 Production of the Double Trigger Tranters began in 1853, when these early percussion revolvers were built on Adams' frames and, whilst their actions were modified by James Kerr, they were originally referred to as the, "Tranter-Adams-Kerr." As a cap and ball revolver it had no integral rammer, but as William Tranter developed his line of double triggers, subsequent models appeared fitted with a barrel clip and a secured rammer; the Second Model utilised a keyed rammer, whilst the Third had a rammer held by a screw. This Tranter is a good early First Model, with the Adams signed frame, marked "50 Bore." It is in full working order, functioning reliably with solid lock-up. Signed "G. Manney, No.4 Colmore Row, Birmingham" on the top strap, this revolver has good colour and sharp engraving, with some light pitting, service wear and minor dints evident. Overall, a good example of a classic design. Barrel length = 6½ inches Overall length =
50 Kynoch .455 Revolver Cartridges An original carton of 50 Kynoch .455 revolver cartridges. These once fired boxer primed cartridges appear to be in good condition, together with the original box - showing some minor damage and stains.
50B Percussion Pistol & Side Spring Bayonet, c.1810 A little longer than usual, this single shot sash pistol features a formidable sprung bayonet, which deploys smartly when the side mounted locking catch is disengaged. Presented in good working order, this personal defence weapon has seen extended service, which has left it rubbed overall. To the side of the working box lock action, the gunmaker's name is part visible, though it is believed to have been signed by, "Richards." London proofs are also present on the barrel. With the finish now reduced to an aged mottled brown, salt and pepper patina, this pistol would benefit from a light clean. Nevertheless the pistol is intact with strong working springs. The bag shaped butt also shows some slight shrinkage, but it is interestingly marked with the crest of a titled gentleman, consisting of a Noble's Crown above a static heron holding a serpent in its bill. The pistol also comes with a simple tapered wood ramrod. Overall a complete dual function pistol, which can be improved with careful cleaning. Barrel length = 6½ inches Overall length = 10½ inches
54 Bore Beaumont Adams Percussion Revolver, c.1855 Selling on consignment: A generally crisp example of a London Arms Company Beaumont Adams 54 Bore double action revolver, retailed by W & J Kavanagh of 12 Dame Street, Dublin, c.1855. Presented in excellent working order with tight lock up, a mirror bore, good screw heads and much original finish, revolvers this good are rarely seen outside of a cased set. No doubt this revolver has seen very little or no use. All in all, a superb collector grade example of a much sought after revolver, that will be difficult to improve upon at this price level. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 12 inches
54 Bore Turn-Off Barrel London Pocket Pistol, c.1800 Probably the most prolific in concealment designs for the 18th century, such pistols were made for routine pocket carry and, whilst many would have been pocketed just occasionally, others were indeed carried regularly through fear of potential attack. Clearly such 'used' examples must have the most interesting stories to tell, but those pistols are always somewhat jaded. Nevertheless, this pistol still features a legible "London" signed and proofed lock, as well as a turn off barrel and the hidden trigger provided the pistol with a reduced profile. Although details are now worn, with only part of the maker's name being visible, the action itself is okay and the cock holds. Yet, despite the wear and light staining to the surface, the overall appearance could still be improved. All in all, a complete but tired 200+ year old flintlock. Barrel length = 2½ Overall length = 7½
54B Tranter Percussion Revolver Selling on consignment: A 54 bore Double Trigger Tranter percussion revolver made c.1858. Presented in full working order, this large revolver retains much blue finish, although showing the typical service wear commensurate of it being a military man\'s sidearm, with holster rubbing, mottled patina and general thinning of finish evident. The action is as it should be and the grips are undamaged, and profiles all remain good. An honest example of this ingenious and sought after revolver.
54B Tranter Percussion Revolver, c.1858 A good 54 bore Double Trigger Tranter percussion revolver made c.1858. Presented in full working order, this large revolver retains much original blue finish, although showing the typical service wear of a military man's sidearm, with holster wear, mottled patina and thinning of original factory finish being evident. The grips are undamaged and profiles remain sharp, including the frame numbers and proofs but interestingly, it has never been engraved with any retailer's address. An honest example of this ingenious and sought after revolver.
54B Webley Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver, c.1862 Introduced in 1857, Webley Wedge Frames were known as robust and reliable revolvers, making them a popular choice among British Army officers. Certainly, this 54 bore example with its plain unadorned finish, may well have been one of those intended for the military market. Presented in full working order, this heavy duty revolver is in very good condition with strong springs and good indexing cylinder with decent nipples. Overall the pistol shows signs of service wear, but has nevertheless retained good angles, screws and excellent grips. Although Webley introduced a Solid Frame version in 1859, demand for their Wedge Frame revolvers continued. This is evident from the fact that this revolver was retailed by Griffiths & Worsley, a gunmaker operating in Manchester between 1862 to 1868, who also supplied medium sized 80 bore and smaller 120 bore pocket revolvers to the same design. An example of the 80 bore revolver is available on this website - sold separately. Barrel length = Overall length =
58 Pattern Browning Webbing Holster An excellent and little used 58 Pattern webbing holster for the NATO Browning Hi-Power self loading pistol. This one is of an earlier type when the metal fittings had a green anodised finish. No rips or tears, just showing minor sign of service use.
6 Kg of Military KFS TO CLEAR - 6 Kilos of military surplus knives, forks and spoons. Generally used but also a lot of new old stock stainless steel KFS. Each piece being marked with NATO stock numbers and broad arrow. Ideal for camps or other projects. A lot.
6x Victorian Senior Metropolitan Police Officer's Tunic Buttons A set of Senior Victorian Metropolitan Police Officer's tunic buttons. All 6 of the silvered buttons are identically marked," Jennens & Co. London." They are in very good original, if slightly tarnished condition, with no dents or damage. Each one depicts the Queen Victoria's Crown and a laurel wreath surround.
7 Woodland Camouflage Helmet Covers TO CLEAR - A lot of 7 military surplus helmet covers simulating green/brown woodland foliage. One size fits all. Mint condition.
78 rpm Lilli Marlene Lale Anderson This article is about the song. For the 1950 British film, see Lilli Marlene (film). For the 1981 German film by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, see Lili Marleen (film). A "Lili Marleen" and Lale Andersen memorial in Langeoog, Germany. "Lili Marleen" (also known as "Lili Marlen", "Lilli Marlene", "Lily Marlene", "Lili Marlène" and similar variants) is a German love song which became popular during World War II with soldiers of both sides. Written as a poem in 1915, during World War I, it was published under the title "Das Lied eines jungen Soldaten auf der Wacht" (German for "The Song of a Young Soldier on Watch") in 1937 and was first recorded by Lale Andersen in 1939 under the title "Das Mädchen unter der Laterne" ("The Girl under the Lantern"). Following the Nazi invasion of Yugoslavia in 1941, Radio Belgrade became Soldatensender Belgrad and played the song frequently to entertain the German armed forces within its reach. It became popular throughout Europe and the Mediterranean among both Axis and Allied troops. In 1915, as a 22-year-old soldier fighting in the First World War, Leip wrote his poem to express the anguish of separation from his sweetheart, a grocer's daughter named Lili. On sentry duty at night, he would receive a friendly wave from a nurse going off duty; her name was Marleen. In 1937, feeling that the darkness of another war was looming, Leip released his collection of poems, including The Song of a Young Sentry, under the title Die Hafenorgel ("The Little Organ by the Harbour"). It was his hope that those who had not lived through the First World War might be alerted to the pain and horror of wars fought in the name of "national pride". The story behind the song: Moon River The story behind the song: Happy Birthday Norbert Schultze was a successful German composer of songs, opera and film music. He barely remembered the Great War but when he read Leip's poems, he caught their ominous mood and wrote a melody for the Young Sentry poem. But the song was rejected by several publishers. By 1939 Schultze had modified the composition and a successful singer named Lale Andersen was offered the new song to record. It didn't appeal to her but she made the recording, just before the outbreak of the Second World War. Its sales were lacklustre. More seriously, Nazi politics nearly sent the song into oblivion. Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda chief, was reported as hating the song for not being "military" enough. He wanted it changed into a stirring march. To loyal Nazis, the song seemed to be anti-war, even close to treason, and singer Lale Andersen was believed to be sympathetic towards Jews. The song was banned and both Andersen and Schultze were charged with "moral sabotage" of the nation's aims. She was placed virtually under house arrest and he was ordered to compose music praising Nazi ideals. By 1941, the Germans were broadcasting to their troops in North Africa from a radio station in Belgrade. When the station was shelled, most of its records were smashed and the station was desperately short of music to play. One day the station's military director, Lieutenant Karl-Heinz Reintgen, came across a dusty box in which a few records had survived - and right at the bottom was Lili Marlene. Officially the recording had been banned, but Reintgen knew that a buddy of his in the Afrika Korps had liked the song, and they had precious little else to play, so Lili Marlene was broadcast. It was a turning point. The German troops asked for the recording over and over again, and non-military people also requested it. Field Marshal Rommel didn't agree with Goebbels and asked Radio Belgrade to play the song every night. Goebbels was forced to retract, and to pretend that the Nazis welcomed the song. Schultze and Andersen were brought in from the cold and sent around Germany to perform the song. Allied troops in Africa could also hear the German broadcasts, and the plaintive song soon crossed enemy lines and became a favourite with the Eighth Army, who sang it with its original German words. American troops followed suit. When a group of British soldiers were on leave in London, publisher Jimmy Phillips chided them for singing a song in German, so the men challenged him to produce an English version. Phillips did so, in collaboration with Tommy Connor. Their "translation" offered words which differed from Leip's original poem. Although still plaintive, it was now a bitter-sweet song of dreaming about a distant love, rather than a plangent anti-war statement. Anne Shelton recorded this English version with the Ambrose Orchestra, and the BBC promoted it enthusiastically, establishing its popularity throughout Britain. In France, Suzy Solidor recorded it in French. By 1943 German-born anti-Nazi Marlene Dietrich was singing the song throughout war-torn Europe, and continued to sing it for the rest of her career, as did Vera Lynn. Many recordings followed - Bing Crosby, Edith Piaf, Perry Como and Jean Claude Pascal. Hans Leip died in 1983, and Norbert Schultze's death followed in 2002. They had seen their song survive the Second World War, be translated into 48 languages (including Hebrew and Latin) and feature on hit parades in countries as diverse as the US and Japan. When the original recording artist, Lale Andersen, was asked in 1972 if she could explain the popularity of Lili Marlene, she replied, "Can the wind explain why it became a storm?"
7mm Solid Frame Revolver & Holster By E. Pope - Clonmel, c.1860 Revolvers like this were among the first of the 'modern' self contained cartridge firearms that brought about the close of the cap 'n' ball era. Made c.1860, this Birmingham proofed revolver has an interesting extractor with elements of Webley and Tranter about it. Chambered for the now obsolete 7mm rimfire cartridge, this revolver bears the retailer's name of E. Pope, a gunmaker residing in Clonmel, Southern Ireland. Given its age, this revolver retains good springs and works in both double and single action modes, with good chambers and reasonable bore to the 4.5 inch barrel. All iron surfaces retain a proportion of original finish, with the rest fading and grey. Complete with damage free walnut grips and its leather holster, this good outfit may be purchased as a curio, without the constraints of a certificate, provided it is retained as an ornament only.
8-Day Pocket Carriage Clock Watch, c.1900 A large 8-day carriage clock watch complete with its original Moroccan leather pocket case, all in very good condition. Made c.1900, this Swiss watch measures 68 mm in diameter and features an oversized movement providing excellent timekeeping. Such watches were often carried in tunic pockets of gentlemen travellers and army officers, and when needed the discreet fold-away stand could be deployed to stand the watch by their bedside. Presented in original condition, the case shows only minor signs of pocket rubbing to the blue leather exterior, revealing the underlying red colour around the corners. Internally the case is clean, retaining all its vivid colour. The watch has a crisp dent-free steel case, hinged front and back, with a clear bevel-edged crystal framing the Arabic numeral dial with only minor service wear marks between 1 - 2, not immediately noticeable with the glass closed. A beautiful example suitable for daily use.
8-Day Smiths Military Bakelite Office Mess Clock An excellent example of a military-marked 8-day clock by Smiths, with a perfect bakelite case. This pendulum clock is fully marked on the pristine dial with a prominent broad arrow. Having been serviced recently, it is sold in working order and is capable of keeping precise time provided it is set up on a level surface. The clock comes with its original \"Smiths\" marked key. Please note, that the clock\'s pendulum was removed for handling during photography. It is present.
80 Bore Adams' Wadded Bullet Percussion Revolver, c.1851 This six-shot Birmingham gun trade self-cocking revolver is an evolution in design, thanks to the improvements made by Robert Adams and his development of the wadded bullet, in 1851. Adams' newly designed bullets featured a fibrous wad, pinned to a spigot on the bullet's base. The benefits of this wad were several; bullets could be seated more easily into their cylinder, without the need for a forceful rammer; either soft or hard lead alloys could be used as shaved debris was eliminated; faster reloading times resulted, as the friction fit to the chamber wall was taken care of mainly by the wad. Furthermore, if harder lead bullets were used, this opened up the prospect of achieving higher muzzle velocities with less bore fouling. Presented in full working order, the main feature of this 80 bore percussion revolver is its sprung loaded plunger. As the task of bullet seating was made easier using wadded bullets, the plunger needed only to be operated by an effortless finger push. All springs and action operate without fault - Indexing and cylinder timing are all rock solid. Cosmetically the revolver is good, with micro groove rifling and excellent grips, as well as much original finish, showing some surface speckling and light pitting around the barrel and frame. A rare revolver in good collectable condition. Barrel length = 4½ inches Overall length = 10 inches
80B Webley Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver, c.1857 An excellent 80 bore Webley Wedge Frame percussion revolver, first introduced in 1857. These robust revolvers proved to be a successful design, although they were superseded within two years by the development of Webley's Solid Frame. Being both double and single action, these revolvers were reliable thanks to their straightforward mechanism. Being unsigned, this revolver is presented in excellent condition, retaining much of its original blued finish, as well as subdued case colours to the cylinder. A working action, a good bore, chambers, solid nipples, and perfect chequered grips, make this a good example for the collector. Barrel length = inches Overall length = inches
80B Webley Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver, c.1862 Introduced in 1857, this Webley Wedge Frame revolver was made in three sizes. However, with production concentrating on the 54 bore military spec versions, these 80 bore examples are rare to find. As the mid sized offering, this revolver was retailed by Griffiths & Worsley of Manchester, c.1862. It is offered in good condition and full working order, with tight indexing, decent nipples, screws, grips and some original finish, with the rest to a dark patina. An example of a full size Webley Wedge Frame 54 bore revolver is also available on this website. It is shown in the last image together with the 80 bore - sold separately. Barrel length = Overall length =
80B Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver, c.1857 An excellent 80 bore Wedge Frame percussion revolver, made c.1857. These robust revolvers borrowed much from the designs of Webley and Adams, proved to be a successful design, although wedge frames were superseded within two years by the development a Webley Solid Frame. Being both double and single action, these revolvers were considered as reliable, thanks to their straightforward mechanism. Unsigned, but bearing Birmingham proofs, this revolver is presented in excellent condition, retaining much of its original blued finish, as well as subdued case colours to the cylinder. A working action, good bore, chambers, solid nipples, and perfect chequered grips, make this a good example for the collector. Barrel length = inches Overall length = inches
9 Pounder Royal Artillery Barracks 6.1 This is a British “Blomfield” cannon used at the Battle of Waterloo. The heaviest type of artillery used by the British Army at Waterloo, it fired a solid cannonball weighing nine pounds (about four kilos). Cannons were a vital part of warfare at the time of Waterloo, with the ability to rip through massed ranks of troops and inflict terrible casualties. In 1780 Captain Thomas Blomfield RA was appointed Inspector of Artillery and Superintendent of the Royal Brass Foundry. Three years later he was given responsibility for re-organising the Ordnance Department. At the same time he was experimenting with new forms of ordnance. The resultant Blomfield guns had thicker breeches, thinner chases and a cascabel ring to control recoil, making them stronger without increasing their weight. The Blomfield 9-pounder cannon was introduced to the Royal Artillery (RA) in 1805 as a response to the heavier French calibre guns. At Waterloo Wellington had 157 pieces but only 60 were 9-pdrs, in 12 batteries. The remaining 13 batteries had 6-pdrs and howitzers. Interestingly, the Dutch-Belgian and Brunswick Artillery, who fought alongside the British at Waterloo, used French cannons (known as An. XI Ordnance). Wellington employed his Royal Horse Artillery very effectively during the battle as a mobile reserve to plug holes in his line. For example, with Hougoumont under attack, Major Bull’s troop was brought forward in support from its original position towards the rear of the allied position. The allied artillery faced 246 pieces in 34 French batteries. As was his usual tactic, Napoleon started the battle with a heavy artillery bombardment on the Allied line to soften up the enemy. Cannons on both sides used round-shot that was lethal against columns of infantry, knocking down several men at once for as long as the ball continued to travel. Case shot or canister (tin coated iron cans) packed with smaller iron balls was devastating at close range. Only the British used spherical case (Shrapnel) where a shell was filled with small iron balls. A specially cut wooden fuse detonated a bursting charge. The technology to produce cannon was an integral part of the Industrial Revolution. Other technological developments were the introduction of water-powered machines, the tin can, improved metal alloys, accurately bored cylinders for steam engines, and even ordnance survey maps. These might be balls from a special “shrapnel” shot, a weapon unique to the British at Waterloo. This was a combination of the exploding shell and the canister shot, a hollow iron sphere filled with gunpowder and musket balls, ignited by a fuse. Correctly used, this shot could explode in the air and blast the enemy with balls, like a long-range canister shot. This was a sort of British “secret weapon”, invented by Henry Shrapnel in 1784 – his name has become synonymous with the debris from artillery shots.
9x NATO Issue Silva Compass 9 British military issue Silva compasses make up this bundle, which is a mixed lot. All are complete and whilst some appear to be servicable and in reasonable cosmetic condition, none are perfect. Some have chips, scuffs, cracks, dirt and fluid loss. A good lot which can easily be improved.
A 1991 Dated Precista - Royal Navy Issue ASDIC Timer Stop Watch This Royal Navy issue Precista stop watch, is new old stock, dating from 1991. It even retains its clear protective label on the case back. These stop watches were used by ASDIC operators during submarine hunting work, where they would be used to manually time the "ping" as it travelled through the sea, returning an echo when a possible enemy submarine was detected. It is interesting to note that the dial is calibrated in yards, even though metric is the order of the day. Presumably these stop watches were use in conjunction with other aged equipment. Such stop watches are now pretty much obsolete as most of this work is conducted electronically. A mint example of a relic from the end of the Cold War era and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
A Birmingham Proofed 7mm Pinfire Revolver, c.1860 A well made Birmingham proofed 7mm Pinfire revolver, made c.1860. With folding trigger and lovely undamaged walnut grips, the revolver retains a decent amount of original blued finish and crisp profiles throughout. Although unsigned, this 6-shot revolver is a quality made example, in full working order, having both single and double action functions, operating well with strong springs. An obsolete calibre revolver, reasonably priced for the collector. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 7½ inches
A Bow Street Runner's Flintlock Pistol By W.Parker, c.1820 To see the Bow Street markings more clearly, please enquire for higher resolution images. This is an exceptionally rare "Public Office - Bow Street" flintlock man stopper pistol, made c.1820. Believed to have been issued to Principal Officers and judging by its condition, has seen very little or no use at all. A real sleeper. The Bow Street Public Office likely needs no introduction. Colloquially referred to as "Runners" by the populace of the time, and still reverently referred too as such today, much has already been written about these, initially plain clothed, men that became the world' s first properly organised team of detectives; together with their later formed red waistcoated mounted colleagues, plus their foot patrolling counterparts through their diligence all helped Londoners and the travelling public, reduce the threat of fear from the highway robber, bringing some semblance of law and order to the capital and surrounding areas. It is known from many reports that the Bow Street Runners were frequently well armed; as is documented in 1834 by Henry Goddard, himself an experienced Principal Officer, who was required to ride out from Bow Street to investigate the murder of Mr Richardson, a local carter in 1834. Of the matter Goddard wrote that the Chief Magistrate, "Immediately directed me to proceed without delay to the scene, telling me to use all energy and spare no expense to discover the murderers; and he added that as it is probable that in the course of the enquiry I would have to contend with desperate characters, I was not to forget to go armed with a brace of loaded pistols." Note from the above date that the Metropolitan Police had already been in existence for five years, however it was the Runners who continued to investigate serious crime. From surviving examples of flintlock pistols supplied by the contracted gunmaker W. Parker, it can be evidenced that they would appear to have been generally marked to either the horse or the foot patrols, with the trigger guards being engraved with the legends, "Mounted" or the curiously named "Dismounted Patrol." These pistols would also have been numbered. Of those rare surviving pistols, it is also noted that they were equipped with wooden ramrods. However, this Bow Street flintlock is specifically marked to the, "Public Office" and this suggests that this superior example with its captive iron ramrod, may have been carried by a Principal Officer, who continued to operate independently of the New Police for several years thereafter… until eventually in 1837 the Metropolitan Police finally absorbed the last of the Bow Street Runners into their ranks, taking possession of whatever pistols still remained. Interestingly then, this wonderful Bow Street pistol is in fact broadly very similar to the later Constabulary percussion pistols supplied by Parker Field & Sons, which were issued to the Metropolitan Police in 1856. Overall, a historically important and great Bow Street pistol, with a low rack number of just, "32" and still maintaining a strong working lock, plus a perfect .65" bore. A museum piece.
A British 1915 Commemorative R.M.S. Lusitania Medallion The original version of this medal was sold in Germany to mock the British government for allowing civilians to sail on board the Cunard liner R.M.S. Lusitania, whilst simultaneously permitting the vessel to transport war supplies. They saw the British as being responsible for the deaths of the innocent: In response, the British seized upon a propaganda opportunity to turn the tables and announced that the Germans were being callous in their attitude not only in the sinking of an unarmed vessel, but in reveling in the barbaric act by creating medals to glorify the U-boat's kill. Hence they copied the medals selling them in England to foster resentment of the Germans, thereby deflecting attention from their own shortcomings. This iron medal is a WW1 original British copy, complete with its original issue box. All in very good condition.
A British Constabulary Service Revolver c.1868 This Birmingham proofed .442 CF calibre revolver was made c.1868, in the style of the early Webley RICs. It is a typical gate loading revolver of the type that would have been carried by many police forces in Britain; it has contemporary hand engravings to the top strap reading, "British Constabulary." This revolver is in full working order, with an aesthetically pleasing appearance, having been worn to a mottled black and brown finish. Yet despite the surface colouring, the markings are all discernible. Furthermore, the revolver is in working order with a good action, but the trigger spring is a little weak… although it does work when released smartly. Benefitting from a good bore and chambers, this revolver may be owned without any certificate as a collector's curio, due to its obsolete calibre status under the Firearms Act 1968.
A British Railway Worker's Winegartens Pocket Watch c.1930 Winegartens were a British Jewellers who worked in the City of London. They were primarily importers of quality watches, which they had made for them in Switzerland, and then imported them for retail here. The company is today perhaps best known for their niche in the supply of railway type watches. Whilst from the outside the Winegarten watches may ostensibly appear alike, a closer look at the movements is alway desirable, as the quality whilst always good, is sometimes much higher than expected. Most of these watches were sold at discount to railway staff by way of private purchase. The example offered here is their standard watch, which utilises the exact same movement as was chosen by Rolex for their military pocket watches of the time - namely a calibre 534 Cortebert, 15 jewel movement. It is in working order, but has not been serviced. Cosmetically the watch is good condition, with no dents but some service wear and chips to the original heavy duty glass. Dial is otherwise perfect. A lovely example at a reasonable price. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
A Carbine Bore Irish 'Constabulary Pistol' By Kavanagh, c.1845 This percussion pistol with its .65 calibre, "carbine bore," was made by Kavanagh c.1845. It is of typical plain and robust 'constabulary' appearance, very much like earlier pistols that had been supplied to the Irish Constabulary by Rigby. However, there are no details inscribed on this pistol by which to properly attribute it, other than to say that there were several law enforcement or revenue authorities who might have carried pistols of this type. Presented in an untouched state of preservation, this Kavanagh percussion manstopper pistol shows no sign of having been fired - The bore is mint. The springs are all strong and the lock works with a good and firm action. Woodwork is all unmolested without sign of shrinkage. All metal parts retain their crisp sharp edges. All in all, this is a superb and sleepy example of an Irish Constabulary or Authority's percussion pistol, made by a great maker.
A Cased Pair Of W. Parker Pocket Flintlocks, c.1800 A superb pair of William Parker pocket flintlocks, made c.1800, complete with their accoutrements and original pistol case. W. Parker supplied many such pistols, swords and truncheons, initially to the Bow Street Public Office, but following the government passing of the Middlesex Justices Act of 1792, a further six Public Offices were established within the Metropolis. The new offices were set up at Queen's Square (Westminster); Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Worship Street (Shoreditch); Lambeth Street (Whitechapel); Shadwell, Union Hall (Southwark) and Hatton Garden. By 1816 each office employed up to eight Constables, who were led by three Stipendiary Magistrates. At this same time Shadwell Office was closed, but a new one opened at Marylebone High Street. Presented in fine and untouched condition, the flintlock pistols offered here are sharp, crisp, and in full working order, appearing to be untouched. They are of a pattern that was carried by the Constables and bear the name, "W. Parker" and, "Holborn, London." A more perfect pair of pistols would be difficult to find.
A Coachman's Blunderbuss Flintlock Signed "H. Nock," c.1810 In times past, few but the wealthiest of citizens habitually traveled any distance around England. For those that did journey, the possibility of an encounter with a highway man would have posed an ever present worry, in particular around the turnpikes of London, especially on Hounslow Heath and the Bath Road. Although by the 19th century a decline in Highway Robbery had been recorded: Whilst it is often argued that it was the railway that had brought about this demise, the truth is that by the 1830s Highway Robbery had already been curtailed, which was more down to the increase in coordinated patrols and the ever increasing availability of firearms being produced for the masses, that folk regardless of class, could now afford a pistol to give them some level of personal protection. Meanwhile however, many travellers in an effort to outwit the footpads and highwaymen, relied on their own mount, riding in company and visiting inns outside of normal coach operating times. Alternatively, passengers on a lower income could opt to ride on a lumbering stagecoach or, for a faster transport service, tickets to ride the mail coach would have provided an 'express' mode of carriage. This latter service had the added benefit of providing a well equipped attendant guard, with a remit to protect the Royal Mail. This guard went about this duty armed with a cutlass, a pistol and a blunderbuss, but for safety in transit, the firearms were usually retained in the arms locker when not immediately required.

 Obviously these coaches were operated as a business enterprise and so the passenger compartment would have been shared with whomsoever had purchased a ticket that day. Regardless of station, all occupants would have been tossed around on the rougher roads, which could have been quite unpleasant on a hot day. 

For the well-off, the convenience of travel in your very own carriage, driven by a coachman in your employ and acting at your beckon call, would have been the preferred option. However a merchant, or his family, travelling in their obviously ostentatious coach would have been a clear target to any would-be robber, who could be assured of easy rich pickings. So to that end, any coachman driving on the bidding of a master would have needed to be armed and, be prepared to use firearms for the protection of the family. Therefore in that respect, servants would have relied upon their employers to provide them with the necessary tools and consequently, pistols of this "H. Nock" nature were contrived through the gun trade.

 Purporting to have been made by the renowned London gunmaker H. Nock (Henry Nock actually died in 1804), this blunderbuss pistol was made to typical 'service' or 'servant grade' standard. Often commented on as being of a "Trade Pattern," such pistols when commercially available, were never intended for use by England's nobility, but rather for use by those in the employ of the landed gentry. These 'service' guns would have been carried by servants in connection with their domestic duties, which may have involved an expectation by the benefactor, that their servant would protect them or their family from harm, should circumstances arise. Therefore, a need to supply pistols to trusted servants was a requirement for the master to consider; though sourcing 'suitable weapons' was of course another matter for the financially aware Master of the House. The question no doubt left many in a quandary - Should they supply their servants with the best arms, or would lesser named guns be acceptable? As can be seen by this Coachman's Blunderbuss, one clear option was to buy suitable quality arms, but bearing a usurped maker's name, living or dead. This kind of marketing within the gun trade was not meant to cheat the buyer, but rather, it was a way of delivering status for the master - to help him maintain that all important 'image' with his staff. Plus, in return his servants did actually benefit by receiving appropriate quality firearms that they could genuinely be proud of - All done on a budget. No doubt though that over the course of time these servants' guns, with their bluff names, have lost their true place in social history and have become linked to counterfeiting, which is ashamed as they were never meant to be: A comparison can certainly be seen in the modern trade of pseudo 'military' watches, whereby buyers know their high street watch was never army issue, but to the onlooker that watch, with its phoney broad arrow, conveys kudos upon the wearer. Typically then, this utilitarian blunderbuss lacks any wealth of refinement, but what was lacking in sophistication was made up for in pure functionality. Nevertheless, this pistol did make some allowance for elegance in its barrel style, as well as having some simple decoration. It is also one of at least three identical pistols that are known to exist, all bearing the name of H. Nock. Made for a serious application, these heavy cannon barrelled pistols have a swelling towards the muzzle, increasing the diameter to about 1.2 inches - This was to facilitate reloading. The choice of brass barrel is also one of practicality, required for its all weather anti corrosion properties. Stocky and robustly built, this servant's flintlock sits well in the hand despite being a little oversized, to give it the additional characteristics that make it appear, virtually indestructible. Presented in excellent sleepy condition, the larger lock is darkly patinated, showing just basic floral decoration. The flintlock is in full working order with dark barrel, all crisply stamped on the octagonal. The ramrod also appears to be the original and overall, this is a wonderful damage free example, with what appears to be the remains of a very old [inventory?] label on the grip.

 A superb Birmingham proofed coachman's flintlock, which is made more interesting by the presence of an unusual barrel mark of a lion passant, surmounted by the number 2 within a tombstone surround. More information on this subject can be found on the Birmingham Gun Museum website which shows a number of servant or trade type pistols bearing this intriguing mark. 

Barrel length = 4.5 inches 
Overall length = 10 inches
A Colt Keyring Pistol Lighter, c.1980 A vintage and attractive nickel-plated gaslighter in the form of a self-loading pistol. Frame marked, "Colt" and bearing the prancing pony trademark. Grips are of simulated snakeskin and show a little wear on the left side. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
A Colt Police .36 Calibre Bullet Mould c.1862 The last percussion revolver to be introduced by Colt was known as the Model 1862. It was targeted for customers who required a medium .36 calibre revolver in a small handy package and became known as the Colt 'Police.' Coming as they did at the dawn of the self contained cartridge era, few of the Police revolvers were ever made; instead most of the 1862 components were converted to make breech loading revolvers instead. In consequence to the above, this bullet mould, which is marked ".36P," is actually quite a rare item as it was intended for the the short-lived percussion .36 Police revolver. Made of iron, the mould is signed "COLT'S PATENT" and is able to cast both .36 conical bluets or ball. It is in generally good condition with minor bruises commensurate with use.
A Fine .442 Wolverhampton Police Issue Revolver c.1880 Situated in the West Midlands, Wolverhampton's new police were established in 1848 under the command of Chief Constable, Lt. Col. Gilbert Hogg. Lying in an area aptly referred to as the "Black Country," due to the wealth of coal deposits located there, this industrial region was marked at the time with violence and numerous industrial disputes, amidst a general backdrop of nationwide civil unrest. Wolverhampton's inhabitants of the time were largely made up from a working class society doing their best to improve their lot. Consequently, the Black Country spawned many reformers looking to challenge the government. Not surprisingly rebellion orchestrated by Chartists, was very much part of life. Given these turbulent incidents, it is understandable that Wolverhampton Police felt it necessary to have access to a variety of weapons including, rifles, pistols and swords. However, there is no record of how these weapons were deployed, yet alone any report of them being fired to quell civil disturbances. Nevertheless, the police armoury of outdated single shot muzzle loaders remained unchanged, even after revolver technology had made significant advances. With little urgency being expressed by the administrators of a traditionally unarmed police, their firearms modernisation policy only gained momentum after the development of the metallic cartridge. It is believed that the first widespread issue of revolvers commenced after a quantity of cartridge converted government surplus Adams revolvers were supplied to several British police forces. Being ex military though, these Adams revolvers were larger than the police desired, which in turn prompted the likes of Webley to offer a smaller size solid frame gate loader, which they did in 1867, naming it the "Royal Irish Constabulary" model. Of course Webley receives much deserved credit for their revolver designs, but there were other independent gunmakers that also had aspirations. One clear competitor and associate of Webley's, was the gunmaker William James Hill. At around the same time that Webley was developing the short barrelled MP revolver for the Metropolitan Police in 1880, Hill was also at work selling a virtually identical revolver to his local police. Whether other forces purchased from Hill is not known, but at least one police authority dealt with the man. This is evidenced by his supply of this full-bore pocket revolver, which bears Wolverhampton Police details, together with both Hills' winged hour glass trademark and name. The only significant difference between what Hill and Webley offered, was in the revolver's chambering; Hill opted to use the now obsolete .442 cartridge (also called the .44 Webley), whilst the Met pistols were chambered for the military spec .450 cartridge, which was the same as had been used in the earlier Adams revolvers. These two similar rounds of ammunition are not interchangeable, yet unlike military applications, these variations in calibre did not cause the domestic police any ammunition supply problems. Given the size of the Wolverhampton Police, numbering just 73 officers in the 1870s, a total which includes the Fire Brigade volunteers, the contract likely only called for a small number of these W. J. Hill revolvers. Numbered 18, this police issue revolver is in remarkably fine condition, possibly being unfired. This has resulted in a high percentage of original lustre blue finish remaining, with the remainder having turned to russet. Overall the action is absolutely perfect, as are the chambers and mirror bore. This revolver will be difficult to improve upon. Simply stunning and rare to find a police pistol chambered for this obsolete calibre. For more information on the history of Wolverhampton Police Station, see item Code: 50541. listed elsewhere on this site. Barrel length = 2 inches Overall length = 7.5 inches
A Fine Brooklyn Arms Co., Slocum's Patent .32 RF Revolver, c.1863 Smith & Wesson had a 12 year monopoly over revolver manufacturers, resulting in many a gunmaker being diligently sued for infringing on their Rollin White, "bored through cylinder" patent. Yet, with the outbreak of the Civil War, the demand for modern revolvers created an eager market, resulting in some clever alternative designs that legally, circumvented the copyright. One such revolver made by the Brooklyn Arms Company, c.1863, utilised an unusual design by Frank Slocum, which had an advantage over competitors by maintaining the use standard .32 rimfire cartridges. This was only possible due to Slocum's innovative idea, whereby the cylinder is loaded via individual sliding covers fitted to each chamber. Around 10,000 of these revolvers were made. Presented in fine condition, this pocket revolver is in full working order, retaining its engraved detail and most of its nickel plating. Markings are all clear and legible and the walnut grips are in perfect shape. Overall a fine, unique and rare Civil War era revolver. Barrel length = inches Overall length = inches
A Fine Colt .38RF Breech Loading Revolver c.1875 When Colt's London factory closed in 1856, all the left over spare parts were returned to the USA where they were mixed with American stock, for use in the manufacture of successive Hartford Colts. By the 1860s, of the many Colt Pocket and Police revolver components made for percussion systems, most were now being adapted to chamber newly developed self contained ammunition. Of these breech loading revolvers, a number of variations exist, as Colt experimented with various ideas to gradually exhaust their store of outmoded parts. This fine example, which retains most of its original blue and case colours to the frame, is one of the last of its type to be made c.1875. Likewise, mechanically the revolver functions crisply and the cylinder 'Stagecoach Robbery' scene is sharp. Unusually, but perhaps not surprisingly, this Hartford revolver was fitted with a London contract steel strap and trigger guard, which must have been put on the revolver either at the factory, or very soon after, creating a mismatch in the gun's serial numbers. Consequently the revolver has been priced to reflect this contemporary anomaly. Colt has also stamped their revolver with a '.38 Cal' marking on the trigger guard, to obscure the earlier '.31' designation, which indicates that this example was made from surplus 1849 Pocket Model parts. That aside, the revolver shows very little sign of any wear and the action is crisp in every respect, making this a fine example at a reasonable price.
A Fine Colt .38RF Breech Loading Revolver c.1875 When Colt's London factory closed in 1856, all the left over spare parts were returned to the USA where they were mixed with American stock, for use in the manufacture of successive Hartford Colts. By the 1860s, of the many Colt Pocket and Police revolver components made for percussion systems, most were now being chambered for the newly developed self contained ammunition. Of these breech loading revolvers, a number of variations exist, as Colt experimented with various ideas to gradually exhaust their store of outmoded parts. This fine example, which retains most of its original blue and case colours to the frame, is one of the late types to be made c.1875. Mechanically the revolver is faultless, functioning crisply with strong springs. The cylinder 'Stagecoach Robbery' scene is also sharp, as are all the stampings and perfect original grips. Unusually, but perhaps not surprisingly given the assortment of parts being used in the final production guns, this Hartford pocket revolver has been fitted with a London contract blued steel strap and trigger guard. This must have been put on the revolver either at the factory, or very soon after, given the near new condition of the part and revolver overall. However, this trigger guard is a mismatch in the gun's serial numbers - Consequently the revolver has been priced to reflect this contemporary anomaly. Certainly according to these numbers, the trigger guard must have been fitted later the same year. Colt also stamped their revolver with a '.38 Cal' marking on the trigger guard, to obscure the earlier '.31' designation, which indicates that the parts were made from surplus 1849 Pocket Model parts. That aside, the revolver shows very little sign of any wear and the action is perfect. A fine example of its type. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
A Fine Pair Of 20 Bore Coat Pocket Pistols By J. Blanch, c.1835 John Blanch had an excellent start in the gun trade. Following his apprenticeship to the prestigious London gun maker, Jackson Mortimer, as well as his marriage to his master's daughter, the firm of Mortimer & Blanch was established. However, this was was a short lived partnership and Blanch's early years were spent working more in the company of John Manton. Needless to say, Blanch rapidly became a prominent business man in his own right, setting up his own gun making company in 1809, situated at Fish Street Hill, London. In 1826 the firm of J. Blanch moved premises to 29 Gracechurch Street, London, where these pistols would have been made some years later. As his reputation increased, Blanch rose in the ranks of the Farriers' Company, culminating in 1834 with his appointment as ‘Master’. By 1848 his youngest son, William, had become a partner in the business and the firm changed its name to, John Blanch & Son. The workmanship of John Blanch is of premium quality and these percussion pistols show just how talented a gunmaker this man was. Furthermore, these pistols are early percussion pistols which made use of the drum and nipple system. Cosmetically they have stood the test of time and are in fine condition, showing little sign of actual use. In fine condition throughout, these percussion pistols are sharp and no doubt have spent most of their life in a case, rather than any coat pocket for which they were intended. Beautifully engraved and coloured, these pistols are offered in full working order with crisp actions and no significant wear. Barrel Length = 4 inches Overall Length = 9 inches
A Fine Remington 1863 New Model Police .38 Rimfire Revolver This scarce 1863 pattern 'New Model Police' revolver was Remington's answer to Colt's Police model of the previous year. It is offered in fine condition throughout. Light and handy, this revolver was appreciated in the city where the sleek profile, provided comfortable covert carry. Together with the short barrel, it was ideal for those who required an unobtrusive weapon, equal in calibre to the bigger Navy guns. Chambered for five .38 rimfire cartridges, this Remington is in fine original condition, retaining much of its factory finish with just some thinning to the plating around the grip and frame, but no flaking, scratching or pitting. With a crisp action and tight lock up, this revolver generally shows minimal signs of actual use, having survived with an excellent bore and chambers. Sharp angles, unspoilt grips and a clear barrel address, make this an excellent collector grade piece that would be difficult to improve upon. A wonderful example of a scarce Remington Police revolver. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
A Fine WW1 Colt .41 'Army Special' Revolver c.1916 Colt's swing out cylinder revolvers proved to be immensely popular with the army, navy and the police, ever since they first became available in 1886. However, it took several more years to iron out various mechanical flaws before finally achieving this quintessential revolver design. This model went on to become the basis for all their modern revolvers, including the Colt Python. By the time that this outstanding .41 Colt double action revolver was manufactured in 1916, the military had already accepted the M1911 Colt .45 self loading pistol, to be their standard issue sidearm. So, it is somewhat confusing to see that Colt called this model their, "Army Special." This is even more peculiar considering that it was only law enforcement departments and civilians that purchased these. Although, after the Great War this model was re branded as the, "Official Police." This Army Special offered for sale is in virtually mint condition, having retained most of its original factory blue finish. Pristine and untouched screw heads and a perfect action, coupled with the original box, make this outfit one for the collector to enjoy. Being additionally of obsolete calibre, this revolver may also be held as a curio without any certificate, provided it is not fired. Interestingly this revolver came with an original NYPD firearm instruction manual, which suggests a likely police heritage. Other indicators that support this notion, is that the revolver has a small amount of wear to its high spots and back strap, as may be expected from holster carry. Some other small usage marks and knocks below the muzzle are also present, but the revolver is otherwise in 95% condition, with a perfect mint bore and chambers. Difficult to improve upon at this price. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
A Gem Air Rifle c.1900 A vintage air rifle marked, "Gem" on the barrel flat and additionally stamped, "Made Abroad" on the underside of the barrel. A clear barrel serial number, 58879, is present around the chamber and the same number is repeated on the breach face. The lock-up of these components is firm, without play and only a slight wobble to the butt. Although basic, Gems are an interesting development in the world of modern break barrel air rifles as we know them today. Gems, together with their clones, were made by a host of manufacturers. This one is of .177 calibre and has an excellent smoothbore. It appears to be complete as far as key components go and it will fire once cocked and the trigger is depressed, however, I make no comment as to how powerful it might be, as it clearly needs a service. It is, however, complete. It even retains a good amount of original nickel plating to the receiver, whilst the barrel is blued, with surface rust evident. It is in untouched condition, other than having some oil applied to identify the markings as described above. No further cleaning has been attempted. Rifle ways exactly 2kg.
A Gentleman's Birmingham Proof Boxlock Percussion Pistol This good quality percussion pocket pistol, is a cut above the rest. Made c.1850, the pistol features a 3 inch turn off barrel in .45 calibre, bearing Birmingham proof marks and fine well executed engraving to the muzzle and brass box lock. The added refinements of a concealed trigger and a stout metal eared butt cap, reinforce the notion that this was a pistol intended for the protection of a discerning gentleman. The pistol, measuring 7½ inches in length, retains a strong action and is presented in good unmolested condition throughout, with no appreciable damage.
A Gentleman's Industrial Grade Pocket Watch By Elgin, c.1918 Elgin pocket watches of this robust calibre saw widespread service within industry and military circles alike. Made in 1918, according to official watch company records, this watch must have been genuinely appreciated by its middle class owner, as suggested by its well maintained condition. As is, this industrial model may have been the only watch that the owner could have afforded, compared to the more costly higher jewelled versions. As is, this classic Elgin 7 jewel timepiece is the same as those used by the British Army. In summary, this Elgin is undamaged and showing no sign of abuse, keeping time and being capable still of providing future service despite not having been serviced recently. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
A Large Copper & Brass Powder Flask By Sykes c.1840 This is an original large size copper bodied powder flask, with an adjustable 3 step nozzle signed, "Sykes." It is suitable for use or display with antique long arms and is presented in working order. Cosmetically it is free from signs of neglect, but does bear some minor dings of former usage. Overall, a very presentable shooting accoutrement offered at a reasonable price.
A Large Powder Flask, c.1840 An attractive British powder flask made c.1840. The fluted copper body shows some working life dings and repairs but the flask is otherwise sound, with a good spring and an adjustable 3 position nozzle. An ideal shooting accessory that remains in serviceable condition. Overall length = 7 inches Width = 3¼ inches
A Metropolitan Police Plate By Wedgewood, c.1980 A Wedgewood blue Jasperware plate, having at its centre the Brunswick Star helmet badge of the Metropolitan Police. The plate is in excellent condition with no chips or cracks.
A Mid Victorian Police Constabulary Truncheon A good example of a Victorian police constable's truncheon. This walnut stick has the usual service carry marks and minor paint wear, yet over all the condition of the truncheon is very good, with no significant damage or splits. Measuring 17.5 inches in length, this original black painted truncheon is a good example of its type with the Crowned VR cypher, dark walnut ribbed handle and additional gold paint embellishments.
A Military Man's Belt Pistol By Labron & Day c.1840 This large high quality mid 19th century belt pistol of .65 'carbine bore,' was made for a military man by Labron & Day. As such, it was originally carried by William Wilson of Shilbottle, whose details are engraved on the top rib of the twist barrel. Wilson was a Colour Sergeant in the Worcester Regiment, serving in the West Indies before returning to Irealand's Curragh Barracks in 1840, where he passed away from illness soon after. He was buried in the Shilbottle graveyard. Overall this pistol has superb engraving on the lock and barrel back strap, with some trace of original bluing and a percussion cap compartment within the butt. The action is in good working order, with strong springs and solid construction throughout. A quality pistol with military history.
A Near Mint, WW2 Air Ministry Aircraft Clock, c.1943 Made by Smiths and bearing a 1943 production date mark on the dial, this 8 Day Mark II D aircraft clock is in near mint condition. It has retained its original glass complete with the red marker hands and the bakerlite case is damage free. Interestingly the clock bears postwar 1956 dated repair marks that have been applied to the back of the watch. The clock is working properly and keeping time and has been inspected internally, with no obvious faults being identified. The movement is running well and the clock keeps time.
A Pair Of "D. Egg London" Signed Coat Pocket Flintlocks, c.1815 A handsome pair of "D. Egg" signed coat pocket flintlocks, made c.1815, with hexagonal barrels set into walnut stocks. These sleepy pistols are of quality manufacture and show a good standard of decorative embellishment. Both are in full working order, having retained original reinforced cocks, working safeties, roller frizens, semi waterproof pans and captive ramrods. All these features made these desirable personal protection pistols in their day. All springs are strong and the actions work without fault in both full and half cock. The woodwork is in excellent condition with some minor abrasions from service carry. Overall, the pistols are in excellent unmolested condition, with faded traces of original brown to their twist barrels, together with sharp lines and decent angles around the flats. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8.75 inches
A Percussion Travelling Pistol By E. London, c.1840 A good early percussion travelling pistol, made by Edward London, c.1840. Offered in good condition and working order, this pistol is of around 24 bore, with a captive ramrod and working safety. Cosmetically the pistol is in untouched condition, with no damage. It benefits from having much original finish to the wood and some remaining finish to the brown twist barrel, as well as nicely executed floral engraving around the signed lock, which is additionally marked, 'London Wall.' Iron parts are now mottled, but free from the ravages of pitting. A good and complete example. Barrel length - 5 inches Overall length - 9.75 inches
A Pre WW2 German Airman's Doxa Oversized Wristwatch, c.1938 During the 1930's flying clubs expanded across europe, becoming popular with many a young man. Of course for some, flying would become their vocation in the war years that followed, but in the beginning and for appearance's sake, the German authorities were keen to only show themselves as no more than pure aero club enthusiasts, promoting gliding as no more than a pastime. Away from spying eyes however, more advanced aviation training was being conducted in the surrounding countries who were sympathetic to their neighbour. Hence pilot training was conducted discreetly, mainly in Czechoslovakia and also in Russia. Not surprisingly then, aviator's watches from the region of Bohemia do turn up periodically, but most can only be described as little more than 'wannabe' pilot's watches. Nevertheless, a good percentage of the better ones, typically supplied by the same makers who went on to produce other timepieces for the Wermacht, did offer proper aviation industry grade watches to those who required them. Doxa is of course one such Swiss company, as was Helvetia, Longines and Zenith, as well as H. Moser in the USSR. This aviator's watch is itself a very unusual timepiece in terms of its art deco styling. It actually copies the design of a smaller gent's watch produced by Doxa, but this version measures a generous 40mm across (or 42mm including the large winding crown), plus 50mm end to end. It also benefits from the added features of having a water resistant case, rotating bezel, sweeping hand and clear dial display. As is, this Doxa watch does show clear evidence of service wear, together with the usual case erosion that only occurs in such instances. Nevertheless, historically if this watch did indeed see service with the Luftwaffe during WW2, it would almost certainly have been worn by an aviator that had already cut his teeth during the earlier Spanish campaign. Offered in full working order, this watch is in good condition having retained most of its original finish. It is keeping time, but there is no indication as to when it was last serviced. Furthermore, the watch comes with a new old stock vintage leather strap, which looks good on this imposing watch. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
A Quantity Of WW2 Era Aviation Items Just some odds and ends of aviation interest, allegedly associated with the Spitfire aircraft and marked with Air Ministry stamps or similar. Altogether there are 5 items comprising of: a relic 1943 dated brass 20mm aircraft cannon case, made by the Dominion Arsenal in Quebec; a good 1944 dated A.M. cockpit instrument gauge marked, "RAD;" an incomplete Gyro Gun Sight Recorder marked "14A/3629," with jack lead - associated with gun camera image recording; a similarly linked device/part and, an A.M. pilot's oxygen mask microphone marked, "10A/12570," showing some chipping to the Bakelite surround. All in all an interesting lot of 1940's flying gear. All images are of the actual items, but some pictures are montages, which are not necessarily shown to scale to other surrounding items. None of the items have been tested and all are sold as seen.
A Rare Admiralty Mark II Pilot's Watch c.1912 A rare Admiralty issue Mark II pilot's watch, procured by the War Department for issue to the Royal Naval Air Service. As such, this watch is of the early specification and 8 Day timepiece, which would have been used in the cockpit instrument panel of RNAS aircraft. It is a rare survivor, remaining in outstanding original condition throughout. The watch has not been polished or altered from new, and interestingly, bears the details of the, "Royal Aircraft Establishment" recorded on the face. This is an important detail which evidences this watch's visit to the experimental aircraft facility at Farnborough - in itself a fascinating institution that saw Samuel F. Cody make Britain's first aeroplane flight just a few years earlier in 1908. The movement looks to be unmolested and is working well, keeping time. The luminous paint all looks to be original and this shows signs of deterioration, which can be remedied as part of the Premium Service concessionary deal. A collector's example that will be difficult to find this original. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
A Rare Francois Borgel "Impermeable" Pocket Watch, c.1895 First developed in 1891, the watch's designer Francois Borgel, claimed that his watch was "Impermeable," or in other words, Waterproof - An attribute that was eminently suitable for a military man's watch. The necessary waterproofing was achieved by enclosing the movement into a steel case, that dispensed with the traditional case backs and hinged joints of other watches. Instead, the case was precision engineered in such a manner, as to allow the movement to be drawn out through the front of the watch, with the mechanism contained within a finely screw threaded rim. This in turn had a closely fitting bezel and glass, which fully sealed the watch against the ingress of dirt and water. Although it was not a diver's watch, the design was sufficient to prevent water from entering the delicate movement during daily wear and even up to a point, the rigorous of active service. These watches were a considerable improvement on what already existed, but the complexity of the case manufacture and fine tolerances needed, made these watches expensive to buy. Consequently, these earlier pieces are rare to find today. Note also the F.B. makers initials on the inside of the case. This mid size F. Borgel pocket watch shows more wear to the oxide finish on the back of the case, than on the bezel and surrounding area. This pattern of wear can only mean one thing and that is, that this watch has been carried [worn] face up - unquestionably upon a wrist. This would normally have been achieved by the soldier using one of the special leather straps that were made and sold for that purpose. As a campaign watch retailed in Glasgow c.1895, this watch was most probably owned by an officer of a Scottish Regiment. The dial shows signs of an old repair, which is typical to find on an exposed campaign watch. Nevertheless, the watch is working and keeping good time, despite not being serviced. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
A Special Constabulary, "W.S.C." Marked Truncheon, c.1850 Even though the office of Special Constable is much older than that of the New Police, because they were a body made up of semi volunteers, the Special Constabulary became subservient to the full-time regular officers, regardless of their rank. Typically, the equipment that the Special Constable carried was usually privately purchased or homemade. Certainly, when it came to truncheons, these were usually less than elaborate with many being no more than turned down and crudely painted chair legs. As such, the Special Constable's appointments were in a class of their own, with much variety existing between officers. In fact it took many more years after the introduction of the New Police, to see some meaningful effort made to elevate the status of this old guard, which remained deliberately 'different' at the behest of their new masters. In the case of the Metropolitan Police, it was not until the 1990s that the Special Constabulary were even allowed to wear the same beat Bobby's helmet and permitted to drive a police Panda car! Given the under appreciated status of the Special Constabulary, which was seen by many to be a somewhat comical ensemble, it is perhaps not surprising to find that a small pattern of truncheon existed. Most probably this short stick represented status in rank among the Special Constables who retained their own rank structure, in much the same way as a short truncheon was carried symbolically by senior officers of the New Police: All truncheons existed not just to be used as clubs, but more importantly they were also a means of identification to the masses, many of whom could could not read or write. So the presence of a decorated stick conveyed to their eyes, authority over them being used much like a police warrant card would be today. Even though the Special Constabulary could hold rank of sorts, a New Police constable regardless of experience, could direct them in their duties. So whether this stick is a symbol of rank or a defensive weapon, will remain a question for reasoned debate. This truncheon is plain, measuring just 12 inches in length. It has been painted with an unknown constabulary's initials, "W.S.C." It is in good overall condition, showing some fading to the WSC lettering and minor paint chips all around, but otherwise no damage to the wood. The second larger stick is shown for comparison only, it is not included in this sale.
A Victorian Lady's Concealed Percussion Book Pistol, c.1859 Emily Ellis, the young Victorian lady who owned this leather bound book, may have appeared to gentlemen as a helpless member of the fairer sex. Yet if that was so, then their perception was flawed, for inside her book Emily carried a small percussion pistol for her personal protection. It is believed that this pistol was probably given to her by a relative, possibly her Mother, as the book bears inked details of a former owner, J. R. Ellis and 1859 date. At some point this has been covered over by Emily's paper label. The Birmingham proofed pistol is itself in fine condition, retaining most of its original finish and detailed engraving, with vacant panels and escutcheon for the addition of the owner's name. The ribbed barrel can be unscrewed and takes a ball of around 120 bore. The woodwork is free from defect and benefits from having an unspoilt, detailed lion mask to the finely chequered grip. Presented in full working order, this box lock pistol comes with its own original powder flask of unusual wedge form, together with a handy ornate barrel wrench and treen cap box. All the accoutrements are contained in the leather bound and gilt paged book entitled, 'Poetical Works Of Thomas Campbell.' They are all discreetly housed behind a securely fastened false cover. Overall the entire ensemble is a decorative and a fine collectible for the connoisseur gun collector. Barrel length = 1.5 inches Overall length = 5 inches
A Vintage Brass Advertising Bore Measure By Colt This is a pocket sized brass gun bore measure, produced by Colt. It was likely a free giveaway to Colt's customers as an advertising gimmick, but it is also a handy functioning tool. Measuring 90mm in length, the tool is effectively marked to identify a gun's bore, expressing the result in both the gun's gauge and its calibre in millimeters. Offered in good condition with age patina.
A Warranted New Land Pattern Flintlock Pistol, c.1810 A "Warranted" New Land .65 flintlock pistol of regulation pattern, made c.1810. It is presented in very good and untouched condition, with a uniform salt and pepper patina and no pitting. The early stye rounded lock is in good clean condition with a strong working action. The round barrel has a very good bore and even age colouring, with crisp proof stamps and excellent woodwork with no rubbing, damage or losses. Even the rammer channel has no sign of repair - just the usual service wear showing minor bumps and grazes. Overall, a generally an excellent example of its type, with much to recommend it. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15½ inches
Adams 54 Bore Bullet Mould, c.1855 An excellent double cavity bullet mould marked, "54" and, "Adams, Registered 28 Nov 1851." Complete and undamaged, this brass mould was capable of producing both ball and conical bullets suitable for their range of revolvers. Overall a sharp example suitable for use or display in a cased set.
Adams' Self Cocking Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1855 This fine self-cocking percussion revolver was made by an unknown European gunmaker to Adams' patent, c.1855. It is nevertheless of fine workmanship, with acanthus scroll engraving and quality finish, having once been owned by Dr. G. Lammert, whose name appears on the top strap. Most probably, Dr. Lammert kept his pistol in a desk drawer, which would account for its excellent condition. Overall a well maintained example of a personal protection revolver, formerly owned by a professional gentleman. Retaining much original finish and sharp profiles. Mechanically tight with excellent grips. Barrel length = 4 inch Overall length =
Admiralty Pattern No.4 Split Seconds Watch, c.1915 An Admiralty Pattern No. 4 Split Second Watch, used by the Royal Navy during WW1, in situations where the timing of two simultaneous events was necessary. Sometimes referred to as a "Ratrapante", this complex watch is offered in very good condition and working order, showing just light signs of service wear. It is crisply marked with a large Admiralty arrow. Overall, an attractive and useable example of its type.
Air Mail Pilot\'s Longines, c.1938 This is an incredibly rare Longines \"Avigation\" watch from 1938. These aviators\' watches were especially designed for use by Air Mail pilots who required a clear and legible timepiece, especially as much of their flying was solo and at night. Perhaps the most striking feature about the watch is its dial; as a tribute to Charles Lindbergh, himself a pioneering Air Mail pilot, Longines incorporated a silhouette of the \"Spirit of St. Louis\". This was the aeroplane that Lindbergh had flown from New York to Paris ten years previously. However, it is the clear luminous markers and bold numerals that proved most useful, although not surprisingly in the dark confines of the cockpit the porcelain dial sustained some damage, yet it remains intact with no enamel loss. Internally, within the steel case, the movement is of top quality, having a rhodium-plated and Geneva-striped finish. It is in working order and keeping good time. All in all, a superb Longines aviator\'s watch.
Air Ministry Issue Binoculars, c.1942 An unusually clean pair of WW2 Air Ministry issue binoculars by Wray, complete with their leather case - All stamped with the King's Crown and AM marks. These have hardly been used as they still retain the printed inspection or supplier's printed stamp to the body. Fully functioning, these binoculars have undamaged lenses, which feature individual setting diopters and, whilst there is some dirt present, the image through the glass remains bright and sharp, with perfect collimation. The binoculars come with their original black leather neck strap and a scarce filter case (empty).
Air Ministry Issue Jaeger LeCoultre Weems Pilot's Wristwatch c.1940 A rare WW2 Royal Air Force issue Jaeger LeCoultre wristwatch, which was designated by the Air Ministry as a Mark VIIa pilot’s second setting watch, when first issued in 1940. This example is in superb original condition throughout, which will be difficult to improve upon. Most of the Air Ministry Weems watches were sourced by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company. These can be immediately identified as they bare Air Ministry markings coupled with the supplier's details, which were machine pressed into the case backs. However, this example has a plain dial and only bares a contemporary King’s Crown and AM mark. This would have been hand engraved here in England prior to issue. Albeit, other examples of this Jaeger LeCoultre watch may be encountered additionally displaying the supplier’s mark of SS&S, which were the brand initials for S. Smith & Son. Hence, the probability that this watch was also part of Smiths stock is most likely. Furthermore, Smiths professional instruments rarely bore any, other than official military nomenclature, which was in keeping with specifications. Interestingly then, those Weems watches that are encountered solely marked as LeCoultre, are products that have been marketed in the USA. There, the Swiss firm of Jaeger LeCoultre operate a business selling their watches from a company they call, LeCoultre & Co. LeCoultre also supplied near identical Weems watches to the USAAF. Due to the design, many Weems watches have suffered the loss of their original factory fitted auxiliary locking crowns; so to find one unspoilt makes this example a museum grade Mark VIIa. The bezel also rotates smoothly and once synchronised to the second, is securely held in place by the lock. Internally, the Jaeger LeCoultre signed movement is working very well indeed. These wristwatches were among the finest to have been produced in Switzerland during the war and after. Their reputation can be validated by the fact that a modified ebauche was used for the production of the postwar Mark XI series of RAF watches. Not only that, but the ebauche was also chosen by Vacheron & Constantine for their Chronometer Royal range of watches. A true gem offered in excellent order throughout. Although the watch is offered in working order, the Premium Service would be a wise consideration to protect your investment. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Air Ministry Pilot\'s Longines \'56 Pattern A superb Air Ministry Longines, fully marked with RAF 6B/159 codes, as issued to pilots and navigators. The 1956 pattern watches were made using WW2 surplus timepieces, which were brought up to postwar spec and mounted in a steel waterproof A.W. Dennison screw back cases. This example is totally original, showing just minor signs of use. The hands, crown, dial and even the shock protection spacer and seals, are all as issued. This Longines watch was fully serviced about 12 months ago and it keeps excellent time. At that time it was placed in a genuine old MOD plain watch carton (just some ink writing at one end). The bracelet is also period, being of BonKlip design, the steel links are infinitely adjustable for maximum wearer comfort, however, the bracelet has no maker\'s marks. As military timepieces go, the \'56 pilot\'s watches have an impressive vintage diameter of 36 mm.
Air Ministry \"Dennison\" Pilot\'s Wristwatch, c.1942 An excellent and original British assembled RAF issue pilot\'s wristwatch, made with a Swiss movement, c.1942. These watches hold a special place in the unfolding story of military timepieces and this one is offered in full working order and with a near-perfect dial - This steel-cased watch is in fabulous condition and an important stop-gap model issued at a time during the war when watches were a requisite item that was particularly difficult to get hold of from the mainstream suppliers. World War 2 provides us with a number of examples that illustrate how agreements and pacts alone, don\'t keep the peace. To that end, even Switzerland\'s neutrality was at times in peril, with stability relying on a precarious convention that offered no absolute guarantee of freedom from invasion. In fact, the Swiss politicians governed over a nation of both, Allied supporters, together with those who would be sympathetic to the Nazi regime and with the German Army on their doorstep, literally, they trod carefully so as not to antagonise their waring neighbour, and to keep the status quo. This called for skilful diplomatic manoeuvring to appease those who had designs upon Switzerland and what she had to offer. Of course, in this instance, the belligerents were unified in their need for war-grade timepieces which collectively, the Swiss watch houses were in a position to supply all that was needed but their neutrality prevented them from doing so, at least openly. Swiss watch companies were now faced with a number of dilemmas as to how best to circumvent Nazi dictates. A number of schemes were considered early on to help maintain commerce and relations with all their customers, Allied or Axis, yet keeping their operations secret for fear of reprisals, they needed to leave their diplomats scope for plausible denial in case of accusations of \"war-trading\". This Air Ministry watch is just such example that highlights the intelligent way that the Swiss were able to support the Allies, by not providing war-critical timepieces but rather, by providing the raw watch movements to the \"jewellery trade\". The fact that the British jewellers were working on the behest of the Air Ministry and completed the assembly of the Swiss movement into a British custom made case, would not have been discussed openly with the Swiss, although the possibility of such activity would not have gone without comment in certain quarters. Hence their need to downgrade and sell these products as unfinished timepieces, and it is also very likely that these watches came to England without dials and hands, only Swiss products were a little sharper in execution and were proudly marked, \"Swiss Made\" on the face - Here, there is no such mark, which again adds circumstantial evidence to say that they were British printed dials. The final process to finishing the watch was to have the British case maker, Dennison, provide suitable cases. As a long-standing contractor to the War Department, Dennison supplied the cases to the contractors to complete the assembly and the wristwatches were handed over to the Air Ministry, not as a premium military watch but as one that \"would-do\" under the circumstances. As a 6B/159 credited wristwatch, the watch was rated to a higher standard of timekeeping than might be expected from other forces wristwatches. A fine example of a collector grade Air Ministry wristwatch. A Premium Service can be requested for this watch, including a 12-month warranty.
Aircraft Clocks - Mark IIC 1940 RAF Issue 8-Day Instrument Clock Getting harder to find, these early WW2 RAF issue aircraft clocks were fitted to a variety of aircraft types. It is also a well known fact that even fighter pilots had clocks such as this, mounted onto their cockpit instrument panels. This clock is marked by the supplier S.S.&S., which are the initials for the English maker Smiths. These details are impressed on the dial together with the issue date, 1940. The Air Ministry equipment code, 6A/1104, is also present. The dial is actually in very good condition with clear numbering. Externally over all , this clock show some signs of having been previously used and the original black painted finish is a little scuffed and worn - particularly in the area of the winder but nevertheless, the clock is working and keeping time. A Premium Service is however, recommended. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Aircraft Clocks - RAF Issue Mark IID 8-Day Instrument Clock This Mark IID aircraft clock is dated 1941 on the dial, whilst the plastic casing is impressed with the King's Crown A.M. marking. It has clearly been used, as the case shows signs of having brown cockpit paint applied to it. Presumably also, the clock's original glass must have been damaged, likely during action, as a quick fix period replacement has been fashioned from celluloid, giving the clock a yellowed appearance on the dial. This is purely down to the presence of the discoloured glass, but we prefer to keep it as such for historic reasons. The clock is working, however a Premium Service is recommended. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Airfix British 8th Army Model Soldiers - Vintage Stock A vintage, previously unopened box of Airfix British 8th Army figures in 1:32 scale. Box contains 14 unpainted detailed model soldiers retained in their original sealed bag, plus promotional leaflets. The box is in good vintage condition but a little faded from shop display.
Allied Military Watches - Pre WW2 Polish Army Issue Zenith Pocket Watch With the possibility of war already on the minds, the Polish Army took possession of this Zenith general service military pocket watch. These military watches were marked on the inside of the case back cover,"1936r," which gives us the issue year as the information conferred by the "r" relates to,"rok" or translated it means "year." Both the case and dial also have the M.S. Wojsk legend. This is short for, "Ministerstwo Spraw Wojskowych," which is the Polish equivalent of the Ministry of Defence. The dial also gives the Warsaw agent's name as, "Z. Jeznacki." Most frequently these watches have suffered a tough life, so to find an example of a Polish Army Zenith in this unusually fine condition, complete with a perfect dial, showing only minor signs of service wear, is very rare indeed. The watch movement is in working order and the watch keeps time, but the opportunity for the Premium Service should be considered. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Allied Military Watches - WW2 Normandie D-Day Army Tribute Wristwatch A scarce Normandie [Normandy] wristwatch, made to mark the D-Day landings, c.1944. These watches were produced to meet the demand for a military inspired private purchase wristwatch, sold to honour those who took part in the largest amphibious landing the world has ever seen. Other D-Day watch examples made include those marked, "Colomby," whilst some others also bear Free French Army Cross of Lorraine emblems. Given that D-Day could only be achieved with the significant help of a heavy US Army and Airborne troops presence, these watches were not surprisingly first sold in the USA. Although retailed in the States, the watches themselves were actually of Swiss origin. The Swiss manufactured the parts whilst the American watch industry put them together before marketing them. These watches are consequently, comparatively rare here in Britain. The watch on offer is in working order, however Premium Servicing needs to be considered to preserve the watch in peak condition. Interestingly, this watch is fitted to a period metal bracelet of a kind that was favoured by troops during and post WW2. The waterproof case, shockproof precision movement and luminous dial, would have made this watch a prized possession no doubt. All in all, a good and capable watch with a great association to Operation Neptune and the Normandy Landings of 6th June, 1944. Watch diameter is 30mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
American Gun Makers Book American Small Arms Makers: A large vintage tome by Colonel Robert E. Gardner, described as "A directory of, fabricators of firearms, edged weapons, crossbows and polearms." Invaluable hardback reference book giving details of many known and unknown US gunmakers. Presented in good useable condition. No obvious signs of abuse but in used condition.
American Military Watches - US Army Elgin Wristwatch - Korean War Issue This Elgin wristwatch is very similar to the WW2 variant, however the case, with its dull parkerised finish, dates the watch to c.1950. The watch is also property stamped on the screw back, to the Ordnance Department of the US Army. The watch is in working order, featuring a 15 jewel movement which is protected by an extra internal dust cover and an antimagnetic shield. To keep the watch in top working order, a Premium Service is recommended. During the service the dial will undergo a light clean, but the discolouration that is currently evident, is likely to be ingrained and may not respond fully to the process. As is, the dial patina simply reflects the age and environment in which the watch served. The canvas band that accompanies this watch, is a real bonus. It is a near mint US Army issue strap of the same Korean War period. Watch diameter is 31mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
An 1801 Duchal George III Truncheon A very good and rare George III truncheon painted with a Royal Coat of Arms above a Shamrock & Thistle. It is additionally marked with a Duchal Crown over, "N" and dated "1801", which notably connects the truncheon to the historic "Act of Union 1800", that on 1st January 1801, recognised the Kingdom of Ireland as part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. The presence of the Ducal Crown would suggest that the truncheon served within an area or Parish linked to the letter, "N", where a Duke was presumably the Lord of the Manor. Extra details to be found on this truncheon include the letter "J", plus another indistinct character appearing similar to "I I". The grip is also deeply carved with the initials, "D.N.", which may be a further reference to the Duke or just the initials of the person who possessed the truncheon? All in all, this truncheon has sufficiently clear images to allow for a proper historical investigation. It is unrestored and apart from surface wear, is undamaged. Overall length - 14¼ inches
An Afghan / Tibetan Knife An Afghan / Tibetan knife. This ornate knife would appear to have been made using just rudimentary tools, yet it is nicely decorated with silver rope wire and embossed designs. The overall knife shows craftsman qualities in its robust construction.
An Early Colt No.2 Single Shot c.1871 Only 9,000 of these Colt No.2 Derringer pistols were between 1870 - 1890, which were all chambered for the obsolete .41" rimfire cartridge. In their day, they were regarded as the best commercially available single-shot pistol, ideal for concealment. Not surprisingly these pistols have been popularised as a gambler's gun, but they were certainly the choice of the well-heeled. This example with its low serial number would have been made in the first year or two of production. Extensively carried for self-protection, this Colt No. 2 remains in good condition and working order. All details, stamps and engravings are perfectly clear, with the ironwork now having an aged, mottled appearance. Grips and screws are all very good and unmolested. An honest and solid pistol for the Colt collector. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 5¼ inches
An Exceptional Coaching Blunderbuss By Dust, c.1800 An exceptional coaching blunderbuss by Dust made c.1800, showing little sign of use. This flintlock blunderbuss was intended to be carried by a guard for use in close-quarter situations, to protect passengers during coach journeys. When danger threatened, this short barrelled gun could be easily swung into action and if that wasn't enough, a menacing bayonet could be rapidly deployed to create distance from any adversary. Presented in untouched condition and full working order, this formidable blunderbuss has a signed and bolted lock, with crisp profiles and wonderful age patina. With no sign of any restoration, this gun is an outstanding example in near pristine condition - Difficult to improve upon. An attractive coaching blunderbuss with an original wooden ramrod. Barrel length = inches Overall length = inches
An Exquisite Enamel & Gold Lady's Fob Watch, c.1880 A rare lady's gold fob watch, made c.1880, depicting an exquisitely hand painted and enamelled polychrome miniature of Raphael's Madonna. Watches of this calibre were, and still are, extremely valuable objects' d'art that would have belonged to a lady of substance, most likely having received it as a gift. The symbolism of the Madonna as seen here, was a popular metaphor to mark a special occasion, usually associated with the start of a new family. Having a jewelled cylinder movement, the watch is of high quality manufacture, which was made by Echinard, of Rue Vivienne 19, A Paris, as detailed and numbered "940" on the watch's inner cuvette. Overall this watch has been used with great care, which has preserved the hand enamel and guilloche work, free from damage. The pristine white porcelain dial and fine Breguet hands, are all perfect as is the dent free case. All in all the watch is showing no more than the delicate sign of respectful use, making this an heirloom quality item. Coming from the Neo-Renaissance Victorian revival period, this 33mm watch is key wound and key set, with an appropriate key being supplied with the watch. Having been serviced a few years ago, the watch is a reliable timepiece that would make a fine gift.
An Officer's Back-Action Belt Pistol Signed, D. Egg, c.1835 An excellent carbine bore belt pistol, signed by Durs Egg and proofed in London, c.1835. Such large percussion pistols were popular with military officers, as they operated using the new ignition system at a time when other issue pistols were still of flintlock type. Fully working, this attractive pistol features a regulation barrel with adjustable sights, which also bears Irish, "EC-506," registration marks, dual platinum lines and a good amount of original finish, all complemented by a finely engraved lock and full stocked chequered walnut furniture. A sprung belt clip and captive ramrod complete the specification of this attractive, damage free pistol. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13.5 inches
An Officer's Heavy Cavalry Flintlock, c.1810 A very good pistol of Heavy Cavalry type made c.1810. Presented in perfect working order, this large musket bore flintlock features a crisp and lightly radiused lock, which is signed "Spencer." Cosmetically the flintlock is in attractive condition, with some signs of service wear, but is otherwise solid and overall looking good - Presented complete with its original iron ramrod. A large and well-presented cavalry type pistol. Barrel length = Overall length =
An Original Breitling Chronograph Wristwatch, c.1941 This is a genuine and stunning WW2 Breitling chronograph - Not a fake. Leon Breitling, the inventor of the modern chronograph, was always concerned with the manufacture of functional instrument grade watches for professionals. His watches were often sought out for military consumption, but civilians also found themselves in need of these mechanical marvels. In the earlier years of Breitling, many of their chronographs were sold without any brandname - After all, Breitling was not a household name back then. Sold unmarked, most of these quality watches became unattributed utilitarian tools. Of those that were labelled, some were given the name, "Montbrillant." Today, those early examples are in high demand by investors, as are any genuine vintage Breitlings. The only caveat as always, is to beware of forgeries. Fortunately, I can guarantee from the outset that this is the real deal. Nevertheless, to be 100% satisfied that any watch is a genuine Breitling, collectors are urged to study key Breitling features to become competent at identifying authentic timepieces. These correct features will help to confirm a Breitling's heritage, but an absence of them will not automatically mean a watch is "wrong," just that unattributed watches will require careful consideration. Here we have several genuine characteristics that leave no room for doubt as to this chronograph's authenticity. Such early Breitlings were rarely triple marked on the case, dial and movement. But when they are, as this one is, it is the best way of guaranteeing the provenance of these chronographs, giving peace of mind. Here's what to look for: 1. Many vintage Breitlings have a serial numbers on the case back. If present, this must be machine pressed onto the back of the case, not engraved, crooked or hand stamped. In this instance, the number 446,878 can be attributed to c.1941, but by the end of WW2 the serial numbers had risen into the 560,000 range... And, 635,000 by 1946. 2. Breitling watch dials may or may not be named. Here the "Breitling" name is written in script, which is correct for the era.* 3. The inside of the case back is finely impressed with the words, "Breitling Ltd. Swiss" The use of the term 'Limited' seems to have been only used on the earliest identifiable timepieces. 4. Using another small type face, Breitling have also used a fine rotary engraving tool to apply the "Breitling Ltd. Swiss" legend to the movement. Forgers rarely have access to an appropriate variety of engraving and stamping machines, as these tools are prohibitively expensive... As a result Breitling forgeries will fail to have the same clarity as found on genuine factory marked examples, or their logos and labels may be marked off-centre. Forgers will most likely use identical counterfeit logos or marking methods on both the case and the movement, where they have no option but to use the same engraving template or tool. However, in the instance of a genuine Breitling, where the case and watch movement were not made on the same jigs, but rather at different points on the assembly line, their manufacturer's marks were not repeated by the use of use of the same tool. Any evidence of this should give rise to suspicion. In this instance, this watch can without any doubt, pass any Breitling inspection as genuine. Overall this watch is in stunning condition, showing little sign of service use, with no case restoration and perfectly fitting watch case parts. Most of the factory finish remains showing only the lightest signs of age and wear, commensurate with the rest of the watch. The dial is likewise in outstanding condition, with just a hint of ageing. The hand-set is also correct, all perfectly matched to the dial, but, *given the dial's amazing condition, I am unable to entirely rule out the possibility that the dial may have been professionally refurbished at some point in the past, or possibly even replaced by Breitling - It's incredibly good, with a hint of age showing. Internally the watch works in the manner of other two pusher chronographs, with start, stop, restart or reset options. Timekeeping is excellent and the watch was, according to its previous owner, serviced 3 years ago. A super watch, which quite possibly served among the armed forces. Presented on a new WW2 style army green webbing band. Large hi-resolution images available on request.
An Unusual Victorian Bronze Signal Cannon, c.1860 Made in the Victorian era, this most unusual looking bronze signal cannon might very well be described in modern speak, as being, "Steampunk." It is certainly an extraordinary and well made item that features a robust garrison carriage, with traction engine styled main wheels, together with a roller on its trailing end. Bored through to the vent, this stout cannon is of about 54 bore and has an interesting and working elevator crank handle. The design operates a cam which raises and lowers the barrel - All very well made. Having a lovely deep age patina, this cannon is certain to appeal to many tastes. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 7 inches
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Anti-Garrotte Belt Gun, c.1860 A curious and rare, unnamed muzzle loading belt gun designed during the London Garrotting Panic of the 1860s. With newspapers articles telling of the Garrotting Gang, mercilessly attacking victims from behind, Londoners were gripped by fear. Their panic resulted in various devices, such as protective neck collars, becoming commercially available. However, one of the most effective items must have been Ball's Patent anti-garrotte belt gun. As with the Ball's pistol, this belt gun was worn around the waist, resting in the small of the back. Fired by the pull of a string, the gun would have been devastating at close range, discharging from its short barrel, directly into the groin of the assailant. Presented in full working order, this profusely decorated version of an anti-garrotte gun is complete with its original leather belt, which remains supple. A rare survivor from a violent time in the history of London.
Antique "Gaoler's" Iron Pistol Key Often regarded as being "Gaolers' Pistols," such key-guns were a genuine product of early gunsmithing but, any concept that ever imagined these to be credible defensive weapons would have been highly fanciful. Instead, these were intended for use by the kind of staff, such as gamekeepers or perhaps even gaolers, who routinely carried a key in the course of their work. Suitable keys would have been adapted or made from the outset, that included a concealed secondary purpose. So, these key-guns were carried loaded but only with a simple gunpowder charge - no shot - providing the gamekeeper who witnessed some untoward activity whilst out on his rounds, with the means of signalling an alarm. This would have been done in slow time and may even have caused trespassers to flee at the sound of the gunshot. At the very least, the alarm would have been raised without the need of discharging an actual weapon! Much like the gamekeeper's tripwire operated alarm-guns that were concealed along suspected poaching routes, these key-guns were a portable means of achieving the same effect. This antique iron key-gun has a hollow barrelled body of around 70 bore, which is clear through to the touch hole and the ring end is shaped to provide a comfortable two-finger hold. With a lovely dark aged patina, this is a genuine item of law enforcement history. Overall length = 5¾ inches
Antique .41 Rimfire Single Shot Pocket Or Vest Pistol, c.1870 A plain single shot pocket or vest pistol, probably made by a provincial gunmaker. The palm sized pistol features a tipping barrel, sheathed trigger and bird's head butt. To operate the pistol, the side lever is used to lock and unlock the hinged barrel. Interestingly, although the pistol has a .41 calibre smooth bore barrel, it has been re-chambered in antiquity, to accept an alternative obsolete rimfire round, of around .31/32 calibre. This was most probably done to accommodate a supply of available ammunition - probably shot shells. Fully functioning with a two stage hammer, this pistol is in mechanical working order, whilst cosmetically has faded to a light grey patina.
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Antique Bronze & Oak Signal Mortar, c.1900 An antique model of a mortar, with bronze four stage barrel, raised astragal rings and a pair of basal trunnions mounted on an iron-clad oak frame. The large barrel, which is of approximately 4 bore, is clear through to the narrower chamber and raised vent. Overall an attractive and robustly made mortar of proportions which suggest that it was made as a gentleman's desk ornament. Barrel length = 2¾ inches Overall length = 7½ inches
Antique Ebony Police Truncheon This genuine police truncheon is unbranded but likely dating between WW1 - WW2, although it could be earlier. It is well made, turned from a dense and dark hardwood, which is probably ebony with a straight tight grain. Presented in used condition, this stick shows signs of working life carry, exhibiting a few minor nicks, but nothing ugly. Overall length = 15½ inches
Antique English Revolver Box, c.1850 An antique case for an English revolver, dating to c.1850. It retains its original finish and green baize lining, but the compartments have been removed. Fitted with excellent unturned brass screws and hinges, the box benefits from having a lock, although there is no key and the escutcheon is lacking. Overall the wooden case has no structural damage - No splits, cracks or repairs. Basically, the box is an excellent starting point for an easy refit, which will require a lid medallion to complete. External measurements = 12 x 6¾ x 2¼ inches
Antique Georgian - Wade & Butcher 'Bushman's Friend' Knife c.1825 In the early nineteenth century, William and Samuel Butcher became one of Sheffield's most successful cutlers, who advertised themselves as being part of an original knife making dynasty, established by their father in 1725. Their business expanded, but trade records relating to their company are vague, nevertheless they do state that William, as the elder brother, introduced an edge tool manufactory in Eyre Street, in 1819. This detail is recorded in a company directory dated, 1822. His products may be found marked as, ‘W. BUTCHER. WARRANTED CAST STEEL.' At this same time however, another similarly named business was also listed in the directory. That firm was, 'Wade & Butcher,' which operated in the adjoining Arundel Street. The principal figure, Robert Wade, had been a razor manufacturer since 1816 and was also the captain of the local Volunteers - His partner is believed to have been, Samuel Butcher. Shortly after, in 1825 Wade & Butcher disappeared from the Sheffield directories, presumably due to the death of Robert Wade at the age of 54. Wade was buried in St Paul’s churchyard on 8 December 1825 and with that, the company passed into the hands of the widow, who in 1828, is curiously listed as "Mrs. Robert Wade," a razor manufacturer in Arundel Street - She too died soon after in 1829. Today examples of other Sheffield made knives bearing the name, 'Wade & Butcher,' may also be encountered from time to time. Most of these are however, clearly of more recent 20th century manufacture appearing mainly to be from the 1950's. These do not have the same early manufacture traits as found on this knife. Meanwhile, William and Samuel Butcher renewed their partnership, which became known as, ‘W. & S. Butcher’. This Georgian example offered here, is a rare hunting or skinning knife made by the early firm of Wade & Butcher. It has seen extensive service, but remains in very good original condition. Clearly it has been sharpened on numerous occasions, but as is, it has retained the etched legend details stating, 'Bushman's Friend;' superb brass rivets with cast cattle heads on them; damage free wooden grips and the original stitched hard leather sheath, all in very good condition and rare to find complete. Overall the length of the knife is just short of 9 inches, whilst the blade length measurers 4.75 inches. Apart from the obvious wear and tear caused in use, this knife is nevertheless a superb example. A superb antique item for the vintage knife collector.
Antique Gun Case - Colt 1849 Revolver This is a good antique gun box that has been previously relined to accommodate a Colt Pocket or Police revolver, up to a maximum 5 inch barrel length. The crimson lining is in good cosmetic condition and the compartments are well laid out to permit a number of accessories to be added. All the woodwork is in reasonable order, but the corners are opening slightly. The lock is missing, but the hinges are good and the lid contains a good replacement trade label for George H. Daw & Co. An attractive and serviceable gun case
Antique Gun Collecting Book Vintage \"Antique Gun Collecting\" book by Frederich Wilkinson. Slight tear to dust jacket at top but otherwise, generally good condition.
Antique Guns - Police Constabulary Flintlock Pistol By Barnett c.1825 The Constabulary Flintlock Pistol was of a rather plain overcoat pattern, with a short 4 1/2" barrel, firing a large .68" calibre ball. This example made by Barnett c.1825, is no different to the Tower pattern pistols issued to Customs, Coastguard and Revenue Officers of the same era. The only exception to the Constabularies was that their pistols, the ones carried by "The Law," were never (or perhaps rarely) supplied from military stores. Instead, they were sourced from independent private label gunmakers - many of whom were contracted to the Board of Ordnance anyway. The Constabularies would then buy their pistols out of public taxes. They had to do things that way, as the Police were not under the control of the government, as were the other Crown Servant agencies. The Police did not work on the behest of the government, rather, they held office for the benefit of the people. The government only stipulated that the Police should act within the law and with integrity. Needless to say, the government still appointed magistrates and a Home Secretary to oversee the day to day functioning of the Police. Police equipment then, typically followed pre-existing military patterns, but it had to be sourced and paid for out of their own budget. In the instance of firearms, the police naturally approached local gunmakers to ask them to supply suitable pistols. Most of those provided were unmarked, but some wealthier police establishments did have their pistols engraved to the "Public Office" from whence they operated. Certainly the notion that the police were unarmed, was just a myth that came about later due to certain political edicts. In fact, just before the Bow Street Public Office came under the control of the Metropolitan Police, every "runner" working from that office had been issued with at least one pistol. Those Bow Street pistols are almost the same as the one produced by Barnett. All these Public Office pistols that were in existence when the Metropolitan Police were established, became part of the new police resource. Of course, initially not all the police pistols were precisely to this pattern, but standardisation took time to achieve. As most of these pistols went unmarked, the history as to where the Barnett pistol served, may never be known, yet it remains a good example of what would have been a regularly carried item of equipment. The walnut furniture is a nice deep brown colour and the stepped lock plate, throat hole hammer and roller frizen are all original with good springs. Metal work now shows a good grey patina, with some light areas of pitting. Over all a good pistol of a scarce pattern.
Antique Gunsmith's Tapered Bore Gauge This is an excellent and very useable antique gun bore gauge. It caters for every conceivable calibre, measuring approximately 14 inches in length. The tapered gauge is part round and part flat, marked in bore to one side and inches on the other. Made of solid iron, this antique gauge is in very good original condition.
Antique Horn Pistol Patch Container, c.1850 This small antique patch or wad container was originally part of a cased pistol set. made from horn, the container is presented in perfect condition with a screw-off top.
Antique Horn Tipped Pistol Ramrod A genuine antique ramrod for a muzzle-loading pistol. This hardwood rod is in very good condition, finished with a horn tip. Length = 16cm Widest width = 14mm Narrow end = 4mm
Antique Model Brass & Bronze British Military Cannon This is a most interesting piece of apprentice engineering, made by a young engineer during his youth c.1920. Whether the model depicts an existing cannon is not confirmed, but it appears to be a very close copy of the type of muzzle loading cannon that the British Military was using in the mid 19th Century. Constructed from a mixture of brass, bronze or gun metal and copper in its entirety, the cannon has a clear touch hole through to the chamber, which is approximately 54 bore. However, that is not to say that this is a signal cannon, nor any indication that the cannon could fire, but it is a statement of fact. Today, it is not known whether the maker intended to make a working cannon, or merely to make a first class model, but it is apparent that it has never been fired. So, it is being sold simply as a model. This model cannon certainly show cased the talents of the engineer, who has created a detailed representation, down from the rivets to the water bucket, tools, jack and many other features. All in, this cannon measures 16 inches in length and weighs about 6 Kg. A most impressive piece. Many more images available on request.
Antique Percussion Gun - 1849 Tower Percussion Coastguard Pistol An 1849 dated Tower Coastguard percussion pistol, showing the stockers name of, "Smith." This pistol is in pristine unissued condition having been released from the Tower Armoury in the 1980s. The light coloured woodwork shows light evidence of inspection marks and the Board of Ordnance acceptance stamp. All metal work is black and free from signs of wear. A very good example.
Antique Police Gun - Model 1763 Gendarmerie Flintlock Pistol A rare .60 calibre Model 1763 Gendarmerie flintlock pistol, made c.1765. The pistol has a 5 inch tapering barrel with an iron muzzle cap, retaining its original ramrod. Much original finish remains throughout and the iron pommelled walnut stock shows only minor signs of service carry. The plain and slightly curved unsigned lockplate, features a brass pan with good springs throughout. Overall, a rare to find example in collector condition.
Antique Railway Guard's Watch - Victorian Royal Train Guard's Pocket Watch Queen Victoria became the first British monarch to travel by train, when on 13th June 1842 the Queen travelled from London to Windsor on the Great Western Railway. The GWR was a progressive company who were the first to adopt a coordinated time along their region, as it was already acknowledged that time errors caused by inaccurate station clocks and watches, could lead to a potential disaster. This coordinating of time became known as "Railway Time" and over the next few years, it was adopted by all railway regions throughout Great Britain. After her first experience as a rail passenger, Queen Victoria was soon a seasoned traveller, enjoying the convenience that this mode of transportation offered. In fact, the Queen was so open to the possibilities provided by the railway, that she ordered a train be kept available for her disposal. This led to the introduction of the first Royal Train, which evolved into a most opulent mode of transport, with fully equipped carriages fitted out in grand splendour for the Royal Family. For those entrusted to staff the Royal Train, certain qualities were demanded of them and, of their equipment. Staff needed to be impeccably turned out and Royal Train guards needed to carry an accurate timepiece. Consequently, to ensure that an appropriate watch was used, special pocket watches were purchased for the job. These watches were deliberately made larger than regular pocket watches, simply because it was easier to manufacture a more accurate oversized watch, than try to make a precise smaller version - This was a logical approach. Furthermore, as no railway allows locomotives to cross tracks within seconds of another passing train, timing with the aid of a seconds hand on a watch was simply not required, so that feature common to many civilian watches, was dispensed with. In the 1870s, Gillett, Bland & Co. of Croydon, a company who had already been supplying ornate station clocks to the railways, as well as having made the bell called Big Ben, were requested to produce guards' pocket watches for the Royal Train. This is one of those rare opportunities to acquire one of the more historic railway timepieces made by Gillett, Bland & Co. Gillett & Johnson, (as the clock company is known today), has acknowledged that watches made by them, number very few indeed. That aside, these watches had more than just their size to aid accuracy; this one also has a chain driven fusee which assisted timekeeping, by carefully releasing a uniform degree of power from the mainspring, over the total running period of the watch. This was important, as early watches without this feature, ran well at first winding, perhaps a little fast given the spring was at maximum tension, but as the day went on, the timekeeping changed with the ever decreasing spring power. This was okay for the ordinary gentleman in the street, but such fluctuations in a railway timekeeper were just not acceptable. Clearly these heavy railway watches were impressive with their size and robust build quality, but they were very much meant to be a working watch, a tool to be used responsibly. And this example does show the typical wear of decades of careful and responsible owners, who kept their watches clean and likely, polished them continuously. Not surprisingly then, the once fine Royal VR Cypher, is now but a trace of the former Queen's Crown and issue number 53 - but all of this is still discernible to the eye. There are also some very tiny hairline marks on the outer edge of the dial, just by the 3 o'clock position under the bezel. It is almost inevitable that over many years of daily use, this area of the dial will have become chipped or cracked, as this is where the watch has its locking latch. Internally though, the movement is still in working order and the watch is running for the full length of the chain. Due to the watch's age and a lack of immediately available spares, no Premium Service can be offered at this time. For more information about the care of antique and vintage timepieces, please contact ZMW to ask for alternative service options.
Antique Revolver - A Victorian Gold Filled Pocket Watch Key These rare Victorian novelty pocket watch keys were made during the same period as the pistols that they represent. This fine example dates from c.1860 and is in remarkably good condition. With just a hint of wear, this key has survived dent free and with most of its original gold finish. It measures 50 mm in length and the square key end, is around 1.5 mm across the flats. A great functional novelty item for the gentleman shooter.
Antique Shotgun Locks & Parts Two working locks from a double-barrelled hammer shotgun together with associated gun parts. The locks are unsigned but are complete, together with a trigger assembly and forend stock.
Antique Travelling Pistol - Percussion Overcoat Pistol by Hewson A c.1845 18 bore, single shot percussion overcoat pistol by Hewson. Featuring a 6 inch octagonal barrel with adjustable blade foresight and post rear sight, signed "London" to the top flat. The pistol retains a good amount of original colour and has two silver escutcheons to the butt. One plain on the base of the grip and the other with a beast's head crest to the back-strap. The pistol has minimal oxidisation on the exposed metal work and some bumps and chips to the wood.
Antique WD 12 Bore Steel Pincer Mould, c.1800 An antique steel pincer mould used to cast 12 bore balls, marked with the maker's initials of W.D. This is most probably the maker, William Davies, who founded his business in 1790, which became Webley in 1834. The ball mould itself is in serviceable condition with good pivoting hinge and with the actual mould part, being in good order. The remainder of the body is a little pitted, but the No.12 and WD markings are still clear. An unmolested and useable example.
Antique William IV Coastguard Percussion Pistol Scarce antique Tower pistol of Coastguard Pattern made c.1837 and bearing William IV King's Crown marking. This percussion pistol was manufactured as the flintlock era was being superseded by the percussion method of ignition. As such, new percussion pistols were assembled, but using older supplies of lock plates. This WR IV example is particularly interesting as it has the early stepped lock with a working safety and strong springs throughout. All metal work has now faded to a grey patina whilst the walnut stock bears the Board of Ordnance stamp. Light impressions of inspection stamps are also evident. By 1842 Lovell's percussion lock had become available, but it would still be several years before the mass of older locks were exhausted. A good pistol of scarce type.
Armourer\'s Broad Arrow Inspection Stamp A rare armourer's punch used to stamp a small broad arrow inspection mark on weapon components, or similar items of military equipment. The punch is is very good condition with an undamaged face producing a clear arrow stamp measuring approximately 2mm in height. The punch itself is 75mm long and that too is stamped with a deep large broad arrow.
Army & Aircrew Issue Survival Knife A genuine military survival knife of the pattern designed by Wilkinson. Variously stamped issue numbers on the scabbard and grip, together with the maker's mark, "H" it is believed that this example was made by the Sheffield cutler, Hopkins. Overall in excellent untouched condition retaining virtually all its original colour and undamaged blade with a 5mm spine - capable of undertaking a wide range of survival tasks, including batoning. The leather scabbard is in equally excellent condition with its snap fastener remaining intact. A solid tool ideal for bushcraft work.
Army / Navy Style Hardwood Grips A good modern pair of grips from a black powder revolver of Colt Army or Navy type. Presented in good condition these hardwood grips may require some fettling to fit other revolvers.
Army Bomb Disposal Armoured Fist An unusual and rare item formerly used by the British Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams as part of their bomb suit. Unissued and in new old stock condition with labels attached. When used in mine clearance ops, the armoured fist would cover the spare hand, while a similar guard and probe would be worn over the working hand. The final image shows how this would function.
Army Issue General Service Pocket Knife, c.1953 An excellent stainless steel example of a British Army General Service pocket knife dated, 1953. Presented in superb condition, this early pattern knife shows little sign of any use. Fully marked with the broad arrow and other numbers. An outstanding example. Reserved for TM
Army Issue GS Knife By J Rodgers A current army issue General Service knife by J. Rodgers, in very good, used condition. Fully marked with a broad arrow, the blade complies with UK EDC law.
Army Mechanic\'s Metric Feeler Gauge 388M A very good British Army issue metric feeler gauge. Sheffield made, the gauge has a comprehensive set of 13 blades, each marked between .03 mm - .50mm. Tool stamped, 388M and broad arrow marked. Perfectly useable.
Army Mechanic\'s Metric Feeler Gauge 391M A very good British Army issue metric feeler gauge. Sheffield made, the gauge has 9 blades marked between .05mm - .80mm. Tool stamped, 391M and broad arrow marked. Perfectly useable.
Army Vehicle Box Spanner Tool Kit, c.1950 A rare and complete set of post WW2 box spanners, together with their Allen key wrench and metal case. All the Whitworth spanners are broad arrow marked and correspondingly size stamped and stacked in their case alongside the hex wrench tool. They are all in generally unworn condition showing only minor sign of use. All the sockets have thick walls and remain good to use. Socket sizes shown; 1/4 W 3/8 W 7/16 W 1/2 W 9/16 W 5/8 W The case measures approximately 8 x 2½ x 2 inches and weighs in at 1.2Kg.
Aviator's Omega Stop Watch With Fly-Back c.1970 An interesting stop watch of a type that was used by pilots and the Royal Air Force, typically mounted on the aircraft cockpit instrument panel. A similar example of this type can be found at Brooklands Museum, fitted into their Harrier jump jet. These Fly-Back watches were used to calculate time intervals between critical inflight operations. As such, the watch features a high beating precision Omega movement with both regular stop/start operations, as well as an additional fly-back button that allows the operator to rapidly zero the watch and simultaneously restart the timing of the next immediate event. This special feature does away with the 'pause' that is caused by regular stop… reset… restart functions of a standard stop watch. Overall this Omega Fly-Back is a very good example of its type, despite showing signs of service wear to the painted finish and edge damage to the perspex, it is nevertheless in good working order although its precision accuracy has not been tested. All buttons works crisply on demand.
Aviators' Watches - WW1 RFC Mark V Issue Watch - RAF Baldonnel Whilst this is a regular WW1 era RFC Mark V issue pilot's watch, which would have first seen service with the Royal Flying Corps towards the tail end of their existance, a closer examination of this timepiece has revealed that it has been hand inscribed with details of its former user in Dublin, Ireland. This provenance has been recorded on the inner case back, which bears an indiscernible name, followed by the inscription, "RAF Baldonnel, February 1921." RAF Baldonnel was initially an RFC aerodrome, but then in 1922 it was handed over to the Irish Air Corps. This RFC Mark V timepiece is a cockpit instrument watch that has been adapted into a proper pocket watch by fitting a chain bow, thereby extending its usefulness. This conversion was most likely done for service in WW2, where these now ageing watches were redistributed for general service to the Home Guard. The watch is in good order, with typical signs of service wear showing light indentations to the back. Otherwise internally the Gallet Electa signed movement is in good condition and working order, albeit the Premium Service would be of benefit. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Aviators' Watches - WW1 Royal Naval Air Service Mark II 8-Day Cockpit Watch In 1912, the British government created two new air wings. One would be under the control of the War Department, whilst the other came under the auspices of the Admiralty. By the time that WW1 broke out, the Royal Naval Air Service actually had more aircraft under its charge, than the Royal Flying Corps. Whilst the RNAS had a total of 95 aircraft, blimps were also utilised, which were hand-me-downs from the army. The RNAS aeroplanes were primarily used for shipping patrols. The RNAS were also expected to engage and attack enemy vessels, and to harass their coastlines. They were also tasked with locating and bombing Zeppelins still at their German airfields. The task of engaging airborne Zeppelins was in the RFC's remit, but the RNAS worked in cooperation to good effect. This original RNAS Mark II 8-day cockpit watch has retained its original long necked winder in its original form - without provision for a bow. On the dial, the watch's provenance is clearly shown as being the property of the "Admiralty." The only peculiar feature of the watch, which is explainable, is the fact that the case back bears the army War Department mark. Most likely, when this watch was serviced in 1918 by the new Royal Air Force, they must have undertaken remedial work. The evidence that shows this to be correct is the presence of trace wording on the dial reading, "RAF REPAIR." Likely, at the time of the refurbishment, a War Department back must have been used - probably to replace a damaged case back. The inner case cuvette is also lacking, which again supports this notion that the watch sustained damage in its early years, necessitating the removal of the inner dust cover and the replacement of the back utilising a spare WD marked cover. We can only speculate as to how this happened, but it is all part of epic events in history that these timepieces endured. Although the watch is in working order, the movement is in need of a service. The Premium Service is strongly recommended to remove decades of dirt build up. Apart from that, the watch is in good condition and presents well, exhibiting a good dial and slight signs of service use. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Avimo 7x42 British Army L12A1 Binoculars, c.1979 An excellent and near mint pair of British Army L12A1 binoculars. Made by Avimo, these self-focusing binoculars were introduced to army stores in 1979, with many going on to see conflict during the Falklands War, Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, most surviving examples show evidence of hard service use and it has become virtually impossible to find clean examples. Most likely this pair of binos were refurbished by the contracted company, Thale Optics (previously known as Avimo), before being returned to military stores and since then, they have seen little further use. Cosmetically excellent and near mint, this broad arrow marked, serially numbered, and "79" dated pair of binoculars, have a very bright view. They are technically perfect, including the inbuilt reticule. Altogether a superb outfit that is ready to use without the need of manual focusing, designed to be suitable even for spectacle wearers. A great optical instrument with multicoated lenses. Robust and heavy, when made the Avimos were waterproof and gas-filled for antifogging. Superb.
Avimo L12A1 Binoculars A pair of British Army L12A1 binoculars by Avimo, c.1980. This pair of binoculars have a slight collimation (double image) issue, which can generally be corrected by turning one or t\'other of the objective lenses, in or out slightly. Either that, or making minor adjustments to correct the hinge screws where the binoculars pivot. If you have the patience to do that, then these binoculars will reward you with sharp, clear views as the glass is perfect. No dirt. Bins come with eyecups only.
Axis Military Watches - Pre WW2 Nazi Police Issue German Army Pattern Wristwatch By Protex A Nazi Police military spec wristwatch made by Protex, bearing the Dienst Uhr (DU) Service Wristwatch marking associated with pre WW2 German watches. DU marked watches are actually very rare to find. They date to c.1938 yet, are basically the same as the more common DH (Deutsche Heer) watches of WW2. Just like many of the DH army watches, most have the AS1130 "Wermacht" calibre movement, waterproof cases, black luminous dials and shock proofing characteristics as standard. This DU example is made by the relatively unknown company, Protex. The watch is in excellent overall condition showing very little sign of wear, retaining most of its original finish, with only some minor dinks and marks. Clearly it has not seen heavy action or been used in the field. Internally the movement appears to be factory fresh and looks sharp. It is in good working order, however it has not been serviced. The Premium Service is therefore recommended, at which point if it is so desired, the minute hand can be refilled. Most extraordinary about this watch, is the fact that it is on a typical German contemporary WW2 black leather strap. The buckle, studs and general style of the strap, are all typically of the WW2 period. The strap itself appears to have been reduced in length, so it might at some point been worn over the top of a sleeve, like many military and aviators watches were, so there's nothing unusual about seeing long military pattern straps. What is unusual though, is the way that the strap has been personalised. It bears Nazi police insignia and faithful service devices. The wear to the insignia suggest that they have been worn in this manner and are not recent or modern add-ons. A rare watch in collector grade condition, with an original WW2 period strap that is still very supple and wearable. Watch diameter is 34mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Bacon Arms First Model .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1855 A 1st Model Bacon .31 percussion revolver, that can be distinguished from the later models by virtue of its cylinder release mechanism - This is operated by the unusual knurled catch, just forward of the cylinder. Being a comparatively rare revolver from the Bacon Arms Company of Norwich Connecticut, only 1000 of these pistols were made in the mid 1850's. As with most of them, this piece is also unmarked, apart from the serial number that is stamped on the barrel rammer retaining lug. Presented in good mechanical condition, this 5-shot spur trigger revolver operates crisply. It has no original finish remaining, although the metal shows some light discolouration and staining. Nevertheless the decorative vine detail remains clear and the revolver benefits from decent nipples and good screw heads. All in all, a good example for the collector of different pocket pistols. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Barnett Coastguard Pattern Flintlock Pistol, c.1822 Formed in 1809 by the Board of Customs, the Preventive Water Guard had a remit to stop the smuggling trade. However, after their successful formative years, the institution responsible for overseeing the work of the PWG was handed over in 1816, to the Treasury. Now heavily influenced towards the needs of the Board of Trade, their priorities changed, resulting in the PWG concerning themselves mostly with revenue collection. This led again to further government intervention in 1822, amidst public allegations of inefficiency. "The Preventive" were now returned to the control of Customs, who renamed them the, "Coastguard," reinstating their primary task as a proactive anti-smuggling authority. This Barnett flintlock is one of those early Coastguard pattern pistols, made c.1822, which would have been carried during patrols along the British coast: Interestingly, a lock from one of these pistols was recovered a few years ago in relic condition, near to Margate beach. The final image shows that lock (not included in the sale), which had lain undisturbed in a ready position, half cocked with pan down... A poignant relic. A fascinating law enforcement pistol from a violent period in history. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length =
Barnett Coastguard Pattern Flintlock Pistol, c.1822 Consignment sale: A historic and untouched Barnett Coastguard Flintlock, c.1822. First named as the Preventive Water Guard, the group started in 1809, under the directions of the Board of Customs, with a remit to stop the smuggling trade. However, after their successful formative years, the development of the PWG was handed over to the Treasury. Now heavily influenced towards the needs of the Board of Trade, the guard's priorities changed, resulting in the PWG concerning themselves mostly with revenue collection. This led again to further government intervention in 1822, amidst public allegations of inefficiency. "The Preventive" was now returned to the control of Customs, who renamed them, "Coastguard," reinstating their primary task as a proactive anti-smuggling authority. This Barnett flintlock is one of those early Coastguard pattern pistols, made c.1822, carried during patrols along the British coast: Interestingly, a lock from one of these pistols was recovered a few years ago in relic condition, near to Margate beach. The final image shows that lock (not included in the sale), which had lain undisturbed in a ready position, half-cocked with pan down — a poignant relic. A fascinating London proofed law enforcement pistol from a violent period in history, presented in working order but with a weak mainspring. Excellent woodwork with original finish and only minor signs of service wear. A collector grade pistol. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length =
Barnett Coastguard Pattern Flintlock Pistol, c.1822 Consignment sale: A historic and untouched Barnett Coastguard Flintlock, c.1822. First named as the Preventive Water Guard, the group started in 1809, under the directions of the Board of Customs, with a remit to stop the smuggling trade. However, after their successful formative years, the development of the PWG was handed over to the Treasury. Now heavily influenced towards the needs of the Board of Trade, the guard's priorities changed, resulting in the PWG concerning themselves mostly with revenue collection. This led again to further government intervention in 1822, amidst public allegations of inefficiency. "The Preventive" was now returned to the control of Customs, who renamed them, "Coastguard," reinstating their primary task as a proactive anti-smuggling authority. This Barnett flintlock is one of those early Coastguard pattern pistols, made c.1822, carried during patrols along the British coast: Interestingly, a lock from one of these pistols was recovered a few years ago in relic condition, near to Margate beach. The final image shows that lock (not included in the sale), which had lain undisturbed in a ready position, half-cocked with pan down — a poignant relic. A fascinating London proofed law enforcement pistol from a violent period in history, presented in working order but with a weak mainspring. Excellent woodwork with original finish and only minor signs of service wear. A collector grade pistol. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length =
Barnett Coastguard Pattern Percussion Pistol, c.1840 Consignment sale: Barnett held a long standing contract to supply pistols to the Board of Customs. Starting in the flintlock era, Barnett went on to supply percussion weapons and, although their pistols maybe considered to be commercial examples, due to their private label, the barrel nevertheless bears a couple of Crown over "7" government inspector's stamp, together with the usual proofs. Presented in good used condition, this Barnett pistol has a robust early type percussion lock. All the iron work has a dark aged patina and the wood furniture is free of repairs, exhibiting just the small bumps from service use. All in all, a tidy and scarce government contract pistol made for the Board of Customs.
Battle Of Malakoff Sebastapol Commemorative Plate, c.1855 A rare Victorian commemorative plate by Creil Et Montereau L.M. & Cie Déposé. Plate made in France and titled, "Siege De Sebastapol - Prise Du Mamelon Vert" (The taking of the Green Knoll). Signed by the artist, "Schellenbach". The plate is in generally good condition with clear black and white transfer image, although it does exhibit some flaws to the glazing and edge wear. It measures 19cm in diameter. Wikipedia History: The Battle of Malakoff (French: Bataille de Malakoff, Russian: Бой на Малаховом кургане) was a French attack against Russian forces on the Malakoff redoubt and its subsequent capture on 8 September 1855 as a part of the Siege of Sevastopol during the Crimean War. The French army under General MacMahon successfully stormed the Malakoff redoubt, while a simultaneous British attack on the Redan to the south of the Malakoff was repulsed. In one of the war's defining moments, the French Zouave Eugène Libaut raised the French flag on the top of the Russian redoubt. The Battle of Malakoff resulted in the fall of Sevastopol on 9 September, bringing the 11-month siege to an end.
Bayonet Frog for Austro-Hungarian M1895 Manlicher Rifle A very good leather bayonet frog for the Austro-Hungarian M1895 Mannlicher bayonet. The leather has nice colouring and is supple, plus, all the stitches are intact.
BCM Cadet Cowboy Cap-Firing Revolver, c.1960 A scarce miniature nickel-plated cap firing revolver, which is marked "Cadet" and "Made In England". These were made in the 1960s by the BCM Company Limited in Derby and were sold as part of a cased set called "The Outlaw". The three pistol set included a pistol called, "Pirate", which is advertised elsewhere on this page, plus a Deringer. This Cadet revolver appears to be based on a Colt Navy and features white undamaged grips. With most of the original plated finish remaining, there is some sign of cap firing around the breach but the action is in full working order, making this a collectable example. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
BCM Pirate Cap-firing Flintlock Novelty Pistol, c.1960 A scarce cap-firing pistol marked "Pirate". This pistol was part of a three-gun set made by BCM Company Limited in Derby. See the separate listing for the "Cadet" revolver, which was also part of "The Outlaw" set. Interestingly, this novelty pistol came with caps, oil and plastic projectiles, which could be fired. On inspection one of the orange bullets can be seen loaded down the barrel waiting to be shot through by the addition of a paper cap, which is held in place by the faux frizzen. The pistol even retains its original ramrod - all in good order with a plastic stock and plated metal parts. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
Beaumont Adams 54 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1855 Consignment sale: A generally crisp example of a Beaumont Adams 54 Bore double action revolver, c.1855. Although showing signs of use, this revolver is presented in excellent working order retaining much original blue, with the trigger guard reduced to a grey finish, and very good undamaged grips. All in all, a good collector grade example of a classic British percussion revolver. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 12 inches
Beaumont Adams 54 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1855 A good Beaumont Adams double-action percussion revolver. Cosmetically, this revolver has an even and dark age patina, with some traces of original blueing being present in sheltered areas. Profiles remain sharp and the top strap is clearly marked, "Robert Adams, 76 King William Street, London." In full working order, this revolver has excellent undamaged grips, nipples and screws. Altogether, it is in much better collector grade condition than the price suggests.
Belgian Constable .320 Pocket Revolver, c.1890 Named on the top-strap as the "Belgian Constable" this genre of pocket revolver was sold throughout Europe and Britain during the late 19th century. They were a serious competitor to Webley, being chambered for the obsolete .320 British cartridge. Ornately engraved and nickel-plated, this solid-frame revolver retains most of its original finish, as well as its elaborate grips, which are undamaged. The overall crisp appearance suggests that this revolver may have been purchased for home-defence, possibly having been left in a desk drawer with its lanyard ring removed. It is still in full working order with strong springs. A good Liege proofed example for the collector. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 6 inches
Birmingham & Midland Motor Omnibus Company, Bus Conductor's Whistle The Birmingham & Midland Motor Omnibus Company was England's largest bus company, operating from 1905 - 1974. After which time the company changed its title to Midland Red, and continued to operate under their new name until 1981 when they were sold off to five large private bus companies. This whistle is a new old stock bus conductor's pea whistle, made by Hudsons pre 1974. Its condition is as new.
Birmingham Arms Fair - 18th September 2016 ZMW Militaria are pleased to announce that we will be trading at the Birmingham Arms Fair on the 18th September. We look forward to meeting up with fellow collectors, both present and new. Best wishes, Ziggy
Birmingham Borough Gaol - Prison Warder's 25 Bore Pistol c.1850 Consignment sale: A very rare prison warder's pistol formerly used at the "Birmingham Borough Gaol," also known by locals as "Winson Green Prison," which opened in 1849. The new prison replaced the smaller "Town Lock-Up" that had existed at the rear of the police station, since 1806. Historically, British prisons had been managed by various authorities in what was a complicated system of administration dependant on a prison's status. This status was generally determined at the time the institution was approved but could be amended as the prison's profile in society changed. Birmingham Gaol was and still is, considered to be a violent prison, necessitating increasingly higher levels of management. Initially, the prison was first governed by George Glossop but he was rapidly succeeded by Captain Alexander Maconochie RN. A noted and successful prison reformer who believed in allowing prisoner's dignity, he was politically undermined and sacked in 1851 for being too lenient. Yet Maconochie's policies and beliefs were adopted as the basis of the penal system instigated over 100 years later! With its checkered past, Birmingham attracted what was at times, a hotchpotch of influence from now-discredited Magistrates, as well as the Local Authority and even Central Government, before Victorian reforms saw the prison service coming under the singular control of the Home Ofice. As an official sidearm, this large calibre box-lock pistol was property marked to the Birmingham Gaol on the barrel flat, as well as bearing a government issue Broad Arrow on the butt. This pistol is in full working order with a robust and crisp action, while cosmetically appearing sharp, with some decorative engraving to the metalwork and some light salt and pepper frosting. In summary, a superb Law & Order firearm from a historically interesting institution. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9 inches
Birmingham Gaol - Prison Guard's Short Carbine, c.1845 This is a rare short carbine made for the prison service and marked to the "Birmingham Borough Gaol." Interestingly the engraver has made an error in his spelling, writing instead, "Goal." It is additionally marked with the government property broad arrow on the butt. These carbines were intended for use by prison guards, entrusted with prisoner security during transportation. Overall the carbine is in very good condition, both mechanically and cosmetically, with just minor bumps and marks from service use. Barrel length = 16 inches Overall length = 31 inches
Birmingham Gun Trade - Side Hammer Pocket Pistol, c.1835 This is a super original percussion pistol dating from c.1835, which has survived in very good aesthetic condition, retaining most of its original case colouring and sharp profiles, with just some slight fading and surface speckling to a left side barrel flat. Although not attributed to any gunmaker, the workmanship is of a decent standard and the pistol was proofed in Birmingham. Overall this is an appealing side hammer pistol with a hexagonal turn-off barrel, with finely chequered and close fitting grips finished off with an ornate butt cap. However, the action only holds on half cock - otherwise the pistol is in working order with strong springs. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.5 inches
Birmingham Gun Trade Pocket Pistol, c.1813 A Birmingham Gun Trade turn-off barrel pocket pistol, made c.1813, which was signed "London." Other military trophies adorn the box lock, together with a maker's name, which is not immediately discernible. Basically this pocket pistol lock was adapted to fire percussion caps during its working life, and whilst its springs remain serviceable, the safety was removed. Overall the pistol is working and cosmetically it is in reasonable condition throughout, with good bag shaped grips - No cracks, but a tiny chip to the front right side corner. Barrel length = 2 inches Overall length = 6.5 inches
Birmingham Gun Trade Side Hammer Pistol, c.1835 This is a super original percussion pistol dating from c.1835, which has survived in very good aesthetic condition, retaining most of its original case colouring and sharp profiles, with just some slight fading and surface speckling to a left side barrel flat. Although not attributed to any gunmaker, the workmanship is of a decent standard and the pistol was proofed in Birmingham. Overall this is an appealing side hammer pistol with a hexagonal turn-off barrel, with finely chequered and close fitting grips finished off with an ornate butt cap. However, the action only holds on half cock - otherwise the pistol is in working order with strong springs. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.5 inches
Birmingham Gun Trade Turn-Off Barrel Percussion Pistol, c.1835 An attractive and well made side hammer pistol, proofed in Birmingham, c.1835. This unsigned percussion pistol retains a strong working action and features a sighted barrel, together with a butt trap for spare caps 'n' ball. Attractive scroll engraving surrounds the lock and muzzle and the finely chequered woodwork fits well to the surrounding ironwork. Overall an attractive pocket pistol.
Birmingham Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1855 A Birmingham Gun Trade pocket revolver, c.1855. This trigger cocking revolver is in full working order, indexing and locking well with a positive action. There is, however, a small part of the rammer missing as shown in front of the cylinder. Cosmetically the revolver has a thinning finish with the remainder showing a dark age patina, good grips and tidy screw heads. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 8 inches
Blunderbuss Pocket Pistol By Dust, c.1815 A good blunderbuss pistol by Dust, originally made c.1815 as a flintlock, but having had its working life extended with a conversion to percussion ignition. This was a simple and effective conversion where the cock's top jaw was replaced by a blunt iron striker, without the need for a new hammer. Overall this brass pocket pistol with its flared barrel, is in full working order with strong springs. Clear Birmingham proof marks and a "London" engraved box lock, are all sharp with a good fitting walnut bag shaped butt. An attractive blunderbuss with separate wooden ramrod. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 6 inches
Boeing B-47 Stratojet Flight Computer This is a scarce navigator's flight computer, also referred to as a "Whizz Wheel," which was specifically calibrated for use on the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. This remarkable aircraft entered service with the USAF Strategic Air Command in 1951 as a supersonic, hi-altitude long-range bomber, capable of delivering a nuclear payload over the Soviet Union. During the Cold War the B-47's role also saw it configured as a recognisance aircraft, which remained in service until 1969. Presented in very good condition. Diameter = 7 inches
Boer War Army Pocket Knife This good example of a military knife is attributed to the Orkney Royal Garrison Artillery Territorial Volunteers. The knife is signed by the maker, F. Newton, Premier, which dates to c.1900. Presented in used and aged condition, this knife has retained a good blade profile and no damage to the horn scales. Overall, a very collectable knife worthy of further research. The last image shows soldiers at Orkney RGA.
Boer War Era, Gentleman's Silver Pocket Chronograph Chronograph pocket watches pack an extra complication into what is already an intricate mechanism, which enables the watch not only to tell time in the normal manner, but also to record time intervals. This makes chronographs versatile timepieces, which were often favoured by well to do gentlemen and army officers of the day. Dating from c.1900, this silver marked vintage timepiece is in exceptional condition throughout and, although it is not known when this watch was last serviced, it is nevertheless in full and proper working order. Cosmetically this watch only exhibits the lightest signs of any pocket wear, which supports the notion that it has led a sheltered life for over 100 years. A watch that would be difficult to improve upon. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Boer War Officer\'s Shoulder Holster c.1890 A Boer War, late Victorian period holster, which fits the Webley RIC pattern service revolvers very well, made for shoulder wear with a crossover strap. Presented in very good condition, this military holster shows signs of service wear but no notable damage. The stitching is intact and the leather remains supple. A very nice example that also holds the Colt New Army & Navy series of revolvers from the 1890s.
Boer War Royal Artillery Silver Fusee Watch A superb Royal Artillery issue pocket watch from the Boer War. Made by Adam Burdess, the watch is in
Boer War Royal Artillery Silver Fusee Watch, c.1899 A genuine 1899 silver hallmarked Boer War pocket watch by Adam Burdess. Presented in working order, having recently undergone a full strip down and service. This rare watch is broad arrow marked along with having details of the Royal Artillery unit that it was issued to. A superb example of a collector grade military watch that is capable of daily service over 120 years later. Fully serviced, this watch comes with a period Double Albert chain with a 1902 Edward VII token.
Boer War Royal Garrison Artillery HRGA Bugle, 1903 This early copper and brass bugle is engraved with the military broad arrow, together with various issue stamps. Made by C. Mahillon & Co. and dated \"1903\", this bugle also bears the regimental title, \"HRGA\", which identifies it as having been originally owned by the Royal Garrison Artillery in Scotland. The prefix \"H\" was added, which denotes \"Highland\", a practice that was short-lived within the War Department. This bugle is in good condition with no repairs, playing well although displaying some typical dents and bruises of a military musical instrument with a 120-year history.
Boer War Soldier's Wristlet, c.1900 From existing documents, letters and diaries from the Boer War, we have learnt that the first military wristlets to be worn by soldiers in any number, were no more than pocket watches strapped to their wrists. As is, this example must rank as one of the first of its kind, being no more than a late 19th century fob watch, with the only adaptation being the removal of its bow, which allowed it to be inserted into a faux tortoise shell protective case. A long one piece leather thong type strap was then attached, permitting it to be literally, "strapped" to the wrist - being positively bound in place, even around a tunic sleeve. The timepiece is in working order, having a "Cylinder" escapement, with pin-set hand adjustment. This was an early development as the era of key wound watches was coming to a close. Remarkably this wristwatch is in untouched condition, showing just signs of honest dark patina and service wear to the finish, yet remaining in working order. It is all running well and keeping time, but the watch has not been serviced. All together, there is every reason to believe that the watch and its accessories belong together and as such, this timepiece must rank as one of the earliest military watches on offer worldwide today. Measuring approximately 34 cm in diameter, the retaining leather band is still wearable, but a little tired, with slight surface cracking along its 52 cm length, but all too good to replace. A wonderfull survivor for the military watch collector to find. A Premium Service is available, together with a 12 month warranty.
Bow Street Dismounted Horse Patrol Cutlass, c.1821 Consignment sale: Originally the Bow Street Horse Patrol had red coated officers stationed along highways leading out to a distance of 20 miles from the centre of London. However in 1821, with the crime rate growing, a much smaller body of officers known as the Dismounted Horse Patrol, took up the responsibility to police the streets around a 5 mile radius of the centre. At night, the regular Bow Street Foot Patrols supplemented the Dismounted Horse Patrol by concentrating their efforts on the remaining streets, as directed by the Magistrate. On joining the Dismounted Horse Patrol, the officer was issued his "Appointments," which were the tools he was expected to carry whilst on duty. His appointments include; "Cutlass and Belt, Pistol and Case, Handcuffs with Key and Case, Truncheon, Book of Orders in Case." Each item was marked with its issue number, individually recorded against the receiving Officer. This particular cutlass is engraved with the, "No. 109." In 1822 Bow Street introduced an additional force known as the "Day Patrol," to assist the work of the Dismounted Horse Patrol. Presented in very good aged condition, this cutlass is clearly marked by the maker, "W. Parker," together with his London address and details of his Royal Warrant. The other side of the blade is etched to the, "Dismounted Horse Patrol, No. 109." Complete with its brass mounted leather scabbard, which is intact and in good order, as is the sharkskin grip. All in all, a very rare and museum quality item of authentic Bow Street origin.
Boxed Webley Mark 1 Air Pistol c.1938 A good early example of the slant grip Webley Mark 1 air pistol in .177 calibre, complete with its carton and a mint, unused, spare leather cup washer and brush. Cosmetically, this Webley pistol retains most of its factory blue finish, although it is a little mottled around the sides of the cylinder. All the screws are in good condition and the profiles remain sharp, but the Bakelite grips do have some damage. The box is in good order with no repairs but the labels on the lid, while clean, do have some perforations around their edges; the carton itself is sound. A rare pistol outfit.
Boxed Webley Mark 1 Air Pistol c.1938 (More Photos)
Boxlock Pocket Flintlock Signed Ketland & Co. c.1795 Boxlock Pocket Flintlock Signed Ketland & Co. c.1795 A 56 bore pocket pistol signed "Ketland & Co" and "London". These handy pistols were popular self defence weapons, so a good many were sold by Ketland who was a contractor to the Board of Ordnanace, as well as being a large scale exporter of arms, particularly to America. This pistol is presented In working order but the drop-down trigger requires attention.
Boxlock Pocket Flintlock Signed Ketland & Co. c.1795 These pistols were popular self-defence weapons often made by unattributed gunmakers, so finding one by the prestigious "Ketland & Co", who were also prolific contractors to the Board of Ordnance, is a bonus. This pistol is presented In working order with strong springs but the drop-down trigger requires attention, failing to sit correctly within its recess. Woodwork is good and without damage. A flintlock worthy of some attention.
Boxwood & Brass Military Folding Rule c.1956 A vintage British Army marked folding pocket ruler by Rabone. Made from boxwood, with brass hinges and reinforcing caps, this ruler, when opened, measures 2 feet (24 inches). It folds down to a compact 6 inches. Some minor stains and signs of service use but no damage. All hinges are firm.
Boxwood & Brass Military Folding Rule c.1975 A good British Army marked folding pocket ruler. Made by Rabone & Chesterman from boxwood, with brass hinges and reinforcing caps. The ruler when open measures 2 feet (24 inches on one side, 60 cm on the reverse). When folded, it collapses down to just 6 inches. Some minor stains and signs of service use but no damage. All hinges are firm.
BPD Military .303 Dummy Drill Rounds, c.1983 A rare clip of 5 genuine .303 military dummy drill rounds, dating from 1983. With postwar stocks of older .303 dummy rounds exhausted and the Lee Enfield No.4 rifle remaining in service, primarily with cadet corps, the military ordered a small quantity of these from the Italian supplier, Bombrini, Parodi et Delfino. Each one was fitted with a drilled primer and delivered to the UK where the distributor fluted the cases to meet MOD requirements. These 5 drill rounds have identical headstamps marked, "B.P.D. 962." The jacketed bullets also retain traces of the original white paint to the tips. Overall in used condition but generally very good, complete with rifle clip.
BPS History of the Bengal Pilot Service Brice and Labey[2] give a date of 1651 for the foundation of the service, but according to James Prinsep's Chronological Tables,[3] the service dates back to 1669: [1669 ...] This year also were received orders from home, to institute a pilot establishment at Hoogly, to build a pinnace to be manned with intelligent seamen from the Indiamen, to take charge of the shipping up and down. Thus originated the Bengal Pilot Service. The Bengal Pilot Service was abolished on the 15th May, 1948. The Bengal Pilot Service was responsible for guiding shipping along the Hooghly River between Calcutta and the Bay of Bengal and was part of Bengal Marine In 1877 the Bombay Marine and the Bengal Marine were combined to form HM Indian Marine, which became the Royal Indian Marine in 1892 and the Royal Indian Navy in 1935. The Bengal Pilot Service (BPS) was an arm of the British East India Company (EIC). Its pilot boats were responsible for guiding East Indiamen, and other vessels, up and down the Hooghly River between Calcutta and the sea. The BPS vessels and their role were transferred to the Indian Navy in 1834.
Brace of Rigby Post Office Flintlock Pistols, c.1823 A brace of .65" carbine bore flintlocks, described by W. & J. Rigby in their own gun brochures as being, "Post Office Pattern," which were probably intended for carry by the Post Office Inspector. A larger version of the same pattern was also carried by armed mail coach guards. Made c.1823, these pistols are in excellent sleepy condition showing little sign of actual use, but having some service and carry wear, with marks to the wood. The sighted barrels are both signed ''DUBLIN" and the robust locks are all in full working order, benefitting from roller frizzens, semi waterproof pans and captive ramrods. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
Brander & Potts Revenue Officer's Flintlock c.1810 Brander & Potts were Board of Ordnance contractors, working from their premises at 70 Minories and Goodman’s Yd, between 1802-27. During this time they are known to have supplied a quantity of flintlocks, including modified Light Dragoon, to H.M. Customs House. These were of very plain pattern, being devoid of any extraneous engraving, although some were marked to HMC. This particular 16 Bore flintlock is of a Revenue Officer's pattern, which itself is a design taken from the pistols used by the Preventive Water Guard, c.1810. The PWG were a body of men set up by the Board of Customs in 1809. Interestingly, these pistols all appear to feature a radically re-profiled butt, providing a slimmer grip, presumably aiding retention in wet hands - but whatever the reason, a trend for smaller coast guard butts continued until the last of the Tower Pattern pistols of the 1850s. Presented in full working order and excellent sleepy condition, this pistol has a wonderful dark age patina. The slightly curved lock plate and cock, suggest that this is an earlier made pistol, which has retained its original ramrod with worm. Without any losses to the woodwork, this Brander & Potts pistol is an excellent item for the collector. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Brander & Potts Revenue or Constabulary Flintlock, c.1820 Brander & Potts were Board of Ordnance contractors, working from premises at 70 Minories and Goodman’s Yard, between 1802-27. During this time they are known to have supplied a quantity of flintlocks, including modified Light Dragoons, to H.M. Customs House. These pistols were always of plain pattern, being devoid of any extraneous engraving or other embellishment. However, it appears that just a few were engraved to HMC, whilst most were left unattributed, being conspicuous only by virtue of their distinct pattern. This particular 16 Bore flintlock is of a Revenue Officer's pattern, which itself is a design shared with the pistols used by the Preventive Water Guard, c.1810. The PWG were a body of men set up by the Board of Customs in 1809. Interestingly, these pistols all appear to feature a radically re-profiled butt, providing a slimmer grip, presumably aiding retention in wet hands - but whatever the reason, a trend for smaller coastguard butts continued until the last of the Tower Pattern pistols of the 1850s. Presented in full working order and wonderful sleepy condition, this pistol has good age patina and excellent woodwork all round, although the contemporary horn tipped ramrod and worm, might be a period replacement? Woodwork is without any losses, just a minor line at the tail of the lock, making this Brander & Potts pistol an excellent item for the collector. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Brass "All-Weather" Flintlock Pistol By Wheeler c.1800 Robert Wheeler was a Birmingham gunmaker operating between 1767 - 1813. It is known that he marked his guns, "London," despite only obtaining gun warehouse facilities in Cheapside between 1805 - 1808. Nevertheless, Wheeler became a Contractor to Ordnance and to the Hudson's Bay Company, doing considerable business supplying guns and rifles to the American trading companies. The firm was also involved as armourers to the newly established Thames River Police at Limehouse. "All-Weather" pistols constructed from brass in this manner, were popular wherever arms were required to be carried substantially outdoors and in all seasons. Overall this intriguing 7 inch pocket pistol benefits from having a strong working action, undamaged woodwork and good cosmetic appearance, which does much to recommend this flintlock to the antique gun collector. Examples of a Wheeler pistol, made Thames River Police and an "All-Weather" Millwall Militia pistol can be seen elsewhere on this website.
Brass "All-Weather" Percussion Pistol By Hadley c.1775 Made by Hadley of London in the late part of the 18th century, this pistol features a turn off cannon barrel. In later years it has also undergone conversion to percussion, indicating that it saw protracted service, possibly over several decades. The box lock action is in working order and generally, the pistol is in good overall condition, with good undamaged walnut grips. Little is known of this gunmaker, although Henry Hadley son of Charles, was noted for a series of silver mounted pistols with Spanish type barrels. There are also two pairs of his pistols in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle.
Brass 1851 Double Cavity Adams 54 Bore Bullet Mould This is a very good example of a mould capable of producing 54 bore bullets and balls. It is in very good condition and bears the crowned trademark of Adams. A great useable item or accoutrement for the pistol case, keenly priced for the shooter or collector.
Brass 8-Day "Campaign" Portable Clock, c.1890 Designed for military officers requiring a portable timepiece, "Campaign Clocks" were made for field use: Although they could be stood on a mantlepiece in a regular fashion, these clocks came into their own on active service where the function of the top ring allowed the timepiece to be hung from a beam in a redoubt, or inside a tent. Straightforward in nature, the simple 'brass can' body conceals the movement, winding arbour and hand setting knob, but it was the true genius of the clock that when suspended on a lanyard, it was as though it was held on gimbals. This simple trick bestowed rudimentary shock proofing qualities to the clock, which provided it with adequate protection from anything other than a direct hit. Offered in excellent original condition this clock is very well made, bearing the French Government Brevete S.G.D.G. mark, together with two unidentified trademarks; One is a stylised T.B.(?) whilst a smaller pair of initials in an oval read, "A.D." Most unusually however for such a clock, is the additional benefit of a sweep second hand - Most had no seconds or at best a small hand. The 8-Day movement can be wound and set from inside by pulling the back off the case, which is all in excellent dent free condition and keeping good time, although not serviced. It measures just short of 10cm in diameter and 6cm in depth. The bevelled glass, dial and hands are all originals, damage free and in remarkably clean condition, with the face having an aged ivory colour to it. Delicate engine turning on the small turned brass legs and ring post, are also evident decorative touches showing this Campaign Watch to be a cut above the rest. Although made in France, this Campaign Clock was probably made for the British Market, as suggested by the presence of the English abbreviation, "S-F" (Slow - Fast), engraved beside the indicator on the balance bridge. Continental market timepieces tend to be marked either, A - R or possibly, +/-. A very useable military timepiece that is offered with an optional Premium Service and 12 month warranty.
Brass 8-Day Campaign Clock, c.1890 A French made 8-Day Campaign Clock. Designed for military officers requiring a portable timepiece, "Campaign Clocks" were made for field use: Although they could be stood on a mantlepiece in a regular fashion, these clocks came into their own on active service where the function of the top ring allowed the timepiece to be hung from a beam in a redoubt, or inside a tent. Straightforward in nature, the simple "Brass Drum" body conceals the movement, winding arbour and hand setting knob, but it was the true genius of the clock that when suspended on a lanyard, it was as though it was held on gimbals. This simple trick bestowed rudimentary shock proofing qualities to the clock, which provided it with adequate protection from anything other than a direct hit. Offered in excellent original condition this clock is well made. Most unusually for such a clock, is the additional benefit of a sweep second hand - Most had no seconds or at best a small hand. The 8-Day movement can be wound and set from inside by pulling the back off the case, which is in excellent dent free condition and keeping good time, although not serviced. It measures just short of 10cm in diameter and 6cm in depth. The bevelled glass, dial and hands are all originals, damage-free and in remarkably clean condition. A very useable military timepiece.
Brass All-Weather Flintlock Pistol By P. Bond, c.1800 All brass or bronze pistols, such as this, were constructed to better suit the needs of those who carried their firearms in a wet environment. The design offered the pistol a greater resistance to corrosion, which made them eminently suitable for those who worked on the rivers or were simply out in all weathers. Made c.1800 by the London gunmaker, Philip Bond, this 54 bore flintlock is of the identical pattern to the contemporary pieces issued to the Thames River Fencibles. Quite possibly then, this flintlock may have served with one of the militia units or watchmen employed to guard against the threat of a French invasion or, to protect the river trade and dockyards from the many thieves and smugglers encountered in their day. Presented in very good cosmetic condition, with damage free and tight fitted woodwork, this brass flintlock is all original. A crisp mechanical action, plus strong springs and deep stamps with clear engraving, make this flintlock a good example for the collector. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.25 inches
Brass Barrelled Coaching Flintlock, c.1800 A London marked and proofed brass barrelled flintlock of coaching pattern, made c.1800. Although unsigned, it is very similar to the pistols made by Harding for issue to the Royal Mail coach guards. It features a stepped and bolted lock, together with a roller frizzen and, what is probably its original horn tipped ramrod, with worm. Presented in very good condition overall, this is a quality made pistol, which has retained a strong working action, exhibiting good age patina. Generally being of straightforward, no frills construction, this flintlock has little engraved decoration, suggesting that it was intended to fulfil a practical role. A good quality coaching pistol, with little sign of service wear and overall very good order. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Brass Coal Miner's Protective Pocket Watch Case Working down the coal mines has always been a hazardous occupation. The dark, filthy environment, the hard rock surfaces, methane gas and ever present danger of collapse, created great hardships for the miners. If a miner owned a watch that he used at work, it needed to be robust and well protected from the exterior elements. This robust brass case dating from c.1915, will hold a pocket watch measuring 50mm in diameter. That is a standard size watch. The case shows signs of wear and use, but it is remarkably in dent free condition. Interestingly, the screw down bezel has a lead seal, which would be necessary to protect the delicate watch movement from the corrosive nature of the atmosphere.
Brass Flintlock Pocket Pistol By H. Nock, c.1800 A gentleman's "All Weather" brass pocket flintlock by H. Nock. Made c.1800, the pistol is in full working order, with a turn-off barrel. Some sign of wear and pocket carry, but the pistol remains in good order, with nice bag shaped butt and some decorative embellishment to the box lock.
Brass Patch/Ball Tin c.1850 An unusual patch or bullet tin with a cylindrical brass body featuring two screw-on caps, allowing entry from either end, presumably to aid access to greasy or stuck components? This is a finely made container, dent free and retaining much of its gilt finish. Approximate Height - 4 cm Diameter - 3 cm
Breitling "Emergency" Chronograph Watch Used by professionals, these Breitling "Emergency" titanium cased wristwatches, have already been used to help save lives. it is not a gimmick watch, but a genuine tool to be used only in emergency where people are in real danger. If you don't know about these Breitling watches with their inbuilt distress beacons, then you probably don't need this watch. However, if you are aware that this watch, born out of military necessity, is capable of triggering a world wide Sea & Air Rescue, then this watch might be just what you're looking for. Although this watch is over 10 years old, it has always been returned to Breitling for servicing at regular intervals. It has a full service record with Breitling, who tested the watch a year or so ago, replacing its batteries and resealing the watch. These batteries last for several years, but each time the job needed doing, this watch has been returned to Breitling to guarantee the watch will continue to perform. The present owner at regular intervals has instructed the watch company to inspect all the emergency elements and to ensure that the transmitter is fully operational. Each time this is done, Breitling have always returned the watch looking like new. Since the last Breitling inspection the watch has been worn as is evident, but there is no damage to report - just light signs of service wear. The watch has been retained in its original strong case, with all accessories, including the emergency test receiver. The locator beacon within the watch operates on the international distress frequency of 121.5 MHZ. To activate the distress signal, two aerials need to be deployed from the watch, which are enclosed behind tamper evident caps - so there is no likelihood of them being activated in error. Breitling Emergency watches are a must for aviators, mountaineers or for those who generally enjoy the wild outdoors. The watch comes boxed in the original case and self test apparatus so that you may know that everything is functioning without broadcasting an international alert! ONLY TO BE USED IN A GENUINE EMERGENCY. As such, Breitling will be supplied with details of the new owner, prior to the watch being handed over.
British Army Data Terminal Carry Case A modern British Army padded carry case for a Bowman Data Terminal - a type of laptop computer. It is in perfect unused condition with all carry straps. Pack measurements W = 25cm H = 15cm D = 7cm
British Army India New Land Pattern, c.1800 A regulation Tower New Land Pattern flintlock pistol, which served in India where it received a working-life armoury replacement lock. The pistol is in good condition with a dark age patina and early furniture styled with an apron, showing the bruises of active service. The lock remains in strong working order having been gunsmith wrought using only basic tools and limited spares. Nevertheless, the lock is a genuine feature of the pistol and adds historic interest, with its quirky GR Crown and improvised inspector's stamp. An interesting example.
British Army Issue Armourer's Turnscrew Presented in very good used condition, an armourer's turnscrew by Clay of Sheffield. Bearing broad arrow and military codes, this gunsmith's tool is a useful collectable in serviceable condition. Total length = 7 inches Approximate blade tip width = 7mm
British Army Issue Avimo 7x42 Monocular ZMW Militaria has acquired a small number of these desirable military issue Avimo monoculars, which date from c.1980. All are tested and are in good serviceable condition. All have new eyecups and some have rubber armour around the prism, as pictured. The one you see is the one you will receive.
British Army Issue Avimo 7x42 Monocular ZMW Militaria has acquired a small number of these desirable military issue Avimo monoculars, which date from c.1980. All are tested and are in good serviceable condition. All have new eyecups and some have rubber armour around the prism, as pictured. The one you see is the one you will receive.
British Army Issue Avimo 7x42 Monocular ZMW Militaria has acquired a small number of these desirable military issue Avimo monoculars, which date from c.1980. All are tested and are in good serviceable condition. The image is clear but there is a chip on the internal prism. This does not affect viewing. All have new eyecups and some have rubber armour around the prism, as pictured. The one you see is the one you will receive.
British Army Issue Avimo 7x42 Monocular ZMW Militaria has acquired a small number of these desirable military issue Avimo monoculars, which date from c.1980. All are tested and are in good serviceable condition. All have new eyecups and some have rubber armour around the prism, as pictured. The one you see is the one you will receive.
British Army Issue Avimo 7x42 Monocular A desirable military issue Avimo monocular, which dates from c.1980. It is optically excellent with a clear and sharp image showing no apparent damage, other than minor service wear to the exterior. It comes with a rubber eyecup and part armoured around the prism, as pictured.
British Army Kit Bag Brass "D" Lock A WW2 or earlier, British Army issue brass "D" lock, for use with kit bags and presented in good order throughout. The lock also has what may be a poorly struck broad arrow on it.
British Army Office Clock, c.1967 An excellent British Army issue Office Clock by Smiths. All fully marked and in good condition, this 8-day clock has been serviced and is running very well. It has never been repainted or restored (aside from servicing), as such, it retains its original Smiths mechanical movement.... so many have been converted to quartz, this one hasn\'t. The case retains its original khaki enamel paint and and generally the clock appears to have led a charmed life. Overall, a lovely example with minimal signs of service wear.
British Army SA80 Rifle Cleaning Kit TO CLEAR - A good military cleaning kit for the SA80 rifle, missing some accessories.
British Army W10 CWC Stop Watch, c.1978 A good British Army issue stopwatch made by the Cabot Watch Company. Fully marked with NATO stock numbers and dated to 1978, this watch is offered in full working order, capable of timing events down to one-tenth of a second. With minimal signs of use, this timer does exhibit some wear and tear to the perspex crystal but this remains intact and serviceable. The watch runs strong and it starts, stops and resets crisply.
British Army W10 Lemania Stopwatch, c.1967 This high-quality Lemania W10 stopwatch was made for the British Army. Cosmetically it appears to be very bright and hardly used, exhibiting minimal handling and storage marks, including one on the glass at the "80" marker. The dial is white but has photographed a little yellow - it's not. Offered in full working order. This Lemania has a stop/start function and a pause/restart slide, which also allows for a helpful flyback feature. Whilst the army may have had a number of applications for these timers, I'm told that the Army Air Corps routinely used them. Excellent condition to use or collect.
British Army WWW Record Watch A desirable WWW (Watch, Wrist, Waterproof) British Army issue timepiece, introduced to the military toward the end of WW2. Commonly referred to nowadays as a \"Dirty Dozen\" watch, the WWWs were meant to replace the Army Trade Pattern (ATP) watches but the latter only became obsolete in the mid 50s; the WWWs remained in service until the early 1980s. Made by the Swiss company, Record, this watch is in superb collector grade condition, having been well maintained during its working life when it would have been serviced routinely and received its MOD dial. Presented in working order, this Record watch will be serviced before being sold to ensure complete satisfaction.
British India "Collis" Flintlock c.1850 This large 18th Century style holster pistol is a superb example of artisan ingenuity from the days of British India. Craftsman made, this is an unique working flintlock of a type that was frequently sold to the Victorian Sahibs, as mementos of their visit to India. This genre of original 'tourist' antique was period made from a blend of surplus or obsolete gun parts, previously used in the 18th and early 19th Century - It is NOT a modern reproduction or copy. Utilising an early military lock signed by the original gunsmith, "Collis" and bearing a Crown GR, this flintlock action holds on both half and full cock. The barrel however, is probably from a sporting gun and is half octagonal and part round along its length. All the ironwork is fitted into an attractive stock, which in itself came from something not dissimilar to a Heavy Dragoon, that has been period reworked to accommodate the bigger action. An original iron ramrod complements the appearance, whilst craftsman cast brass furniture add the finishing touches to this most intriguing pistol. As is, this Collis hybrid flintlock appears to be a viable firearm, but as a muzzle loader from centuries past, it may be owned without a licence so long as it is held as an antique ornament or curio.
British Military Firearms 1650 - 1850 Book A very good and clean copy of \"British Military Firearms 1650 - 1850\" by Howard L. Blackmore. Decent dust jacket, solid hardboards and spine and pages generally bright.
British Military Firearms 1650 - 1850 By Howard L. Blackmore This is the first edition of one of the classic books on the history of British Military firearms, written in 1961 by Howard L. Blackmore. Although not in collector grade condition, this book is a great working copy and a very good reference tool for the collector to thumb through. No loose pages and a good spine - just general wear from half a century of use.
British Military Pattern Lock Knife Not the standard jack knife, this single blade lock knife was nevertheless regarded as a utility knife, but given its sharper point it was particularly good for cutting plastic explosives, thin wires and setting detonators. As such, early versions of this knife were commonly issued to Commandos and the SOE. Examples with a hooked tyre slasher were also distributed to saboteurs. This Special Forces knife is in unissued condition, with an unspoilt cutting edge of 3 inches. Amazingly we have managed to acquire a few of these sought after military knives, each one being an outstanding example. Total length closed = 4½ inches
British Palestine Police Longines Watch, c.1920 A very rare Longines Chronograph watch, issued to the British Officers in command of the Palestinian Police, whose history is linked to events in the Middle East, stemming from when the Egyptian Expeditionary Force won the decisive Battle of Gaza in 1917. One month after in December, Jerusalem came under British Martial Law and less than a year later, the Ottoman Empire finally surrendered, leaving the British in full control of Palestine. Not wishing to appear heavy-handed and to keep the population on side, a civilian authority was created to administer the British Mandate. Simultaneously then, on the 1st July 1920, the Palestine Police were established under the control of Police Commander Lt. Col. P B Bramley OBE. Under his authority were, 18 British Officers supported by 55 Palestinian Officers and 1,144 rank and file, whose role was described as, "Fulfilling the ordinary duties of a constabulary, such as the preservation of law and order and the prevention and detection of crime, to act as their numbers will allow as escorts for the protection of tax collectors, serve summonses issued by the judicial authorities, distribute Government notices and escort Government treasure throughout the country." The authority responsible for the procurement of equipment decided to purchase this Longines chronograph pocket watch, which they numbered "P.P.9." Certainly a desirable timepiece. It's a fact that this watch was a very expensive commodity and judging by issue number "9", it would be reasonable to conclude that only a handful of chronographs were purchased. According to archived Longines records in Switzerland, information states that this "Longines watch, serial number 2’975’577 (a silver 0.900 pocket watch), fitted with a Longines' mechanical movement with a chronograph mechanism, calibre 19.73N, was invoiced to Messrs. Kramer, who was for many years, the Longines agent for Egypt, on 23 April 1920." So, this watch was in existence right from the start of the Palestine Police Force. Possibly issued to one of the original 18 Officers and now fitted with a metal rope watch chain and original tunic button by Firmin. This chronograph is in very good condition, showing subtle signs of what amounts to careful service wear. The movement is in good order and it is running well, however, the Premium Service is recommended for such a complex mechanism, to allow it to continue to give good service. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12-month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £190.
British Proof 9mm Pinfire Revolver By E. Lefaucheux, c.1860 A fine and well made 9mm pinfire revolver by Eugène Lefaucheux, bearing his Crowned "EL" trademark and both British, as well as Liege proof marks. Retaining most of its original blue finish, this military style revolver is in excellent condition in all respects. Mechanically without fault and with tight indexing - as well as a superb bore, this robust revolver has probably seen very little use. An ideal revolver for the collector at a very fair price. Barrel Length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
British Proof 9mm Pinfire Revolver By E. Lefaucheux, c.1860 Selling on consignment: A fine and well made 9mm pinfire revolver by Eugène Lefaucheux, bearing his Crowned "EL" trademark and both British, as well as Liege proof marks. Retaining most of its original blue finish, this military style revolver is in excellent condition in all respects. Mechanically without fault and with tight indexing - as well as a superb bore, this robust revolver has probably seen very little use. An ideal revolver for the collector at a very fair price. Barrel Length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
British Rail (Midlands) Railway Guard's Pocket Watch As part of the railway regrouping after WW2, the London Midland & Scottish railway network was split, forming the British Railways (Midlands) region. This watch dates from that early period, c.1948. The actual timepiece was made by the Swiss watch company Limit, and features a quality 15 jewel movement, mounted in a heavy duty nickel silver case. The watch is in good condition and working order, but given the nature of the environment in which these watches served, the Premium Service would be a worthwhile consideration. As is, the case shows signs of pocket carry and general service wear, but is nevertheless free from any unsightly damage. Only the original thick crystal glass shows typical edge nibbles and scratches - the dial itself is pristine. Overall, a good quality timepiece from the bygone British steam railway era. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
British Rail (Southern) Railway Guard's Pocket Watch, c.1948 The postwar government nationalisation of the railways in 1948, led to the grouping and reorganisation of established rail networks across Great Britain, resulting in the formation of six British Rail regions. The Southern Region served south London, Kent, Surrey, Sussex, Hampshire, eastern Berkshire, the Isle of Wight, southern Wiltshire, eastern Dorset through into Devon and Cornwall. Then, in 1991 the Southern Region was abolished in favour of the privatisation of the railways. This particular Limit No.2 pocket watch is from the early years of nationalisation. It is of typical railway pattern, with a perfect dial and well embossed markings to the rear of the screw back case. All in all, the watch is in very good condition with only minor signs of service use and slight wear to the crown. Internally, the movement is signed by the contractor, Limit, who assembled the watch, but the movement was actually made by the Cyma watch company. The movement is in working order but it has not been serviced. Nevertheless the watch is running and keeping time. Overall the watch is a good example for the collector. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Bronze Naval Saluting Cannon A superb antique desk top muzzle loading saluting cannon, having a bronze barrel, bearing the Royal Cyphers of King George III and Princess Mary. Although the cannon is unsigned, it is of the highest gunmaker quality, Gun Powder London proof stamped and marked as .380\" calibre. Cosmetically the cannon has a good age patina and a well constructed oak truck with iron features. Overall (barrel) length = 8 inches
Bulldog "Pup" - Belgian Pocket Revolver c.1890 Just like its pocket cousin, this Belgian version of Webley's Bulldog revolver is also chambered for the obsolete .320 calibre black powder round. However, this variant differs significantly in size, appearing here in its most diminutive form. As such, it was a favourite of law enforcement officers, who carried such revolvers as a back-up to their standard service issue pieces. Just like the larger British cousin, this revolver features the advantages of a fluted cylinder and double action trigger, dispensing with the popular folding trigger more commonly found on other casual european pocket pistols of the day. Commonly referred to as a "Pup," this revolver is in full working order, but without adequate licensing, may only be possessed as a curio. Nevertheless, as a collector's piece the condition of the revolver is very good, with some original bluing showing and the rest of the finish having a mellowed, faded dark patina. A nice example with good bore and chambers.
Bundeswehr Issue Pocket Knife A genuine Bundeswehr issue pocket knife made in Germany by Carl Julius Herbertz, following the Victorinox contract. Virtually unused and in near mint condition, this knife has the usual main blade, saw, screw driver, spike, corkscrew and bottle opener tools. It even retains its saw blade guard. Perfect green grip scales incorporating the national eagle emblem. Ideal for the collector or for everyday use. Blade Length = 2¾ inches
Bunney Joseph Bunney is listed for Birmingham and London. . Bailey & Nie - BUNNEY Joseph (1766-1814, & Son 1814-1825) Gun maker & Pistol maker 25 Snowhill, Birm. 1766-1803; 10 Caroline St., St. Paul\'s 1804-1814. & Son, makers of improved magazine air guns etc. 31 Snowhill 1814-1821; 120 Bromsgrove St., 1822-1825. shows a Bunney Trade Label circa 1820) . Blackmore - BUNNEY Joseph Gun & Pistol, Birmingham 1765-1814. Registered silver mark at Birmingham Assay Office, 1773 (Dixon) Marked guns \'London\'. The proof marks only suggest that the pistol was proved at the Ordnance Birmingham Office.
C.1843 Regulation Cavalry Issue Percussion Pistol - Marked QORYC A scarce regulation Tower percussion pistol of New Land form, with property marks relating to the Queen's Own Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry. This was the new name for the former Dorset Yeomanry Cavalry, a unit that performed the duty of a mobile police force at a time of much civil unrest, making themselves available to protect the interests of landowners' and farm properties in Dorset. This pistol is basically sound and in working order with good springs, however as with many such designed pistols, there is some loss to the woodwork where the ram rod enters the stock. Cosmetically then, the pistol has a good dark age patina to the iron work, which also bares proof marks to the barrel and a Crown GR to the flat lock. A complete pistol that presents itself well for display.
C.1843 Regulation Cavalry Issue Percussion Pistol - Marked QORYC A scarce regulation Tower percussion pistol of New Land form, with property marks relating to the Queen's Own Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry. This was the new name for the former Dorset Yeomanry Cavalry, a unit that performed the duty of a mobile police force at a time of much civil unrest, making themselves available to protect the interests of landowners' and farm properties in Dorset. This pistol is basically sound and in working order with good springs, however as with many such designed pistols, there is some loss to the woodwork where the ramrod enters the stock. Cosmetically then, the pistol has a good dark age patina to the iron work, which also bears proof marks to the barrel and a Crown GR to the flat lock. A complete and interesting military pistol that presents well.
c.1887 Nickel Silver Hudsons Whistle - Jack The Ripper Era This is a great example of a Victorian handmade whistle of police style, handmade by Hudsons of Birmingham. The whistle is made of nickel silver and comes in excellent collector grade condition. It comes from 1887/88 as this is when the company relocated their factory and, as they normally stamped their address on the body tube, they omitted this choosing to replace the address a simple "J.H.& Co. Bir'm" imprint. This was due to the fact that the new address stamp had not yet been delivered. The classic elongated top loop likewise, is of the late 131 Barr Street design used around 1887. Presented in very good condition, free from any damage and with good light age patina. The whistle is in full working order.
Caledonian Railway - Hudsons' Thunderer Guard's Whistle This is a beautiful and well marked Caledonian Railway whistle, issued c.1920. It is well marked with good clear engraving, showing only light signs of service wear. It is in loud working order and was originally used pre the Railway Grouping of 1923. The CR marked whistle also bears 1908 Patent numbers which relate to the reinforcing rings around the barrel, making this whistle a stronger design than other Thunderers. Over all, this whistle is in excellent used, but dent free condition, retaining most of its original finish.
Canadian Army Issue 17 Jewel GSTP Waltham Premier Watch Watches such as this WW2 GSTP Waltham Premier, with higher jewel specifications when compared to the regular British Army General Service watch, were issued to the Canadian Armed Forces. Made by the American Waltham Watch Company in 1941, this watch's movement has been Adjusted for Temperature and Positions, which simply meant that it was additionally checked over a protracted period of time, not only for best timekeeping dial up, down and pendent up, but also through a variety of varying hot and cold temperatures. Typically this fastidious checking of timekeeping to cater for all eventualities, meant that these timepieces were eminently more expensive to produce, but the result was that they became superior grade military timepieces. The watch offered here bears the Canadian Broad Arrow emblem to the screw back hermetic case. This is in good dent free condition, showing just careful pocket wear and light staining to the nickel case. The movement itself is in very good order, working well and keeping time, however a Premium Service may be considered, to prolong the usability of this scarce timepiece. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Cased .320 Tranter DA Revolver, c.1874 Selling on consignment: An excellent cased .320 Tranter five shot double action revolver, dated to c.1874, bearing the retailer's name, "Veisey & Son," on the octagonal barrel. Extensively engraved with floral designs, this 5 shot gate loading revolver, is clearly stamped with Tranter's Patent details and retains a good amount of original finish. Offered in full working order, this revolver has been well maintained and comes complete with an original blue baize lined gun box, together with a turn screw and cleaning rod. Overall an excellent and well preserved outfit. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 8 ¼ inches
Cased 50B Pocket Flintlocks By Oakes, London c.1800 Made in circa 1800, this is a good pair of gentleman's pocket boxlock pistols by Oakes of London. Both these matched flintlocks bear the original owner's initials on the shield escutcheon, presented in an original contemporary oak case, with period accessories. Cosmetically the pistols show some signs of use and wear, but both remain crisp and in full working order. Featuring drop down triggers and frizzen safeties, these pistols would have made an admirable set of self-defence weapons in their day. Barrel length = 2 inches Overall length = 6½ inches
Cased 54 Bore Pryse & Redman - Beaumont Adams Percussion Revolver In 1856, a British Army officer, Lieutenant Frederick Beaumont of the Royal Engineers, patented improvements to the Adams revolver. These new features now allowed the Adams revolver to be fired in both single or double action manner. This was the first true dual-action system and the revolver saw widespread acceptance, including with the British Army. This particular percussion revolver was made by the London Armoury Company, which was established just days before Beaumont's patents had been finalised. Robert Adams was also the primary supplier of revolvers for the Confederacy during the US Civil War. In fact, once the war ended, the LAC could only manage do stay in business for one more year, before closing in 1866. This profusely engraved Beaumont Adams revolver bears a clear LAC stamp, proofs, serial number, Adams' patent details and the retailer's name of, "Pryse & Redman, 230 Piccadilly, London." The revolver is also in very good mechanical condition, with absolutely solid lock up and perfect timing, however much of its original finish has now faded to a grey lustre and a little mottling, although the cylinder has retained a good percentage of its blue finish. Nevertheless, the revolver is fully functioning with good springs and good bore. Only the grips have a minor loss to the top of the back strap on both sides - A letter 'A' has also been scratched into the right panel and some general wear to the checkering, commensurate with service use… Probably an officer's revolver, which has been retained in its oak case, complete with all original accoutrements, all in good to excellent condition and with the mould bearing Adams' details and 54 marks. The English oak case itself is in good condition with no splits, however there are some small gaps opening around some of the corner joints and the lid is missing its lock catch. Hinges and green baize lining are very good, but there is no sign of any former trade label. All in all, a pleasing and complete example of this much sought after revolver, at a bargain price.
Cased 54b Webley Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver c.1857 Introduced by Webley in 1857, their Wedge Frames had straightforward mechanisms, which made them strong and dependable revolvers in their day. As such, they were sold through many outlets throughout Britain, even well into the metallic cartridge era: Usually, as in this instance, the gunmaker's name is omitted in deference to the retailer's name being given priority on the top strap, but there are pointers to help identify the maker in this instance. Evidence points to the gunmaker as being Philip Webley, due to unique characteristics found with the original accompanying accessories, as well as the pistol itself. Firstly, this revolver is boxed in a quintessential Webley mahogany case, where the brass cartouche to the lid is typical of the design found on other known Webley cases. Secondly, the original and rare brass bullet mould is again classic Webley, with the distinctive long scissor curl emanating from the days when the company started out as a bullet mould maker and thirdly, given the fact that the revolver features a "Bentley Patent" hammer safety, to my mind leaves no doubt that this revolver did indeed come from P. Webley & Sons. The top strap is of course engraved to the retailer, "H. Dickenson, Prescot Street, London." From a technical viewpoint, this self cocking (double-action only) revolver's Bentley patented hammer safety catch, is an interesting device. This catch is fully operational and when engaged, it keeps the hammer off the nipples, yet, when the trigger is fingered for use, the safety automatically disengages. The barrel also has the micro groove rifling and this, plus the chambers, are all very good - just as the nipple are too. Grips are also damage free with good checkering. Cosmetically the pistol is sharp, but has no finish remaining, which has allowed the exposed iron to acquire a silver grey patina, with slight frosting and minimal surface staining present. The wooden box has an age split to the base, but no unsightly damage to detract from its otherwise excellent condition, other than some slight age wear to the interior compartments. All the original accoutrements are in good order, with only the pewter oil bottle being a replacement. All in all, this is a rare percussion Wedge Frame revolver, mechanically tight and presented in its original box. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 10.5 inches
Cased 80 Bore Fourth Model Tranter, c.1858 A scarce and good Fourth Model Tranter revolver, complete with its correct case, all signed and labelled by the retailer, John Venables & Son, Oxford, c.1858. This revolver has a super tight lock-up and an excellent bright bore. Offered in full working order, this Tranter appears to have been carried more than used, possibly by a military gentleman, as suggested by the provision of a lanyard hole to the grip. Retaining sharp profiles, good screw heads and clear engraving throughout, this revolver has some original finish remaining, with the rest faded to a pleasing dark patina. Presented in its original fitted case with its correct label, the wooden box is generally sound and undamaged but showing signs of frequent handling, resulting in the loss of one of the brass fastening catches - Lock is intact. Nevertheless, internally the box has kept its lining intact and all the compartments are in good order, with only minor rubbing. The accompanying period accoutrements show signs of wear and tear, with the mould being bruised and the Dixon signed powder flask now lacking its thumb lever. A cleaning rod, nipple extractor, pricker, pouch and cap tin, together make up the remaining tools, all appearing to be in good and serviceable condition. All in all, a sharp mid-size Tranter revolver, together with its case and many accessories, which can be easily improved by light cleaning. Barrel length = 4½ inches
Cased 80B Webley Wedge Frame Percussion Revolver, c.1855 A very good Webley Wedge Frame 80 bore revolver, complete with its original case and most accessories, signed and labeled by the retailer, "Frederick J. Smith & Co. London" Cosmetically in near excellent condition, this revolver is crisp, retaining much of the original nickel. Typically though, it does have some wear but no pitting. As for the action, this benefits from having strong springs, together with a positive indexing lock-up. Excellent bore and nipples suggest that this pistol has seen little use. All engraving is sharp and the grips are perfect as well. Remaining with its box and accoutrements, this revolver would be a lovely addition to a Webley collection. Only the case top does have a split, which it may be possible to clamp and repair. Nevertheless, the case is substantially solid with original green baize lined compartments. A lot of cased revolver at a reasonable price. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10½ inches
Cased Adams DA Percussion Revolver A near excellent 54B Deane, Adams & Deane percussion revolver, together with its oak case, complete with original accessories. This "Automatic" revolver, where the shooter uses the trigger to cycle and fire a cartridge without the need to manually cock the hammer first, is in full working order, retaining much of its blued finish, sharp lines, tidy screws and having the top flat engraved, "Deane, Adams & Deane (Makers To HRH Prince Albert) 30 King William St. London Bridge". This revolver has attractive floral scrollwork around the frame and finely checkered grips with a domed shell engraved butt cap to keep spare primers. The revolver's polished oak case contains a Dixon & Son browned copper powder flask and pewter oil bottle; a brass 54 bore, dual conical and ball bullet mould marked, "Adams Registered 28th Nov 1851"; a steel wad punch, wad and percussion cap tins; a cleaning rod and other shooting accessories in their green-lined compartments and a retailer's label within the lid. Overall, the box is very good but does have some separation around the dovetailed corners, which could be improved. A working lock and key also come with the set. A lovely and comprehensive set.
Cased Adams Percussion Revolver By Tatham, c.1850 A mid-Victorian 80 Bore revolver of Adams\' double-action type, retailed by Henry Tatham. At his time Tatham had a shop in Charing Cross specialising in providing cutler services and guns to his customers, many of whom were naval officers from the nearby Admiralty in London. This 6-shot Birmingham-proofed revolver is a good-looking example, which retains much of its factory finish and crisp detail, as well as its oak case complete with many of its period accessories, including the original turnscrew and nipple key, although the flask is a quality reproduction. All in all, a nice example that is in full working order - would grade up with careful light tidying.
Cased Army Issue Drawing Instruments A superb and complete set of military issue drawing instruments and accessories by A. G. Thornton of Manchester. The 3 tier case is fully lined and compartmented for a variety of broad arrow marked instruments, bearing various army codes. Each instrument appears to have seen little or no use but some have a light tarnish, yet each is fully functioning. The case is also British Army marked and is in excellent original condition, with tools fitted in the lid, lift out tray and base.
Cased Beaumont Adams 54B Revolver, c.1855 A good 54B Beaumont Adams percussion revolver, in its original case, with many accessories. This revolver is of plain finish, without adornment, suggesting an officer\'s private purchase. It is maker marked to the top strap, \"Robert Adams 30 King William Street, London\" and while it is in good working order retaining much of the original finish, the rammer has snapped and only the hinged section remains. This very likely occurred when rushing to reload the revolver. Nevertheless, should this revolver be repaired or remain, as is, this cased cased example remains a good item.
Cased Colt M1851 Navy Revolver, c.1856 This is an early .36 Colt cap 'n' ball revolver, which was made in 1856. Interestingly however, it was manufactured with an iron back strap and trigger guard, which is a rare feature for an American made Colt. Presented in an original Colt case, complete with accompanying period accessories, this Navy revolver is free from abuse showing just honest patina commensurate with age and holster carry. Overall this revolver remains mechanically solid with a strong working action, all indexing correctly and benefitting from a good bore, chambers and nipples. With all the serial numbers matching, including the wedge, this Colt Navy is a decent example of what was a used, but very well maintained revolver. Accessories include; Bartram flask, Colt .36 mould, percussion cap tin and original instruction label. The case itself has very good woodwork and crimson interior, showing just light age stains. All in all, a very nice outfit. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Cased Fancy Belgian 7mm Pin Fire Revolver c.1860 This is a gorgeous Liege 7mm pin fire pocket revolver, presented in its wood case, complete with accoutrements and label bearing the retailer's details, "M. J. Chaumont - Liege." It also comes with 8 dummy/inert pin fire cartridges for display. This revolver would have been carried by either a lady or a gentleman, and thanks to its folding trigger, would have been an unobtrusive personal protection piece, at home in a purse or pocket. Cosmetically this revolver is in super condition, with much original finish and sharp engraving, plus excellent ivory grips with just minor staining. It clearly has not been out of its case much. The mechanism is fully working with strong springs and a good action. The revolver may be owned as a curio, given its obsolete calibre status. Barrel length - 3.5 inches Overall length - 7.5 inches
Cased J Adams Mark II 54 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1860 A rare John Adams Mark II - (the Mark I being the earlier Beaumont-Adams made by his brother Robert) - "Improved" Six-Shot 54 Bore percussion revolver, complete with its original English oak case. When the Mark III was developed, the remainder of these revolvers were made to fire the .450 cartridge, making this version very desirable. Offered in excellent working order, this revolver shows signs of carry, probably in the hands of a military gentleman, yet it retains good traces of its factory blue finish and sharp profile. Having a low, 2-digit serial number, the top strap is marked, "Adams's Patent Small Arms Company 391 Strand London," whilst to the right side of frame it's marked, "Adams's Patent Improved, No 51." Retaining undamaged and finely checkered walnut grips with blued buttcap. The green baize-lined oak case is worn but undamaged, with faded red base. Accessories comprise of assorted period and later items, including; a brass two-cavity bullet mould, copper powder flask, two-piece cleaning rod, 54 Bore wad cutter, cap tin, turnscrew and bullets. A lovelly and rare set. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Cased Liege Pocket Revolver .320" CF c.1870 Manufactured in Liege c.1870, this pocket revolver was made to chamber the obsolete .320 Centre Fire round, which was a popular alternative to Pinfire ammunition in Britain. This obsolete calibre revolver has since been cased in an attractive contemporary oak box bearing the label for the gunmaker, Robert Jones of Liverpool, and be owned as a curio without a Firearm Certificate, provided it is not fired. Presented in very good condition, both cosmetically and mechanically, this pistol is sharp. It has retained much factory finish throughout as well as a smooth working action, indexing the cylinder correctly, assisted by strong springs - The bore and chambers are all very good too. The case is superb and damage free, having all the original red lining and some associated period accessories, plus a virtually perfect old label. Interestingly the revolver frame is stamped under the trigger, with bullet details specifying, "52 grains," whilst the cylinder is marked .320". All in all, a nice revolver, sold complete with period associated box, accoutrements, working brass lock and key. Barrel length = 3.25 inches Overall length = 7.5 inches
Cased Pair - Gentleman's Box Lock Pocket Pistols c.1845 An original pair of box lock pistols, made for a gentleman's carry, c.1845. These pistols are in untouched and sleepy condition, having retained their original accoutrements within a superb velvet lined box, undamaged and showing little sign of wear - Locks are intact but the key is missing. Although unattributed, these two pocket pistols were made in England to an overall high standard and they bear Birmingham proofs. Their locks have well executed engraving, tight working actions, with strong springs holding in both full and half cock. Each pistol also features a concealed trigger, which drops when the hammer is cocked. Both pistols are additionally equipped with metal butt caps giving strength to the woodwork in the event of a fist fight and, vacant cartouches within the checkered grips. Ribbed barrels permit them to be unscrewed easily and identifying them to be of around 88 bore when firing patched ball. This equates nicely to the 3/8" marked on the accompanying bullet mould. Likewise the powder flask is a gem, in excellent condition and working order, showing little sign of wear. All in all, the accoutrements fit the case exactly, appearing to be the original from the set. In keeping with the pistols, none are signed. Furthermore, the case also contains an early tin for percussion caps. A very attractive and original cased pair of pocket pistols measuring 6.5" in length, with 1.75" barrels.
Cased Pair of T. Smith London Pocket Pistols, c.1842 A delightful pair of percussion pocket pistols, signed in gothic script on the barrels, "T. Smith London." Both pistols are in good condition and full working order, with nicely fitted woodwork ending with lion masks to the butt. Featuring captive ramrods and sharp profiles, the pistols have an even dark age patina that compliments this attractive compendium. Presented in a good period gun box, lined with navy blue baize, the additional accoutrements consist of; a pincer "52" bore mould, powder flask, F. Joyce cap tin and a quantity of lead ball. The case itself shows minor wear and has a felt covered base. Thomas Smith was a London gunmaker, first recorded in 1829 as working in partnership with Robert Alden at 10 Ray Street, Clerkenwell and then at 15 Great Portland Street. Thomas Smith began trading on his own in 1835, operating from premises at 55 Parliament Street, before moving in 1842 to, No. 3 Bridge Street, Westminster. A couple years later the gunmaker moved to 288 High Holborn and finally between 1849-50 to, 13 Little Compton Street, Soho. Records show that by 1860 Mrs. E. Smith had taken over the gun business, presumably following the death of her husband. No other entries are found after 1862. All in all, a lovely set. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 7.25 inches
Cased Pocket Revolver
Cased Webley 80 Bore Revolver, Retailed by T. Murcott, c.1861 Regarded as a superior gunmaker, Theophilus Murcott worked from premises at 68 Haymarket, London, between 1861 - 1878, before being bought out by W. W. Greener. Murcott is probably best remembered for his invention of the hammerless "Mousetrap" shotgun, and other long arms in general, but not pistols. This fine 80 bore percussion revolver is something of an exception, although, having been retailed by T. Murcott in the early years of his business, this solid frame Birmingham proofed revolver is actually a Webley. Most probably Murcott had ordered this revolver on behalf of a customer, perhaps as an accompaniment to a rifle that he had supplied. Certainly such combinations were often the requirement of hunters, who might need to dispatch a wounded quarry. Presented in near fine condition, this revolver is retained in its original case and shows no sign of actual use. Mechanically the cylinder rotation and lock up are all rock solid, and the micro-rifled bore is mint. Most of the charcoal blue finish remains, but there is some fading around the frame. Grips are perfect and screws all appear excellent. All accoutrements, with the exception of the quality "Sykes" flask, appear to be the originals and all are in excellent condition. Interestingly, the brass bullet mould is "WD" marked, relating to William Davis, the predecessor of Philip Webley. A superb outfit. Barrel length = Overall length =
Cased Webley Bentley 80 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1860 Cased Webley Bentley 80 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1860 A very good larger sized Webley Bentley 80 bore revolver, complete with its original case and most accessories, signed and labeled by the retailer, "
Cased Webley Bentley Pocket Revolver, c.1855 An attractive Webley Bentley designed revolver of pocket proportions, made by the Birmingham gun trade, c.1855. Presented in full working order, this unsigned revolver is in overall crisp condition retaining much original colour; it does however, have damage to some of the nipples. This well designed double-action-only pistol comes with a contemporary English oak case, which has been crudely lined to accommodate this revolver and its accessories. The oil bottle appears to be period. Overall an interesting and sharp English pocket revolver of around 80 bore.
Cast Brass Statue of a Bow Street Runner A solid metal, cast brass statue of a Principal Officer from the Bow Street Public Office, depicting the figure in a purposeful stride with staff in hand. Being marked at the green felted base, "Bow Street Runner." The model is of reasonable quality, showing the main detail and trim of the garments worn, standing 6 inches tall and 3 inches wide. Overall, a good statue by an unattributed maker.
Cavalry Flintlock By Woolley, Sargant & Fairfax, c.1815 A volunteer officer's flintlock pistol of regulation bore, signed on the lock by the maker, "Woolley, Sargeant & Fairfax". This robust cavalry pistol made c.1815, is offered in good order with a strong working action. The round barrel has pleasant even age colouring to the ironwork and bears deeply struck proof marks, presented within tidy woodwork, which displays well. Overall, a generally good example of its type, with much to recommend it. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15½ inches
Cavalry Officer's Holster Pistol By H. Nock, c.1800 Made and signed by Henry Nock, this large flintlock is of carbine bore and would have been made c.1800. Its size and style suggests that it was a holster pistol of military type, probably carried by a cavalry officer. It has the regulation length barrel, bored to .65" calibre and the pistol also features a captive ramrod. It is generally in very good and sleepy condition, showing minor signs of service wear and just one old loss to the stock at the fore end. A hand inscribed letter, "B," is also evident, having been no doubt applied to the butt by the armoury. A good example overall, presented in sleepy untouched condition.
CHANGE OF VENUE - Kempton Park Arms Fair @ SANDOWN PARK CHANGE OF VENUE: The Kempton Arms Fair is now being held at Sandown Park - KT10 9AJ We will be attending the Kempton Classic Arms Fair of the 4th October. Although the main event will be held indoors, our stall will be situated outside. Hope to see our regular customers as well as meeting new ones. Keep safe and let's look out for each other. Ziggy
Charity Sale - MOD KFS ZMW Militaria is proud to support the Sea Cadet Corps by selling these KFS to raise money for the local Unit. Every penny will be given to TS Black Swan to help with their building fund. The charity promotes good values to children, teaching them skills and self-confidence in a maritime setting. These vintage military knives, forks and spoons are all made in Sheffield, most dating from before the Falkland\'s War. Each bears a crow\'s foot mark and stock numbers and is sold in very good to excellent condition. Price includes P&P Please help support the Sea Cadets.
Chatham Prison Officer's Sword, c.1856 Consignment sale: A rare sword made by Parker, Field & Sons marked to "Chatham Prison," complete with its steel mounted leather scabbard. All fully engraved and broad arrow marked, as well as being numbered, "23." Opened in 1856 following the closure of the floating prison hulks in Woolwich, Chatham was also known locally as St Mary's Prison due to its proximity to St Mary's Island. It was a Convict Prison that quickly became notorious for its rioting, which came under government control. It closed in 1892 when the building was handed over to the Admiralty. Presented in very good condition throughout, this is a rare surviving example of a marked prison sword.
Cheshire Police Percussion Belt Pistol, c.1840 A rare Police issue percussion belt pistol, made cica1840 by Cunningham of Manchester, displaying a silver escutcheon engraved to, "No. 5 Division Cheshire Constabulary." This pistol has a plain undecorated back action lock, which is in good working order with strong springs, whilst the bulbous bag shaped butt is of hand filling proportions. Overall the pistol has a utility form and shows signs of service carry, with some armourer's modifications along the way and possibly having had a belt hook replaced or retro fitted - yet throughout this pistol is in good used condition. The pistol measures 12 inches in length and has a 20 Bore barrel of 6 inches.
Circa 1810 - New Land Light Dragoon Flintlock Pistol A regulation Light Dragoon .65 flintlock pistol of New Land Pattern, made c.1810. The Tower marked lock has boarder engraving and is in good clean condition with clear marking, plus a strong working action. The 9 inch round barrel, marked with a crowned 4 on the tang, features the standard swivel ramrod, with the usual associated splits existing where the ramrod enters its channel in the wood stock. Typically the furniture has seen service repairs to this area, but basicaly the pistol remains unaltered from its original form, as it has never had the ubiquitous armourer's repair of a strengthening brass plate, fitted to this known weak spot. A generally good example of its type with some minor wood loss around the lock and furniture repair. Offered at a very attractive price.
Circa 1900 Railway Guard's Pocket Watch - By Rotherhams of London This is an early Edwardian Rotherhams pocket watch, of a known type that saw service on the Great Western Railway. Although not marked to the GWR, this watch bears the movement number 178357, which is close to the ranks of other known GWR marked examples. Those known GWR examples are numbered, 177***, 215*** & 216***. Those GWR watches would either have had their cases engraved, or their dials painted with the railway acronym, or both. As is, this large 58mm diameter industrial grade watch is presented here in fine sleepy condition, having seen very little or no use at all. Its over all appearance could easily be described as being close to factory new. Due to their robust workmanlike construction, Rotherhams watches were held in high regard by the Railway Guards and Station Masters, who trusted them to provide an accurate time of day. Even now this watch is capable of delivering good timekeeping, however the Premium Service is recommended to refresh the lubricants. Nevertheless as is, this watch is running well. Visually, inside and out, this watch will be near impossible to better – it is free from dents and all other signs of neglect or abuse. Just some minimal handling or storage marks are evident around the case. A choice original watch at a bargain price, due to it never having been railway marked. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Civil Service (India) Governmet Issue Wristwatch c.1940 A scarce Civil Service issue wristwatch made for issue to the authorities in India. As is typical of these watches, the property marks have been concealed on the inside of the watch case, engraved as C.S.(I). Made by Favre Leuba & Co. in c.1940, this watch model was known as the, "Alresist." This indicates that the watch has characteristics that would make it an admirable service watch. Thanks to an unusual case design, the watch back utilises a bayonet fixing to secure the movement from any possible ingress of water. Furthermore, the watch has additional antimagnetic protection and a shock absorber fitted to the balance. Presented in good working order, the watch is keeping time and functioning as well as can be expected. However, consideration should always be given to having the vintage watch Premium Serviced. All in all, a very capable watch designed for overseas service. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Civil War Bowie Knife & Leather Scabbard Consignment sale: Presented in sleepy condition, this unsigned stag handled Bowie is complete with its original wood and leather scabbard, showing signs of service wear but nothing serious - All in all, a very good damage free example in unmolested condition, with good age patina to the blade. Created in 1838 by Rezin P. Bowie for hunting, these hefty knives became legendary through their association with his brother James Bowie, who went down in folklore as a hero of the Alamo. As reputation spread, the versatile Bowie knife became a companion for many a soldier, and by the Civil War, these robust knives stood out as favourites among Confederate forces. Overall a nice antique, mid 19th century, example of this well balanced and hansom Bowie. Overall length of knife = 13½ inches Length of knife in scabbard = 14 inches Blade length = 9 inches Blade width = 1¾ inches
Civil War Issue Colt M1860 Percussion Revolver, c.1863 Consignment Sale: A good looking .44 Colt Model 1860 cavalry issue percussion revolver, retaining a detailed cylinder scene and all matching serial numbers dating it to 1863. This martially marked revolver shows a partial inspector's cartouche to the right grip, as well as 3 additional notches. All other marking is crisp and clear, including the barrel address and cylinder engraving. Overall the ironwork has a dark patina and the revolver benefits from having good screw heads. A decent example at a reasonable price.
Coaching Blunderbuss - Additional Images
Coast Guard 1849
Coast Guard Cost 600 A Sea Service / Coast Guard Pistol A Sea Service / Coast Guard Pistol, With round barrel struck with Government viewing and proof marks, stepped plain lock, stamped with a crowned VR and TOWER 1841, full stocked in walnut, brass mounts comprising trigger guard, butt cap and ramrod pipe and fitted with a captive ramrod. The pistol has never been fitted with a belt hook so it is almost certainly used by the coast guards. In nice uncleaned condition. Dimensions: Bore: 22 Bore Barrel Length: 6 Inches (15.24 cm) Total Length: 11.5 Inches (29.21 cm)
Coastguard & Constabulary Pattern Percussion Pistol By Beckwith, c.1850 Although these ubiquitous pistols were made to fulfil the needs of the Coastguard and Customs, they also proved to be popular for police work. Not surprisingly numerous versions of this pistol were purchased by British Constabularies, both in England and overseas. Many of these were made by the same gunmakers who also supplied the Board of Ordnance. However, unlike the government "Tower" examples, the police pistols were normally marked with just the gunmaker's name. Upon the death of William Beckwith in 1841, his widow Elizabeth and son Henry, carried on his trade under just the name, Beckwith. They worked from River Street off of Myddelton Square, but later moved in 1858 to 33 Fieldgate Street. Interestingly, their last listed address from 1864 - 1868, was 58 Skinner Street, London E., which was the premises that was ransacked for weapons during the Spa Field Riots while William Beckwith worked there in 1816. This particular pistol was made by Beckwith in around 1850. It utilises a strong working Lovell's lock, which was designed for military service in 1842. But unlike other Tower pistols of this ilk, this one was made with no belt hook or lanyard ring, indicating that it was intended for holster carry. Overall this rarer variation of a police pistol is presented in very good original condition, having a good depth of dark patina and original finish remaining. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Coastguard Pattern Flintlock By Barnett c.1825 The Customs or Coastguard pattern flintlock is a rather short overcoat pistol with a 4 1/2" barrel. This example made by Barnett in c.1825, is bored to fire a large .65" calibre ball and as is, would have been a popular choice for use by Revenue Officers, police and prison service. This coastguard pistol is nevertheless a good example of what would have been a routinely carried item of equipment. All the walnut furniture has darkened to a nice deep brown colour and the stepped lock plate, throat hole hammer and roller frizen are all evenly coloured giving the metal work a good grey patina, with some light areas of pitting. Over all a good pistol of a scarce pattern.
Coastguard Pattern Percussion Pistol By Beckwith, c.1850 A Coastguard Pattern percussion pistol made by Beckwith, c.1850, which features a strong working Lovell's lock, originally designed for military service in 1842. But unlike other Tower pistols of this pattern, this one was made with no belt hook or lanyard ring, indicating that it was intended for holster carry. Overall this rarer variation is presented in very good original condition, having a good depth of dark patina and original finish remaining. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Coastguard Pattern Percussion Pistol, c.1810
Coastguard Pattern Pistol By Lacy & Co. c.1850 Lacy & Co. were gunmakers who were very much involved in the supply of military weapons under government contract. This example of their Coastguard pattern, was retailed under their "London" maker's label, suggests that the pistol may have been for a constabulary, or other private security force. This is a superb example of this genre of robust percussion pistol, which is in very good original condition, showing minor signs of carry, but no abuse. The action is fully working without fault and all springs are strong ,now showing a dark age patina, with sharp marking throughout. Woodwork is all excellent, but does have some minor service wear and knocks. All together, a wonderful and sleepy example of its type. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Coastguard Pattern Pistol c.1850 Selling on consignment: A Coastguard patten percussion pistol with proof marks and inspector's stamps. Offered in presentable condition, this pistol does show signs of overall cleaning and wear but nevertheless, it retains many original features including, swivelling ramrod and Crown marked belt hook. Some closed fractures to the right of the forend suggest that the pistol has led an active service life yet, this robust pistol remains in full working order. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Cogswell Revolver Case
Colonial Railway Pocket Watch By Omega c.1915 The West End Watch Compay of Bombay, were purveyors of quality timepieces throughout India and became official suppliers to the British Government, military and railway authorities. However, whilst much of what the West End Watch Company sold came from high end Swiss watch manufacturers, most of their stock was marketed with only the West End Co.'s details and trademark Star. Yet, many of their early timepieces had originally been contracted from Rolex, Longines, Zenith and Omega. Indeed, this railway pattern pocket watch is documented to have originated at Omega, having been manufactured in 1915. During WW1, a force of British and Indian soldiers were mobilised from Bombay to the Persian Gulf to reach Mesopotamia. At this time, some of those troops were issued with West End Watch Company watches. The Bombay Railway also saw much activity throughout this era and beyond. This Omega railway watch bears a motif of a railway locomotive on the reverse and is typical of the style that saw use on the many private and government railways operating throughout the region. It is in good condition throughout, with some signs of pocket carry and service wear, but exhibiting no sign of abuse. Mechanically the watch is in excellent condition and it is keeping time. Nevertheless, being just shy of 100 years old, consideration should be given for the Premium Service package. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Colt "Storekeeper" .41 Thunderer Revolver, c.1882 William Manson designed the Model 1873 Single Action Army, as well as Colt's first successful double action revolver in 1877. This became more commonly known as the Thunderer, and in its shorter barrel length, is frequently called the "Storekeeper." The M1877 remained in production until 1909, with this one being dated to 1882. This Thunderer is in excellent mechanical condition - all good and tight with a fully working action. Cocking the revolver is smooth and the hammer holds in all positions, with perfect indexing and lock up. Generally in very good cosmetic condition, with strong traces of original finish and good screws throughout. Grips are period and very good, but the gutta-percha has slightly shrunk as shown. A very good obsolete calibre Colt, which may be owned by a bone fide collector without a certificate, as part of an antique gun collection. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length =
Colt "Storekeeper" Model 1877 .41 Thunderer Revolver Selling on consignment: A superb M1877 Thunderer with all matching numbers, dated to 1893. Retaining a good amount of original finish, this Thunderer is still in good mechanical condition, with the action indexing well - All springs are strong. Showing just light signs of use, the revolver is in a very good state of preservation, with no sign of any abuse. All in all, a good representative piece. Undamaged grips, good chambers and a decent bore, make this Thunderer an example for the collector. A good and original Colt. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Colt .30 New Line Pocket Revolver, c.1874 When Colt introduced there New Line revolver in 1873 it became immediately popular due to its diminutive proportions. In the succeeding years the revolvers became increasingly larger, as bigger calibres became available, until production ceased in 1884. Over this time period, the .30 was the shortest lived variant, produced from 1874 - 76. Consequently it is the most difficult of the New Lines for a collector to find, at least in good condition. Presented in full working order and crisp condition, this .30 obsolete calibre Colt is a sweet revolver. With overall signs of wear, it has clearly been handled and no doubt carried, but it remains free from any signs of tampering. The frame just behind the loading port is stamped ".30 Cal" and the barrel stamps are all good and clear. Grips are undamaged, with much original varnish and screw heads, plus cylinder rod knurling, being all decent. A lovely example with matching serial numbers.
Colt .31 1849 Pocket Revolver "Six-Shooter," c.1867 The 1849 Pocket Model was Colt's most widely carried revolver, which remained in production for 23 years. However, this variant is the much rarer six shooter (most were five shot), assembled in New York and then sent to their London agency in 1867. As such, it also has the "L" marked [London] iron back strap and trigger guard. Slim and eminently packable, this revolver is in good working order with a crisp action, sharp profiles and clear but slightly worn 'Stage-coach Robbery' cylinder scene. Well defined inscriptions, traces of original finish with the remainder to dull black and plum patina, plus a good bore, make this a collectable example at a reasonable price. Barrel length - 5 inches Overall length - 9.5 inches
Colt .41 Bisley Model Revolver, c.1906 Colt's "Bisley Model" is broadly based on the Single Action Army revolver of 1873, however it is more accurate to say that it is more closely related to the civilian versions that emerged post 1877, under the title of Colt "Frontier Six-Shooter," which were offered in a variety of calibres. Visually distinct, Bisley Models were introduced in 1895 and offered the shooter a more refined revolver with a longer grip and a wider target trigger and hammer. Some Bisley Models were even supplied with adjustable rear sights. Incidentally, 1895 was also the same year when the National Rifle Association relocated their Club-House Pavilion to Bisley, having been granted a Royal Charter the previous year, with the edict to serve the, “Promotion of marksmanship in the interests of the Defence of Realm and permanence of the Volunteer Forces, Navy, Military and Air.” Having a rakish grip, the Bisley mainspring is la little longer to those used in other SAA revolvers, which resulted in a deserved reputation for these pistols having a superb trigger and cocking action. All in all though, this revolver is in excellent and solid working condition, with a good bore and chambers. Chambered for the obsolete .41 LC cartridge, this version may be owned as a curio only without a Firearm Certificate. Manufactured in 1906, this Colt Bisley is also in very good cosmetic condition, with faded case colours and much original but dulled blue finish. Having been previously fitted with attractive vintage stag horn grips (slightly oversized at base), this revolver is a striking example of a model that ceased production in 1912. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
Colt .41 Bisley Single Action Army Revolver c.1901 Consignment Sale: A lovely Colt Bisley revolver in obsolete, .41 calibre. This revolver is presented in very good original condition, fully working with a strong action and cosmetically untouched. All the profiles are crisp, as are the stamps, address and matching numbers, with some factory blue finish remaining with the rest to a pleasant grey mottled aged patina. The grips are undamaged and fit well and the bore is decent. All in all, a reasonably priced Colt Bisley for the collector.
Colt .41 Double Action Revolver, c.1899 Selling on consignment: Colt records show that this Double Action revolver was made in 1899. It is mechanically very good and is chambered for the obsolete .41" calibre. Offered in full working order, this model was available from Colt in a variety of calibres, barrel lengths and finish combinations, which were sold to the Army & Navy, as well as Police Departments and civilians alike. Working smoothly with good lock up, the barrel bore and chambers are all good, as are the hard rubber grips. Cosmetically this Colt has some of its original finish remaining, with the rest fading to grey and age patina. It has never been polished and looks good as is. All serial numbers match and barrel address with patent details are all clear. Although no licence is required for this item, an identity and age check will be necessary. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11½ inches
Colt .41 M1873 Single Action Army Revolver c.1901 Consignment Sale: A good Colt SAA revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41" calibre cartridge. This example is in original condition having good age patina throughout. Mechanically it is crisp, with a good action and strong springs. The bore and chambers are bright with clear rifling. The grips show signs of handling, with minor bruises but are generally very good. Showing evidence of holster carry, resulting in light rubbing around the barrel, cylinder, backstrap, as well as on the top of the frame, this revolver has survived with matching numbers dated to 1901, with clear stamps and engravings throughout. All screw heads are in equally sharp condition. Overall a collectable example. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 11 inches
Colt .41 M1877 Thunderer Consignment sale: A good Model 1877 Thunderer.
Colt .41 Model 1889 Double Action Revolver In 1889 Colt became the first gun manufacturer to produce a revolver of swing-out cylinder design. Originally offered in a variety of calibres, barrel lengths and finish combinations, these modern style revolvers were purchased by the Army & Navy, as well as Police Departments and civilians alike. Unlike their earlier revolvers, it seems that Colt arranged for their new revolver to have a counterclockwise operating cylinder, apparently following communications with the US Navy. Notwithstanding this decision, Colt later reversed it again to make the future production operate clockwise. So, the counter rotating cylinder is a feature of their earliest design. As is, this Colt Model 1889 was made within the first couple of years of production. It is presented in very good cosmetic condition, retaining much of the factory blue finish, whilst mechanically the revolver functions smoothly with good lock up. The barrel and chambers are all good too, with only the hard rubber grip having a piece missing from the right heel. Nevertheless, this is a good piece for the collector of obsolete calibre weapons: Although no licence is required for this item, an identity and age check will be necessary. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
Colt .41" Single Action Army M1873 Revolver, c.1901 Selling on consignment: A fine example of a Colt SAA revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41" calibre cartridge. This example is in outstanding condition having retained much of its original blue and case colours throughout. Mechanically it is faultless, with a crisp action and strong springs. The bore and chambers are all bright and in mint condition, as are the grips. Nevertheless, this is a used revolver which shows some evidence of holster carry, resulting in light rubbing around the barrel, cylinder, backstrap, as well as on the top of the frame, which has a slightly speckled appearance. All serial numbers match and all the stamps and engravings are clear. Overall a superior example. Barrel length = 4¾ inches Overall length = 10 inches
Colt 1862 Police .36 Calibre Percussion Revolver This scarce Colt 1862 Police percussion revolver was developed for early law enforcement officers, who had a requirement for a pocket pistol, either for concealment or as a backup. The pistol was a successful design that gained favour with those for whom it was intended as well as with Civil War Army Officers and remained in production until 1873, becoming the last percussion pattern revolver to be made by Colt. This example of the Colt 1862 Police revolver is in very good, near excellent condition with all matching numbers, retaining traces of original colour with most of the ironwork having a lightly mottled and peppered appearance. The action is in full working order with very good lock up, clean nipples, bright bore and cylinder. Overall an unmolested pistol for the collector.
Colt 1862 Police .36 Percussion Revolver Ever since Colt marketed pocket revolvers, their handy size has proved to be very popular for self defence and, whilst the Colt 1862 Model Police revolver was meant for individuals that might have been engaged in a law enforcement as an unobtrusive carry gun, these same attributes made it equally desirable for the outlaw alike. Consequently, as this was to be Colt's last offering of a cap and ball pistol on the cusp of the metallic cartridge era, the model 1862 Police has always been in short supply with only 30% of the components produced for the 1862 Police revolver were ever assembled into this model. With that, Colt's percussion era drew to a close making this Police revolver a rare pistol for collectors to find. Presented in unmolested and crisp condition, this Colt 1862 Police revolver is a good looking piece for the collector - totally original with matching serial numbers throughout. The action is also working very well, with smooth operation and indexing of the cylinder as well as tight lock up and strong mainspring. The bore and chambers are all in good order too. Even the hammer rest pins are still proud. All in all a very nice original example with uniform dark age patina. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Colt Enfield M1851 .36 Percussion Martial Revolver c.1866 This scarce Colt Navy Model 1851, was part of a shipment of revolvers that came to London in 1866, where they were proofed and then stored at the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield. As such, they are part of a small consignment of late fourth model Navy revolvers, which were apparently intended for military issue within the British Commonwealth. They were then simply marked with the Enfield storekeeper's roundel, just to the left side of the butt. Typically, this marking is faint but still discernible. Presented in good condition, this Colt revolver is in working order, indexing well with good springs. With serial numbers prefixed by the code letter "L" for London, they are all matching aside from the unmarked wedge, which is probably a period replacement. Showing signs of armoury handling and service wear, the finish on this revolver is now down to a frosted patina of greys and browns with some light pitting. All nipples are intact and the bore is good, but the cylinder scene is worn. Grips are damage free and generally, this is a very good representative piece of a martially marked revolver. Overall, this Colt Navy has seen service use, but has still survived with important evidence of its military heritage. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Colt Flask
Colt London Agency .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1867 The 1849 Pocket Model was Colt's most widely carried revolver, which remained in production for 23 years. However, this variant is a rarer six-shooter - most were five shot revolvers. It was assembled in New York and then sent to their London agency in 1867. As such, it also has the "L" [London] marked iron back strap and trigger guard. Slim and eminently packable, this revolver is in good working order with a crisp action, sharp profiles and clear but slightly worn 'Stage-Coach Robbery' cylinder scene. Well defined inscriptions, matching numbers throughout and a pleasing dark age patina, plus some traces of original finish, as well as a good bore, add up to making this a collectable Colt. Barrel length - 5 inches Overall length - 9½ inches
Colt M1849 .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1856 A Model 1849 .31 Colt Pocket revolver, dating to 1856. With a full set of matching serial numbers, this revolver has seen a lot of use resulting in a loss of original finish, yet, remaining in good working order with a solid action, good nipples, decent cylinder scene and sharp address. Grips are original but with losses to the wood around both toes. Overall, this revolver is better than the price suggests. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Colt M1849 .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1857 A very good .31 Colt Pocket M1849 percussion revolver, dating from 1857. This crisp example has retained 30% of its original blued finish, plus, most of the silver plating and factory varnish to the grips, with the rest ageing to a pleasing patina. All the screws are excellent and the cylinder scene is sharp and clear. All serial numbers match, including the wedge. The action works in a positive manner and without fault and overall, this Colt shows very little signs of use, with the nipples and safety pins showing virtually no wear. Basically, this Colt is in an eminently collectable condition that is better than the price suggests.
Colt M1849 .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1870 A Model 1849 .31 Colt Pocket revolver, dating to 1870, must make it one of the last percussion pistols to have been made by the gunmaker. With a full set of matching serial numbers, this revolver is in good condition, with working action and dark age patina, retaining some elements of the cylinder scene and clear barrel address. The bore is good with deep rifling and the grips are undamaged, overall, making this revolver much better than the price suggests. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Colt M1851 .36 Navy Percussion Revolver, c.1857 This is an early .36 Colt cap 'n' ball revolver, which was made in 1857 and bears the rarer "Hartford" address on the barrel. When this model was designed by Samuel Colt, it was initially called the "Ranger," but given its naval calibre the name was soon changed. The Navy revolver is basically a scaled up version of Colt's earlier Pocket models and as such, it became a popular midsize small arm suitable for belt holster carry. Not surprisingly then this example shows typical holster wear probably caused by abrading sand trapped against the iron and leather work. This has resulted in some general muzzle wear and scene loss as the gun bounces and jiggles around, specifically when carried on horseback - Yet it leaves good traces of silver plating to the sheltered areas of the backstrap and the stampings remain good with no significant pitting throughout. Overall this revolver remains mechanically solid with a strong working action, all indexing correctly and benefitting from a good bore, chambers and nipples. With all the serial numbers matching, including the wedge, this Colt Navy is a decent example of what was a used, but very well maintained revolver of the Wild West. Presented in a modern custom made pistol case, in the style of the originals, complete with a mix of associated period accoutrements and a modern brass bullet mould. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Colt M1851 Navy .36 Percussion Revolver, c.1852 This is an early .36 Colt Navy M1851 cap 'n' ball revolver, which was made in 1852. It has several unusual stamps, which may make it of additional interest to enthusiasts. Small letters, H, G and F, can be found close to the serial numbers on the barrel, frame and butt, respectively. Furthermore, whilst much of the naval ship scene is still clear, the cylinder appears to have never had the legend,"ENGAGED 16 MAY 1843" stamped on it. Quite why any of this should be so, is not known. Well preserved, this revolver remains mechanically solid with a strong working action, all indexing correctly and benefitting from a good bore and chambers. Even the cylinder safety pins and nipples are very good and all the serial numbers match, including the wedge. Overall, this Colt Navy is a decent example of what was a used, but well maintained revolver. Now exhibiting some light pin prick pitting on the cylinder and frame, the revolver is still sharp, with much original silver over the back strap and trigger guard. All in all, a really nice and early Colt Navy. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Colt M1851 Navy .36 Percussion Revolver, c.1852 A very good and early .36 Colt Navy M1851 cap 'n' ball revolver, which was made in 1852. It is serially numbered 16000, making it of additional interest to enthusiasts, plus it has matching numbers throughout, including the wedge. Furthermore, whilst much of the naval ship scene is still clear, the early cylinder was never marked with the legend,"ENGAGED 16 MAY 1843." A crisp and well preserved Colt revolver remaining mechanically solid with a strong working action, all indexing correctly and benefitting from a good bore and chambers. Even the cylinder safety pins and nipples are very good. Overall, this Colt Navy is a very decent example of what was a used, but expertly maintained revolver. Now exhibiting some light pitting on the barrel but generally a sharp, untouched and nicely aged revolver, with some original blue in sheltered areas and silver to the back strap and trigger guard. All in all, a really nice and early Colt Navy. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Colt M1860
Colt M1860 .44 Army Revolver c.1861 Selling on consignment: When Colt introduced the Model 1860, most of their production of .44 revolvers were immediately purchased by the US Army. Few were spared for anything other than military use, making this civilian example, a rare survivor. Furthermore, this example was factory made with the possibility of use with a fitted shoulder stock - However, it appears that few stocks were ever made. Nevertheless, this revolver frame has the additional screws, frame cut out and butt recess to accommodate one. The example offered here bears matched serial numbers, which can be traced through Colt's records to 1861. Overall the revolver's finish is holster worn (not polished), leaving a resulting brown patina that shows no real sign of abuse, retaining good angles to the ironwork. Mechanically the action is sound, working crisply with a positive lock up, good cylinders, original nipples and defined rifling to the bore with just light pitting and nothing nasty to report. Clear stampings and impressed barrel address, are also discernible. Overall a good, tight and collectable Colt 1860 Army revolver. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14½ inches
Colt M1860 Army .44 Percussion Revolver, c.1863 A martial US Army issue Colt M1860 percussion revolver, with matching serial numbers, dated to 1863. It remains in good mechanical order with proper indexing and strong spring action. Overall this Army revolver shows the surface signs of a much-carried gun. The Inspector's cartouche on the grip is still discernible and engravings and stamps are evident, with just the overall finish being worn. Typically, many martial revolvers after becoming surplus to military needs were sold to the gun trade, eagerly purchased by prospectors and wild west pioneers. Benefitting from a good bore, solid nipples and a sound action, this revolver was clearly well cared for and no doubt would have a story to tell. A reasonable example of its class.
Colt M1862 Police Percussion Revolver, c.1863 The Colt M1862 Police revolver has the distinction of being the company's final percussion pistol, produced as the metallic cartridge era was transforming the gun world. As such, it is a comparatively rare pistol in this original form. This revolver is a good honest example, which is mechanically solid and in full working order. Cosmetically the finish is worn, but it has aged with a pleasing salt and pepper patina. Further benefitting from having good grips, as well as clear markings and matching numbers. All in all a good example that has seen use, but no abuse. Barrel length = 4½ inches Overall length = 9½ inches
Colt M1877 Thunderer .41 Revolver, c.1891 Consignment Sale: A good nickel Colt Model 1877 Thunderer revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 cartridge. This revolver is in good working order and cosmetic condition, retaining much of its original plated finish, with the rest being to a grey patina. According to Colt archives, this revolver dates to 1891. It has matching numbers as well as sharp profiles, good screw heads, and undamaged grips. Generally, this Thunderer is a decent example in good cosmetic condition. Barrel length = 6 inches
Colt M1877 Thunderer .41 Revolver, c.1894 Consignment Sale: A good Colt Model 1877 Thunderer revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 cartridge. This revolver is in working order and has a good original cosmetic finish, showing a strong grey aged patina. Crisp marking and matching numbers are also evident. According to Colt archives, this revolver dates to 1894. It has good screw heads and undamaged grips, making this a decent example for the collector. Barrel length = 5 inches
Colt M1877 Thunderer, c.1902 Selling on consignment: A superb M1877 Thunderer with all matching numbers, dated to 1902. Retaining a good amount of original finish, this Thunderer is still in good mechanical condition, with the action indexing well. All springs are strong. Showing just light signs of use, the revolver is in a very good state of preservation, with no sign of any abuse. All in all, a good representative piece. Excellent grips, good chambers and a decent bore, make this Thunderer an example for the collector. An excellent and original Colt. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Colt Model 1849 - London - Pocket .31 Revolver The 1849 Pocket Model was Colt's most widely carried revolver, which remained in production for 23 years. However, this variant is a much rarer British made gun, assembled at Colt's London factory in 1854. As a British Colt, this revolver has retained all the features which are unique to these early Colts built in Pimlico: Iron back strap and trigger guard; dome head screws; 'London' barrel address and proof marks, are all the original characteristics that make these Colts stand apart from their US counterparts. They were only made for a few years between 1853 - 1856, before Colt opted to close the factory, as sales were not as high as expected. Slim and eminently packable, this model was available in various barrel lengths to meet the customer's needs, with this one being the 5" model. It is mechanically perfect with solid, crisp action, sharp profiles, a good 'Stage-coach Robbery' cylinder scene, well defined inscriptions and a very good bore. A rare Colt revolver, which is difficult to find in this untouched and unmolested condition - with the iron work naturally aged to a dark patina. Barrel length - 5 inches Overall length - 9.5 inches
Colt Model 1860 .44 Army Percussion Revolver Selling on consignment: When Colt introduced the Model 1860, most of their production of .44 revolvers were immediately purchased by the US Army. Few were spared for anything other than military use, making this civilian example, a rare survivor. Furthermore, this example was factory made as a dual function weapon, suitable for belt carry as well as the possibility of use with a fitted shoulder stock. However, for unknown reasons, probably as a result of experiences during the Civil War, it appears that few stocks were ever made. Nevertheless, this revolver frame has the additional screws, frame cut out and butt recess to accommodate such stock. The example offered here bears matched serial numbers, which can be traced through Colt's records to 1861. Overall the revolver's finish is holster worn (not polished), leaving a resulting grey patina that shows no real sign of abuse and retaining very good angles to the ironwork, with only minimal handling impressions evident. A reasonable amount of cylinder scene is evident, with all the patent and some typical wear to the grip caused by the holster flap. Mechanically the action is sound, working crisply with a positive lock up, good cylinders, original nipples and good bore with just light pitting and nothing nasty to report. Clear stampings, deeply impressed barrel address and some sign of the cylinder's navy scene, are also discernible together with the engagement legend and date remaining sharp. Overall a good, tight and collectable example that has not been messed with. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14½ inches
Colt Model 1862 Police .36 Percussion Revolver Ever since Colt marketed pocket revolvers, their handy size has proved to be very popular for self defence and, whilst it is valid to say that the Colt 1862 Model Police revolver was meant for those individuals engaged in a security role who required an unobtrusive carry gun - These same attributes made it equally desirable for the outlaw alike. Consequently, as this was to be Colt's last offering of a cap and ball pistol before their arms production went over completely to metallic cartridges, the model 1862 Police has always been in short supply. Even when metallic cartridges were first available, not everyone could access them, preferring to make their own balls and continue muzzle loading. In this transitional period, Colt realised that the metallic cartridge was the way forward so only 30% of the components produced for the 1862 Police revolver were ever assembled into cap and ball pistols. The majority of the barrels, cylinders and frames were instead utilised in the production of their equally popular pocket rimfire revolvers. With that, Colt's percussion era drew to a close and today, this Police revolver has become a rare pistol for collectors to find. Presented in very good and crisp condition, this Colt 1862 Police revolver is a superb looking piece for the collector - totally original with matching serial numbers throughout. The action is also working very well, with smooth operation and indexing of the cylinder as well as tight lock up and strong mainspring. The bore and chambers are all in good order too with clearly stamped address and patent dates. All in all a very nice original example.
Colt Model 1862 Police .36 Percussion Revolver Ever since Colt marketed pocket revolvers, their handy size has proved to be very popular for self defence and, whilst the Colt 1862 Model Police revolver was meant for individuals, perhaps engaged in a law enforcement role as an unobtrusive carry gun, these same attributes made it equally desirable for the outlaw alike. Consequently, as this was to be Colt's last offering of a cap and ball pistol, before their arms production went over completely to metallic cartridges, the model 1862 Police has always been in short supply. Even when metallic cartridges were first available, not everyone could access them, preferring to make their own balls and continue muzzle loading. In this transitional period, Colt realised that the metallic cartridge was the way forward so only 30% of the components produced for the 1862 Police revolver were ever assembled into cap and ball pistols. The majority of the barrels, cylinders and frames were instead utilised in the production of their equally popular pocket rimfire revolvers. With that, Colt's percussion era drew to a close and today, this Police revolver has become a rare pistol for collectors to find. Presented in unmolested and crisp condition, this Colt 1862 Police revolver is a good looking piece for the collector - totally original with matching serial numbers throughout. The action is also working very well, with smooth operation and indexing of the cylinder as well as tight lock up and strong mainspring. The bore and chambers are all in good order too. Even the hammer rest pins are still present. All in all a very nice original example with uniform dark age patina. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Colt Model 1877 .41 Thunderer Revolver The Model 1877 was the first successful double action revolver design made by Colt. It had been designed by the same man, William Mason, who had been responsible for the hugely popular Single Action Army Model 1873. The M1877 remained in production until 1909, with this one being dated to 1906. Originally offered in three calibre choices, this example is chambered for the largest cartridge of the trio, the .41 Long Colt. As such, these M1877's became known by customers as 'Thunderers.' Under UK law the .41 LC cartridge is regarded as an obsolete calibre, which basically means that this revolver may be owned as a curio without a firearm certificate, provided the revolver is not used. This Thunderer is in excellent mechanical condition - all good and tight with a fully working action. Cocking the revolver you will hear 4 clear bent clicks, whilst in double action the rotation and lock up are very smooth. Generally looking at the lack of overall finish and seeing that the majority of the ironwork has been reduced to a grey mottled patina, it is clear from this that the revolver has been extensively carried. Note the undamaged grips, worn smooth by the hand of a grateful owner, yet this revolver shows no sign of abuse, pitting or other damage. This suggests that whoever the original owner was, likely depended upon his Colt to be kept in top working order over a protracted period. A very good piece at a sensible price.
Colt Model 1877 .41 Thunderer Revolver The early Model 1877 was the first successful double action revolver design made by Colt. It was designed by the same man, William Mason, who was responsible for the hugely popular Single Action Army Model 1873. The M1877 remained in production until 1909, with this one complete with matching numbers, being dated to 1882. Originally offered in three calibre choices, this Thunderer is chambered for the largest cartridge of the trio, the .41 Long Colt. As such, these M1877's became known by customers as "Thunderers" and the short barrelled version like this one, were also referred to as the, "Storekeepers." In reality though, this pattern was popular not just in civilian hands but it was also issued to law enforcement officers, most notably the Pinkerton Detective Agency. This Thunderer is in excellent mechanical condition - all good and tight with a fully working action, whilst cosmetically the majority of the ironwork has been reduced to a faded blue and grey patina, although areas of original finish remain. It is clear from this that the revolver has been carried, yet it still has good undamaged grips, plus clear chambers and a good bore. A good and original Colt. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8 inches
Colt Model 1877 .41 Thunderer Revolver In 1877, William Manson designed the Colt's first successful double action revolver. This became more commonly known as the Thunderer, which remained in production until 1909. This example dates to 1888 and whilst it is representative of a much sought after revolver, it is no longer in working order. Pulling the trigger works the hammer and rotates the cylinder, but the mainspring is lacking and, it feels as though other internal parts may be broken, worn or lacking. Retaining some original plating on the frame, the rest of the revolver is worn to a dark patina - Good screws all around. Price reflects faults, but this is nevertheless a good opportunity to acquire a Colt on a modest budget. As an obsolete calibre this revolver, which is stamped .41 on the barrel, may be owned by a bona fide collector without a certificate, as part of an antique gun collection. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 8 inches
Colt Model 1877 .41 Thunderer Revolver, c.1890 In 1877, William Manson designed the Colt's first successful double action revolver. This became more commonly known as the Thunderer, which remained in production until 1909 - This example dates to 1890. Working in double action only, this .41 Thunderer is a good looking revolver with all matching numbers and a strong mainspring. It will however need attention to correct the single action facility. A budget priced obsolete calibre Colt, which may be owned by a bone fide collector without a certificate, as part of an antique gun collection. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 9½ inches
Colt New Line .30 Revolver, c.1874 Selling on consignment: A very good Colt New Line revolver made c.1874 and chambered for the now obsolete .30 rimfire cartridge. When Colt introduced their New Line revolvers in 1873, this petite model was an immediate success due to their ease of concealability, however, over the coming years as Colt introduced increasingly larger calibres to their range, this diminutive revolver was dropped from their catalogue after just two years of production. Nevertheless, demand for these pistols remained strong among those requiring something highly concealable. As a result, it is difficult to find good Colt New Line revolvers in this calibre, as so many continued to be carried for many years. Presented in full working order and crisp condition, this Colt is a sweet revolver. With overall even signs of wear, it has clearly been handled and carried, but it remains free from any signs of tampering or abuse. A lovely example with matching serial numbers, good grips and crisp marking throughout.
Colt New Line .38 Rim Fire Revolver, c.1875 An excellent and untouched .38 Rim Fire Colt New Line pocket revolver, retaining much of its original nickel finish, together with factory varnished rosewood grips and a solid, crisp action. All coupled with a near mint bore, etched "New Line .38" barrel panel and clear address, make this Colt one for the collector. The serial numbers date the revolver to 1875.
Colt No.2 .41 Rimfire Derringer, c.1874 An excellent .41" rimfire Colt No. 2 derringer, in the brown but retaining very sharp profiles and rare additional factory detailing seldom seen on these pistols: Note the extra engraving to the side of the barrel and the presence of the rampant horse stamp on the left side of the frame - all still clear, not worn at all. Originally designed by the Brooklyn's National Arms Co., this company was taken over by Colt in 1870. During their time, these pistols were regarded as being among the best concealable derringers on the market. Yet, despite their long production time, which ended in 1890, very few were made annually and Colt did not keep records of their serial numbers - Although it is said that approximately 9,000 were made. This suggests that this pistol would have been made c.1874. Overall an excellent opportunity to acquire a sharp London proofed Colt No.2 with a decent rifled bore (just some light pitting), strong working action and a secure breech-to-frame fit, altogether making this example one for the collector. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 5¼ inches
Colt Pocket Model 1849 .31" Percussion Revolver The 1849 Pocket Model was Colt's most widely carried revolver that remained popular throughout its 23 year production run. Light, slim and eminently packable, this model was available in various barrel lengths to meet the customer's needs. Dating to 1860, this Colt is mechanically perfect with crisp action, sharp profiles and a 6" octagonal barrel. The 'Stage-coach Robbery' cylinder scene is very good and all inscriptions are clear, plus, a good amount of silver finish remains. Generally then, this Colt revolver is in good collectable condition with matching numbers, nice screw heads and undamaged grips. Difficult to improve upon at this price.
Colt Signature Series Sports Folding Pocket Knife A previously owned, but never used, original Colt Signature Series sports pocket lock knife, complete with case and papers. As new. This knife can only be sold to those over the age of 18.
Colt Thunderer M1877
Colt Thunderer Model 1877 .41 Revolver, c.1892 Selling on consignment: Colt's Model 1877 was the company's first successful double action revolver. Designed by the same man, William Mason, who was responsible for the hugely popular Single Action Army Model 1873, the M1877 remained in production until 1909, with this one complete with all matching numbers, being dated to 1892. Nickel plated, this Thunderer retains good traces of its original finish, whilst the rest has worn to reveal the underlying ironwork. Still in good mechanical condition, the action indexing is good, with a little play in the axis - All springs are strong: It is clear that the revolver has been carried and used, but it has not been abused and is a good representative piece. With undamaged grips, good chambers and a decent bore, this Thunderer with its longer barrel is a rarer example for the collector. A good and original Colt. Barrel length = 7½ inches Overall length = 12½ inches
Compact Adams Self-Cocking Revolver Working at capacity, Adams' concentrated their work on the production of officers' pistols. However, realising that there was another lucrative market for personal protection revolvers, the company sourced gunmakers in Europe to manufacture pistols to their patent. This revolver is fist-size Adams self-cocking revolver, made under licence in Belgian. Featuring work of the highest quality, the diminutive design is proportioned to be both comfortable to hold as well as shoot, given its full grip profile. Retaining much original blue lustre, the revolver is beautifully engraved in the English style, showing Adams' name to both sides of the frame, and patent date of 1851. The action works exactly as it should, with lock-up and timing being perfect. On the top strap flat, the revolver is engraved by the maker, "Manufc. By C. D. Duly & Legally Licensed," together with numerous Belgian and Liege proof marks. Fitted with a brass foresight. A super petite revolver in great condition.
Comprehensive Military Navigation Tool Set c.1950 A fine and comprehensive set of military high quality Lee Guinness navigator\'s or draughtsman tools, comprising of assorted compasses, dividers, accessories, pens and a parallel rule. The leather bound hard case is clearly impressed with the broad arrow and other issue markings. Not a standard issue set but rather, a very desirable outfit in nickel silver, presented in excellent order throughout.
Constabulary / Coastguard Percussion Pistol c.1854 Selling on Consignment: An interesting Coastguard Pattern pistol with its lock signed, "1854 Blake & Co. London" and featuring fixed bead sights and belt hook, this pistol also has a pair of unusual Crown "T.C." inspector's marks to the butt, together with Birmingham proofs, which suggest that this sidearm was in service with a civilian agency. Offered in working order and with a strong action, this pistol is in very good condition with solid walnut furniture. Only the ironwork has overall surface pitting resulting in a speckled appearance. An interesting example.
Constabulary Pattern Hanger By Parker Field, c.1850 A good mid 19th century police pattern hanger, having a curved blade of 24½” and bearing etched foliate detail of the maker, “Parker Field & Sons, 233 Holborn, London.” This hanger is of the type issued predominantly by the Constabulary, but the design was also used to the prison service, customs and coastguard. Overall it is in untouched sleepy condition, with dark age patina throughout, having a plain steel knucklebow, quillon and pommel. The hanger has retained its wire binding with some minor loss to the fish skin grip. Edge nicks and minor light surface pitting and wear present. Generally, these hangers were only permitted to be issued during large scale civil unrest, however, hangers could carried at the discretion of a senior officer, where it could be shown that there was a risk to a constable's safety when patrolling certain neighbourhoods - but that order could only be given on Night Duty. A good example for the collector who prefers items to be untouched.
Constabulary/Customs Percussion Pistol By Lacy & Co., c.1840 Lacy & Co. were a gunmaker who was very much involved in the supply of military pattern weapons under government contract, including the supply of flintlocks to the Bow Street Horse Patrol. Of those arms that were issued to Crown authorities or supplied for military use, those pistols would have been marked with the standard ordnance and inspection stamps. However, other pattern pistols bear no more than private label of the maker, which suggests that such pistols were made for other authorities - most typically this means police who, despite being Crown Servants, were responsible for the procurement of their own equipment, which was by way of distancing the constabularies from government control. On a historical note, after the Metropolitan Police Force absorbed the Thames River Police in 1839, the Thames Division police were created. It has also been documented that Thames Division kept customs pattern pistols as part of their armoury. Regardless of the history which will probably never be known for certain, this is a superb example of this genre of robust percussion pistol. It is in very good original condition, showing signs of carry, but no actual evidence of use. The bore is very clean and the action is working without fault. All ironwork has faded to an aged grey patina and the woodwork has some minor knocks. A wonderful example of its type.
Continental Military Regulation Flintlock, c.1800 2019 New Year Special Selling on consignment: A good and interesting .70" calibre continental military flintlock pistol, similar in style to the earlier French Cavalry Modelé 1766. Featuring all steel mounts and a belt hook, this pistol would have been made during the period of arms modernisation in Europe, towards the end of the 18th Century. Presented in working order, this regulation style flintlock is in sound and good condition, with signs of service use. This has led to general surface wear and tear towards the muzzle, which remains solid and strong. The pistol comes complete with its original iron ramrod, with worm end. Overall an interesting military grade flintlock. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches On Hold for DL
Continental Military Regulation Pattern Flintlock, c.1800 Selling on consignment: A good and interesting .70" calibre continental military flintlock pistol, similar in style to the earlier French Cavalry Modelé 1766. Featuring all steel mounts and a belt hook, this pistol would have been made during the period of arms modernisation in Europe, towards the end of the 18th Century. Presented in working order, this regulation style flintlock is in sound and good condition, with signs of service use. This has led to general surface wear and tear towards the muzzle, which remains solid and strong. The pistol comes complete with its original iron ramrod, with worm end. Overall an interesting military grade flintlock. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches
Cooper .31 Double-Action Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1863 The Cooper Fire Arms Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, was in business between 1851 - 1869. By and large they made good quality revolvers, mainly based on the expired patent designs of Colt. However, their 1863 double-action revolver was arguably their most successful signature pistol, with many seeing service during the Civil War. Certainly this one, with its iron trigger guard and back strap, is one of the earlier examples, which is confirmed by the low serial number. Presented in very good and tight condition, this revolver has a crisply functioning action, which operates without fault and locks the cylinder with a positive stop in both double and single action mode. Strong springs and smooth operation, coupled with sharp profiles and no significant loss of detail, including clear barrel address and patent details, make this Cooper a good piece for the collection. Good age patina with surface staining but no deep pitting, coupled with good walnut grips, help to enhance desirability. Wholly original and fully working, this one also benefits from good rifling and nipples. Priced to sell. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8.75 inches
Cooper .31 Double-Action Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1863 The Cooper Fire Arms Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, was in business between 1851 - 1869. By and large they made excellent quality revolvers, mainly based on the expired patent designs of Colt. However, their 1863 double-action revolver was arguably their most successful signature pistol, with many seeing service during the Civil War. Certainly revolver with its low serial number, is one of the earlier examples made with the rare iron trigger guard and back strap - Apparently only 400 Cooper revolvers were ever made to this configuration. Presented in very good and tight condition, this revolver has a crisply functioning action, which operates without fault and locks the cylinder with a positive stop in both double and single action mode. Strong springs and smooth operation, coupled with sharp profiles and no significant loss of detail, including clear barrel address and patent details, make this Cooper a good piece for the collection. Lovely age patina with surface staining but no deep pitting, coupled with nice walnut grips, help to enhance desirability. Wholly original and fully working, this one also benefits from good rifling and nipples. Priced to sell. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8.75 inches
Cooper .31 Double-Action Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1863 A solid, working example of a .31 Double-Action revolver, made by the Cooper Fire Arms Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, who were in business between 1851 - 1869. By and large Cooper made excellent firearms, mainly based on the expired patent designs of Colt. However, their 1863 double-action revolver was arguably their most successful signature pistol, with many seeing service during the Civil War. Showing evidence of service use, with a mismatched cylinder, this revolver retains an excellent bore, as well as a smooth and fully functioning action. This operates without fault and locks the cylinder with a positive stop in both double and single action modes. Cosmetically the revolver has not been cleaned, leaving it with the pitting scars resulting from poor storage, over much of the revolver's surface. Nevertheless, the bore and nipples are remarkably good, and the barrel address is clear. Overall, this Cooper is an honest example - Priced to sell. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8¾ inches
Cooper .31 Double-Action Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1863 Previously sold by ZMW MILITARIA to GR
Copper Powder Flask By G. & J. W. Hawksley, c.1850 A good mid Victorian powder flask of elongated bag form, made of copper and brass, by G.&J. W. Hawksley. Capable of delivering up to 2¾ drams of black powder per charge, the flask is fully functioning but does have a minor imperfection to the seam around the otherwise near perfect body. A lovely powder flask of unusual form, that displays well and looks great.
Court or Police Brass & Ash Tipstaff, c.1830 An excellent and original 19th Century tipstaff used as a symbol of office by the courts and police. This tipstaff has a brass tubular body, with a heavy crown top mounted onto an ash wood grip. In tree lore, the ash wood handle may have been chosen as it is said to be a symbol of power, used to ward off evil. Overall excellent condition, with little or no wear. Overall length = 11 inches
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Crimean War Exigency - London Colt Navy .36 Revolver, c.1853 When Colt opened their London premises in 1853, this revolver was among the earliest Model 1851 Navy pistols to leave the Pimlico factory. In fact, Colt's records actually document the manufacture date for this pistol as being 1852. However, the most intriguing detail about this particular revolver, is the absence of all British proof marks: At least two other "London" specimens are known, which incidentally are serially numbered to within 250 pieces of this pistol. This unprecedented anomaly was caused by the outbreak of the Crimean War, which dominated the life and times of this revolver. Today's historians know that a batch of London .36" Colt Navy revolvers were indeed ordered by the British government, who waived the legal requirement for these revolvers to undergo proof. This was a crisis measure done to facilitate the revolvers' immediate delivery to Southampton Docks, where waiting troop ships were about to set sail to the Balkans. By the end of the war, the Royal Navy is documented to have acquired 4,000 Colt revolvers, with a further 5,000 having been procured for the War Department. Most of these of course went through the regular channels of proof... with only the early exigency models being without. Sold un-proofed, this revolver and its other known counterparts continued in service, to a point where they eventually required refurbishment. During their armoury rework, the US naval scene was officially removed from the cylinder, but the serial numbers were left intact. After the work was complete, where appropriate the revolvers were marked with a WD and crow's foot stamp. This is evident on this Colt, but those markings have since become indistinct. From thereon, many government Colt Navy revolvers were redistributed, with supplies going to the Dockyard Constabulary as well as overseas police forces, but may more went on to serve in India, in the aftermath of the Mutiny. Some field repairs and the addition of a lanyard hole in the original grip, suggest the latter may have been the route taken by this example. Unlike many others of this genre, this Colt Navy revolver has retained its correct cylinder... although the wedge is mismatched. Good angles and a general state of aged preservation make this an attractive piece for the collector of historic firearms. With good nipples and some original domed screws, light surface pitting and a dark age patina, is now evident throughout. All in all a rare variant for the Colt collector.
Crimean War Exigency - London Colt Navy .36 Revolver, c.1853 When Colt opened their London premises in 1853, this revolver was among the earliest Model 1851 Navy pistols to leave the Pimlico factory. In fact, Colt's records actually document the manufacture date for this pistol as being 1852. However, the most intriguing detail about this particular revolver, is the absence of all British proof marks: This is not altogether an unprecedented anomaly as at least two other "London" specimens are known to exist, with the lack of proof being attributed to the military's need for pistols brought about by the outbreak of the Crimean War. Today's historians know that at this time a batch of London .36" Colt Navy revolvers were indeed ordered by the British government, who waived the legal requirement for these revolvers to undergo proof. This was a crisis measure done to facilitate the revolvers' delivery to Southampton Docks, where waiting troop ships were about to set sail to the Balkans. By the end of the war, the Royal Navy is documented to have acquired 4,000 Colt revolvers, with a further 5,000 having been procured for the War Department. Most of these of course went through the regular channels of proof... with only the early exigency models being without. Sold un-proofed, this revolver and its other known counterparts continued in service, to a point where they eventually required refurbishment. During their armoury rework, the US naval scene was officially removed from the cylinder, but the serial numbers were left intact. After the work was completed, where appropriate the revolvers were marked with a WD and crow's foot stamp, as was evident on this Colt - albeit those markings have since been rendered indistinct. From thereon, many government Colt Navy revolvers were redistributed, with supplies going to the Dockyard Constabulary as well as overseas police forces, but may more went on to serve in India, in the aftermath of the Mutiny. Some apparent field repairs and the addition of a lanyard hole to the original grip, suggest the latter may have been the route taken by this example. Unlike many other revolvers of this genre, this Colt Navy has retained its correct original cylinder and only the wedge is mismatched. Good angles and a general state of aged preservation make this an altogether attractive piece for the collector of historic firearms. With light surface pitting and a dark age patina covering the ironwork, this revolver further benefits from good nipples and some original domed screws. All in all a rare variant for the Colt collector. Code: 50836Price: 1290.00 GBP
Crimean War Exigency - London Colt Navy .36 Revolver, c.1853 2019 New Year Special When Colt opened their London premises in 1853, this revolver was among the earliest Model 1851 Navy pistols to leave the Pimlico factory. In fact, Colt's records actually document the manufacture date for this pistol as being 1852. However, the most intriguing detail about this particular revolver, is the absence of all British proof marks: This is not altogether an unprecedented anomaly as at least two other "London" specimens are known to exist, with the lack of proof being attributed to the military's need for pistols brought about by the outbreak of the Crimean War. Today's historians know that at this time a batch of London .36" Colt Navy revolvers were indeed ordered by the British government, who waived the legal requirement for these revolvers to undergo proof. This was a crisis measure done to facilitate the revolvers' delivery to Southampton Docks, where waiting troop ships were about to set sail to the Balkans. By the end of the war, the Royal Navy is documented to have acquired 4,000 Colt revolvers, with a further 5,000 having been procured for the War Department. Most of these of course went through the regular channels of proof... with only the early exigency models being without. Sold un-proofed, this revolver and its other known counterparts continued in service, to a point where they eventually required refurbishment. During their armoury rework, the US naval scene was officially removed from the cylinder, but the serial numbers were left intact. After the work was completed, where appropriate the revolvers were marked with a WD and crow's foot stamp, as was evident on this Colt - albeit those markings have since been rendered indistinct. From thereon, many government Colt Navy revolvers were redistributed, with supplies going to the Dockyard Constabulary as well as overseas police forces, but may more went on to serve in India, in the aftermath of the Mutiny. Some apparent field repairs and the addition of a lanyard hole to the original grip, suggest the latter may have been the route taken by this example. Unlike many other revolvers of this genre, this Colt Navy has retained its correct original cylinder and only the wedge is mismatched. Good angles and a general state of aged preservation make this an altogether attractive piece for the collector of historic firearms. With light surface pitting and a dark age patina covering the ironwork, this revolver further benefits from good nipples and some original domed screws. All in all a rare variant for the Colt collector.
Crimean War Issue, WD Beaumont Adams Percussion Revolver, c.1855 A genuine Ordnance contract 54 bore Beaumont Adams percussion revolver, made and signed by the London Armoury Company. Only around 5000 of these revolvers were made by the LAC, with the majority of them converted to take the .442 centre fire cartridge. So, to find one that has not been adapted or refurbished, is rare. With about 75% of its original finish remaining, this Beaumont Adams revolver has crisp WD and broad arrow marks, as well as a crown inspector's stamp on the butt. Basically this revolver is in a very good state of preservation for an ordnance issue weapon. Tight lock up and smooth indexing, working in both single and double action and all springs are strong. Even the bore, nipples and chambers show little sign of actual use and the grips are undamaged - complete with the military specified lanyard hole. All inscriptions and proof stamps are visible, with some overall service and storage wear being evident. It is of course unusual to find any British martially marked revolvers from this period, as officers were expected to purchase their own. However, it was the NCO's that were supplied with these, brought in for the Crimean War. Difficult to improve upon. Barrel length = 5.5 inches Overall length = 12.5 inches
Crown Contract Officer's Flintlock by Barnett, c.1810 A good government contract flintlock by Barnett, made c.1810, which bears a crown inspector's mark over "2" on the signed lock. This officer's pistol is of the Light Dragoon pattern, with its regulation barrel showing London proofs, together with an interesting and deeply struck stamp, of a star above a pair of letters, which are believed to be, "RS." The flintlock is fully functioning with a strong action and dark patina, showing signs of former service use, leaving a good cosmetic appearance throughout. The pistol has also retained its original ramrod. It is known that John Edward Barnett, who operated between 1810 - 1842, was also a contractor to the Customs and Ordnance. A good find for the collector. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches
Crown Contract Officer's Flintlock by Barnett, c.1810 A good government contract flintlock by Barnett, made c.1810, which bears a crown inspector's mark over "2" on the signed lock. This officer's pistol is of the Light Dragoon pattern, with its regulation barrel showing London proofs, together with an interesting and deeply struck stamp of a star above a pair of letters, which are believed to be, "RS." Another unidentified cartouche of entwined letters can also be found stamped into the woodwork towards the left of the side plate. The flintlock is fully functioning with a strong action and dark patina, showing signs of former service use, leaving a good cosmetic appearance throughout. The pistol has also retained its original ramrod. It is known that John Edward Barnett, who operated between 1810 - 1842, was also a contractor to the Customs and Ordnance. A good find for the collector. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches
Custom Handmade Bushcraft Knife By ASH - Unused A custom bushcraft knife made in England by Anthony Steven Harding. All ASH knives are handmade to a very high standard and this example features O1 Carbon steel in the making of the full tang blade. An easy to sharpen Scandi-grind has been purposefully chosen to aid sharpening to a razor edge and for its ability to split and carve wood, as well as slice. Falling into the bushcraft genre, this knife is well capable of providing lifelong service in the field. From battening wood to making feather sticks, this knife has a robust 4mm spine and full tang beautifully finished with oak laminate scales, green G10 liners and brass Corby bolts, plus lanyard tube. All tempered to Rockwell hardness 59. The leather sheath shows signs on the inside where the knife has been inserted and removed, but is otherwise of good quality, being handmade by Harding. Blade length = 4¼ inches Overall length = 8¾ inches
Custom Moose Frontier Bushcraft Knife By A. S. Harding A premium moose handled Frontier knife, designed and made by Tony Harding. Bearing his "ASH" logo, this robust bushcraft knife has a 4mm thick blade and Scandi grind. This Frontier knife is brand new, although Harding has given it an aged appearance by acid etching the blade and embellishing it with a wayfarer's compass rose. It comes super sharp, protected by a gorgeous handmade leather sheath, wet moulded and fitted to the knife. Made from O1 heat-treated carbon steel, Harding's knives are of premium quality and when married to moose scales, there's something very Wild West about this one. Having used Harding's knives myself, I can attest to their functionality and outstanding build quality. A great collector's knife, or a blade to use for all manner of camp work.
Customs Officer's Brass Barrelled Flintlock By Barnett, c.1810 ZMW Militaria recently sold an identical Barnett flintlock, which was duly attributed to, H.M. Customs. That particular pistol bore a clear, "CUSTOMS," property mark, impressed into the flat atop the brass barrel. The officer's flintlock presented here however, does not have that property mark. On the subject of property marking, traditional hand engraving methods were the most common means of applying ownership details to any service weapon. Hand engraving was relatively quick and easy to apply, whereas the mechanical stamping of an item first required expensive tooling to be obtained. Of course once equipped with a dye, the act of stamping a pistol during its assembly, became an even simpler process. John Edward Barnett was one of the most prolific contractors to the Board of Customs, 1810 -1842, yet few of his "Customs Pattern" flintlocks are ever found thusly marked. Nevertheless, it seems that of those pistols that likely served, Barnett had reserved a space on the barrel flat, where the gunmaker might otherwise have placed his Minories address - This space has however been left vacant. Perhaps the Board of Customs just did not feel any urgent need to marking its weapons? Brass barrelled pistols are believed to have been carried on Customs' cutters operating at sea. Offered in full working order, the pistol is in excellent condition, complete with original ramrod and worm. A superb find for the collector. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13½ inches
Customs Officer's Brass Barrelled Flintlock By Barnett, c.1810 A very good Customs Officer's flintlock by Barnett, being of a rare pattern with brass barrel of approximately 25 bore. Made c.1810, the pistol is fully functioning with a strong action and superb cosmetic appearance, with age patina and overall sleepy, damage free condition - Plus, original ramrod. Such pistols may have been carried on one of the Customs' cutters that operated at sea, in an attempt to trap smugglers before coming inland. The presence of such cutters might well have caused traffickers to dump their cargoes, rather than risk the heavy penalties involved in their illicit trade. Made by the best known supplier of arms to the Board of Customs, this Barnett pistol's provenance is guaranteed genuine, with a correctly impressed "Customs" mark. John Edward Barnett contractor to the Customs and Ordnance, c.1810-1842. An excellent find for the collector. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13.5 inches
CWC British Army 1979 Issue NATO Wristwatch This is a very good example of a genuine NATO wristwatch, made by the Cabot Watch Co. and issued in 1979. All these CWC general service watches were actually issued to every branch of the Armed Forces and as such, they can be found with various case back markings. This particular example has the W10 code and NATO numbers indicating service with the British Army. These watches are also referred to in military circles as the G ten ninety eight, in reference to the form G1098 that a soldier would need to complete to request the issue of such a timepiece. This watch is presented in very good condition and full mechanical working order, with a functioning hack. These watches need to be hand wound on a daily basis, although they will actually run accurately for around 36 hours. This watch was serviced by a third party recently, however no implied guarantee can be given against a third party's work. Nevertheless, the watch is running as well as can be expected, and an optional Premium Service can be purchased to extend the watch's warranty. Although not shown, this watch will be sold complete with a brand new NATO strap. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
CWC RAF Issue 1980 NATO Chronograph These watches were previously manufactured for the MoD by Hamilton, however when the Swiss firm went out of business in 1972, the 'Cabot Watch Company' was created specifically to continue the supply of these superb military watches. CWC was at the time established by the business man Ray Mellor, who had been the director of Hamilton, UK. The CWC name chosen by Mellor, pays homage to John Cabot the enterprising 15th century sailor, navigator and merchant, who was sponsored by King Henry VII to explore and find new lands. Cabot is credited for following in Columbus' wake and likewise, finding North America. CWC is now owned by the military surplus dealer, Silvermans, who purchased the business in 2002. Today however, they no longer hold an MoD contract to supply watches to the armed forces, although they do still manufacture a classic range of military watches for the commercial market. The example offered here is a genuine Royal Air Force issue chronograph dated to 1980 - this detail is confirmed by the presence of the 6BB on the case back, relating to 'flying equipment.' This marking is clear, but shallow and therefore difficult to photograph. If clearer images are needed, please ask for a hi-resolution version to be sent to you. This is one of the last mechanical chronographs to have been made for military consumption, on the cusp of the quartz era. It is still a stunning watch in every respect, with just minor signs of service wear. Military chronograph watches are very desirable, but they no longer come on the market as frequently as they once did, consequently their price has seen a meteoric rise. Today, CWC list a very similar watch in their catalogue, but rest assured this example is a genuine vintage pilot's watch in excellent original condition, complete with NATO strap. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £120.
Czech VTD Military Officer's Pocket Compass, c.1937 A rare pre war Czechoslovakian Army officer's compass, made by the Vojenské Telegrafní Dílny (Military Telegraph Workshop). The VTD company were responsible for field communication equipment, mainly radios and telephones, but under the German protectorate the company was renamed, "Telegraphen Werkstätte." A year later, another name change saw the company calling itself, "Werk Prag, Gbell." The original application of this VTD compass was probably linked to the army's field communications division, as this unusual square compass is clearly marked, "TEL 37." A military property mark, being the Bohemian double tailed lion, is also evident. Presented in excellent used condition, the brass compass is in full working order, with the silvered compass rose being marked, S, J, V and Z. This represent the cardinal points, SEVERNÍ (North), JIH (South), VÝCHOD (East), ZAPÁD (West). A functioning lock is also present and the glass is undamaged. This collector grade compass measures, 4 x 4 cm square.
Danish Remington Rolling Block Rifle, c.1872 A Danish Military Model 1867 Rolling Block Rifle, developed under licence with Remington and chambered for the now obsolete 11.7mm x 51 calibre cartridge. These service rifles represented a major international deal with Remington leading to other Scandinavian armies adopting the Rolling Block. Ingeniously, the Danish armoury redesigned the action in 1872, allowing the rifle to shoot either rimfire or the newly adopted centre fire cartridges. This was down to the Danish Rolling Block having two firing pins that worked simultaneously firing whatever cartridge was chambered - This dual cartridge system was used in the manufacture of this rifle. Presented in very good condition and strong working action, this rifle is regimentally stamped "3AB 1396" within a brass roundel in the butt. The bore is in mint condition and the screws appear to be generally untouched, with the woodwork having a small loss at the forend. It comes complete with its good original leather sling. Barrel length = 33 inches
Deane Harding 54 Bore Percussion Revolver c.1860 First made in 1858, this scarce 54 bore revolver was made by Deane & Sons in partnership with their hired company manager, James William Harding. This was an unusual union brought about after the Deane-Adams relationship dissolved, when Robert Adams left the company to ally with the London Arms Company, allowing them to take over production of the Beaumont Adams revolver. Needing a large frame double action revolver to compete with the likes of Adams, Tranter and Webley, the Deane-Harding relationship offered to provide a high-quality firearm suitable for military applications. These revolvers differed substantially from others by virtue of their two-part barrel and frame assembly that relied on a hinge and hook to lock both parts together. The concept resulted in a strong revolver but mechanically it failed to gain widespread approval in military circles. Certainly, when Lord Roberts influentially wrote in an English firearms publication that the gun, “Could always be depended upon to malfunction at a critical moment," his comments impacted on sales. In the end, Deane turned his sights toward the civilian market and the production of smaller calibre pistols. Sales of the expensive London Deane-Harding revolver were slow, so the company approached the Birmingham Gun Trade to manufacture the pistol more cheaply. A cartridge version of the revolver later appeared, which continued in production until the early 1870s. This London proofed Deane-Harding revolver has an all over dark aged patina, however, it is mechanically in need of some attention - The double action is working but the trigger return spring and hand are missing. Nevertheless, the revolver is visually complete with an attractive salt and pepper speckled and lightly dimpled surface, which has retained good angles as well as having a readable "Deane Harding" makers and Patent legend. The top strap is however unattributed. Decent grips, nice nipples and a good mainspring make this revolver worthy of further preservation. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Demolition Special Ops Dagger Jack Knife A dagger jack knife issued to demolition teams, usually associated with Commandos and SOE. Bearing the manufacturer\'s mark of \"H. Rowbotham\" this knife is in good condition, retaining a firm opening and closing action. Cosmetically the knife has some surface rusting but it is otherwise in sound condition with a nicely profiled balde showing signs of service use and sharpening, while the grip has a typical loss to both scales around the lanyard ring. The large locking screwdriver blade, often used as a pry tool, also features a wire-stripper. The knife has an overall length of 12 cm with a main blade measuring 7½ cm, making this suitable for EDC under UK law. Only the screwdriver/pry bar is lockable.
Department of Energy Nuclear Stopwatch, c.1980 A rare broad arrow marked stopwatch by Precista, issued to the Department of Energy, probably within a nuclear establishment. It comes in its original \"Gosport\" marked watch repair box. Presented in excellent condition, this stopwatch has just been cleaned and tested as working correctly. ZMW Militaria do not restore or polish timepieces, rather, our service work removes the detritus of decades without adversely affecting any desirable age patina. Watch and clock mechanisms are then checked, oiled and reassembled. Should parts be required, we will endeavour to use only original parts.
Des Horn HBP80 Meteorite Flipper Knife A rare Gibeon Meteorite \"Front Flipper\" knife by the legendary Master Bladesmith, Des Horn. Known as the model HBP80 (Hidden Ball Pivot), this knife features Horn\'s, \"Front Flipper\" Damascus blade and gold pins: This is not a spring assisted blade, but rather, it\'s a blade designed to be opened one-handed, requiring only a quick flick of the finger. This action releases the blade and the perfect HBP locks it into position, engaging the side lock. Absolute precision. Sold in as new condition, with its original handmade ostrich pouch. For more information and a video, please see an identical but new knife offered at \"Blade Gallery\" https://www.bladegallery.com/shopexd.asp?id=109279 Original Price: $4,200.00 *** This is handmade and one-of-a-kind *** Blade length: 2½ inches Total length open: 5½ inches
Desk Top Model Cannon Selling on consignment: A desktop model cannon with a turned iron/steel barrel and fittings, on a solid wood truck. Barrel length = Total length =
Detective Duty Irish Constabulary Percussion Pistol c.1848 In 1847 Hollis Brothers were contracted to supply 500 Special Duty pistols. These pistols were made to a new design for the Irish Constabulary and were intended for plain clothes work. Each pistol featured a box lock action with a large heavy hammer and 4 ½” barrel bored to take a man-stopping .65 calibre ball. With the swivel ram rod slung below a strengthening rib, the overall profile of these pistols, was given a smoothly contoured look. The first pistols were supplied in 1848, were stamped with the VR Queen's Crown mark - this mark is still present at the side of the action. Feint proof marks are also present, but these marks have been worn through service wear. Originally the pistols were supplied with a holster, but given their profile and intended duty, no doubt these pistols were carried in coat pockets. Given the troubled times in which this rare pistol served, it is still in good order and is mechanically sound with a proper solid action. A strong period repair to the walnut butt gives further testimony to the circumstances in which these arms were used, as many a constable must have been thankful for the reassuring touch of the bag shaped grip in his hand.
Devizes House of Correction Pistol, c.1810 A rare prison guard's pistol of about 13 bore, made by William Parker, c.1810. The County House of Correction in Devizes, Wiltshire, England, has existed in one form or another since the late 16th century. During this time it has been both a castle and a purpose built place for the punishment and reformation of those convicted of petty offences. Although on a much smaller scale, the House of Correction - Devizes - was run on the principles of Bridewell Prison in London, which also led to it being informally referred to as, "Bridewell." It consisted of just 12 cells, but included an infirmary and chapel. In 1806, following the death in custody of Thomas Platt, from cold and hunger, the authorities set about building entirely new premises situated in what is Bridewell Street, Wiltshire. Opened in 1817, New Bridewell existed alongside Old Bridewell, which was now little more than an occasional holding place for those awaiting court trial. However, with the formation of Britain's first rural police force in 1839, Wiltshire Constabulary took over "Old Bridewell" for use as their police station. Dating from those transitional years of the House of Correction, from Old to New Bridewell, this muzzle loading pistol by Parker has seen extended service as a prison guard's firearm, which possibly became part of the Wiltshire police armoury. This would certainly account for why it was adapted to fire using the percussion ignition system, probably in the late 1830's. Presented in good condition, this pistol is in strong working order, with worn but nevertheless clear marking, which reads, "Maker to His Majesty - House of Correction - Devizes." All woodwork is in good condition, with no losses or repairs, decorated with attractive brass embellishments and unusual flared butt. Overall a rare and attractive military styled pistol, which served with the legal authority of Wiltshire. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15¼ inches
DH Military Watches - WW2 German Army Officer's Gala Wristwatch During WW2, just as the British Army appears to have issued more in the way of military pocket watches to its troops, the German Army appears to have done the reverse, by issuing more wristwatches to its military. Interestingly, when you compare the British Army wristwatch equivalent to the Wermacht's, you will find that the Germans procured superior timepieces from their Swiss watch suppliers. There is a good reason for this too - and not just one of penny pinching cost. Being in a neutral country, the watch companies of Switzerland were able to carry on trading, supplying both combating nations with timepieces. The Germans certainly ordered the latest innovations such as watches with dust and waterproof cases, plus antimagnetic and shockproof movements. No doubt, the British War Department would have been delighted to receive watches with the same specification of attributes, but the Germans authority was able to influence the Swiss trade with England, to only permitting air freight to pass via Berlin, containing lesser grade materials, where they believed that the products may be aiding the Allied war effort. So, only the war grade "economy" watch cases and standard watch movements made it to the UK in this manner. Perhaps that may also account for as to why the British used more pocket watches? After all, the pocket watch was better protected in a Battle Dress pocket. Made by Gala c.1939, this German Army watch is fully stamped with the DH (Deutsche Heer) property mark and issue number. Internally the good movement made by A.Schild calibre 1130, is the ubiquitous and so called "Wermacht movement," as it dominates the German Army wristwatch scene. This in itself was a shrewd tactical decision, thereby limiting the need for numerous spares to be held in stock to fit all manner of watch movements. Therefore, whilst there were numerous watch suppliers providing for the German Army, the vast majority had the mechanical parts and spares all sourced from the one factory. This is just such a utility watch, carefully designed to meet military requirements. Presented in good used original condition, this watch is also supplied on what may be its wartime issue leather strap - it's certainly the correct pattern. The watch is in working order, although servicing is recommended for those who would wish to use the watch on a regular basis. The movement is nevertheless in very good condition, whilst the case exhibits typical signs of service wear. The dial and hands are in excellent condition and should the buyer so wish, the Premium Service would also restore the hands to peak condition. Watch diameter is 34mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Dixon & Sons Pistol Size Gun Powder Flask c.1850 A good copper and brass pistol flask made and signed by James Dixon & Sons. With some minor service wear and bruises, this flask is in overall good condition, with all seams intact, working nozzle and a functioning spring. Unusually the flask has a side suspension loop, allowing it to be worn on a lanyard or cord, which may indicate military use. A good Dixon flask.
Double Action 80 Bore Percussion Revolver, c.1855 This is a smaller 80 bore, 'medium size' six shot version of the double action only Adams revolver, which saw favour with many British army officers. The presence of the lanyard ring certainly suggest that this handy personal protection weapon may have been intended for campaign carry as a back-up. Beautifully engraved in the English style, this revolver is in excellent condition throughout, having retained much of its original finish. Mechanically the action is in very good working order, with good lock up and strong springs throughout. Perfect walnut grips and good screws, make this a wonderful example for the collector.
Double Barrelled O/U Flintlock by J & W Richards, c.1810 Consignment Sale: A good double-barrelled over and under pocket pistol of around 54 bore, signed by the gunmakers "J & W Richards". This flintlock pistol has a strong working action, with a crisp functioning drop-down trigger and operating safety. Presented in good condition, with clear markings, with the ironwork showing dark colours.
Double Trigger - Model 1883 10.55mm Reichsrevolver A rare variant of the original Model 1883 Reichsrevolver, issued to German military officers. These Dreyse double action revolvers were refined and benefited from having twin triggers, polished action, hooked guard and finely checkered grips. They were originally issued to the Kriegsmarine officers, however they also saw service during WW1. This particular revolver comes from the estate of the man who acquired it during WW1. As is, this double action Reichsrevolver is a good and solid example offered in fine working order with a good bright barrel bore and cylinders. All functions work well and the revolver is evenly patinated, with some original blue finish to sheltered areas. All in all, a highly presentable and unmolested example of the sought after military Reichsrevolver. It is an obsolete calibre pistol and may be owned in the UK as an antique, without any certificate.
Dublin Preventive Water Guard's Flintlock by Rigby c.1820 Rigby are regarded as Ireland's premier gunmaker, supplying arms to both the civilian population and also under government contract to the Irish authorities. This is one of their overcoat flintlocks, made c.1820 when the gunmaker started trading under the name, W & J Rigby. This rare flintlock pistol was issued to the Dublin Preventive Water Guard, who were an organised body responsible for curtailing the smuggling trade, becoming known as the 'Coast Guard' in 1822. A summary of the PWG's formation and history can be found elsewhere on this site (search for Preventive Water Guard). Also, a larger version of this pistol is available elsewhere on this site. This Preventive Water Guard's pistol is exceptionally rare to find with the "Dublin PWG" provenance stamped along the barrel rib. Having briefly searched the internet, an intriguing history of the Dublin PWG can be found, amongst which is this letter; To Comptroller General. Preventive Water Guard. Dublin. 27th November 1821 Sir, I beg to acquaint you that Mr.Harris, Chief Officer of the Preventive Station at Rush and six of his men being out on duty at Loughshinney in company with the Chief Boatman and five of the crew of the Station at Skerries on the night of the 23rd. at 9 pm. He discovered a smuggling cutter in the bay at 11pm. Burnt a blue light and fired three carbines as a signal for the remainder of the Rush and Skerries crew to join him. At midnight upwards of 300 men, armed with muskets, pistols, pikes and pitchforks came down for the purpose of forcing a landing. At 2 am. the fieldpiece was brought to Loughshinney from Skerries by Lt. Smith, Chief Officer and a party of men when the smugglers dispersed in all directions at 3am. Two large boats apparently laden put off from the cutter and came close to the shore but finding all the smugglers and cars had left the beach they immediately returned on board and after unloading the boats they got underweigh and put to sea. Richard Williams, Commissioned Boatman and Henry Gilmore, an extra man at the Preventive Station, Rush, were surrounded and disarmed by nearly 100 men on Rogerstown Strand at 9pm. And it appears to have been the intention of the smugglers to disarm both the Rush and Loughshinney crews. Thomas Randal, Chief Boatman at Skerries was knocked down and disarmed at Kirkeen Cross, near Loughshinney. The smugglers I am informed succeeded in landing some tobacco but I believe a very small quantity. As they appeared determined to force a landing if possible, I beg leave to recommend that 8 additional extra men may be employed in this district, viz. 3 at Skerries, 3 at Rush and 2 at Portrane. (signed) Thomas Blake. Clearly this highly collectable pistol has been used in service, but it remains in good unmolested original condition, with a strong working lock. It measures 10 inches overall and has a 5 inch barrel of approximately 16 Bore. A difficult piece to find.
Duelling Pistol By Needler of Hull, c.1800 Duelling pistols are relatively scarce, however the amount of them that have survived leads to the perception that the practice of settling disputes in this deadly manner, must have been common place. Of course, it might also be that any wealthy gentleman worth his salt, simply needed to own duellers to be considered worthy in society. Interestingly however, the act of duelling was never legal in England, yet it was officially made illegal by Statute Law in 1819 - Although the last recorded duel was fought as late as in 1852, with fatal consequences. Made by Needham of Hull, this dueller was originally a flintlock pistol, making it an example from the heyday of duelling. Presented in good condition, the pistol retains sharp profiles around the barrel flats and clearly signed top strap. Slightly muted colours but much original finish remains and the pistol benefits from a fully working action with a bolted safety - All with strong springs. Just a partial loss to the edge of a fore end escutcheon. The ramrod is also original, featuring a turn off end cap, which conceals the worm. Overall a slender and well proportioned duelling pistol
Durs Egg - Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock Pistol c.1795 A Light Dragoon flintlock pistol of regulation pattern, made by the legendary Durs Egg. Initially apprenticed to John Twigg, Egg quickly earned a reputation as one of the finest gunmakers, establishing his own London based trade in 1778. As a gunmaker to the aristocracy, Egg was heavily involved in the supply of pistols to England’s influential nobility. Such a reputation implies that this Light Dragoon pistol was once part of an armoury held by an elite and wealthy Volunteer Cavalry Unit. Many volunteer corps were formed at this time, in response to the wars being fought by revolutionary France - however, only a small number of these volunteer corps could ever be considered as, "Select." Being a member of such an exclusive corps would have either required the purchase of your own regulation pistol, or the patronage of a wealthy benefactor. The latter is certainly more plausible in this instance, as the rack number on the side of the Light Dragoon pistol suggests that it was stored with other like weapons in the unit's armoury. Presumably the benefactor considered it important that his corps would be armed with only the best pistols, supplied by the King’s own gunmaker. The slightly radiused lock shows good clear King’s Crown marks and boarder engraving. All springs are good with the action functioning well. On the 9” barrel there are London Proof marks at breech and all metal work has a grey patina. Woodwork is good and solid, with brass mounts and an iron ramrod. A good regulation pistol by a gunmaker of renowned pedigree.
Early .442 Revolver of Webley/Tranter Pattern, c.1870 This early military type revolver was made by the Birmingham gun trade c.1870, probably with the intention of attracting a private purchase by an army officer. Large and robustly made, this .442 centre fire revolver borrows from the designs of both Tranter and Webley, with its most distinctive feature being the compound link cartridge extracting lever on the right of the frame: In G. Bruce & C. Reinhart's "Webley Revolver" book, they identify this pattern as being made for the gun trade in the late 1870s. Functioning and indexing well with a smooth action, assisted by a friction brake, this revolver is in good condition overall retaining traces of original finish, but generally exhibiting a dark aged patina to the exposed surfaces. Some general signs of campaign wear are also evident, as is a single brass screw within the extractor link. Nevertheless, this revolver benefits from having undamaged grips and a reasonable bore. As is, it is an attractive and scarce pistol for the collector.
Early 1841 Tower Percussion Coastguard Pistol An early Board of Ordnance marked Coastguard percussion pistol, bearing the now rubbed date of 1841. This Tower pistol is marked on the woodwork, "Hollis" and features the early stepped flat lock, stamped with the Queen's Crown and military arrow. The pistol has a strong action with good springs, plus its original nipple. This Coastguard pattern pistol is in service used condition, but it is original and complete, with the usual proof marks on the round barrel and overall surface wear. Iron surfaces have aged to a pleasing salt and pepper colouring and brass fittings are all good. In addition, the trigger guard bears a rack number of XII. A good example of the Coastguard pistol, fully functioning and with evidence of military service use.
Early 1841 Tower Percussion Coastguard Pistol An early Board of Ordnance and broad arrow marked Coastguard percussion pistol, bearing the now rubbed date of 1841. This Tower pistol is marked on the woodwork, "Hollis" and features the early stepped flat lock, stamped with the Queen's Crown and military arrow. The pistol has a strong action with good springs, plus its original nipple. This Coastguard pattern pistol is in service used condition, but it is original and complete, with the usual proof marks on the round barrel and overall surface wear. Iron surfaces have aged to a pleasing salt and pepper colouring and brass fittings are all good. In addition, the trigger guard bears a rack number of XII. A good example of the Coastguard pistol, fully functioning and with evidence of military service use.
Early 1885 Waltham Railway Pocket Watch This is a heavy duty service pocket watch, which still exhibits the coal smoke staining associated with work on a steam railway. This can be cleaned, but as is, it shows the watch to be in a time warp condition. According to Waltham watch company records, this watch was made in 1885, but retailed in London by the firm of H. W. Bedford of Regent Street, London. Identical watches from this period may sometimes be found bearing the initials of the railway companies where they served, however this example has a plain case with no additional engraving. Furthermore, the railway Walthams have some extra features which separate them from regular timepieces. These features include the absence of a second hand and a device that prevents the accidental changing of the watch's time. This means that the time can only be set after a lever is activated under the bezel, before turning the watch crown to move the hands. This large railway watch is in very good and original condition with only mild sign of actual service use. It is presently working with a strong action and keeping good time, although consideration needs to be given to having the movement cleaned. The dial can be also be cleaned if this is desired. A great original railway timepiece in sleepy condition. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Early 19th Century Moroccan Gunner's Powder Horn A Moroccan gunner's powder horn from the early 1800s, of the type and style reminiscent of those used by Berbers along the Barbary Coast. Nominally part of the Ottoman Empire, the area was ruled by pashas in Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis, which together with the independent Sultanate of Morocco were collectively known as the Barbary States. This notorious region was infamously engaged in the slave trade and piracy, with the corsairs being actively at war with America. Overall this gunner's powder horn is in very good original condition, with the body being in solid order and capped at either end with hand chased ironware. A leather bung and hanging belt are also present. A very good item.
Early Brander 25 Bore Duelling Pistol, c.1770 An attractive 25 bore holster or duelling pistol of early style, signed "Brander, Minories London." William Brander is recorded as being at 70 Minories, between 1765-87, during which time he was joined by his son, Martin, as an apprentice gun maker. Interestingly, this pistol bears the initial stamp "MB" on the barrel. Martin later took over from his father and founded the partnership of Brander & Potts in 1802. Just like his father, he was a contractor for the East India Company, as well as to the Board of Ordnance. Martin Brander also joined the Honourable Artillery Company. Converted from flintlock to percussion, using the early drum and nipple conversion, this pistol has seen extended service, but has always been very well looked after, as indicated by the condition of the nickel silver mounts, which now have a pleasant age patina. These mounts comprise of; an early long eared butt cap finished with a cast grotesque mask, trigger guard with finely engraved acorn finial and bearing unidentified family crest of a crossed, bow, arrow and quiver. Overall the pistol is in lovely condition, having strong springs and a working lock - although the nipple is a little short. The warmly coloured full stocked woodwork has most of its original finish, with just minor bumps, compliments the swamped barrel and horn tipped ramrod. An attractive example in all respects. Barrel length = 10 inches Overall length = 15.5 inches
Early British Army Bugle By Keat & Son A very good pre-WW1 British Army issue bugle made by Henry Keat & Son. Keat operated a family business of instrument makers who moved to 103 -105 Mathias Street, London, in 1866. Their history shows that they were contracted to the War Department in 1896, supplying 2000 - 3000 bugles annually. A hallmark of quality identifying this as an early bugle is one of their early bugles is their addition of a silver cushioned mouthpiece, as this one has. Furthermore, the mouthpiece is fully signed with Keat\'s name and address, as well as bearing the same broad arrow stamps. This is rare to find with the security chain intact. Being made of both copper and brass, this bugle is a lovely historic example, which plays well. Early, during WW2, Keat relocated their company.
Early Colt 1862 Police .38 Rimfire Revolver The original design for the Colt Model 1862 .36 Police revolver, called for a percussion ignition system - However, it was not too long after its introduction to the Colt line that designers started to consider the commercial benefits of self-contained cartridges. Being a resourceful man, Samuel Colt initially utilised what was available from stock, resulting in the creation of a familiar styled, yet altogether new genre of breech loading revolver for law enforcement officers and civilians alike, that would be capable of chambering the larger .38 Rimfire cartridge. This particular breech loading revolver, with its low three digit serial number, is one of Colt's first transitional Police pistols. It is being offered in perfect working order with a smooth action, good lock up, bore and clear chambers; yet typically being a pocket carry gun, the finish has become rubbed and is now showing a grey, black and brown overall patina. All inscriptions remain clear. A rare Colt Police pistol for the collector, which may be owned as an antique curio.
Early Colt 1911 .45 Pistol Magazine, c.1912 A rare Colt 1911 .45 pistol magazine being of early two-tone type, with a pinned baseplate. This design incorporating a lanyard loop was shortlived, changing in 1913. Presented in very good original condition, with only minor service wear.
Early Colt M1862 Police .36 Percussion Revolver & Holster The Colt M1862 Police revolver has the distinction of being the company's final percussion model to be produced before the metallic cartridge era revolutionised the gun world. As such, this model needs very little introduction, although this example does have some additional attributes. Most obviously, this revolver has the desirable longer barrel length, but other peculiarities single this one out as being of extra historical interest to the Colt arms collector. Being an early example dating to 1863, this American made Colt Police revolver was sent to England, as the crown marks and London proofs denote. More intriguing however is the presence of an "E" suffix given to the serial number. Some references suggest that the "E" letter was used to identify revolvers that were factory Engraved, but this seems doubtful given the fact that this, and others like it, have a plain finish. Presented here in its rare service black leather flap holster, this M1862 Colt Police revolver would merit further research. Offered in very good condition throughout, this Colt has clearly been carried, but seldom used, as evidenced by its tight condition, lock-up, excellent bore and nipples. Most of the surface finish is now worn, but the pistol nevertheless remains a sharp example with little in the way of pitting, having retained all stamps and clear New York address. Barrel length = 5.5 inches Overall length = 10.5 inches
Early Jet Age RAF Pilot's Smiths Stop Watch This is a superb example of an early RAF Jet Age pilot's stop watch, together with an instrument panel mounting case. Made by Smiths in 1952, this stop watch is in full working order with the stop, start and reset functions all operating well, although not tested for precision timekeeping. Exhibiting only light signs of service use, the case and dial are fully marked with the broad arrow emblem and RAF stores references.
Early Longines Weems Pilot\'s Wristwatch, c.1939 This is a very early Longines Weems pilot's watch, which predates those supplied to the Air Ministry. As such, this Weems has some minor cosmetic differences, most notably the superior rhodium finish on the movement plates. The watch is running well and keeping time, although no guarantee is implied. The characteristic bezel turns freely but locks tight against the auxiliary crown used to synchronise the timepiece to a signal. A great looking and desirable Longine Weems, priced sensibly for the investor, collector or everyday user of fine watches. Presented on a period "Empire" marked military leather watch strap, which is a lovely shade of tan that will colour up further with use.
Early Military Civil Service (India) Wristwatch c.1920 The Civil Service worked throughout the British Empire and South Asia, with civilian staff frequently working under the gaze of military personnel. As such, the Civil Service were also given watches to utilise them at work. These watches were supplied by the Bombay based West End Watch Company, who were required to property mark their timepieces with the CS(I) stamp. Unusually though, this marking was most frequently hidden from view, being on the inside of the watch case backs - as in this instance. This is an early watch dating to c.1920, which is marked "Secundus" on the dial, a name that most likely meant, "Lucky" or "Favourable." It bears the WEW Co. logo on both the dial and also on the jewelled movement, which is working and keeping time. However there is no indication as to when this watch was last serviced. Overall though, this watch is in good condition with just surface wear to the outer case. A good example of an early issue wristwatch. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Early P1887 Martini Sword Bayonet A superb example of an early P1887 Martini sword bayonet, with 18 inch blade. As per the early War Department specifications, this bayonet has the fuller on the blade and, a leaf type spring latch. These features were eliminated in 1888 when a Mark II version was introduced, making the first pattern examples hard to find. Clear WD and Enfield inspector's marks are present throughout and the bayonet comes with a contemporary steel mounted leather scabbard, all in excellent condition, without foreign issue script. Overall, a very desirable sword bayonet.
Early Pattern Webley Holster A pre WW1 military pattern holster, made for a large service revolver of Webley Mark VI proportions. The leather holster is in good condition, with firm stitching, except for the belt tab on the rear where the stitching has come apart. Nevertheless, a nice looking holster which displays well, has no holes and is supple enough to use as storage for your period revolver. Pistol not included.
Early PLA Police Detective\'s Truncheon, Pre-WW1 This is an early and rare Port of London Authority police truncheon, issued to a detective in the CID. It has a length of just 10½ inches (27cm) and is made of lignum vitae or similar heavy wood, which is in excellent condition, being marked \"PLA\" and what appears to be, \"NO 2\" on the pommel. The truncheon style, with its beehive-style ribbed handle, identifies it as a pre-WW1 example - perhaps even late Victorian in date. The PLA Constabulary existed to police the Thames, its dockyards and marine vessels, which also saw them working alongside Customs officials. Burglaries and smuggling rackets were abundant, necessitating undercover operations by the Criminal Investigation Department to thwart what were violent gangs. All in all, a very interesting truncheon from a now-defunct police constabulary.
Early RAF Navigator's Stop Watch c.1940 During WW2, Lemania supplied many pocket stop watches to the Air Ministry. This example is marked with the RAF 6B reference code, identifying that this Lemania was an item of actual 'Flying Equipment." As such, this watch would have been flying with the navigator, performing a crucial role on each of the aircrews' missions. After each operational briefing, the navigator would sit down to calculate a flight-plan. Part of this planning was to identify key points along the route and to work out the time differences between each of these points. Strategic landmarks, turning points and other essential information was as near as could be, calculated to the precise second, so that during the flight the navigator could instruct the pilot at the appropriate time, what to do next. As is, this Lemania stop watch is a good example of its type, with clear signs of service wear, with several abrasions to its finish on the case and glass. The dial is however virtually pristine, with only a tiny crescent clip to the enamel at the very centre below the hand. The case is in good order, with no nasty dents but a mottled aged patina. Internally the movement is in very good condition. The stop watch works, stopping and starting with each depression of the winding crown. This all works as it should, however the watch has not been serviced.
Early RFC Cockpit Watch By Williamson, c.1914 A scarce and early 8-day cockpit watch by Williamson. Early WD marked watches with white dials, predate WW1. Issued to the Air Battalion, the fist army pilots formed what was to become the RFC. After that, cockpit-watches were then only supplied with black dials. “The air battalion of the Royal Engineers became the RFC’s military wing, with both balloons and aeroplanes. Number One Squadron of the RFC manned the balloons. Numbers Two and Three flew the aeroplanes. Confusingly the air battalion’s aeroplane section became Number Three Squadron RFC, but claimed precedence over the others, as it had been the first unit to fly heavier-than-air machines, not balloons. Number Three’s motto stated the matter firmly: Tertius primus erit (‘The third shall be first’). By 1914 two more squadrons, Four and Five, had been created. The naval wing was separated off in 1914 as the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS).” Wikipedia. Offered in full working order, this rare timepiece has some service wear but remains in excellent original condition. An early aviator's watch.
Early RFC War Department 8 Day Pilot's Watch, c.1913 This watch represents a period in history just prior to the inauguration of the Royal Flying Corps, when the War Department controlled the air wing of the Army. Supplied to the military by the London jeweller Casella, this Mark IV aircraft instrument timepiece utilises a Swiss 8-Day pocket watch to conform to the specifications decreed by the War Department. The provision of an 8-Day movement meant that the Mark IV watches could be relied upon to keep running for a prolonged period between winding. Of course these watches remained in service with the RFC, even when the Mark V spec became available. Presented in good condition with only minor signs of service wear, this watch is working well and keeping time; however the Premium Service can be purchased at a concessionary price, which includes 12 months warranty.
Early RIC
Early S&W .44 Russian Double Action Revolver, c.1880 Consignment Sale: A very early Smith & Wesson .44 Russian, DA revolver, made c.1880. With the serial number being in the lower two-digit range, this example must be one of the first double-action revolvers to leave the S&W factory... Probably on the first day of production! Totally original, this S&W revolver shows typical signs of carry and use, with the resultant commensurate wear, but no evidence of abuse or repair. It is in full working order, no doubt having been looked after professionally. With the factory blue having been replaced by age patina and the original wood smoothed by the grip of a grateful hand, this revolver is a great sleepy example. Overall, very pleasing with its salt and pepper finish and light speckled pitting over the ironwork, yet crisp and clear S&W patent details to the top rib.
Early Silver Mounted Flintlock By Blyth, c.1757 Selling on consignment: A lovely brass barrelled flintlock pistol signed Blyth, with 1757 London Hallmarked silver grotesque mask. Presented in good working order, the pistol shows signs of wear and previous gunsmith work, as well as a small loss to the butt where it joins the left side of the rounded frame. Overall, an attractive mid 18th Century flintlock. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 7¾ inches
Early War Department Pocket Knife By Burgh & Son A rare and early military pattern knife by Burgh & Son, bearing the soldier\'s warrant number. The blade, which is a little over 3 inches, is reasonable and bears War Department marks together with a broad arrow. Overall the knife has signs of service wear but it remains in good order.
Early Webley Mark 3 Air Rifle An early example of a Webley & Scott Mk.3 .177 under lever air rifle, made in the first few year of manufacture. Presented in excellent original condition and working order, with no sign of tampering or cosmetic restoration. A genuine collector grade rifle with much original varnish and factory blue finish, showing some age patina on the bright steel surfaces. Offered complete with its Parker Hale PH17B diopter sight and 6 interchangeable foresight inserts. Difficult to find this good.
Early Webley No. 2 RIC .320CF Revolver. c.1881 In 1881 Webley catalogued this small frame No.2 revolver, as a model "RIC." However, unlike the larger Royal Irish Constabulary counterparts, these revolvers were never stamped with the acronym and production of this gate loading model ran alongside the more modern hinged frame Webley Pockets. A fluted cylinder was introduced several years later, but as this revolver has the early plain cylinder, a manufacturing date of pre 1890 can be concluded. Historically, this particular model appears to have been favoured by army officers as a backup to their regular revolver, as evidenced by the fact that the Imperial War Museum has a number of these in their archives. Production of the No.2 RIC finally ended in 1915. Chambered for the now obsolete .320 Centre Fire cartridge, this RIC was retailed by the London based gun company of S. W. Silver. It has a heavy trigger pull but is nevertheless in good working order in both double and single action. Internally the bore and chambers are all excellent, showing just a hint of frosting down the barrel - Probably having seen very little actual use. Although the revolver retains much of the original nickel finish, there is some wear and light pitting to exposed surfaces. The two piece checkered gips are perfect and all stamping, which includes the Webley 'Winged Bullet' trade mark, are clearly defined. A good example of a difficult to find British .320 Webley RIC revolver. Barrel length = 2.25 inches Overall length = 5.5 inches
Early WW1 Era Military Trench Watch & Mesh Guard This is an excellent and original military pattern wristlet of the Great War era. It is very much of the pattern that was issued to the British Army, however this watch is not military marked - so most likely this watch would have been an officer's private purchase. The screw case is marked internally as, "Pure Nickel," and this is in very good condition throughout, with little service wear. The narrow leather strap is again of military specification and is of the one piece design - it has been embossed, "Victor." Internally the movement is of high quality and has been identified as a Rotary watch. It has a fine decorated 15 jewel ebauche, which is working well and keeping time, although it has not been serviced. The military features of this wristlet are further enhanced by the presence of a protective grill cover, over the original glass and the presence of an original onion crown. All in all, this watch is a fine collector's item that is difficult to find in all original condition. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Early WW2 German Army Pocket Watch, c.1938 This is one of the superior German military pocket watches issued at the start of WW2. Made by Doxa, this watch interestingly came to me in a wartime French-made protective case! The watch bears a military number on the case. In 1935, after the Wehrmacht replaced the Reichswehr, Germany looked to procure the most modern equipment for its armed forces. By 1938, after Swiss watchmakers patented shockproof balances, the German Army received these timepieces in robust waterproof cases and with antimagnetic cages covering the movement. These were highly desirable military watches. This original Doxa watch is in superb condition. It has been serviced but not restored, which means that the watch has been cleaned using techniques that do not spoil the attractive age patina.
Early WW2 Military Issue Mark II General Service Pocket Watch This is a rare General Service military pocket watch made by Grana c.1938. Originally the watch company was founded by the Kurth Frères (brothers), who registered the brand "Grana" as it was the Latin name for their home of Grenchen in Switzerland. The Grana company also went by the name "Certina" with the two being inextricably linked. Their high quality watch movements are easily identified, bearing the Kurth brothers initials, KF. This GS Mark II 50mm pocket watch is in good original condition throughout and, whilst it does exhibit some light signs of service wear, all military engraving is good and clear. These timepieces differed from the later GSTP watches by virtue of their screw cases. The screw case does up tightly, making this a desirable early war timepiece with a high grade movement in full working order. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
East India Government Issue Percussion Pistol, c.1871 A very good East India Government issue, 16 bore percussion holster pistol, c. 1871. The pistol bears all the usual array of inspector's marks and Tower proofs, as well as the EIG roundel on the woodwork. Cosmetically in untouched condition, the pistol shows light signs of service wear with minor bruises and age patina. All in all, the action is in fully working condition with strong springs, good bore and nipple. Overall a historic example being one of the last single shot percussion pistols made for the military. Barrel Length = 8 inches Overall Length = 13½ inches
EIC Lancer's Flintlock Pistol, c.1820 A very good East India Company Lancer's flintlock pistol, c.1820. This pistol is of early regulation pattern, featuring the brass side plate and Baker's lock, bearing the company's rampant lion. It is in strong working order with surface staining and light pitting to the ironwork, and no loss to the furniture. A well proportioned martial pistol showing just minor signs of service wear, with clear ordnance markings throughout. Collector grade.
EIC Lancer's Percussion Pistol, c.1842 A regulation percussion pistol of East India Company - Lancer's pattern, as used in all major military engagements in India between 1840 to 1860. This particular service pistol was armoury made in India, probably for issue to an elite native regiments. As such, it does not have all the stampings associated with a British soldier's pistol, but is nevertheless equally well made. Only marks to be found on the pistol is a stamped "2" of Indian font, both on the barrel and butt cap. A good clean pistol with dark mottled brown and black iron work, and good woodwork, free from any damage, other than the presence of minor bruising. Barrel length = 9 inches Overal lengt = 15 inches
EIC Lancer's Percussion Pistol, c.1842 A regulation percussion pistol of East India Company, Lancer's pattern, as used in all major military engagements in India between 1840 to 1860. This particular service pistol was armoury made in India, probably for issue to a native regiment. As such, it does not have all the stampings associated with a British soldier's pistol, but it is nevertheless equally well made. Only marks to be found on the pistol are a stamped number "2" of Indian font, both on the barrel and butt cap. A good clean pistol with dark mottled brown/black iron work and good woodwork, free from damage other than the presence of minor bruising. Barrel length = 9 inches Overal lengt = 15 inches
EIC Lancer's Percussion Pistol, c.1842 A regulation percussion pistol of East India Company, Lancer's pattern, as used in all major military engagements in India between 1840 to 1860. This particular service pistol was armoury made in India, probably for issue to a native regiment. As such, it does not have all the stampings associated with a British soldier's pistol, but it is nevertheless equally well made. Only marks to be found on the pistol are a stamped number "2" of Indian font, both on the barrel and butt cap. A good clean pistol with dark mottled brown/black ironwork and good woodwork, free from damage other than the presence of minor bruising. Barrel length = 9 inches Overal lengt = 15 inches
EIC New Land Flintlock Pistol Dated 1811 An East India Company flintlock pistol of New Land pattern. Presented in working order with clear marking and appearing to be in generally good condition but having signs of earlier repair to the front of the lock. Dated 1811.
EIG Lancer's Percussion Pistol, c.1870 A fine and probably unissued 1858 Pattern Lancer's Pistol with marking to the East India Government. Presented in untouched condition, the pistol bears various inspection and proof marks, as well as the Birmingham roundel to the wood. The 1870 dated lock is crisp with vivid case colouring and a fully working action.
EIG Lancers Pistol A GOOD .65” EAST INDIA COMPANY PATTERN 1858 PERCUSSION LANCERS PISTOL By BENTLY & PLAYFAIR , 8” barrel, stamped with Birmingham Ordnance proofs at breech, together with an Indian issue or stores marking. Brass mounted full walnut stock, bearing Ordnance inspection stamps, Birmingham E.I.G. inspection roundel and the makers name Bentley & Playfair. At the bottom of the left but is stamped “F.A. 3. 1885”, the gun is numbered 235 on the buttcap. The lock bears the Crown E.I.G. Birmingham cypher dated 1869. In excellent condition with most blue and case colours. Production is estimated at approx. 3000. This pattern of pistol is a member of the Pattern 1853 series of arms and a variation of the P58 rifled pistol for India, produced in smoothbore. . In 1855 the British Ordnance rejected the P55 pistol with 8” barrel; it had been rifled with three grooves slow twist as in the P53 rifle. In trials it failed mainly as the rifling twist was too slow for a short barrel. The Ordnance then developed the P56 pistol with 10” barrel and 5 groove rapid twist rifling, which was successful. The EIC army who were professional and experienced and in many cases over the years their ideas ahead of the British Ordnance, decided that a pistol with an 8” barrel more practical. They took the design of the 8” P55 pistol fitted with a 5-groove rapid twist rifled barrel. The success of this pistol in India induced the authorities at home to adopt a similar arm approved as the P61 Cavalry Rifle Pistol. After the mutiny native troops were kept a grade behind British soldiers in armaments and a whole P53 variant family of smoothbore arms produced to fill this need. Initially rifled arms were smoothbored and then as more were required new production followed. Consequently, this pattern of smoothbore pistol was produced for issue to native cavalry of the East India Government. At this time, it was mainly Lancer regiments that were wholly issued with pistols, in line regiments, pistols were issued only to NCO’s. From examination of existing specimens, it would appear there was a large order placed in the late 1860’s examples are known with dates from 1869 to 73, and various makers names all from the Birmingham trade. Many of these pistols survive in excellent condition consequently saw little use. This example like most other known specimens bears an Indian arsenal mark “F. A. 3. 1883 for Ferozepur Armoury, March 1883. Ferozepur was in the Punjab and not far from the famed and turbulent Northwest Frontier, the armoury there was one of British India’s largest. it was situated in the Punjab. When withdrawn from service issue, they were then as obsolete arms passed on to one of the loyal native rulers for issue to their forces. These pistols returned to the UK when firms like Westley Richards and Holland & Holland were buying up the Armouries of the by now redundant native princes. In excellent condition with fine stock, most deep blue to barrel and vivid case colours to look. A fine collector’s item. £995
Elgin A-8 \"Jitterbug\" Ground Speed Stop Watch, c.1944 A USAAF Type A-8 aviation stopwatch made by Elgin, c.1944 and used to calculate Ground Speed. These navigator's watches have a very fast beating balance, "ticking" at a frequency of 40 beats per second. Even when not in use the Type A-8's movement is continuously running, giving off a characteristic sound that earned it the nickname, "Jitterbug". This example is in working order and excellent original condition, having its case factory engraved with manufacturer's and air force nomenclature, although it is typically very lightly done and now also a little worn. In addition, this watch is faintly hand engraved with the name "LT H ROD JR" and presumably his service number, "0-2068472", best viewed with a loupe. Overall an excellent example that is still serviceable and possibly worthy of research into the owner.
Emergency Commission Mora Wristwatch, c.1940 A rare WW2 military marked wristwatch given to successful candidates as part of the Emergency Commissions initiative, awarded to candidates successful in becoming British Army officers, particularly around the colonies of the British Empire. Presented in original and sleepy condition, this Mora watch is in full working order, keeping very good time. However, one case lug is detached at one end. Fully marked with a researchable Emergency Commission number and broad arrow, which will identify the recipient.
Enfield VR Coastguard Pistol, c.1839 Consignment sale: A rare Enfield made Coastguard percussion pistol, with a VR marked, stepped and bolted lock. Both the lock and barrel are stamped, "Enfield" and dated to 1839, bearing assorted inspection stamps on the ironwork and furniture, together with Board of Ordnance acceptance marking. These stamps are worn but remain discernible. Overall the pistol is in strong working order, with an attractive overall frosted, pitted and generally aged appearance and good undamaged woodwork. A rare example of its type.
Enfield WR Coastguard Pistol, c.1830 Consignment Sale: A very good Enfield marked Board of Ordnance percussion pistol of carbine bore, with its lock bearing the WR and crown cypher of William IV. Early versions of this pattern, as this one is, feature a stepped and bolted lock that is in full working order, and the ironwork is generally crisp with a mottled aged patina throughout. The dark wood furniture has clear BO marks and discernible inspector's stamps, appearing to be generally without damage, just some rubbing and minor bruises to the stock. All in all, this rare pistol is in good collector grade condition - Difficult to find. Barrel = 6 inches
Enfield WR IV Short Sea Service Percussion Pistol, c.1835 A rare William IV percussion Sea Service pistol made, c.1835 and bearing the WR King's Crown as well as Board of Ordnance and inspector's stamps. The pistol is in sleepy condition and features the earlier stepped and bolted "Enfield" lock, which has been officially armoury constructed from the surplus flintlock parts that remained in-store during this transitional period. Having seen what must have been extended maritime service, this pistol exhibits the dark iron patina and rubbed woodwork of many years of official Navy service. Overall, this rare 28 bore pistol remains in solid condition with no damage, beyond the surface evidence of its former working life.
Enfield WRIV Coastguard Percussion Pistol c.1835 A rare Enfield percussion pistol of Coastguard pattern marked with the WRIV King's Crown. This pistol shows signs of service wear but remains a sleepy example of a hard to find issue pistol. The pistol is in full working order, with good woodwork, clearly marked with inspection stamps and the ironwork has a dark patina and wear associated with sea service.
English Gunmakers - Birmingham & Provincial A very good copy of \"English Gunmakers\" by De Witt Bailey & Douglas A. Nie. This edition covers \"The Birmingham and Provincial Gun Trade in the 18th and 18th Century\". In good clean condition with the dust jacket having been covered with cellophane. A useful reference book.
English Oak, Revolver Gun Case, c.1860 A good original English gun box that would have once held a revolver. However, since then it has been relined and compartmentalised to hold two small pocket type pistols. Fortunately this work has not impacted on structural integrity of the case, which could be relined again to a higher standard. All screw heads are in good order and most are untouched. The box itself is in good condition with solid brass hinges and lock, but no key. All the sides are intact, but there is a minor splits to the case lid on the top panel (as shown). This is minor and is not immediately obvious. Internally the box measures 11.5" x 5.75" x 1.6" (inches). The external measurements are 13" x 7" x 2.5."
English Pistols & Revolvers Book A good old copy of English Pistols & Revolvers by John Nigel George. Generally clean but with foxing to the dust jacket. No loose pages and a solid spine.
English Rifled .577 Target Percussion Pistol, c.1840 True duelling pistols are relatively scarce, however the amount of them that do still exist suggests that the practice of settling disputes in this deadly manner, was not altogether uncommon. Interestingly however, the act was never actually legal in England, as in the eyes of the law killing a person other than in self defence, could be tantamount to manslaughter, or even murder. Nevertheless, duelling was officially made illegal by Statute Law in 1819 - Although the last recorded duel was fought as late as in 1852, with fatal consequences. In essence though, duelling pistols were really nothing other than a matched pair of target pistols, which coming from the duelling heyday, would of course have been flintlocks. Made by an anonymous Birmingham gunmaker, this large bore (patched .577) percussion pistol would most likely have been intended simply for use as a target shooter, rather than a weapon: It features a fully engraved and working action, with half stock furniture, capped at the fore end in nickel silver and an under barrel rib with ramrod pipes, plus a bone tipped rod. The pistol also has a round and sighted barrel, which is rifled, but the bore is pitted along its length. Other elements of ironware have been previously lightly cleaned, but the overall cosmetic appearance of this pistol is pleasing. The only item to note is that the end of the barrel retaining pin, although present, is broken, with the remainder of the pin doing a sufficient job. A lot of pistol at this price. Barrel length = 6.5 inches Overall length = 13.5 inches
English Vintage Leather Case An English case in excellent condition, suitable for use as a quality Webley air pistol storage box. This small, attractive case is made from fine navy blue Morocco leather and is fitted with a brass lock signed by "Cheney". The case is unspoilt although the corners have a little rubbing, as does the handle but nothing unsightly. It was probably made as a writing case but it is very similar to those used for air pistols, having ample room for pellets, targets, etc. It comes complete with its leather writing pad and ephemera (not shown). No key. Pistol not included. 31 x 20 x 7cm
Engraved 54 Bore Fourth Model Tranter Revolver A profusely engraved 54 bore Fourth Model Tranter percussion revolver, presented in full working order. With strong springs and a tight lock up, this once high-end revolver is signed by its retailer, "Hollis 89 High Street Cheltenham." Cosmetically the revolver has little original finish and overall surface wear, but it has never been scrubbed and retains a good profile with sharp accents. Regrettably however, the rammer is lacking, but in all other respects the revolver is complete and untouched, retaining perfect grips and good screws. Barrel length = 6½ inches Overall length =
ERROR WW1 Officer's Longines Wristlet Trench Watch, c.1915 This superb high grade, 18 jewel watch was made by Longines during WW1. It is of a special design, originally conceived by Francois Borgel, that was claimed to be particularly suited for trench warfare. That is why many of these watches were stocked by military outfitters, available for retail to officers. This example is in excellent condition, free of any damage free and even retaining its original strap and silver buckle. It is mechanically in excellent condition, keeping time and running well, although it has not been serviced. It would therefore be advisable to consider the Premium Service package, should the watch be intended for routine wear. Overall, this is a wonderful example that is still capable of performing well, although the original manufacturer's claims of it being, damp and dirt proof, cannot be verified. Any collector would be hard pushed to find a better high grade Longines Trench Watch at this price. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Escape Axe - BR Sc A military spec escape axe as used by the British Army and RAF, but this very good example is property marked \"BR SC\" for British Rail, Scotland. No damage to the insulated handle and some minor dinks along the axe edge.
European Percussion Pocket Pistol, c.1840 A slab-sided single-shot percussion pistol of European origin made c.1840 and bearing German proof marks. Presented in working order, the pistol has sharp profiles with clear markings and the ironwork has a rich dark age patina. The smooth bag shaped butt has been personalised with a roundel and remains a good fit to the action.
Excellent .41 Colt Single Action Army Revolver, c.1900 An excellent and totally original example of the iconic Colt Single Action Army revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 calibre. Serial numbers are all matching, dating the revolver to 1900. Mechanically the action is as crisp as you could hope to find, with perfect timing and tight lock up on all chambers. Clearly this Colt SAA revolver has seen little use as both the bore and cylinder are bright, with just a trace of light frosting in the barrel at the muzzle. Grips are damage free and sharply defined, as are all screw heads and ironwork, with no signs of abuse throughout. Basically, a superb example that has retained most factory blue finish, with some areas of holster rubbing and silver grey metal now showing on the back strap. Mellow case colours on the frame are still evident and stamped marking is vivid. Overall, a difficult example to find this good, that has never been refinished. Barrel length = 4.75 inches Overall length = 10.25 inches
Excellent .41 Colt Single Action Army Revolver, c.1900 A fine and totally original example of the Colt Single Action Army revolver, chambered for the obsolete .41 calibre. Retaining much factory finish and with all serial numbers matching, this iconic Colt SAA revolver dates to 1900. Mechanically the action is as crisp as you could hope to find, with perfect timing and tight lock up on all chambers. Clearly this Colt SAA revolver has seen little use as both the bore and cylinder are bright, with no signs of abuse throughout. Basically, a superb example that has some areas of honest rubbing around the silver grey back strap, yet lovely mellow case colours on the frame and vivid stamped marking throughout. Overall, a difficult example to find this good, that has never been refinished. Barrel length = 4.75 inches Overall length = 10.25 inches
Falklands War - Hopkins MOD Survival Knife A Falklands War era military survival knife: Originally made by Wilkinson Sword and Joseph Rodgers, these hefty knives are still part of the MOD inventory. Designated by the military as "Survival Knives," they are most useful when chopping branches, splitting logs, prying, levering, digging, gouging, drilling, hammering and generally being the most versatile piece of kit when it comes to outdoor survival. A Jack-of-all-trades, this knife feature a one-piece full-length tang and a 5mm blade rib. Being in sleepy condition, the knife has been lightly used, but has no sign of abuse. The wood grip is stamped with the "H" mark in a diamond, identifying the maker as Hopkins of Sheffield. The knife comes with a factory dull cutting edge but this can be improved upon if required. Cosmetically the knife has a protective black phosphate finish to all the steel parts. Grips are of wood with heavy duty copper rivets. These are further stamped with a stock number, plus broad arrow mark and 1982 date. The knife is retained in its rare original leather sheath, which is also military stamped, just the same as when first produced in the late 1950's. Probably the most robust survival knife ever.
Fancy Belgian Bulldog Pocket Revolver c.1880 The popularity of the Bulldog design saw gunmakers producing many variations of this iconic revolver. Like many, this example comes chambered for the obsolete .320 calibre cartridge and bears Liege proof marks. No licence required. Presented in good cosmetic condition with much original finish, this profusely engraved nickel Bulldog with its perfect ivory grips, is an attractive Victorian personal defence pistol. Mechanically though, the revolver functions but the trigger return is on the weak side and consequently the action requires a light nudge. A pleasant example of a Bulldog style revolver that could be easily improved and at a bargain price. Red case not included.
Fine 1854 Deane, Adams & Deane Percussion Revolver This is a fine 1854 Adams' Patent percussion revolver by, Deane, Adams & Deane. Presented in original condition with sharp profiles, this double action revolver retains most of its bright blue finish, with muted case colouring to the cylinder and sharp chequering on the grip, finishing with a starburst pattern to the butt cap. Mechanically the action is faultless, with strong springs, tight lock-up and very good bore. No doubt this revolver was once part of an elegant cased set, as this dandy five shot is beautifully engraved in the English-style of close leaf design. A crisp fully functioning action with very little sign of wear. These sleek 120 bore revolvers were not meant as service weapons so the earliest ones were consequently produced without integral loading rammers. Apparently this was only a feature of the first 6 months of production - making this example one of Adams' earlier pieces. A fine British Adams revolver for the connoisseur collector. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9 inches
Fine Cased 54 Bore LAC Beaumont Adams Percussion Revolver c.1860 In 1856 a British Army officer, Lieutenant Frederick Beaumont of the Royal Engineers, patented improvements to the Adams revolver. These new features enabled the Adams revolver to be fired in both single or double action manner, which was the first true dual-action system. These Adams revolvers found widespread approval with customers, especially among British Army officers. This particular percussion revolver was made by the London Armoury Company, which was established just days before Beaumont's patents had been finalised. Robert Adams was also the primary supplier of revolvers for the Confederacy during the US Civil War. In fact, once the war ended, the LAC could only manage do stay in business for one more year, before closing in 1866. This Beaumont Adams revolver bears a clear LAC stamp, proofs, serial number, Adams' patent details and the retailer's name of, "George Gibbs, Bristol." The revolver is in fine condition, both mechanically and cosmetically and appears to have been little used. The action has good indexing and the whole revolver retains the majority of its lustre blue finish; a near perfect bore with sharp rifling and generally sharp profiles throughout; with just some minor marks here and there, as well as some dulling of finish at the front of the grip strap and trigger guard. Right side of grip also bears a slight scar to the checkering. The absence of any extraneous engraving suggest that the revolver was purchased as a working tool, rather than as a functioning decorative piece, probably being an officer's sidearm. The accompanying wood case is complete with its accoutrements, which are all in good to excellent condition. The flask is named, "J. Hawksley" and the pewter oil bottle is one by "Dixon," whilst the brass mould bears "Adams'" trademark details and, "54" stamp. The case itself is in good solid condition with a slight fracture to the top lid, but it is otherwise sturdy and intact. Hinges and original green baize lining are all very good. All in all, a fine and complete example of this much sought after revolver, that will be difficult to improve, and at a sensible price. Barrel length = 5.5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Fine Cased Beaumont Adams 54 Bore Percussion Revolver When Lieutenant Frederick Beaumont, a British Army officer serving with the Royal Engineers, patented improvements to the action of the Adams revolver, he enabled these fine revolvers to be fired in both single or double action manner. This was the first true dual-action system. as such, these Adams revolvers found widespread approval with customers, especially among British Army officers. A fine example of an LAC made Beaumont Adams, retailed by Deane Adams & Deane, complete with its original case and accoutrements. It is in superb condition both cosmetically and mechanically, appearing to have been little used. All in all, a superb and complete set of a much sought after revolver, that will be difficult to improve upon. Barrel length = 5.5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Fine Cased Trulock & Harriss .32 Rimfire Revolver, c.1870 Selling on consignment: A fine and early cartridge revolver retailed by Trulock & Harriss of Dublin, but very likely made by Webley and bearing London proof marks, looking resplendent in its original oak case. Chambered for the now obsolete, .32 rimfire cartridge. This is a genuinely superb set, where this double action revolver has retained most of its charcoal blue finish, having been protected by the blue baize lined case. All the screw heads appear unturned and the grips are without blemish, sharply checkered all over. Not surprisingly this little used revolver has a smooth action with strong springs, sold complete with its original accessories; a pewter Hawksley oil bottle and cleaning rod with worm. Stunning. Difficult to find in this condition. Overall length = Barrel length =
First Model Double Action Smith & Wesson .44 Russian Revolver This is a First Model, Double Action Top Break Smith & Wesson revolver, manufactured in the obsolete .44 Russian calibre. It is a good and honest example of its type, with low five digit serial number and a genuine 4 inch short barrel. Although this Smith & Wesson revolver has seen much service use, it remains an unmolested and good example of its kind, with the monogrammed grips having been worn smooth by the grateful hands of its former owner. Over all now, most of the original nickel finish has been lost, which has left the exposed surfaces to darken to a pleasing patina and only some minor pitting. Nevertheless, despite its appearance and service wear, this Smith remains a fully functioning pistol with good timely lock-up, plus a tight hinge and locking catch, with strong working action. All in all a good Smith & Wesson .44 Russian revolver with some original finish remaining and a wealth of character.
First Model Double Action Smith & Wesson .44 Russian Revolver This is a First Model, Double Action Top Break Smith & Wesson revolver, manufactured in the obsolete .44 Russian calibre. It is presented in very good condition throughout, having retained most of its original finish. It is a good and honest example of its type, with low five digit serial number and a genuine 6.5 inch barrel. Clearly this Smith & Wesson revolver has seen little service use, as it remains much original nickel, case hardening and blue colouring. Even the monogrammed grips show little wear and are damage free. There are however some small areas where the nickel has worn off, exposing the underlying metal which has some darkening and light surface pits being evident - All just surface wear. This Smith remains a fully functioning pistol with extremely good timely lock-up, plus a tight hinge and locking catch, plus a strong working action. All in all a very good Smith & Wesson .44 Russian revolver that would be hard to better at this price.
First Model Remington Derringer A very good First Model Remington Derringer with the barrel rib engraved with Elliot\'s 1865 Patent details. No licence required, as this pistol is chambered for the .41 Rim Fire cartridge, listed as an Obsolete Calibre. Presented in very good condition, this double-barrelled Remington Derringer has retained much of its original plating. It is in working order with strong springs, good bores and nice rosewood grips.
First Model, Hopkins & Allen Dictator .38RF Revolver, c.1870 This is a rare 'First Model,' Hopkins & Allen "Dictator," which was made between 1869 - 1872. As such, only 5100 revolvers of this type were produced before the company changed the design to the more common, sheathed trigger variant. Chambered for the obsolete .38 Rimfire round, this Dictator is presented in good order. Mechanically in full working order with smooth indexing and firm lock up, this revolver has the factory adapted cylinder, which allows cartridges to be breech loaded, as well as an altered hammer designed to strike the cartridge on the rim. Much like the Colt, the barrel is wedged and the revolver relies on the open frame set up. Offered with a reasonable bore showing the outline of the rifling but with some light pitting, this revolver has clearly seen action, yet remains in good condition. Cosmetically the ironwork is not abused, but it does have age related surface wear, resulting in some light surface speckling, minor pitting and salt and pepper discolouration throughout. Nevertheless, the cylinder scene with decorative cartouches, have been relatively well preserved, together with the original walnut grips. A difficult to find revolver that was well engineered, at half the price of a Colt. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Flintlock Holster Pistol by Bunney, c.1775 An attractive flintlock holster pistol by Joseph Bunney, one of Britain's eminent gunmakers, c.1775. This well proportioned London proofed pistol has a functioning lock with good springs and lovely furniture, however, the cock does require attention to bring this scarce officer's pistol back into good order. Featuring a military .65" bore this regulation flintlock pistol is worthy of TLC. Overall length = 14 inches Barrel length = 9 inches
Flintlock Pocket Pistol & Barrel Wrench By Wilkinson A crisp pocket flintlock pistol signed on the boxlock, "Wilkinson" and "London". The pistol has a fully working action with a sliding safety and a drop-down trigger. All woodwork is excellent and damage free, fitting well around the tang and boxlock. The pistol comes with an original barrel wrench.
Flintlock RB For Export
Flintlock Travelling Pistol By H.W. Mortimer & Son, c.1810 A sleepy travelling pistol by H. W. Mortimer & Son. Made c.1810, this pistol is presented in full working order, complete with a bolt safety and original ramrod with worm. Clearly signed "H.W. Mortimer & Son" on the lock, the pistol shows some signs of extended carry, with some dints to the furniture and general overall wear to the ironwork. Nevertheless, this pistol is in good order, both cosmetically and in its functionality. A top named flintlock offered at a realistic price.
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French 11mm Chamelot-Delvigne Model 1873 Revolver The Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne revolver was the first double action revolver used by the French army. It was produced by Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne from 1873 to 1887. It was widely used during the First World War and remained in service to reserve units during WW2 and the French Resistance made widespread use of this revolver during the occupation. This is a very good example of the Model 1873, chambered for the obsolete 11mm calibre. It has a 4" barrel and nice original metal work that was left finished in the white - meaning that there was never any blued finishing to this model. As is, it has never been buffed, sanded or polished, remaining wholly original throughout. One for the collector who prefers pistols to be original. Mechanically the revolver has a strong action, all working correctly. Plus, a good bore and chambers.
French 11mm Chamelot-Delvigne Model 1873 Revolver The Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne revolver was the first double action revolver used by the French army. It was produced by Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne from 1873 to 1887. Widely used during the First World War, these robust revolvers remained in service to reserve units during WW2 and the French Resistance also made widespread use of them. Overall this revolver is a very good example of its type, which is chambered for the obsolete 11 mm cartridge. It was actually made in 1876 and was originally produced in the 'white,' meaning that there was no finish applied to the bare steel. As such, this revolver has acquired an age darkened finish, which has never been buffed or sanded. This has resulted in a uniformly wonderful dark mottled grey patina, which looks wonderful, as is. Mechanically the revolver has a strong action which is fully working, with matching serial numbers, plus a good bore and chambers. This is one for the collector who prefers their pistols to be unmolested and untouched. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
French 11mm Chamelot-Delvigne Model 1873 Revolver & Holster The Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne revolver was the first double action revolver used by the French army. It was produced by Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne from 1873 to 1887. Widely used during the First World War, these robust revolvers remained in service to reserve units during WW2 and the French Resistance also made widespread use of them. Interestingly this revolver has retained its original leather holster, which has been radically adapted in the past. Such a modification would most likely have been made to aid access to the revolver, whereby the flap over top has been cut away. Overall his is a very good example of the Model 1873, chambered for the obsolete 10.4 mm cartridge. It features the standard 4" barrel and unpolished metal work that has never been buffed or sanded, which has resulted in this wonderful dark patina being achieved. Some darker spots also exist with some pitting at the top of each grip. Nevertheless, this is one for the collector who prefers their pistols to be unmolested. Mechanically the revolver has a strong action which is fully working, with matching serial numbers, plus good bore and chambers.
French 11mm Modelé 1874 Officer's Revolver A fine example of a French Officer's, M1874 revolver - Original and unrestored. The 11mm Chamelot-Delvigne was the first double action revolver to become general issue to the French army in 1873 and the following year the design was refined by the Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne, especially for officer issue. This rarer "Officers'" model featured a factory blue finish and a polished action, with distinctive flutes to its cylinder, making it stand out from the rank and file model. The limited production run of M1874's ended in 1887. This early example is dated to 1875. Still widely used during the First World War, many even saw service in 1940, among the reserve units as well as in the hands of the Resistance. Overall, this is a fine example of this desirable revolver, which retains most of its original factory finish throughout. A perfect heavy action works correctly and the cylinder locks as it should. All metal parts are numbered and the firing mechanism can be easily exposed by removal of a compartment secured by a single screw - a useful feature to allow quick field stripping. The revolver's chequered wood grips are excellent & undamaged, with a mint bore and cylinders, generally appearing to have been little used. A scarce obsolete calibre revolver that would be difficult to improve upon. To purchase this revolver from ZMW Militaria, you must be over 18 years of age with no legal prohibition. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
French An IX Model Gendarmerie Pistol c.1818 A French An IX Gendarmerie pistol with later official conversion to percussion ignition. Barrel dated 1818. This pistol is in very good crisp condition with no damage, having plenty of official stamps and a rack number, together with a lock marked to Manufacture Royale de Maubeuge. These police pistols were officially modified c.1825. Ramrod appears to be original and the pistol has overall even tones of age patina.
French Cannon Barrel Pistol By Bonnand, c.1790 A superb late 18th century travelling pistol, signed "Bonnand." Presented in full working order, this 54 bore pistol, with its turn off cannon barrel, is decorated in French style. Attractive silver wire inlay and eagle's head pommel, suggest that this pistol was of high quality. Now converted to percussion, this pistol with its rounded lock, is aesthetically beautiful. Altogether a great example for the collector. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8 inches
French Chassepot Bayonet French Chassepot Bayonet, with brass ribbed one piece handle. Crossguard / muzzle ring stamped “T 93900” as is the top of the scabbard. Yataghan blade with partial fuller to the back edge. Stamped with “tulle juin 1872” in script to edge of the blade. Accompanied by a French Lebel bayonet with quillon and housed in steel scabbard. Cruciform blade remains in good condition. (2 items)
French Gendarmerie 'Marechaussee' Flintlock Pocket Pistol, c.1790 This French Marechaussee flintlock pistol was made c.1790, to a scaled down constabulary pattern - making it just two thirds the size of the regulation pistol carried by the gendarmerie. Its reduced size and light weight does however make it very concealable, leading to a wealth of speculation as to who in law enforcement might have carried such a pistol? The 38 bore (12.7 mm) barrel was still of adequate size to be an effective personal defence weapon. A very interesting flintlock, offered in full working order with good damage free wood and nicely presented ironwork, with light patina and correct ramrod. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 6.5 inches
French Gendarmerie M1816 Flintlock This is the final French Gendarmerie-issue pistol to feature a flintlock action before being superseded by the M1822. In reality, what occurred was that all M1816s were armoury converted to adopt the new percussion ignition systems, which meant the removal of the frizzen, pan and cock, as well as the addition of a nipple. Today, the result is that original police M1816 flintlocks pistols are very rare examples for collectors to discover. Presented in full working order, this pistol has another interesting feature, a belt hook. This armoury addition is suspected to have been added for the benefit of the coastguard, or at least for a marine service, which may also account as to how it bypassed the upgrade to percussion. Certainly, the mottled and pitted finish to the ironwork strongly suggests a sea-salt environment. Overall this flintlock pistol is in strong working order with good but bruised furniture, without cracks or repairs. A rare find for the collector.
French Gendarmerie Modèle 1842 Percussion Pistol This French Gendarmerie pistol evolved into the Modèle 1842, having been based on previous police patterns, with their earliest origins being back in 1770. Ultimately, whether they had flintlock or percussion ignition, this genre of pistol was characterised by its compact proportions, with each being robustly built at one of several government arsenals. Manufactured in Alsace, this police percussion pistol is stamped on the lock with the maker's details, "Mre. [Manufacturé] N.le [Nationale] de Mutzig." Other armoury marks and government issue stamps are also present, albeit faint. These are present on the iron and wood work. The octagonal and part round barrel is approximately of 24 Bore and shows some sign of previous cleaning and slight loss of wood around the lock. Nevertheless, it is presented in full and strong working order, complete with its off centre mounted ramrod, which screws into its channel for security. Overall a good example of the final single shot percussion pistol to be issued to the French Gendarmerie. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
French M1766 Style, Military Cavalry Pistol, c.1780 Selling on consignment: An interesting .70 calibre military flintlock pistol, broadly similar to the French Cavalry Modelé 1766, featuring all steel mounts and belt hook. Made during the period of arms modernisation in Europe, a good number of these pistols and their variants were exported. Many of those ended up in America where they saw military and naval service during the late 18th, and early 19th century. Presented in good working order, the pistol's regulation barrel is retained at the muzzle, held by a spring clip to the right side. This makes field stripping easier but, in antiquity, the stress of the clip caused a split in the furniture, which resulted in an old armoury repair - This repair remains solid throughout. The pistol comes complete with its original iron ramrod, with worm end. Overall an interesting military grade flintlock. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches
French M1822 Gendarmerie Pistol, c.1822 A very good example of the Modelé 1822 Gendarmerie pistol manufactured at the Royale de Maubeurge arsenal. With matching "367" numbers on the woodwork and barrel, the pistol also bears clear 1822 date and a number of clear inspection stamps. Cosmetically the ironwork is clean with a light patina and the woodwork shows no evidence of scrubbing, retaining much original finish. A strong working action and overall unspoilt appearance, do much to commend this pistol. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
French M1842 Gendarmerie Percussion Carbine, c.1855 The Modèle 1842 carbine is a relatively scarce long arm of the French Gendarmerie, with this example being dated to 1855. This interesting carbine is in good working order with some service wear and pitting, but no abuse noted. It even retains its correct iron Tete Clou (Nail Head) ramrod. The lock is robust in all respects and the action has strong springs, as well having a good rifled barrel that would have fired .69 calibre Minié bullets. It is all clearly marked with the Tulle government arsenal script and numerous numbered parts. Even the three quarter length stock is damage free and the butt retains the "MI" marked cartouche, which stands for Manufacturie Imperiale, with deference to Emperor Napoleon III. All in all a difficult carbine to find, let alone in good original condition. Barrel length = 29 inches Overall length = 45 inches
French M1842 Gendarmerie Pistol, c.1849 A very good example of the Modelé 1842 Gendarmerie pistol made at the Chatellerault arsenal. All proof and a plethora of inspection stamps all remain crisp, including the arsenal roundel, which is dated to 1849. Cosmetically the ironwork has a dark mottled patina and the woodwork shows no evidence of cleaning, retaining much original varnish. A strong working action and overall unspoilt appearance, do much to commend this pistol. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
French M1853 Minie Rifle & Bayonet, c.1855 A very good military rifle manufactured at the French Government arsenal at Chatellerault. The Modelé 1853 was issued during the Crimean War and is dated "1855", used to fire the formidable Minie bullet through a rifled barrel. Presented in crisp condition, the action is fully working with clear inspection and issue marks throughout. The wood furniture is undamaged and the ironwork has an even light mottled appearance. All in all, a lovely rifle with a good bore, offered with an equally good and correct bayonet, all with matching numbers to the scabbard.
French Revolver The Service Revolver Model 1873 Chamelot-Delvigne was the first double action revolver used by the French army. It was produced by Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Étienne from 1873 to 1887 who manufactured approximately 337,000. It was widely used during the First World War and issued to reserve units in 1940. The French Resistance made widespread use of it during German Occupation. This is a great example of the Model 1873, 6 shot, Revolver in 11mm Calibre. It has a 4" barrel and nice original metal work finished 'in the white'. The barrel is engraved ' Mle 1873' and the frame 'M' d'Armes de Saint-Étienne'. A great feature of this model is that all of it's parts are numbered. All of this examples' metal parts are crisply numbered and the firing mechanism can be easily exposed by removal of a compartment secured by a single screw (illustrated). The compartment fits snugly. The pistol has all its original parts and springs. The single and double action work perfectly with a strong spring mechanism. The frame barrel and trigger guard are also stamped with matching numbers ' G92192'. The frame is also dated '1879'. The pistol's chequered wood grips are excellent & undamaged. It is complete with Military lanyard ring. Price for this impressive nicely stamped and engraved piece includes UK delivery. NB. As an obsolete calibre antique weapon no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 8989
French Rifle
G. Ibberson Seaman's Shackle Knife A good and scarce stainless steel example of a Seaman's pocket knife made by George Ibberson, Sheffield. This knife, usually worn on a lanyard, features a heavy duty blade for rope cutting, a separate shackle wrench and a screwdriver. Fully marked with patent details, this knife is in good condition showing signs of of some service wear and previous sharpening. Yet it is still in cosmetically good order, with plenty of life remaining in the blade. A UK legal quality folding knife suitable for everyday chores.
Gatwick Airport Commemorative Services Watch, c.1958 A British pocket watch named, "Gatwick", made to commemorate the opening of London's second airport. The watch itself was manufactured at The Anglo-Celtic Watch Co. Ltd at the Gurnos Works, Ystradgynlais near Swansea, Wales; a company owned by Smiths Industries and Ingersoll, who operated under the name, "Services". This Gatwick watch is in very good cosmetic condition, retaining most of its original finish. It is in working order, keeping time and showing no sign of restoration. Officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth on 9 June 1958, 12 years after Heathrow, Gatwick Airport became London's second airport at a cost of £7.8 million. It was a landmark achievement.
General Service Trade Pattern Military Issue Cyma Pocket Watch This is a good and tidy dent free example of a GS pocket watch of WW2, made by the Cyma watch company. It shows some characteristic wear of an issued pocket watch, with light handling marks around the high areas and winding neck. This is typical of a watch that has actually been carried and used for a few years, presumably in a Battle Dress pocket. Yet it remains in good condition, with no signs of abuse. Having retained most of its original finish, this Cyma will make a good addition to any collection. It is in working order, but has not been serviced. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Gentleman's 25 Bore Pocket Pistol By W. Bond, c.1830 William Bond opened his business at 59 Lombard Street in 1830, where he made this handsome and very compact, large bore pocket pistol. Most probably the gentleman who purchased it from Bond, must then have requested to have it converted to percussion ignition, which was now more fashionable than flintlock. This improvement has been completed with meticulous attention to the gunmaker's art, with scroll engravings being added to decorate the the action. Overall, this pistol is fully working with a crisp and smooth action, which holds correctly and with the bolted safety. An attractive white metal butt in cap adds a touch of elegance, as does the unusual solid brass ramrod, with capped worm end. A lovely example of a personal defence pistol, with ironwork having a mottled appearance with no pitting and much original varnish to the wood. Generally very good order throughout. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 7½ inches
Gentleman's 25 Bore Pocket Pistol By W. Bond, c.1830 William Bond opened his business at 59 Lombard Street in 1830, where he made this handsome and very compact, large bore pocket pistol. Most probably the gentleman who purchased it from Bond, must then have requested to have it converted to percussion ignition, which was now more fashionable than flintlock. This improvement has been completed with meticulous attention to the gunmaker's art, with scroll engravings being added to decorate the the action. Overall, this pistol is fully working with a crisp and smooth action, which holds correctly and with the bolted safety. An attractive white metal butt in cap adds a touch of elegance, as does the unusual solid brass ramrod, with capped worm end. A lovely example of a personal defence pistol, with ironwork having a mottled appearance with no pitting and much original varnish to the wood. Generally very good order throughout. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 7½ inches
Gentleman's Brass Pocket Pistol By W. Bond, c.1835 In 1768, when William Bond opened his gun shop at 45 Cornhill, unbeknown to him, he was founding a dynasty of gunmakers. All talented craftsmen, the Bonds worked at this address in London for over 60 years. Then, in 1830, a later William Bond moved premises to 59 Lombard Street, where successive generations remained until 1879. This 50 bore percussion pistol was therefore made by the later William Bond, c.1835. With its brass box lock engraved with a stand of arms and sunburst details around the touch hole, the pistol is a fine example of the gunmaker's skill. A short turn-off barrel, sliding safety and concealed trigger, makes this a very pocketable defence pistol for the gentleman. In full working order and with an attractive, well fitting slab sided butt, all together makes this example one for the collector. Barrel length = 1½ inches Overall length = 6 inches
Gentleman's Flintlock Pocket Pistol By Barber & Boaler c.1800 A very good pocket flintlock pistol, made by the Newark gunmakers, Barber & Boaler, c.1800. The box lock action is well engraved with masculine 'military devices' and the butt is embellished with a typical large, plain silver heraldic shield, all well constructed, with much original finish remaining. The pistol also has an unusual sliding safety that automatically disengages when the pistol's action is on full cock, with the folding trigger snapping down at the same moment, making this all in all, a very nice pistol - No doubt, made for the personal protection of a gentleman. Bearing Tower private proof marks, which were only used between 1740 - 1810, the barrel will take a ball of around 50 bore. Furthermore, this pistol was once part of a pair, as is denoted by the presence of the number, '1,' stamped on both the frame and the barrel. This was necessary to prevent the inadvertent mismatching of barrels with its counterpart. A superb pocket flintlock in very good condition and no damage. Barrel length - 1.5 inches Overall length - 6 inches
Gentleman's Self-Cocking Percussion Boot Pistol, c.1840 Made for concealed carry, this scarce rifled percussion pistol would have been worn within the top shaft of a riding boot. Held in place by an internal boot strap, this man-stopping 22 bore pistol had to be quick to access, draw and if needs must, fire! For these reasons this large bore pistol features a snag proof profile, including a hidden hammer and a self-cocking action. It is fully working with strong springs and has a good rifled bore. Overall this handy gentleman's personal protection pistol is in very good aesthetic condition, with profuse engraving around the action. A small heart shaped escutcheon and a butt trap for spare caps, all contribute to making this an attractive item for the collector. Overall length = 6.5 inches Barrel length = 2 inches
Gentleman\'s Percussion Pistol By William Parker, c.1835 A good quality gentleman's coat pocket pistol by William Parker, of the pattern associated with Police Constabularies. Presented in full working order, the action is crisp with strong springs throughout. Likewise, the wood is undamaged, showing only minor marks of pocket carry. All markings are clear and the scroll and acanthus leaf engraving is prolific around the lock plate, and the ironwork features a uniform age patina throughout. Complete with its original capped ramrod with worm.
Gentleman\'s \"Shotgun Cartridge\" Sixpence Holder A gentleman's vintage brass and nickel coin holder, originally intended to hold a quantity of silver sixpences - Probably a tidy way of keeping your "tip" money handy. Formed to look like a 12 bore cartridge, this coin holder is a well made and delightful accessory that can still be used today. Suitable for holding a quantity of 20p coins, or other similar coins. No dings or dents, just very light signs of previous carry.
Genuine 1952 Police Issue Truncheon Pockets Made of a cotton canvas, these new old stock truncheon pockets make an ideal protective sleeve in which to keep your antique truncheon safe. Each one is perfect, but there may be minor differences to the ones shown in terms of shade or marking. Each pocket measures approximately 12 inches in length and is marked with the King's Crown G.R.VI. The price is for one truncheon pocket and includes free UK delivery.
Genuine 1968 British Army Issue Bugle A genuine military issue bugle marked, \"BBIM Ltd Makers, Manchester, England\", including a broad arrow and 1968 date. Complete with stainless steel mouthpiece, this solid brass bugle is in generally good order although having a few dings and dents, Nevertheless, the bugle plays well.
Genuine English Gun Box, c.1855 A good quality English gun box that once held a large revolver. Retaining all its original green baize lining and compartments, the box is presented in very good condition, with some minor wear from use. Although this pistol case appears untouched, it has no gunmaker's label. In fact, it looks as though there was never a label present. For measurements, see last image. Dimensions are all in centimetres.
Genuine Wild-West MOP Colt SAA Eagle Grips This is a genuine pair of mother-of-pearl eagle grips for a Colt Peacemaker revolver. They are not modern copies but rather, vintage aftermarket grips of good quality. Presented in good order, the grips do have some chips and cracks, yet they remain in serviceable condition.
Genuine WW2 Kriegsmarine Wristwatch, c.1942 An excellent Kriegsmarine issue wristwatch, c.1942, retaining most of its factory finish and original dial marked, "KM 720". Rarely do KM watches turn up this good, so it's wonderful to find an example that is unrestored and not corroded. The rear of the watch is also heavily embossed with the Kriegsmarine issue number, again a feature that is not always present. Internally the shockproof movement looks bright and fresh, working very well and keeping time, having been serviced around 12 months ago. The KM Presented on a good leather vintage style strap, ready for daily wear.
Genuine WW2 Sterling Silver RAF Sweetheart Broach This pair of silver RAF wings has not seen the light of day for over 30 years. Needless to say they are of genuine WW2 vintage, or possibly earlier, being marked on the reverse, \"Sterling Silver.\" The Austin Reed box has been home for the wings for all of this time and may be the original, despite not being an exact fit. Overall the silver wings are in very good condition with only minor wear around the high spots, but no actual damage - They also measure 6 cm tip to tip. The box is in similar, lightly used condition. A very good original item - Not a reproduction.
George III Scottish Silver Pair-Case Verge Fusee Watch, c.1811 Pocket watches made during the Napoleonic era could only be afforded by persons of some standing, with larger silver watches being suited to the more adventurous gentlemen. Such large pair-cased watches as seen here were designed to provide the delicate mechanism with an extra degree of protection, making them the preferred choice for these men. However, when it came to the accuracy of the smaller pocket timepieces, watch technology left much to be desired by today's standards. This is one reason why eyewitness accounts, as with those recorded during the infamous Battle of Waterloo, give many conflicting times of the engagements of three armies, which incidentally saw the British Army being largely supplied by the Scottish Regiments. As a Scottish watch signed by the watchmaker, S. William of Aberdeen, this watch has survived in excellent condition, retaining both its original matching silver 1811 hallmarked cases. These show just minor signs of service wear, with a little rubbing around the inner case from pocket carry - Definitely no unsightly dents, wear-through or holes. All the case hinges open and close without fault, whilst the outer case latch, operated by a red cabochon button, locks properly and without gaps. Likewise, the gilt movement is in bright condition and working order, keeping Verge time. Note also the application of a grotesque mask on the balance cock - A Medieval clockmaker's custom used to ward off bad spirits. Even the original porcelain dial is in excellent condition, being free from cracks, but with some minor imperfections, mainly around the edge, associated with routine working life, time setting. Overall an excellent Napoleonic period pocket watch of Scottish interest, supplied with 2 keys - One sets the hands, the other winds the spring. A Premium Service option can be requested for this timepiece. Dial Diameter = 48mm Total Diameter = 60mm
George IV Law Court Officer's Tipstaff or Truncheon c.1827 A very good George IV lawman's long-truncheon. Dated 1827, this black painted stick is decorated with the King's Crown, as well as being lead-weighted to the bulbous top. This long-truncheon is in generally in very good and unrestored condition, with only minimal rubbing and no restoration. Dating from before the establishment of the New Police, this stick is a product from the days of the Parish Constable. A very good collector's example.
German Made "Services" Pocket Watch & Box, c.1930 Being basic in construction, original "Services" watches were made by the Thiel watch company in Germany, which looked to expand early throughout Europe. However, due to the political sensitivities of the time, a decision was made to simply mark the brand on the dial as, "Foreign." Their advertising motto on the box was, "For Distinguished Service." This example known also a "Sports Watch," was also marketed as the "Army" model, targeted towards British customers in c.1930. None of these watches were actually official military issue, but just before WW2 the "Services" brand did manage to produce a wristwatch under their "Transport" label - Some of those may be encountered with ARP issue marks on the dial, as they were utilised by the Air Raid Precautions organisation. Presented in its original "Services" carton, this watch appears to have been little used. Some staining is evident to the case, but generally the watch is in very good condition and woking order, with factory fresh movement, original fitted glass and perfect dial. A scarce and generally unused example.
German Officer\'s Hauptner \"Trick\" Ball-Lock Knife, c.1938 This is a UK Legal EDC knife as there is nothing to prevent the blade from immediately folding - The term "Ball-Lock" refers to the system which prevents the blade from openning in the first instance. In 1901 the German knife maker Heinrich Hauptner of Solingen started a business making surgical and precision bladed instruments. By the 1930s, their range of medical blades extended to the production of nazi daggers, including this unusual pocket knife. Having no nail nick to facilitate opening, this rare vintage pocket knife features a "Trick" or "Ball-Lock" slip joint, requiring the user to hold the knife vertically whilst depressing the blade's spine against spring pressure. This action then releases a ball bearing lock, allowing the blade to disengage and move out from between the scales, sufficiently far to allow it to be fully opened with one hand. Closing the blade requires it to be folded back on itself but this time the knife has to point downwards. Overall, it is a very well made precision knife that is in remarkably good condition, with minor usage marks to the blade, which retains its original profile and clear engraving, marked "Hauptner" and "Inox". There is no play to the blade and the lock-up is secure. Whether this knife was a gimmick to advertise Hauptner's blades or whether it was a serious instrument in its own right, is not known. All I know is that when I purchased this knife it came together with one other, both identically marked "Hauptner Instrumente, Berlin Solingen, München, Hannover". Presented in excellent condition, this precision fitted UK legal EDC slip joint is simply ingenious with its rare mechanism that will leave others baffled as to how it opens and closes. Overall length open = 12.5 cm Blade length = 5.3 cm Length closed = 7.2 cm
Gerstner Oak Hobby, Collector's & Tool Chest This is a traditionally built, high quality and brand new oak chest by Gerstner International. It has a full drop down front panel, which can be locked to secure your contents of the box. This same hinged panel when unlocked, can be lowered and tucked underneath the bottom drawer. All in all, the chest is beautifully made and fully lined with green cloth. It features two smaller draws, below which nest a further two full width drawers and two strong side carry handles allow the box to be transported with ease. This sturdy and solidly constructed chest is on offer well below the usual retail price in the UK. This is a one off item at this special low price. Dimensions: W 55cm x D 25cm x H 24cm Due to weight, this item is suitable only for UK delivery.
Government Issue Livery Pistol By W. Parker, c.1800 A good livery type pistol of regulation bore, made to government contract specification by William Parker, c.1800. The flat lock and ring cock are of military type, with the plate signed by the maker, as well as having an additional stamp with a Crown 2 inspector's mark. Overall the pistol is fully working and in good cosmetic condition, having a dark patina, with good brass fittings and a wooden ramrod with worm. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15½ inches
Government Issue Livery Pistol By W. Parker, c.1800 A good livery pistol of regulation bore, made to government contract specification by William Parker, c.1800. The flat lock and ring cock are of military type, with the plate signed by the maker, as well as having an additional stamp with a Crown 2 inspector's mark. Overall the pistol is fully working and in good cosmetic condition, having a dark patina, with good brass fittings and a wooden ramrod with worm. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15½ inches
GQ(Irvin) RAF Survival Knife GQ(Irvin) RAF Survival Knife Made by Victorinox and supplied by GQ, a parachute manufacturer and supplier to the M.O.D. these knives were part of GQ’s contractual agreement with the M.O.D. The model is the Victorinox “Hunter” and is a survival type knife, equipped with a gutting blade (and corkscrew for the champers if downed!) it has a locking blade operated by the grey plastic lock on the reverse of the logo side. Bottle opener, saw, screwdriver and reamer punch and seeing awl, tweezers and tooth pick! A rare knife that dates from 1995. There is a train of thought that they were an integral part of an ejector seat, so if anyone has information on that please let me know. Thank you to Ron Flook for the photo etc in his superb must have book British and Commonwealth Military Knives. Code: 50397Price: 160.00 GBP
Gras 1874 PATTERN GRAS BAYONET St ETIENNE French sword bayonet. It was manufactured to fit the French Model 1874 "Gras" Infantry Rifle, basically a refinement of the Model 1866 Chassepot Infantry Rifle. The "Gras" was manufactured from 1874 to about 1885. This bayonet has a solid brass pommel with integral latching mechanism (push-button/spring-steel). Grips are wood. Crossguard is steel, lower guard forming a hooked "blade-breaker" quillon. Steel blade , triangular in form (very sturdy as a thrusting weapon). This example has a clean blade although there is some age fogging patina at the top. engraved with Mre Armes de St Etienne Aout 1876 (dated August 1876). The serial number is 74752. The scabbard is numbered 96676. The wooden grips are good with age patina and smoothed marks commensurate with age and use. Code: 50607Price: 140.00 GBP
Great Western Railway Station Master's Pocket Watch, c.1925 A scarce GWR issue pocket watch made c.1925 by Limit. Used by railway guards and Station Masters, these watches were robust in their construction. With 15 jewel movements and sturdy hermetic cases, they were used day in and day out, so finding one that is as crisp and clearly marked as this one is, is pretty rare. The glass is also the original bevelled variety, with some scuffs and scrapes, but no unsightly damage to note. Offered in full working order, the watch is keeping time, but it has not been serviced. A Premium Service and 12 month warranty are additionally offered for this vintage watch.
Green Jackets Pewter Tankard Award, c.1958 An excellent example of a pewter one-pint tankard awarded at the Green Jackets Depot during a Rifle Meeting in 1958, to the Champion in the Light Machine Gun (LMG) class. The tankard is of good heavy quality with no dings or dents, just a lovely age patina.
Group of Victorian & Police Whistles 1887 - 1972 This is an excellent and interesting group of police whistles, all made by the premier manufacturer, Joseph Hudson & Co. All are in excellent dent free condition. The earliest whistle dates from 1887 and is labeled with the company's, "131 Barr Street" address. It is handmade of nickel silver and shows minor staining and light surface markings. The immaculate "Metropolitan Police" marked whistle was made pre WW2. It appears to have never been used, but it was fitted with a modern 1980s police tunic chain when it was issued to a police recruit - 50 years after it was accepted into police service! The last chrome whistle is from the 1970's. It is virtually mint and is of the pattern that was made up to 1972, complete with its original chain: After 1972, police whistles ceased to be made from rolled sheet metal and were instead made of a one piece tube. With that, production of the Hudson police whistle was also affected by technology, when virtually overnight the role of 'The Metropolitan' whistles as a tool to summon help, was replaced by the introduction of police personal radios. From thereon, the whistle has taken on more of a symbolic role for tradition's sake. Albeit the whistle is making something of a comeback in certain quarters. All of these are in full working order and represent a snapshot of the Metropolitan whistles issued to constabularies over the generations.
GS Mark II British Army Pocket Watch, c.1939 This stunning and original example of the General Service Mark II watch was made by Carley & Clemence, c.1939. The Mark II was the military issue pocket watch of choice, until the war stopped production, offering the army a higher grade timepiece over the later war-grade GSTPs. This one, with its nickel semi-waterproof case, is in relatively untouched condition and shows just minor signs of service use. It keeps time and would be a welcome addition to use or add to a military watch collection. Seldom are they found this good.
Gunsmith's Turn Screw By Thos. Ibbotson & Co. A good and original gunsmith's turn screw with a hardwood handle embossed with the maker's name, "Thos. Ibbotson & Co. Sheffield." A succession of family toolmaker's with the name of Thomas Ibbotson, were in business from 1822 - 1909. The wood is in good condition, with clean metal and useable blade.
Gunsmith's Turnscrew - MOD Armoury Issue Military 7 inch long armourer,s flat blade screwdriver with a 1/4 inch tip, it is in good order with a solid handle and clean tip, it is stamped CLAY SHEFFIELD /|\ 1991 137-1728.
H. Nock, 20 Bore Officer's Flintlock Holster Pistol, c.1790 This Henry Nock flintlock pistol was made c.1790, and closely resembles the style of the contemporary duellers. Slim and elegant in form, but less elaborate in external decoration, this Officer's pistol was designed for service use and holster carry. Featuring a slightly swamped, regulation length, 20 bore iron barrel, bearing the maker's name, "H. Nock," as well as his "HN" initials, this flintlock was proofed in London. Furthermore, the signed radiused lock is also in full working order, retaining sharp lines and an overall original dark patina, with just minor pin prick surface pitting. All the woodwork is equally well preserved with rich walnut colouring and no repair or loss. Even the horn tipped ramrod appears to be the original. Overall a very good and sleepy example of a desirable Henry Nock, Officer's Holster Pistol. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 14 inches
H.M. Customs House .65 Regulation Flintlock By Brander & Potts, c.1805 This scarce modified 1796 Light Dragoon Regulation Flintlock pistol is engraved on the brass trigger guard, "H.M. Customs House," as it was once part of the revenue officers' arsenal held at Lower Thames Street, London. These premises were actually destroyed following a fire and subsequent gunpowder explosion on Saturday 12th February 1814. Made by the gunmakers Brander & Potts, who were contractors to the Board of Ordnance, working from premises at 70 Minories and Goodman’s Yd, between 1802-27. This particular flintlock pistol features a plain barrel of .65 calibre and bevelled lock, marked to the maker. In addition, the period repaired walnut stock also bears the B&P stamp, original brass mounts and iron ramrod. Generally the pistol has seen service use and this is evident from by the presence of general wear and pitting, but the pistol is still in fully functioning condition and good cosmetic appearance.
H.Y. Carabiniers' Issue Light Dragoon Flintlock, c.1799 Consignment sale: During the Napoleonic Wars the British Army had a regiment of carabiniers as part of the 6th Dragoon Guards. However, at this time the Hampshire Yeomanry cavalry also maintained an elite regiment of carabiniers, recruited from their best horsemen and rifle shots - They became known as the "Carabiniers." This served to distinguish them from the other volunteer yeomanry who amalgamated into what became the Hampshire Yeomanry. Certainly, in the late Victorian era, when the Hampshire Regiment became part of the British Army, they gave homage to their forebears by adopting the crossed rifles badge and naming themselves, "Carabiniers." This flintlock pistol, made by Durs Egg, is of the 1799 Light Dragoon pattern and bears this prestigious gunmaker's name engraved on the lock, as well as on the regulation barrel. However, the barrel engraving is now worn, leaving just vestiges apparent, together with the word, "London." The early style rounded lock and cock are original, and the lock retains a robust action. Cosmetically all the ironwork shows signs of pitting, resulting in some loss of detail, as well as signs of earlier cleaning and rubbing to the stock, which features an apron on the barrel tang. The ramrod is a quality old replacement. Nevertheless, the pistol stands as a solid example of a French Revolutionary Wars flintlock, in service with a highly regarded yeomanry regiment of mounted riflemen. A good looking flintlock pistol by a renowned gunmaker, clearly stamped to the trigger guard, "H.Y." with a surmounted "C" as well as troop details of "A" and rack number "41." Well worthy of further research. Barrel length = Overall length =
Hamilton W10 Military Wristwatch c.1973 Following the end of Smiths' military contract in 1973, the Swiss branch of Hamilton stepped up to the challenge and continued with the supply of mechanical watches to the Ministry of Defence. The new tonneau pattern case was of monocoque design, where the movement is totally confined in a steel housing machined from a solid block. The only way to access the movement here, is to remove the glass and ease out the mechanism through the front of the watch. A couple of years later the British Cabot Watch Company (CWC), began the production of the very same watch, sourcing the parts from the same company as Hamilton had been using. The switch from a Swiss based company to a London based firm that promised to deliver the exact same product using genuine Swiss parts, was a sound logistical decision. Typically though for collectors, the Hamilton watch brand is most desired as it is the forerunner of this genre of watch, which were the last mechanical watches to be issued in any number to the armed forces. This Hamilton is in great original condition showing virtually pristine, with no appreciable sign of wear. Furthermore, the previous owner gives an assurance that the watch has been serviced within he last 12 months and certainly the watch is running without any obvious fault - However this does not amount to a Premium Service warranty. Watch will be supplied with a brand new NATO strap.
Handheld Vintage Cartridge Primer, Decapper and Sizer This is a complete vintage reloading tool made c.1880, for decapping, priming and resizing shotgun cartridges. The tool is made and stamped for the "Cal. 16" cartridge and it was made in France where this calibre is popular. However, the primer and decapper will work with a 12 bore cartridge as shown. It is in original condition, retaining much of its original finish.
Handmade RAF "Penny Spitfire" Badge c.1940 This wonderful "Penny Spitfire" broach was made by an artisan in the RAF and given to a member of Wing Commander's Moye's family, where it remained until being sold off recently, together with the Wing Commander's pewter tankard. Moyle is known to have served as an RAF pilot during WW2. Apparently the small Spitfire badge was handmade from an old Victorian copper penny, with the work being very well executed and nicely proportioned. The badge can be fixed to a lapel by means of its brass safety pin, soldered to the underside of the fuselage. A great item in unmolested condition with good shape and age patina.
Hannoverian Military Adapted "New Land" Pistol c.1815 This former British ordnance "New Land" pistol was converted by the Hannoverian military in the 1830s, but the facts which led it to be part of the German military's armoury, are worth reviewing… When Hannover was overrun by French troops in 1803, the defeated Hannoverian forces reformed and enlisted their services into the new "King's German Legion," which was part of the Anglo-Allied initiative to defeat Napoleon. Incorporating the cavalry, artillery and infantry, the KGL were German nationals who learnt to be commanded in English by their own leaders, with just some of their officers being seconded from the British Army. Noted as being a well trained and professional regiment, the King's German Legion fostered a sense of 'Englishness' to permeate its ranks, to the point that many of the men adopted British first names. This level of integration helped establish them as being one of the best regiments of the regular British Army. Never would they be considered as mercenaries in the pay of the King, far from it, as the KGL were seasoned soldiers who were often involved in the thick of action at several historic campaigns; most notably the Walcheren Campaign, the Peninsular War and the Hundred Days. In fact, the King's German Legion fought continuously against the French throughout the Napoleonic Wars. In 1815, making up a substantial part of the army under the Duke of Wellington's command the King’s German Legion, together with the integral King's German Artillery, came into their own. Having been involved in the deciding Battle of Waterloo, the KGA went on to Paris and finally, in February 1816, they reentered their City of Hannover amid cheers from jubilant inhabitants. Having achieved their objective, the King's German Legion were henceforth disbanded, but that was only to facilitate the organisation of the 1st Hannoverian Battalion. Having been previously equipped by the British Army, the former Legion or a part thereof, kept hold of their weapons, which were still stamped with their "Tower" and "GR" marks. So this particular pistol remained in service for a great number of years and in later years, was modernised by the Hannoverian military armoury, c.1830. The German improvements to this New Land pistol are particularly interesting and the execution of the work is craftsman like in all aspects: The breech end of the barrel has been reconfigured to allow a percussion ignition system to be incorporated; armoury engraving of the number "30" can be found on several key barrel components indicating that the work was bespoke; the provision of a taller hammer of German style, notched to engage a safety bar; the adoption of a safety catch to keep the hammer just clear off the nipple; the addition of a foresight and a lanyard ring to the butt cap, completes the list of Hannoverian military mods. A fascinating example in good order throughout but with some obvious signs of service wear. Fully working, it is nevertheless a good example of its kind, with a typical period armoury repair to the ramrod channel. All made more desirable by the presence of regimental markings - With plenty of scope for further research.
Hawker Siddeley Presentation Clock c.1960 A high-quality 8-day mantle clock by the English maker, Rotherhams, bearing an engraved plaque which reads, "Presented to W.A.E. TURNER by the Directors of the HAWKER SIDDELEY GROUP in recognition of 25 years service". A similar dedication is also found to the front of the clock with the additional legend, "Tempus Fugit" - Time Flies. As the HSG changed their name in 1964, this means that Turner was employed by them since before the war and, interestingly, Turner had a connection to the Brooklands area of Surrey - which opens up lots of fascinating possibilities for historians to research. Offered in full working order, this clock is British quality at its best, featuring fine pearlescent work on the gilded brass plates and a folding winding key. The movement is also protected from dust by being enclosed in a perspex cage and the whole is beautifully built into a handsome walnut case. Overall height = 25 cm
Heavy Cavalry "W.A." Percussion Pistol, c.1845 An excellent example of an English heavy cavalry type percussion pistol, stamped "W.A." on the woodwork and barrel - claimed to have been reworked by the Woolwich Arsenal, c.1845. At any rate, such pistols are not unique as other identical examples are known to exist, each bearing the same W.A. markings. These all appear to have been armoury constructed pistols, which share additional characteristics, in so much as they have been assembled from obsolete stock parts. Perhaps they may have been intended for supply to militia forces. Interestingly though, whatever the circumstances leading to their creation, these regulation barrelled pistols bear the crowned GR proof and view marks of arms issued much earlier in life. Furthermore, since this pistol's adaptation and refit, it seems to have had little or no additional use - probably having remained in an armoury store. Presented in a generally excellent and untouched condition, this pistol makes for a fascinating example of British resourcefulness. Complete with its plain robust and strong working lock, plus, an original iron ramrod, attractive brass fittings and sharp furniture throughout. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 14½ inches
Heavy Cavalry "W.A." Percussion Pistol, c.1845 2019 New Year Special An excellent example of an English heavy cavalry type percussion pistol, stamped "W.A." [Western Australia] on the woodwork and barrel. Examples of identical pistols can be found in Australian Museums, which identify these percussion pistols as being supplied by the British Government, apparently in response to the mounting tension over suspicious French colonial intrusions, as they looked to expand their interests in the region. All these W.A. pistols appear to have been armoury constructed and share characteristic of them having been assembled from obsolete gun parts. Interestingly these regulation barrelled pistols bear the crowned GR proof and view marks of arms originally issued much earlier in life. Furthermore, since this pistol's adaptation and refit, it seems to have had little or no additional use - probably having remained in an armoury store. Presented in a generally excellent and untouched condition, this pistol makes for a fascinating example of British resourcefulness. Complete with its plain robust and strong working lock, plus, an original iron ramrod, attractive brass fittings and sharp furniture throughout. For a similar "W.A." example see; https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/tennants-auctioneers/catalogue-id-srten10110/lot-3c8bc4d6-e457-4250-9624-a43e00f7caa4 Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 14½ inches
Heavy Duty Bicycle - Extra Images Additional accessories include; Dunlop \"D1\" saddle shows little signs of wear Ever Ready headlamp Field telephone box (empty) - clamped to the rear carrier Front handlebar 58 Pattern tool bag J Brooks pattern Army issue multi-tool correct and as supplied for postwar bicycles Vintage brass tyre pump Correct Adie 3-inch bell
Heavy Lignum Vitae Police Truncheon By Hiatt & Co. Ltd. Birmingham This is an excellent Hiatt made police truncheon, made from a dark, close grained dense wood - probably Lignum Vitae, also known as Ironwood. This was the wood of choice, but later police issue truncheons were made of a much lighter timber. This truncheon is free of splits or other notable signs of damage to the woodwork - only the leather strap is worn and split. Otherwise the truncheon is in excellent condition with the grip being fully stamped with Hiatt's details on the end. The number 361 is also stamped along its length. A nice British police stick.
Heraldry In War - Formation Badges 1939-1945 A very good book detailing many of the formation badges of the British Army and Commonwealth during WW2. This hardback book, written by Lt. Colonel Howard N. Cole, OBE, was printed in 1946 and is in very good condition. With many illustrations, mainly in black and white, although with some colour plates, the book is a useful resource for the collector. No missing pages, rips or stains but it is an old used book that does shows its age.
Hermanos .44 Smith & Wesson Russian Revolver Hermanos of Spain produced fine copies of the Smith & Wesson .44 Russian revolver, which were sold worldwide and seriously affected S&W's retail trade. Smith & Wesson claimed through the US courts, that these copies were built to deceive the unwary into believing that they were Smiths, as the Spanish heritage, at least in the early copies, was craftily disguised with pseudo S&W logos and other patent details that made Hermanos' revolvers appear to be American made revolvers. Anyway, this example on offer here dates from c.1900 and clearly, in small print, bears "Hermanos Eibar Espania" details on the barrel rib. Yet it still has S&W styled monograms on the perfect grips. This top break 5 inch barrelled revolver is every inch a top quality firearm, benefitting from fine factory engraving over most of its surface. It is fully functioning and has a reasonable bore and chambers, and a nickel finish that has not been scrubbed. where the plating has worn, the underlying metal has discoloured, but very light and sympathetic cleaning will see this pistol easily improved upon. Overall a great obsolete calibre revolver at a budget price.
Hertsmere Arms Fair - 29th November 2015 ZMW Militaria is pleased to support the Hertsmere Arms Fair on, SUNDAY, 29th NOVEMBER 2015 HOLIDAY INN, LONDON - ELSTREE WD6 5PU Looking forward to meeting our customers, both old and new. Ziggy M. Wesolowski
Hill Revolver
HMS Ark Royal Copper \"Grog\" Jug An unusual vintage souvenir copper jug depicting the aircraft carrier, HMS Ark Royal - Launched in 1981 and decommissioned in 2011. Presented in very good but tarnished condition, the jug\'s design is reminiscent of the copperware used by the RN to dispense the daily grog. Interestingly, the jug holds exactly 1 Gill - twice the daily rum ration. Splice the main brace. Sadly, that tradition was stopped in the 1970s.
HMS Sirius Model Twin 4.5 Inch Gun A well constructed brass desk model of the main gun from the Royal Navy frigate, HMS Sirius. The model is articulated with gun elevation and tracking and is mounted on a teak wood base, with plaque dated 1972/73. HMS Sirius was of Leander Class and this gun was her main forward armament. This was later replaced with an Exocet missile system. The base measures, 4x3 inches.
Home Front - ARP Warden\'s Whistle c.1939 A WW2 Air Raid Precautions whistle made by Hudsons. Presented in very good condition, having retained most of its original finish. Blows nice and loud.
Hopkins & Allen .32 Rimfire Pocket Revolver One of the better Saturday Night Specials - A good Hopkins & Allen XL No.3 pocket revolver, chambered for the obsolete .32 Rimfire cartridge. Dating to c.1880, this is a crisp and untouched pistol in collectable condition and full working order. The revolver has retained most of its original nickel finish, with just some minimal losses, as well as a perfect set of dog's head vulcanite grips. Mechanically the action is equally sharp, with good lock up and strong springs throughout. All in all, a very good example priced to sell! Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7½ inches
HRH Queen Elizabeth II - Rest In Peace We join our country in sadness at the death of Queen Elizabeth II and offer our sincere condolences to King Charles III and the Royal Family.
HS9 Royal Navy Lemania Chronograph, c.1947 An excellent example of an early Royal Navy Lemania chronograph wristwatch, issued to the Fleet Air Arm. Fully marked with the pre-NATO Hydrographic Survey codes, and never renumbered, identifying it as a pilot's watch. This watch is in perfect working order, with all the chronograph functions operating crisply. The high-grade signed movement looks bright and fresh and free from any inappropriate tool marks. Equally lovely is the white dial, which is stamped with the pre tritium era, "P" for promethium mark. All hands, crown and chrono-pusher are the factory originals, making this a stand-out example. The steel case is sharp and the watch will come fitted to a genuine NATO strap, including the leather band that it is currently fitted to. A great example for the investor, collector and everyday user of top-end watches.
Hudson Police Whistle From Hendon Police College c.2000 This modern "POLICE" marked tube whistle is as new and comes from Hendon, Metropolitan Police Training School. As with the first police calls, it was supplied by the police whistle maker, Hudson & Co. These whistles were then sold to police recruits studying at the college, from a retail outlet at the venue. The above information is fact and the whistle is absolutely like new, supplied with its original chain. A scarce to find modern POLICE marked whistle.
Hull River Police Percussion Pistol, c.1840 A rare percussion pistol used by the Hull River Police, c.1840. As with so many constabulary pistols, these were made to be utilitarian arms, designed to meet the needs of the organisation and built to a price. Typically, they were not attractive pistols and many were unattributed to the gunmaker - likely through considered choice. The location of Hull has for centuries encouraged its growth as a port, leading to the development of its waterways, surrounding roads and later to the creation of a railway network. With each step, these improvements brought with them prosperity to the region as well as attracting those intent on benefitting through crime. This in turn led to the establishment of a variety of law enforcement bodies, both private and crown agents. In turn, this led to the establishment of the Hull River Police. This Birmingham proofed pistol has served around the Hull estuary and has its barrel clearly marked, "Hull River Police - Dock Watch." it is additional marked on the butt cap, "G3," which maybe a rack number associated with Grimsby Dock? In any event, the pistol is in full working order with a strong action, with its furniture showing the bruises and scars of active service, together with a working-life repair to right of the barrel tang. An original and historically early new police pistol. Barrel length = 7 ½ inches Overall length = 13 inches
Huntsman - Small Silva Compass ex MOD Surplus The Huntsman is an item of MOD escape equipment, issued to RAF aircrews. It is a small and lightweight compass made by Silva of Sweden and can be worn clipped to the uniform by means of an integral safety pin. This compass is in mint unused condition, complete with its red box. It is over 25 years old and genuine military surplus, but it has no issue marks.
Imperial German Pocket Watch c.1912
Imperial Russian Military Binoculars By Carl Zeiss c.1907 This is a fine and rare pair of Imperial Russian Military contract binoculars, made by the firm of Carl Zeiss. Having established a company in Tsarist Russia, Zeiss' records indicate that their D.F. 6x glasses, which were first introduced in 1907, were reserved for military supply. Given that the serial number of these glasses is only 1601, such a low number indicates that they must have been among the first of their type to have been made, as by 1910 total binocular production for Zeiss had reached 200,000 pairs and by the Great War that number had risen to close on to half a million. These actual binoculars are marked in Cyrillic with the Carl Zeiss name, plus the place of manufacture is given as St. Petersburg. In addition, they have also been engraved with the military mark of crossed Nagant rifles. As is, those binoculars are wholly original showing just light signs of active service use, with some minor paint loss and handling marks. Optically the image is very good and free from any detracting mould or unsightly damage - although there are a couple of tiny edge chips on one objective lens, almost unnoticeable and invisible when in use. A neck strap is also included, which is believed to be original to the binoculars. Interestingly, these binoculars were found in a WW2 German Army binocular case, some 50+ years ago. It's anyones guess how they came to be together, but as the case is not the original Russian one, it will be offered separately - But this will not happen before the binoculars are sold, just in case they are wanted together. The German case is likewise in excellent original condition, being code marked to the Rudolf Lang, Federn, Draht- und Metallwarenfabrik Brandenburg an der Havel. All in all, a very well preserved set of optics from a rare Carl Zeiss contract.
Indian Tribal Percussion Pistol, c.1880 A late 19th Century Indian made and decorated pistol, made for tribal use during the days of the Raj. Offered in good working order, the pistol is of a Lancer's Pattern where the action bears a rampant lion crest impressed on to the lock plate. The woodwork is highly embellished with mother of pearl and brass rope decoration, with some minor loss of detail and signs of age-related wear. The regulation bore barrel features a fixed rear sight and an adjustable foresight. A good colonial muzzle loading pistol. Barrel length = 7½ inches Overall length = 13 inches
Inert Parker Hale Sergeant\'s Musketoon, c.1978 A rare and mint inert trade example of an Enfield pattern Sergeant's Musketoon, that was made in the 1970's using original tooling. Early examples, as this one is, were made exclusively by Parker Hale in England, whilst later examples were manufactured under contract in Italy. Interestingly, when Parker Hale first offered these on public sale, a few versions were advertised in "Guns Review", where the shortest pattern was the "Sergeant's Musketoon", offered with either rifled or smoothbores - these had 24-inch barrels. However, this "inert" version was one of only a small number that was made especially for the gun trade, which allowed them to be taken to gun shows and handled by potential customers without the risk of infringing UK gun laws. As this Musketoon was never a live-firearm, having left PH in this inert state, it does not require any certificate to possess - It does of course have a solid barrel, save for the top 6 inches near the muzzle. In all other respects, these inert percussion musketoons share the same action, stock and quality of finish as found on the licensed arms. Presented in full working order, this PH Musketoon is in mint condition, retaining all its factory blue finish and casehardening colours. The furniture and action are also crisply stamped in the style of the originals and bearing the legend, "Enfield 1861". All in all, a beautiful Parker Hale Sergeant's Musketoon that is more interesting than a deact-gun and better than a wall hanging repro.
Inert Snider Mark IX Military Ball Cartridge Mark IX c.1860 Consignment Sale: An inert Mark IX Military Ball Cartridge for the Snider rifle. Cardboard cartridge body marked with a red ring around the circumference, with iron and brass base - Typically, has no headstamp marking. Very good condition - One only.
Irish Constabulary Detective Issue Pistol, c.1848 In 1847 Hollis Brothers were contracted to supply 500 Special Duty pistols. These pistols were made to a new design for the Irish Constabulary and were intended for plain clothes work. Each pistol featured a robust box lock action with a large heavy hammer firing a man-stopping .65 calibre ball. With the swivel ram rod slung below a strengthening rib, the overall profile of these pistols was smoothly contoured, making it suitable to its undercover role. The first pistols supplied were stamped "1848," together with theVR Queen's Crown mark, as is clearly seen on this pistol. A deeply stamped proof mark is also present, as is the Irish Registration mark for Cork. Given the troubled times in which this rare pistol served, it is still in very good order and is mechanically sound with a solid action. Given that these pistols were built to a price, some cosmetic shortcuts in the choice of the walnut stock is evident, where the gunmaker has elected to use a more knotty timber, which is original and still bearing its crowned inspector's stamps, plus Board of Ordnance mark. One of the rarest Board of Ordnance pistols for the collector to acquire, in original and good order. Barrel length = 4½ inches
Irish Mounted Constable's Flintlock By Rigby, c.1820 Originally a brace of large .65 carbine bore flintlock pistols would have been carried by constables on horse patrol in the rural regions of Ireland, such as represented by this example supplied by W & J Rigby of Dublin. A smaller pattern of Rigby pistol was also made available for law enforcement work, as shown elsewhere on this site. This robust Rigby pistol, which measures 15 inches in length, is in good overall condition with just minor service wear and an old armourer's repair to the ramrod channel. It is in proper working order with a strong spring action and features a captive ramrod, plus the traditionally Irish form of slim brass capped butt. A good quality collectable pistol.
Irish Pocket Pistol By Kavanagh, Dublin c.1845 William Kavanagh was first recorded as a gunmaker in 1796, being joined in 1822 by his sons, William and James. On occasion both brothers would periodically branch out opting to conduct business by themselves, but after William senior retired or possibly died in 1853, the brothers continued to work together although there would be continued spells of independent practice by them. Work took place at various premises, but the family are most closely associated as working from both 11 & 12 Dame Street, Dublin. William Kavanagh the younger was also joined in partnership by his son, probably after James died in 1872. In this way the Kavanagh name maintained a long association with the gun industry, which lasted until 1928. This percussion pistol is a very good example of what is probably the brothers' work. In design, the pistol is a scaled down travelling pistol of the period, but configured to suit very pocketable dimensions. The whole pistol retains strong traces of its original finish and the lock is finely chiselled with scroll engravings. The boxlock is all working well, with the side mounted hammer holding through all three bents. Beneath the fixed octagonal barrel there is a nicely miniaturised captive ramrod, making this a neat and compact package measuring a little over 6 inches overall and of around 80 bore. All in all, a neat and well presented pocket percussion pistol, made by one of Ireland's most eminent gun making families.
Irish Top Hat Percussion Pistol By Calderwood, c.1830 A percussion pistol by the Irish gunsmith, Calderwood of Dublin, made during the early years of the percussion era, c.1830. At this time percussion caps were different and relied on a flange around their rim making them look like tiny "top hats", which were held down by a false frizzen device. This arrangement not only prevented the cap from falling off but also offered some protection from accidental discharge. Top hat caps were short-lived before simple improvements in manufacturing techniques made the rim unnecessary. This improvement makes the earliest pistols hard to find. Presented in full working order, this turn-off barrel pistol is offered in good cosmetic condition, showing just light sign of former carry, the ironwork has a dark age patina and some age-related staining. The action is strong and all springs function positively, including the automatic trigger. Overall this is a good example of a pocket pistol, morphing from flintlock and into the new percussion era. Barrel length = 2 inches Overall length = 6¾ inches
Italian Military Pocket Knife A very good, possibly unissued, military pocket knife with an embossed coat of arms belonging to the Italian Army. The knife shows no sign of use but does have some storage or manufacturing imperfections to the can opener, which is fully functioning - The main blade remains untouched. Other tools include a flat screw driver and lanyard ring. Attrtactive and perfect for everyday use. Overall length = 8.5 cm (excluding ring) Blade length = 5.5 cm (EDC compliant)
J R Cooper's Patent Under-Hammer Pepper Pot Revolver, c.1845 Selling on consignment: A good Birmingham Gun Trade 6-shot Pepperpot percussion revolver, utilising J R Cooper's under-hammer design and ring-pull trigger. Generally in good order, with a strong working action but missing a couple of nipples. Otherwise cosmetically this pepperpot has an overall even age patina and good undamaged grips. A scarce pepperpot that presents well with no pitting and some scroll engraved decoration. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7½ inches
J, Dixon Powder & Shot Measure, c.1840 A James Dixon brass and ebony gunpowder and lead shot measure, c.1840. The measure is in good used condition with the adjustable cup calibrated for both Drams and Ounces. Overall the measuring scoop remains serviceable with some signs of wear. The wooden handle is undamaged.
J. Harding & Sons Flintlock Pistol, c.1835 A crisp and altogether very good example of a mail guard's style flintlock, made by James Harding & Sons, c.1835. James Harding worked from various premises in Blackman Street, London, from 1810 to 1843, during which time he was a gunmaker to the General Post Office. In 1834 he entered into partnership with his son, continuing to work in the Borough area of London, where this mail guard's pattern flintlock was made on the cusp of the percussion era. Made with an all iron barrel, this example has none of the government marks, apart from the sharply engraved gunmaker details along the regulation length barrel. As such, it can only be considered to be of post office type. Presented in excellent condition, the brown barrel is sharp, showing little or no sign of use. With the barrel removed, the London proof marks can be viewed on the underside - all crisp and clear. Even the full stocked furniture is free from damage, apart from minor age related bumps. Complete with a horn tipped ramrod and worm, which may be its original. Overall, the pistol is in near excellent condition. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15 inches
J. P. Sauer & Sohn, Suhl - 10.6mm Ordnance Target Pistol, c.1880 Among the military powers of Europe during the mid to late 19th century, the Prussian military earned themselves a reputation for being a formidable force. This came about largely from the victories of several major campaigns, bringing about the unification of the German Empire, followed by the Austro and Franco-Prussian wars. Yet, despite their status as a modern army, armed with the latest rifles, the Prussian cavalry never considered pistols to be of any advantage and so, kept the issue of their single shot muzzle loaders to officers only - Pistols were regarded as only good for one, or perhaps two shots. This is at odds to other armies methodology, who had been using percussion and pinfire revolvers for quite some time. Prussian cavalry troopers were thus armed simply with swords, lances and the most up-to-date carbines. This military dogma remained unchanged, even after the introduction of the German Army's first revolver in 1879. Often referred to as the Reichsrevolver, that breach loading pistol was primarily for use by the navy, artillery and military police units, with others being given to buglers, signallers and dispatch riders. Chambered for the new 10.6mm Ordnance cartridge, the Reichsrevolver was chiefly made by the gunmakers of the Suhl Consortium, which included Sauer. J. P. Sauer & Sohn also made this rare single shot pistol, which was itself chambered for the military 10.6mm cartridge. Built around their back-loading rifle design, this pistol was also patented in 1879. Being typically very well made, the result was a rather impressive target pistol that conformed to the traditionalist culture of the cavalry. The pistol also offered adjustable sights, a superb set-trigger and automatic ejector. In military armoury style, this pistol has also been hand stamped with the technical specification relating to its chambering. Marked under the breach the detail reads, "REV. PATR. M 79," followed by other numeric references including, "67/49," which equates to chamber characteristics and diameters of between, 10.41mm to 10.66mm. The propellant, "SP" (Schießpulver aka Gunpowder) and amount of charge are also specified, together with a plethora of other proof marks... Including a Crowned "G," which is normally found on rifle barrels. From a historic perspective, it is also interesting to note the presence of a large British Queen's Crown, together with a German King's Crown, which surmounts the indistinct lettering of a military acceptance mark. These marks are a reference to Queen Victoria, who was also the Queen of Saxony by marriage, just as her eldest daughter, Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, the Princess Royal, became the German Empress and Queen of Prussia, in 1888, by virtue of her marriage to German Emperor Frederick III. Presented in full working order and excellent cosmetic appearance, this fine Sauer target pistol is well worthy of further research. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15½ inches
J.B. Holland Pocket Knife, c.1945 A good quality sporting knife made by the wartime cutler, J.B. Holland, Sheffield. Presented in good condition, this lovely vintage folding knife has nickel scales holding several tool blades securely, with no loose pivots and good springs throughout. A good EDC folding knife for the collection or daily use. Blade length = 2½ inches, (61mm) Total Overall Length = 3¾ inches (94mm)
Jager Italy Single Action Army Revolver A vintage .22 Long blank firing revolver by Jager Italy. Made using gunsmith quality materials, this steel revolver is in good condition and working order. Cosmetically it shows signs of use and handling with light wear to the factory blue finish and plated surface. Presented in strong working condition, these side-venting revolvers are sought after by western enthusiasts, thanks to their faithful full-size representation of the Colt Peacemaker. VCR does not apply.
James Dixon 54 Bore Copper Powder Flask, c.1855 A good James Dixon & Sons of Sheffield, copper and brass bag shaped powder flask of the type found in 54 bore revolver cased sets. Minor signs of service wear, with strong original spring and solid body seems. Overall, an attractive and good usable flask.
James Warner .30 Rimfire Pocket Revolver, c.1868 This .30 Rimfire pocket revolver made by James Warner, in c.1868, is in very good to near excellent condition, having retained most of its original nickel finish. Perfect mechanics and strong springs give this revolver a positive and crisp feel, with proper indexing throughout. Good solid grips, clean screw heads, a bright bore and clear stamps, serve to make this a most pleasing gate loading pistol for the collector. The .30 Rimfire cartridge is regarded by UK Law to be obsolete, so it may be owned by persons of good character as an antique curio, without the requirement of any certificate. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length =
Jeep - Military Style Wristwatch An attractive, modern military style quartz wristwatch advertising the \"Jeep\" motor vehicle brand. Presented in very good used condition, showing little signs of use. benefitting from a damage free glass. Offered in full working order - requires strap. Waterproofing not guaranteed. Diameter = 42mm (excluding shoulders or crown)
Joseph Rodgers RAF Issue Survival & Escape Knife, c.1955 A rare RAF issue survival knife made by Joseph Rodgers, c.1955 for the issue to aircrews. This knife was worn upside-down, high up on the flight suit and incorporated a quick release mechanism in the handle. Depressing the sides of the grip rapidly deployed the knife, which was secured to the airman using a cord attachment. In the event of an emergency, these knives were intended to cut through harnesses or parachute lines; however, the design utilised a sharply pointed blade, which ran the risk of inflicting personal injury during a crisis, or the possibility of puncturing a liferaft in the event of ditching. Consequently, the Air Ministry introduced a knife with a more user-friendly blade. The redesigned blades were curved, with the cutting edge within the concave and a blunter point. Cosmetically this knife is in excellent condition, bearing the maker's details, together with the Air Ministry code, "AM 22C/1996." Interestingly, the rear of the cloth patch bears an official stamp, along with the original owner's name, Pilot Officer Philpott. A rare opportunity to acquire an early Joseph Rodgers Survival & Escape Knife.
JR Gaunt - Military Issue Brass Button Stick A new old stock brass button stick from the 1970s with age patina and some discolouration, but all unused and straight. You will receive one at random but all are identically marked and made by J.R. Gaunt & Son. Additional postage will be refunded on multiple purchases.
Jumbo 1966 Omega Seamaster Diver - Chronostop Watch In 1948, Omega's introduced a new range of high grade watches for the postwar market. Basically, their new line of watches were civilianised military spec timepieces, which were given the label, "Seamaster." Over time the Seamaster collection evolved into what was a professional range of divers' and sports watches. In 1966 Omega manufactured a limited series of single button chronograph watches, which were marketed as the Seamaster Chronostop. However, one oversized tonneau version of this watch, measuring 41mm across, with its inner rotating bezel, was marketed by Omega as the "Seamaster Diver". Of course, by modern standards this dive watch is quite a bit different to those made today: This particular Seamaster features an inner bezel, which can be set against the minute hand for measuring dive and decompression times. Presented in excellent collector grade condition, this Seamaster shows very little sign of actual use. All functions are crisp and smooth, with the watch performing as it should - although it has not been serviced recently. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £120.
KEMPTON ARMS FAIR - 3rd SEPTEMBER 2023 Dear Customers, Please note that the next Kempton Arms Fair will be on Sunday 3rd September 2023. The advert in Gun Mart mentioning a later date, is incorrect. You\'ll also be pleased to know that Kempton Park is outside the ULEZ area, so no charges. Kind regards, Ziggy
Kempton Park Arms Fair @ Epsom Downs With the NRA deciding to cancel our forthcoming Arms Fair, I am delighted to tell you all at short notice, that the Kempton Park Classic Arms Fair will now be held at Epsom Downs Racecourse. To be held on Sunday 23 August 2020 - Same date, usual time, just in a different location. Home of the Derby - Epsom Downs, Epsom KT18 5LQ I hope to see many of you there. Ziggy
King George III Bone Dice A good pair of late 18th or early 19th century, small bone dice bearing the King\'s Crown to indicate that tax duty had been paid. One dice has a clear Crown outline mark, while the other has an indistinct red impression. The \"Stamp Tax Act 1765\" was introduced for many different items, ordering that 10-shillings would be payable on the purchase of a pair of dice. Taxed items were therefor marked to show that duty had been paid. One of the purposes of this Act was to subjugate the citizens in America and for them to pay for the military forces in the colonies. Typically, such dice would have been carried by many a soldier.
Knights Of Norwich Flintlock Holster Pistol, c.1810 A very good 200 year old flintlock holster pistol signed by the provincial gunmaker, Knights of Norwich, which, judging by the condition of the bore, appears to have never been fired. The lock itself is in full working order, all attractively engraved with sharp decorative embellishments, as well as the addition of a roller frizzen that dates the flintlock to, c.1810. Looking at the pan, this is free of the pitting that is normally found in this area, which again supports the notion that this pistol is a sleeper. Even the remaining ironwork has sharp detail, with just the lightest of surface wear to the finish... All in all commensurate with the pistol never having been used. Only the furniture shows some sign of bumps and bruises, perhaps from storage or carriage, but nothing serious. The hexagonal barrel has a bead foresight and much original brown colouring, bored to take a ball of about .60," which equates to a 21, or a patched 22 Bore. Overall, a lot of flintlock from a provincial gunmaker and a beautiful historic part of England. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13.5 inches
KRRC Silver Plated Regimental Bugle An excellent silver-plated military bugle bearing the engraved regimental device of the \"The King\'s Royal Rifle Corps\", together with the name of the territorial force, \"2nd BN - The Queen\'s Westminsters\", who amalgamated with the KRRC. This early and top-quality bugle still plays well, having been made by the military musical instrument supplier, Henry Potter of London. It shows signs of service wear and thinning to the silver plate, but in general, this brass instrument has retained its shape, with just some minor dents at the rear. A genuine example.
L&NER Railway Constabulary Whistle, c.1925 This is a scarce London & North Eastern Railway Constabulary police whistle, dating from the mid 1920s. This force was brought about after the Railway Police were reorganised by the Railways Act of 1921, which caused an amalgamation of the numerous independent railways. Out of the 20 or so organised Railway Police Forces that pre existed, 4 groups now emerged linked to the new networks, namely; the Great Western Railway (GWR), the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER), the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) and the Southern Railway (SR). The size of the reorganised Railway Constabulary now began to increase. Ex service men from the Great War became a ready source of recruit who, once again, found themselves in an occupation that was not without personal risk. Disciplined and generally proficient in the use of small arms, Constables were given additional firearms training and access to a service revolver, which could be carried by those who desired to patrol armed. Certainly, with the police undertaking an even greater responsibility for the safety of passengers and the goods carried by rail during the Second World War, it is incredible to note that the incidence of theft from the railway, between 1941 and 1952, exceeded the total number of thefts reported to the combined civilian authorities of England and Wales! This police whistle, in lieu of the telephone or radio, was the constable's only means of requesting help on the hurry up. As it was a mandatory piece of police equipment, most frequently these whistles are found, well used. Yet this example is in excellent and virtually untouched condition, with no sign of damage. An amazing survivor from one of Britain's lesser known armed Constabularies.
L&NER Railway Police Constabulary Whistle This is a great example of a pre WW2 railway police whistle, used on the London & North East Region. Made from nickel silver by Hudson & Co. of Birmingham c.1935, the whistle is in perfect collectible condition with no dents, just minor pocket carry marks. An excellent whistle in fill working order.
Lancaster P1855 Bayonet & Scabbard An excellent example of a Lancaster P1855 bayonet complete with its rare military marked scabbard. Overall this bayonet is free of damage or other abuse, retaining its original factory polish, as well as having good crisp and clear marking comprising of; broad arrow, "X" bend test mark and other numerous inspection stamps. This Lancaster bayonet comes with its military marked leather scabbard, which is likewise in excellent condition with good and firm brass mounts, showing no shrinkage or cracks, but some of the stitching is undone.
Lang 2 Shot Pocket Pistol A SMALL PERCUSSION TURNOVER POCKET PISTOL, 1.25inch turn-off barrels marked LONDON PATENT, border and scroll engraved rounded action signed LANG 7 HAYMARKET, sliding safety, folding trigger, chequered wooden butt with foliate engraved white metal cap. Hammer cracked and repaired.
Large French Military Percussion Pistol, c.1840 Selling on consignment: A French military percussion pistol c.1840, with the lock plate bearing the inscription, "Manufacture Impériale de Tulle." This large bore pistol, which is of 20mm calibre (approximately 10 bore) has been officially armoury modified, possibly for use as a naval boarding weapon, which could have been loaded with shotgun pellets. As such, it is also fitted with a lanyard ring and belt hook. As is, the pistol is certainly an interesting adaptation of a service firearm, offered in working order and good condition, with a simple wooden ramrod. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Large French Percussion Primer Tin A large antique tin for 250 French percussion Caps, in good dent-free condition.
Large Vintage Pair of Brass Flintlock Pistols, c.1960 A decorative vintage pair of cast brass full-size pistols, depicting English 18th-century flintlocks. Made as a wall hanging decoration. Overall length = 12 inches
Late 1940\'s Belgian Leather Jerkin An excellent and original leather jerkin dating from just after WW2. The heavy grade leather is undamaged with good even brown colour all over. It remains supple and all stitching is solid, with the leather panels free from patches. Likewise, to the inside of the garment, there is no wear or moth to the cloth lining and the jerkin retains its original military blackened brass buttons. Size-wise, the label is faded but the jerkin comfortably fits a 6-foot tall person of between medium to large build, however, it feels a tad smaller than the Size 2 British Army version offered below. All in all, a superior clean and damage-free example that will be difficult to improve upon.
LB&SCR Police Railway Whistle This brass LS&SCR constabulary whistle, was made by Hudson & Co., c.1900. It was the property of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway and features an internal partition within the tube body of the whistle, which is of the 1896 patent type. This railway whistle is in good working order and all the stamped details are good and clear. There are signs of service wear, but the whistle looks generally good without any serious dents.
LCC Park Constabulary Issue Whistle By Hudson, c.1896 A scarce London County Council police whistle, made by Hudsons and issued to the little known Park Constabulary who were established in 1896 (not to be confused with the already established Royal Parks Police or other similarly named Park Constabularies). Prior to 1896, policing of the many London parks and recreational areas fell to the few existing park keepers and regular ground staff under the employ of the LCC, as the Metropolitan Police were largely dismissive of dealing with bylaw infringements and the other problems within the parks, believing that regular police patrols were unnecessary and their duty was best served elsewhere. Consequently, the park's problems were left to, essentially, the gardeners to handle. This saw troublemakers the likes of unsavoury vagabonds, drunks and vandals, having to be dealt with by untrained employees making this aspect of their work very unpopular. To tackle the problems and with a view to creating their own police force, the LCC saw fit to finance their Park Constabulary project by cutting back on the employment of regular ground staff. This helped to provide funds to purchase uniforms and equipment for the new constables as well as building an air of professional officialdom by referring to themselves using the police rank structure. However, from the start the authority of the Park Constables’ was in question and, perhaps due to this controversy, they were instructed to limit their involvement to providing help to visitors and to reporting suspected breaches of the law to the Park Inspector. On the subject of arrest, the constables were only permitted to act in the most serious of circumstances and then, only where the guilt of a wrongdoer could be established beyond a reasonable doubt - In essence, that was the Citizen’s Power of Arrest. Typically then, for several years the Park Constables found themselves with more time on their hands than they should have had and in response, this gave the LCC an opportunity to use the constables as additional ground staff, requesting them to help out around the park to fill in with the shortfall of other staff by picking up litter. Not surprisingly, this additional role did not sit well and Park Constables felt that this was an affront to their dignity. This situation lasted for a few tears as they waited to become sworn Constables under the "Metropolitan Police Magistrates Act”, and even when they did receive their appointment their earlier training remained unchanged. Perhaps it was these early decisions that provided the catalyst for what was to happen, only a few years later the Park Constabulary changed its rank structure; Park Police Inspectors became known as the Park, "High-Keepers" whilst the Constables became the "Under-Keepers”. Sadly, this only further eroded their status and by 1908 the Constabulary was in decline and appears to have morphed into a body of what today might be considered, "Security Guards", yet their desire to provide a thoroughly professional service became an inspiration to others Park Constabularies and local authorities to follow. The nickel silver whistle is the same as those issued to the Metropolitan Police, although it bears the acronym, "L.C.C." It is in full working order, showing the small marks caused by pocket carry but no nasty dents. Made by Hudson at their 13 Barr Street factory, this whistle predates the firm's change of address in 1908. A great police collector's item from a little-understood constabulary.
Leather Pistol Bucket Holster c.1850 This is a rare holster of bucket type, which would have been used to carry a flintlock or more likely given that it probably dates to the mid-Victorian era, a percussion pistol whilst mounted on horseback. Overall a very good example in sound and useable condition.
Leather SAA \"Peacemaker\" Revolver Holster by Hunter A vintage revolver holster marked "Hunter", to fit the Single Action Army and similar western revolvers. Presented in good condition with solid supple leather and intact stitching.
Leather WW1 Era Revolver Holster A supple leather holster that may originally have carried a Webley Mark VI, although its style is a little different to that normally used for that revolver. Generally in good condition throughout but with some service wear. All stitching intact. The final photo shows two holsters for comparison purposes - Only one is for sale on Stock 51091.
Lemania Military Stopwatch, c.1965 We have a number of these ex-MOD Lemaina stopwatches. They are all identical and carry broad arrow engraving but this one is unmarked. The rest have dates from the 1960s and all are basically in unused condition, with perhaps just a few storage marks. This is a high-quality Lemania stopwatch that has been calibrated to show the time as a decimal unit, for example, 6.5 would be 6 minutes and 30 seconds. This is a military preferred way of noting times as any mathematical calculations involving plus, minus or multiplication of time, is easier to work out. This watch comes in a fitted protective case, with numbers impressed into the catch. A nice watch to use or collect.
Liege Proof 12mm Pinfire Service Revolver, c.1860 Invented by Casimir Lefaucheux in the 1830s, pinfire became a popular self contained cartridge system before the advent of centre fire. It was available for a great many calibres, including ones suitable for military use, as this large 12mm revolver testifies. Proofed in Liege, this large revolver dates from c.1860. Plain and free of decoration, it appears to have been made in the white, which was common for service weapons of the time. With its big bore, long sighted barrel, trigger guard and lanyard ring, this pinfire is offered in full working order with strong springs - however it may only be owned without a certificate if held as an antique curio and not fired. Cosmetically the revolver has been cleaned in the past, but it still retains a good profile with no significant loss of detail. Solid original coarse cut grips, chambers and bore rifling, are also good throughout, with just some age related wear, but nothing significant. All in all, a lot of service pistol for the collector at a reasonable price. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Light Dragoon Flintlock by Durs Egg, c.1800 A regulation pattern Light Dragoon flintlock made by Durs Egg, most probably for a volunteer regiment in, c.1800. The pistol has the earlier desirable radiused lock plate and swan neck cock, which is in working order with strong springs and all signed by Egg. The tapering barrel is also signed, together with "London," as well as bearing Tower private proofs. Cosmetically, it can be seen that this flintlock has seen extended service, which has left the iron work uniformly covered in light surface pitting and woodwork covered with surface bruises, leaving an uneven and mottled appearance. The iron parts are untouched, however the woodwork shows signs of old repairs and some previous light scrubbing to the brass butt cap - This can be improved. An interesting and early Light dragoon flintlock by a top end maker, at an attractive price. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15.5 inches
Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock By Thomas, c.1800 A good Light Dragoon flintlock pistol of regulation pattern, complete with its original iron ramrod, dating to c.1800. This pistol is fully functioning, with strong springs and a good action, holding well on both half and full cock. The lock plate is of the flat type and has a step towards the tail, as well as bearing the maker's name, "Thomas." Aesthetically this pistol looks very good for display, but there have been some minor losses to the woodwork around the lock, which have been neatly attended too. This old wear and tear is commensurate with its military service and as is, the flintlock remains a good representative piece for the collector. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15.5 inches
Light Dragoon Tower Flintlock Pistol, c.1800 A superb and possibly unfired Tower flintlock pistol of Light Dragoon pattern, c.1800. This genuine regulation military pistol is a top example, with perfect furniture and ironwork, exhibiting just light sign of wear. Fully ordnance stamped with correct inspection marks, ordnance, view and proof marks, including the storekeeper's entwined Crown GR. Presented in full working order, this pistol is as sharp as they come but is missing the original ramrod - although it does have a good quality replacement. Overall, a fine example of a British military flintlock from the Napoleonic times.
LMS Railway Guard\'s Pocket Watch c.1925 This is a genuine example of a London, Midland & Scottish railway guard's pocket watch. Originally created in 1923, the LMS was an amalgamation of smaller rail networks that served virtually the length of Great Britain. Presented in original condition, this pocket watch shows the signs of life on the LMS but the watch is in a much better condition than seen with other railway watches. Life on the railway would prove hard on timepieces, which is why railway watches needed to be robust. This example uses a nickel silver hermetic case to prevent the ingress of dirt from corrosive smoke and steam. For soot that will inevitably penetrate the watch's barriers, the porcelain dial will be better able to withstand the soiling, as well as offering good legibility. Typically, the dial has some light lines but there is no loss to the enamel and the hairlines are not immediately visible. Offered in full working order, the watch appears to have been well maintained, keeping good time. It is also free from additional signs of inappropriate handling, other than the cosmetic service wear of a careful railway guard. A good example to collect and use.
LNER Railway Guard's Pocket Watch c.1930 Made by the Record Watch Co. in Switzerland, this is a guard's pocket watch, formerly owned by the London & North Eastern Railway. This watch shows signs consistent with service wear on the railway, but fortunately no nasty damage. Typically work on the railways could be punishing for many lesser watches. This example is in good order both mechanically and cosmetically. Record watches were not only used by many Railway Companies, but were also very much in demand by the military, due to their inherent reliability and robust quality. Nevertheless, railway watches required frequent inspection and repair, simply due to the demanding role that they performed - so it is likely that during its working life, when in for repair, this watch's case was additionally engraved internally with the number 662. This must have been done in an effort to make it easier to match all the components of the movement housing. Presumably there would have been several watches on a work bench at any given time. Fortunately there is no sign of any incompetent watchmaker abuse and the case's screw threads have not been forced, as is common to see. This has kept the watch sealed from the adverse smoke filled environment, which has kept the movement clean and in working order, despite not having been recently serviced. You won't find many railway watches from the famous Flying Scotsman line being offered at this low price. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
LNER Railway Guard's Pocket Watch c.1940 Signed Selex, this is an immaculate and totally original London & North East Region railway guard's pocket watch. Amazingly it shows little or no sign of any wear and it is dent free. To find a railway watch in this sharp a condition, where the robust nickel silver case all screws up tightly and displaying sharply stamped details, is everything anyone could wish for. Internally the movement looks virtually factory new and the watch functions without flaw, however a service should still be considered. The wonderful heavy-duty bevel edged crystal is still intact and the dial, hands and crown are all like new, showing no sign of replacement or refurbishment. A real beauty. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
London Colt .31 M1849 Pocket Revolver, c.1854 The Colt Pocket Model 1849 has always been a popular belt holster pistol, especially in the intermediate barrel length. However, it was only the shortest of these percussion revolvers, as this one is, that could be considered suitable for actual pocket carry. Not surprisingly, men often chose the latter model for use as a discreet personal protection revolver. This is born out when in wartime, Colt's London Agency saw British Army Officers purchasing a number of their compact guns - presumably for use as a back-up to their regular service revolver. As such, this London Colt Pocket revolver, which factory records show was made in 1854, may very well have been intended for overseas service in the Crimean War. Presented in very good condition, this Colt is crisp, with sharp lines along the 4 inch barrel and all matching numbers, including the wedge. In the raw, the metal finish is mottled, but it is not as contrasty as the images suggest: The darker areas do retain a good amount of original blue, against a duller grey background, which is all original. Case colours have faded, but the underlying surfaces are nevertheless smooth, with just a hint of isolated light pitting. Nothing bad. Screw heads are not abused and and the cylinder scene is likewise good, with solid nipples. The bore and rifling are also in good order. Mechanically the action is positive with a distinct click and firm lock up every time. A genuinely nice Colt M1849 Pocket Revolver, with the bonus of having undamaged walnut grips. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
London Colt M1849 .31 Pocket Revolver, c.1853 A scarce and desirable London made Colt .31 percussion pocket revolver, c.1853. Presented in lovely cosmetic condition and full working order, with a robust reliable action. This revolver shows signs of service use, with overall wear to the finish but retaining sharp profiles and little evidence of actual firing. The finish is generally down to an attractive grey/blue, showing light staining but all stamps and barrel address are clear and retaining traces of cylinder scene. Matching numbers, a good bore and a tight barrel to frame fit, plus very good walnut grips, which are interestingly stamped to the left and right side, "G. LESSELLS", as well as a full set of domed screws of the original dome type and prominent cylinder pins, make this a very nice collectable example.
London Metropolitan Police Pistol & Holster By W. Parker c.1840 Horse patrols have always been used by those in authority, giving access to outlying areas and enabling the pursuit of criminals who might otherwise remain concealed in their familiar rural settings. The most famous of these authorities was undoubtably the, Bow Street Horse Patrol of 1760. Originally when the new London Metropolitan Police were established, constables patrolled largely on foot, but just as before a mounted presence existed and, together with the Bow Street Horse Patrol, they undertook the work in the rural parts of the capital where civil unrest was growing. In fact, their work was regarded as being especially dangerous, so mounted constables often patrolled armed with a brace of pistols and a sword. Eventually though, what remained of the Bow Street Horse Patrol, was reorganised in 1836 and became a guard to the Royal Palaces: Crowd control was not part of their duty, not until the formation of the specialist Metropolitan Police Mounted Branch in 1919. The percussion pistol being offered here was made and signed by William Parker, c.1840. It is for all intents a Board of Ordnance marked Coastguard pattern pistol, which has had its belt hook removed to permit holster carry; this was officially sanctioned in antiquity and the screw hole left by the hook has been neatly plugged. Overall this pistol is in good solid condition and working order, bearing a number of inspectors' crown stamps and proof marks. All wood furniture is good and the iron work has vestiges of patina and some age wear. The pistol also comes with its 'LMP' marked holster, which is in superb condition and fits the pistol well. A good and rare pistol outfit dating to the early years of the Metropolitan Police (LMP).
London Model 1853 Colt Pocket of Navy Calibre A Colt Pocket revolver of .36 Navy calibre, officially designated as the Model 1853, this one is especially rare by virtue of having the barrel legend, "Address Col. Colt London". Presented in full working order, this Colt is in good cosmetic condition with matching numbers, including the wedge, as well as featuring, clear marking, decent profiles throughout and some cylinder scene remaining but having some pitting on the rammer and no finish, just some light age patina. Overall, this revolver is in original and collectable condition.
London Pair of 40 Bore Flintlock Pistols, c.1800 BOXLOCK POCKET-PISTOLS, no visible serial numbers, circa 1800, with turn-off 1 3/4in. barrels (frozen), London proofs, squared borderline engraved action signed in the centre of martial trophies, central hammers with rear-mounted sliding safes, concealed automatic triggers and slab-sided walnut butts
London Proof Miniature Cannon Barrel, c.1850 An unusual London proof miniature cannon barrel, c.1850. Made from gunmetal, this diminutive cannon barrel must have been more than a toy, given that it has been proof marked and it might be that it was once a part of a midday alarm cannon. Be that as it may, this miniature cannon is very sweet having both proof and view marks to the barrel, which has a bore of around 0.15" (just under 4mm or about 890 Bore). Some minor bruising to metal surfaces. Overall length = 2 inches
London Proofed Pocket Flintlock by Duval, c.1780 A gentleman's elegant travelling pistol, retailed and proofed in London but made by the French gunmaker, "Duval A Nantes". This pocketable 54 bore flintlock pistol was made c.1780 and typically shows off its stylish decoration, including a two stage barrel set in a fully moulded and figured walnut stock, complimented by a horn tipped ramrod, which is probaly original. Presented in full working order, the radiused lock includes considered touches like the reinforced cock and sideplate, together with the long eared iron butt cap, altogether suggesting that this dandy pistol was intended for serious business if the need ever arose. Interestingly, Julien Duval, is recorded as both a gunmaker and Militia officer in Nantes circa 1787-89. Overall length = 7 inches Barrel length = 3¼ inches
London Thames Police - A Victorian Saint Catherine's Docks Naval Truncheon St. Catherine's dockyard was located on the River Thames, between The Tower and London Docks. The area was developed in 1828 and the docks were named after the hospital that once stood in the area. Local maps of the area commonly record the name of the dockyard as being spelt with either C, or sometimes with the letter K. Over the years the name Saint Katherine has become more commonly used. This 16 inch truncheon is itself in good over all condition, having the St. CD mark and anchor, deeply branded into the woodwork. The truncheon is good and solid, but it does show some blemishes naturally found in any wood, together with age splits - Nevertheless, the truncheon remains in robust and attractive condition with wonderful patina.
London Underground Staff "LTPB" Whistle, c.1939 Made by Hudsons & Co., this scarce Thunderer whistle was the property of the London Transport Passenger Board, who were originally formed in 1933. Despite their full title, the board usually went by their shortened name of "London Transport," using a newly adopted symbol of the roundel and bar. Although the LTPB were responsible for the broader network of buses, trams and the Tube, this whistle was issued to key staff at London Underground stations and would have been no doubt used through the Blitz. This whistle shows some service wear and some minor loss of finish, but it is still a good loud and solid working piece.
Longines Admiral Watchmaker's Tool c.1955 The Longines 'Admiral' are a prestige range of sports and waterproof watches, that have appeared in many different model designs over the decades. In the late 50's and 60's Longines manufactured a waterproof design that encapsulated the movement in a seamless case, relying on the crystal to waterproof and protect the inner mechanism from the ingress of dust and water. During servicing though, the crystal would require removal and in order to do this, Longines supplied its watchmakers with a special Admiral crystal extracting tool. This metal tool is in mint condition and comes with its original protective pouch. An interesting and rare Longines tool that is both collectable and useful for the amateur watchmaker.
Longines Avigation Watch c.1933 A very rare and early "Avigation" wristwatch designed by Longines for Air Mail pilots, who regularly flew at night. According to Longines records, this
Longines Chronograph - 1920 Issue Palestine Police Pocket Watch The origins of the Palestinian Police have their roots linked to events in the Middle East, stemming from when the Egyptian Expeditionary Force won the decisive Battle of Gaza in 1917. One month after in December, Jerusalem came under British Martial Law and less than a year later, the Ottoman Empire finally surrendered, leaving the British in full control of Palestine. Not wishing to appear heavy handed and to keep the population on side, a civilian authority was created to administer the British Mandate. Simultaneously then, on the 1st July 1920, the Palestine Police were established under control of Police Commander Lt. Col. P B Bramley OBE. Under his authority were, 18 British Officers supported by 55 Palestinian Officers and 1,144 rank and file, whose role was described as, "Fulfilling the ordinary duties of a constabulary, such as the preservation of law and order and the prevention and detection of crime, [to] act as their numbers will allow as escorts for the protection of tax collectors, serve summonses issued by the judicial authorities, distribute Government notices and escort Government treasure throughout the country." For whatever reason, the civilian authority responsible for the procurement of equipment, decided to purchase this Longines chronograph pocket watch, which they numbered "P.P.9." Certainly a desirable timepiece in its own right, but quite what was envisaged that the Palestine Police should want with such a Longines watch, is not clear. For a fact, this watch was a very expensive commodity and judging by the application of the issue number "9", it would be reasonable to conclude that several chronographs were purchased. According to archived Longines records in Switzerland, information states that this, "Longines watch, serial number 2’975’577 (a silver 0.900 pocket watch), fitted with a Longines' mechanical movement with a chronograph mechanism, caliber 19.73N, was invoiced to Messrs. Kramer, who were for many years, the Longines agent for Egypt, on 23 April 1920." So, this watch was in existence right from the formation of the Palestine Police Force. Possibly issued to one of the 18 Officers, or for the force hierarchy? This chronograph is in very good condition, showing subtle signs of what amounts to careful service wear. The movement is in good order and it is running well, however the Premium Service is recommended for such a complex mechanism, to allow it to continue to give good service. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £120.
Longines Lindbergh Watch - US Army Air Corps c.1939 Original Longines Lindbergh 'Hour Angle' watches are rare, but to find one that was actually a military issue piece, is exceptionally rare indeed. The 'Hour Angle' watch was developed as an aid to aerial navigation by Charles Lindbergh. Its primary benefit was to enable a pilot to quickly read how many degrees, known as Angles of Arc, the globe had rotated since the start of his flight. This was an important calculation that helped the pilot take into account the apparent shift in position of the sun or other celestial body, relative to his position - This was all to do with calculating longitude. The outer rotating bezel of this watch is thus calibrated from 1 to 15 degrees, with Minutes of Arc shown shown in-between. In use, the bezel would be lined up against the minute hand, which would then start to count up the globe's rotated degrees/angle of arc. The inner seconds disc is also rotatable via the additional winding crown, which can then be accurately lined up and paced with the sweeping seconds hand, to coincide with a time signal. With practice, the accurate setting of this watch could be rapidly achieved and the watch became a useful navigational tool. Most of these watches were made by Longines for the American civil aviation market, which accounts for the trend that most were made in gold filled cases, however, this example is a rare version that was purchased by the US Army A. C. and is engraved as such on the movement's centre post bridge. It was imported into the States by Longines' partner agency, Wittnauer. Overall this watch is in very good condition for a working military instrument. Typically the watch has some service wear, but most of its original finish is intact and it has also undergone repair to the crowns, which are very good old replacements - a common matter for this genre of military watch. An original new old stock US military strap dating from WW2, also accompanies this watch. Relatively few Longines Lindbergh watches were ever made as there was a greater emphasis on the production of the less complicated Weems Watch, making this is a rare opportunity to acquire a truly historic US Army Air Corps' watch. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Longines Watchmaker\'s Victorinox Knife A rare promotional vintage Swiss Army knife made for Longines by Victorinox, complete with its wallet. Presented in near-mint condition. This is an EDC folding knife.
Longines Weems Aviator's Watch c.1990 Originally designed by Lt. Commander Philip Van Horn Weems in 1938, this genuine Longines Weems aviator's wristwatch is one of the rare collector's watches reissued by the company in the 1990's. The production run was limited to only 1000 pieces distributed worldwide. As such, this is an absolute rarity offered in near mint condition, free of damage and in perfect working order. The steel 33mm case is superb and mechanically the watch keeps excellent time, however a Premium Service and warranty can be requested for the concessionary price, when ordered within 3 months of purchase. See Terms & Conditions. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Lovell's Pattern 1856 16th Lancer's Rifled Percussion Pistol This antique pistol is the property of a discerning collector, offered here with all the benefits of a business sale. Designed in 1856 by George Lovell, the British Army's Inspector of Small Arms, this well balanced percussion pistol can be differentiated from the earlier P-1842, as these later sidearms benefitted from having rifled barrels and adjustable rear sights - some were even slotted for a shoulder stock, but this one has not been so modified. Offered in good condition, this regulation pistol is marked on the butt with the regimental details of the 16th Lancer's, who saw active service along India's North-West Frontier, at a time when the British Army were involved with the Native Uprising. To note, this pistol has lost one of the flip up rear sight leafs, but is otherwise original and in good order.
LTE Railway Guard\'s Whistle This is a scarce Hudsons whistle, made for use on the London Underground circa 1948. It dates from 1948, when the London Transport Executive was initially established and bears the LTE property mark. The whistle shows signs of wear, but is nevertheless complete and in working good order.
M1842 Gendarmerie Pistol A 22-BORE PERCUSSION MODEL 1842 GENDARME PISTOL, 5inch tapering barrel, back action Chatellerault lock, half stocked with regulation steel mounts, the side plate area with various maker's stamps and dated 1849. Split to fore-end and ramrod lacking.
M1849 .31 Colt Pocket Revolver Marked, New York Penitentiary This M1849 .31 Colt is an extraordinarily rare Pocket revolver issued to the "New York Penitentiary" and marked accordingly on the back strap, together with a US Stars & Stripes shield emblem. Made in 1857, this revolver would have served at either Sing Sing or Auburn Prison New York. Interestingly, in 1857 Auburn commenced the building of an Asylum for the criminally insane within the grounds of the penitentiary, which opened the following year. Clearly, this revolver has seen extended service and is now in overall worn condition, with no finish remaining. However, it remains in good working order, with matching numbers, although the trigger guard bears no numbers whatsoever - This trigger guard is old yet it does not appear to have ever been numbered and may well be a contemporary armoury supplied part, made during the working life of this revolver. The history of the infamous New York Penitentiaries make for compelling research, making this revolver an exciting find for an early Law & Order collection. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
MAK Survival & Camp Knife By Alan Wood ZMW Militaria is pleased to offer a small collection of custom made knives. Alan Wood is a highly respected knife maker, best known for making the "Woodlore" knife of Ray Mears fame. However, the MAK is actually the knife that Alan would choose as his preferred survival tool for wilderness camping - MAK being his acronym for "My Adventure Knife". Presented in mint and unused condition, this larger robust knife features Tufnol scales, stainless hardware and his classic tapered tang. Simply beautiful, complete with its right-hand leather sheath and dangler. Mint and unused. Blade length = 4¾ inches Overall length = 9¾ inches
Man-Stopper Flintlock, By Parker of Redditch, c.1810 A good coat pocket flintlock pistol, made by Parker of Redditch c.1810. Presented in sleepy and untouched condition, the pistol has retained much original varnish and dark colour patina, with no restoration. The signed lock is crisp and in full working order, with strong springs and a functioning safety. It also features some well executed decoration, a reinforced cock, roller frizzen and semi waterproof pan. The round sighted barrel is engraved, "Redditch," on the flat and the iron work is in good condition, with just surface stains but no undue pitting. Woodwork is very good with minor knocks. All in all, a very good gentleman's pocket man-stopper, made for personal defence.
Man-Stopper Pistol By Kavanagh, Dublin, c.1840 An impressive and stout Man-Stopper pistol by Kavanagh of Dublin. Made c.1840, this .65 military carbine bore side-hammer pistol is in untouched condition and appears to be unfired. A sturdy pistol that is a true sleeper, which has retained strong traces of original blue colouring and very good metal work. All engraving is sharp and screw heads generally appear untouched. The action is faultless, with a clear resounding three bent click as the sear engages the hammer during cocking. All woodwork is likewise tight and free from damage, which all in all makes this pistol a superb example by one of Ireland's finest gunmaker's. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Manhattan Arms .36" Pocket Navy Revolver, c.1862 Established by a group of savvy business men in 1856, the Manhattan Firearms Company took advantage Colt's expiring firearm patents and produced their interpretation of their rival's best selling revolvers. Production of their arms began immediately at the Manhattan facility in Norwich, Connecticut, but within a few years their factory moved to premises in Newark, New Jersey. Predominantly, Manhattan Arms concentrated their efforts on the famous Colt Model 1851 Navy and Model 1849 Pocket revolver models: The revolver offered here, is an excellent example of their .36" Pocket Navy percussion revolver. It features the Manhattan 10 slot cylinder, which allows their revolver to be carried safely, fully loaded with the cylinder locked and no live chamber under the hammer. This was a positive step to ensuring greater gun safety and, whilst the company did not have any government contracts, their arms were selling well during the civil war and on the civilian market. By the time that Manhattan Arms finally ceased trading in 1873, a total of around 175,000 various pistols had been produced. This Navy revolver is presented in full working order, with much original finish. Sharp lines and a good amount of cylinder scene are all very evident. Likewise, the bright bore is in excellent condition. All matching numbers and prefect grips, make this a superb collectors piece. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Manhattan Arms .36\" Navy Revolver, c.1862 Selling on Consignment: A very good Manhattan Arms .36 Navy revolver made for holster and belt wear, c.1862. Established by a group of savvy businessmen in 1856, the Manhattan Firearms Company took advantage of Colt's expiring firearm patents and produced their interpretation of their rival's best selling revolvers. Production of their arms began immediately at the Manhattan facility in Norwich, Connecticut, but within a few years, their factory moved to premises in Newark, New Jersey. Predominantly, Manhattan Arms concentrated their efforts on the famous Colt Model 1851 Navy and Model 1849 Pocket revolver models: The revolver offered here, is the .36" Navy and it features their 10 slot cylinder, which allows the revolver to be carried safely with a fully loaded cylinder, locked with no live chamber under the hammer. This was a positive step to ensuring greater gun safety and, whilst the company did not have any government contracts, their arms were selling well during the civil war and on the civilian market. By the time that Manhattan Arms finally ceased trading in 1873, a total of around 175,000 various pistols had been produced. This Navy revolver is presented in full working order, with much original finish. Sharp lines and a good amount of cylinder scenes are all very evident. Likewise, the bright bore is in excellent condition. All matching numbers and perfect grips, make this a superb collector's piece. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9½ inches
Map RAF Escape & Evasion Map for Germany A wartime early Silk type, single sided, black & white Escape & Evasion Map for Germany and it's border countries. Showing the major German cities including Berlin, Dresden, Chemnitz, Brunswick, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt etc...also parts of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Switzerland and Austria. Date, approximately 1941. Size 18" x 14". Unusually for Escape Maps, this one is Air Ministry marked. In an excellent condition (folded). Code: 50526Price: 85.00 GBP
Mark IV 8-Day Royal Flying Corps Issue Cockpit Watch c.1914 The Mark IV A cockpit instrument watches were the first true aviation orientated timepieces to be issued to the Royal Flying Corps. Up until then, the War Department were happy to make do with ex Royal Navy chronometers or any other timepiece that was to hand. Purchased in 1914, the War Department were making a real effort to get things right for the pilots, many of whom were tyro with little experience of flying before qualifying for their 'wings.' As few persons around at the time had any real knowledge of how flying affected the human body, ad hoc research was being conducted to help with problems that were manifested. That is why the Mark IV A watch can be found with both white and black dials, as quite simply it was not clear at that time of purchase, which dial best met the flyer's needs? However, it did not take long to realise that the black dial with the white numerals, was actually easier on the eye. Data could be acquired from instruments with enhanced rapidity and as such, aviation instruments started to be produced that were in part, user friendly. The Admiralty version of the same cockpit watch was designated as, the Mark II. These were also ordered in 1914, but only after the RFC had considered the merits of the dial choices. Consequently, all the RNAS Mark II watches that were ordered, came with black dials. Later on many of the white Mark IV A watches had their dials replaced with a black version, but this very early timepiece has survived with its perfect original double sunk dial. The fact that it is an early type can also be surmised because the WD case marking is far more ornate than the stamped marks of the later produced examples. Supplied by Moise Dreyfus (founder of the Record Watch Co.) this timepiece is in superb condition, having retained its long winding neck, which never had a bow fitted. Internally the Octava signed movement is running strong and the watch is keeping time, despite not being serviced. A superb example for the collector. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Marlin XXX Standard .30RF Pocket Revolver, c.1873 A good Marlin .30" Rimfire revolver made, c.1873, bearing the legend, "XXX Standard 1872" stamped on the barrel rib. Presented in full working order, this 5-shot tip-up barrel pocket revolver is in untouched condition, retaining sharp profiles, perfect rosewood grips, clean screw heads, rifled bore and clear stamps. Overall a lovely revolver with even tones of age patina. A larger .32 RF version was introduced the following year, making the 1872 model a rarer example to find. A good example priced to sell. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7 inches
Martial Marked .44 Colt 1860 Army Percussion Revolver Colt's 1860 Army revolver was one of a few pistols that were standard issue to the Union forces at the time of the American Civil War. As such, there is a great deal of history associated with the military firearms from this era, many which would have seen action at some point during the conflict. The example offered here bears all matched serial numbers, which can be traced through Colt's records to 1862. As this is an early issue revolver, commensurate with US Army policy, it was examined twice over by two independent government inspectors, each of whom stamped their initials to either side of the butt. Although the revolver's finish is holster worn, the resulting aged patina is pleasing and shows no real sign of abuse. Furthermore, the revolver has retained very good angles to the ironwork, with only minimal handling impressions evident and some typical wear to the grip caused by the flap holster. Mechanically the action is sound, working crisply with a positive lock up, good cylinders, original nipples and good bore with just light pitting and nothing nasty to report. Clear stampings, deeply impressed barrel address and some sign of the cylinder's navy scene, are also discernible. Overall a good, tight and collectable example that has not been messed with. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14.5 inches
Martini Henry Bayonet Practice - Fencing Rifle A rare Martini-Henry bayonet practice rifle, army designated as a "Fencing Rifle". Made at Enfield, this fencing rifle was officially constructed from a stripped-down MKII Martini-Henry, which still bears its impressed crown VR over BSA MCO to the receiver, dated 1877, and bearing numerous Inspector's stamps throughout. Cosmetically it is in untouched condition, retaining much of its armoury finish. These early bayonet fencing rifles had a hard life in military service, frequently leaving them broken. Consequently, many were scrapped, so finding one this good despite some loss to the left side of the forend, is very rare. The sprung bayonet plunger is fully operational, with the pommel end together with all Enfield adapted parts, bearing clear acceptance stamps to the front. As the bayonet plunger is pushed against the body of the trainee by an opponent, the resistance felt simulated the real force that would be required during an actual bayonet fight. The butt is in excellent shape bearing an Enfield roundel and a checkered butt plate.
Massive Man-Stopper Pistol By W. Parker, c.1815 Made by William Parker c.1815, this pistol was designed to be a man-stopper, which a gentleman would have been carried under a heavy cloak or in a great coat pocket. Given its relative short length and capacity to fire a ball of 12 bore size, such pistols would be devastating at close range. Presented in good condition, this pistol shows evidence of careful use and long term associated service wear, through the flintlock era and into the percussion period. Looking also at the style of decoration, it is probable that William Parker himself was responsible for the conversion, as the quality of the engraving on both the lock plate and hammer, together with other custom work, appears to have been finished by the same hand. Mechanically, the signed lock is in full working order, holding firm on both half and full cock. Fixed sights and a captive ramrod, make this a purposeful and no nonsense pistol, marked to the barrel flat, "Gunmaker To His Majesty." Overall, an attractive stocky and robust pistol made by a quality maker, showing signs of handling and gentle wear to the ironwork, but no abuse. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Medium/Large Victorian Percussion Pistol Nipple Wrench, c.1855 A good Victorian nipple wrench, suitable for a larger military type revolver. The wrench is in serviceable condition, but lacking its pricker. Showing light signs of service use, the wrench has nevertheless retained a good working end, but with some oxidising along the steel parts. Overall length = 5¼ inches Approximate nipple size across the flats = 5.5mm
Merry Christmas & Happy New Year As the Holiday is now upon us, I would like to wish all my customers and visitors to ZMW Militaria, A Very Merry Christmas & Happy New Year Looking forward to meeting more of you at 2017's Arms Fairs. With best wishes, Ziggy
Merry Christmas & Happy New Year Wishing our customers, those past, present and future, a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Looking forward to catching up with you all, with some new items coming and special offers for 2018. A family business run by a collector, for collectors.
Met Police PISTOL A .500” Man stopper or Travelling Percussion Pistol By Parker Field & Sons Possibly Metropolitan Police Issue, 4” octagonal barrel to flat stamped “Parker Field, 233 Holborn, London”, swivel rammer hinged to muzzle. Full walnut stock with chequered bag shaped grip. Iron trigger guard with pineapple finial. Foliate engraved lock inscribed with makers name. Parker Field were an old established London Gunmakers, established 1822-1881, they were contractors to the Ordnance, the East India Co, Hudson’s Bay Co. More interestingly as far as this pistol is concerned they were armourers to the Metropolitan Police. It is stamped with the number “23” on the stock, indicating it must be one of a rack, possibly a Metropolitan Police pistol.In vg cond. with fine grips, barrel to brown/grey patina.A classic piece. £895
Metropolitan Arms Co. Pocket Police .36 Revolver, c.1864 When Colt suffered a catastrophic fire at their factory in 1864, which nearly put them out of business, the Metropolitan Arms Company of New York City was quick to appear, offering customers near identical copies of Colt's best selling revolvers. These arms borrowed heavily from Colt's designs, but some minor improvements were made - particularly in their ability to be carried more securely, with the hammer down in a safety recess. Furthermore, some Metropolitans were cosmetically enhanced by the use of nickel silver back straps and trigger guards, as opposed to brass. Yet, despite the quality of Metropolitan Arms Company revolvers, the firm was a relatively short lived venture, which went into decline once Colt resumed production and marketing in 1866. Typically then, Metropolitan pistols are pretty rare with just 2,750 revolvers of the Pocket Police model being recorded. Another interesting fact about this revolver can be found in the 8th edition of Flayderman's Guide, states that the barrel address of the Police model was omitted on revolvers numbered between, 1100 - 1800, as this one has. Presented in full working order, with a crisp action and solid lock up, this revolver has seen service carry and is now devoid of its original finish, but despite this the profiles are generally sharp with some rubbing to the highlights. The revolver also benefits from excellent grips, nipples, screws and a very good bore; plus all matching numbers throughout - including the wedge. All in all, a very decent example for the collector. Barrel length = 4.5 inches Total length = 9.5 inches
Metropolitan Police - Thames River Police Sword P1868 A rare P1868 Thames River Police issue sword, with brass grips and knucklebow, marked to the ricasso with the maker's name, "Field." "MP" property mark, broad arrow, "X" bend test mark and several inspectors' stamps present. All markings are sharp and clear. Overall this sword is in excellent condition, with no evident damage to the blade, which retains its factory polish and now, a light surface patina. No scabbard.
Metropolitan Police Commemorative Medallion There have been a number of commemorative medals and coins produced for the Metropolitan Police and no doubt this one reflects an anniversary milestone in police history - Believed to be 150 years (1979). On the one side is the 'old' Metropolitan Police heraldic crest, whilst the reverse side depicts different helmet plates of all the ruling monarchs from Queen Victoria to Queen Elizabeth II. The medallion is of bronze coloured metal, showing some braising to the highlights and edges, but is nevertheless in excellent condition free of damage. Price includes domestic UK delivery.
Metropolitan Police Inspector's Sword, c.1868 In 1868 swords were made available to the Metropolitan Police. Most of these were of a pattern intended for Constables and Sergeants, which differed to the scarcer type offered to Police Inspectors. Those for the lower ranks had brass hilts and locking catches on the scabbard as standard, whilst those carried by Inspectors had a steel triple bar hand guard and, for whatever reason, the need for any form of retaining lock was dispensed. Made by Parker Field & Sons, this M1868 Metropolitan Police Inspector's sword is a are survivor in excellent untouched condition. Retaining its original polish, the blade is marked with the police acceptance stamp, 1868 date and MP owner's mark. A centurion's helmet is also evident, together with distinct etching giving the manufacturer's name and address. Never sharpened, nor dinged, the edge and blade are like factory new, but with a darker age patina. The leather and steel fitted scabbard is intact, with only minor signs of carry wear. Generally, this example is in superb collector grade condition. Blade Length = 31¼ inches Overall length = 36½ inches
Metropolitan Police Inspector's Sword, c.1868 A rare Metropolitan Police Inspector's sword, issued in 1868. Interestingly, this sword design was first adopted by the military as their 1821 Light Cavalry pattern. Made by Parker Field & Sons, this P1868 Metropolitan Police Inspector's sword is a rare survivor in excellent untouched condition. Retaining its original polish, the blade is marked with the police acceptance stamp, 1868 date and MP owner's mark. A centurion's helmet is also evident, together with distinct etching giving the manufacturer's name and address. Never sharpened, nor dinged, the edge and blade are like factory new, but with a darker age patina. The leather and steel fitted scabbard is intact, with only minor signs of carry wear. Generally, this example is in superb collector grade condition. Blade Length = 31¼ inches Overall length = 36½ inches
Metropolitan Police Issue Chronograph Watch, c.1910 A stunning Metropolitan Police pocket chronograph watch supplied by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company and issued, c.1910. Presented in fine condition with little sign of any service wear, this watch features an excellent high-grade Swiss jewelled movement, which is operating perfectly. The steel case is crisply engraved to the rear with the King\'s Crown and \"MP\" in script. All original and functioning correctly in all respects. A rare watch to find, especially in this museum grade condition.
Metropolitan Police Issue Hiatt 1960 Handcuffs Original Met Police issue Hiatt 1960 pattern handcuffs, complete with their original box, key and instructions. Until the 1990s and the introduction of Speedcuffs, there was no requirement for Metropolitan Police officers to carry handcuffs. Instead, temporary restraints [handcuffs] would be issued on a request basis. Still, many officers either purchased their own pattern cuff or by stealth, managed to retain their temporary issue cuff. This pair of vintage Met Police marked cuffs are in near mint condition and working order.
Metropolitan Police Issue Lignum Vitae Truncheon This Metropolitan Police issue truncheon was made by Hiatt, as stamped on the leather strap. It was likely used in the 1950s and is further marked in pen on the leatherwork, "F.S. Frank Seears." Foxtrot Sierra is the station code for Shepherds Bush police station, which is on F Division - Hammersmith being their HQ. Possibly one of the most notorious incidents to have taken place at around this time, in 1966, was the murder of three unarmed police officers from Shepherds Bush, after a gang of criminals feared that the constables driving in Foxtrot One One, may uncover their stash of guns that they were planning to use in a bank robbery. Also noteworthy, is the fact that F Division is the most bombed peacetime Division in the whole of London. The Irish Republican Army were responsible for the bombing outrages on the Ideal Home Exhibition in Olympia, the Territorial Army building in Princess Louise House, Hammersmith Bridge and the BBC. This truncheon is in good order with some minor knocks, bearing the Crowned MP property stamp.
Metropolitan Police Issue Pocket Chronograph, c.1906 In 1906, to counter the growing problem of speeding motorists in the capital, the Metropolitan Police were issued with a small number of chronograph pocket watches - They were to be used in the first ever speed traps. Imported by Stauffer & Co., a small number of these fine timepieces were selected not only because they were the chosen official motor racing timers for the Gordon Bennett Cup, but because Stauffer were the winners of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd chronometer prizes, awarded by the Kew Observatory in 1905-1906. These watches were indeed the best that was available. Perhaps that is why Stauffer had the inside back covers of this watch engraved with the image of the "Flying Lady" Gordon Bennett Trophy. The name on the dial is that of the London jeweller and watch supplier to the police, John Meader. Internally the movement is marked with the S&Co. crowned emblem and throughout, the condition of this watch is superb. It is absolutely free from any case dings or dents and is a reliable timekeeper. In fact, this same watch underwent a Premium Service within the past 3 years. These watches remained in use for a number of decades, well after the Second World War. The watch is completely original and even retains the original glass which shows some minor sign of edge chipping, but remains too good to replace. The Crown and MP stamp to the rear was hand engraved prior to issue. Over all a most desirable timepiece that would be difficult to improve upon. My final image shows plain clothed officers and the obligatory uniformed constable to stop the car, seemingly discussing the finer points of using such a chronograph.
Metropolitan Police Truncheon c.1955 This is one of the older heavy weight truncheons that were issued to the police up to the early 1960s. This one is in excellent condition and bearing the Crowned MP stamp of the Metropolitan Police, as well as the leather wrist strap. All in all a good example of its type with minor service knocks but no cracks.
Middle Eastern Agate Jambiya Dagger, c.1955 A Jambiya dagger from the Middle East, acquired by a British Army soldier serving in Aden, now Yemen, in the 1950s. Arab artisan made, this knife is largely of polished agate, showing its raw colouration, including natural fissures and some cracks to the top pommel, as shown. Bound with decorated brass repoussé work, the characteristic 12 inch long curved knife has a steel blade measuring 4.5 inches, which shows signs of historic sharpening. Overall, a nice example.
Military & Pilots' Watches - Smiths W10 Military Issue Wristwatch Whilst this is a relatively modern Smiths W10 military issue watch the company of S. Smith & Son (London), have been in the watchmaking business since the mid 1800s. Certainly by the time WW1 broke out, Smiths was already making watches for the War Department. For Smiths, their production of cockpit watches for the Royal Flying Corps, signalled a new direction for the company towards the pursuit of aviation and military interests. Nevertheless, Smiths still carried on with the production of regular watches, but so much more of what they now produced was aimed at the supply of aircraft and automobile instruments, pilots' stopwatches and ships' clocks. It would be an over simplification to believe that Smiths were only involved in the production of basic affordable watches for everyone. Whilst that notion was a part of their business ethic, Smiths were more concerned with innovative watchmaking and the supply of precision instruments at a competitive price. This resulted in them producing many a fine timepiece at reasonable cost to compete with the Swiss industry. However it would not be until the late 1950's that would see Smiths producing their first true Royal Air Force pilot's wristwatch. These early wristwatches are now rare and highly prized amongst collectors, as their production was short lived. Nevertheless, in 1966 Smiths won yet another tender to supply the Ministry of Defence with more wristwatches. Then in 1967 their latest and arguably their best military watch, the GS.4701, was introduced to the military. Production of this model was based on their renowned 17 jewel Astral movement, that had been modified and equipped with a hacking device. This allowed the watch to be stopped during hand setting to permit perfect time synchronisation to another master clock. The supply of these watches was staggered over a few years, until 1971. Then, manufacturing stopped as Smiths opted to focus their efforts into the production of aircraft instruments. Wristwatches form now would be limited to those that utilised inexpensive imported movements. True English watch production had now come to an end. Here now is one of the final run of Smiths, "Made in England" military watches, dated 1968. It is presented in good original condition and working order, with a fully operational hack, showing just light signs of service wear. Yet despite this being a more modern military timepiece, consideration should be given to the watch being subjected to a Premium Service. Watch diameter is 35mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military / Police New-Hudson Roadster A large vintage New Hudson \"Roadster\" bicycle - A barn find from Canterbury, Kent. Early WW1 cycle regiments as well as the police, were both using \"Roadsters\". These were generally the largest civilian bicycles available, having big 28-inch wheels. Certainly, it is documented that New Hudson supplied 16,000 Roadsters to the military, which included the \"Kent Cyclist Battalion\" who used them mainly used for coastal patrols. Some continued in service with the Home Guard during WW2. Interestingly, this Roadster dates from c.1925 as more New Hudson machines were supplied postwar. As such, this actual bike may be a rarer Constabulary issue bicycle, as they also used Roadsters with rod brakes but ocassionally with subtle cosmetic differences. This Roadster is fitted with a nickel-plated and broad arrow marked Silver-King Lucas lamp; Brooks saddle; Villiers hub and other original features such as the enamel finish, brass badge, partial transfers, correct chain wheel and crankset. This bicycle is complete and in generally untouched condition. It is mechanically sound but requires servicing and a safety inspection if it is to be used on the road. This is a collection-only item.
Military A.T.P. Watches - WW2 ATP British Army Timepiece By Cortebert Military A.T.P. Watches - WW2 ATP British Army Timepiece By Cortebert Judging by the volume of surplus military pocket watches left over from WW2, it appears that there must have been fewer wristwatches available to the British Army. This situation seems to have been reversed for the German Wermacht. Cortebert was one of several Swiss watch companies to supply military watches to the British. Today, their watches are regarded amongst the best that were produced and in fact, Cortebert was one of very few companies to supply Rolex with movements for some of their timepieces. This ATP is in very good used condition and working order, with the case retaining a sharp profile with very little wear. However, a service would be recommended for the movement sooner than later. What's more, the winder has at some point in the past been replaced with a crown that is probably only 40 years old. So, should the buyer opt for the Premium Service, a more appropriate period crown will be sourced and fitted. Watch diameter is 30mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military A.T.P. Watches - WW2 British Army Issue Cyma ATP Wristwatch During WW2 military watches like this British Army Cyma ATP were the standard issue wristwatch. Yet, it was not possible for everyone to be issued with a military watch - instead, it would be more to do with need rather than rank. In total there were 17 Swiss watch companies that supplied the British Army with the ATP military watches. Even after the war, some of these watch companies became the supplies of the WWW series of military watches. Whilst the ATP was an army issue watch first and foremost, examples may also be found where the ATP acronym has been erased and replaced by either, RAF 6E codes or Royal Navy "HS," marks. This utilitarian version of the British Army ATP military watch, was made by the Cyma watch company. This is one of the scarcer examples to find with a solid steel case. If you are looking for this watch, you will be hard pressed to find a better example. Offered in completely original condition with good crisp marking and perfectly aged dial, this watch only exhibits careful signs of service wear. It is also in working order, but consideration needs to be given to the benefits of the Premium Service. Watch diameter is 28mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military A.T.P. Watches - WW2 Moeris Military ATP Army Timepiece Wristwatch During WW2, Moeris supplied the British Army with an interesting variant of the ATP wristwatch. It was a little larger than many of its military counterparts, but the movement was a fair bit smaller than the case diameter. This arrangement naturally created a void between the inner edge of the case and the movement. Moeris then had the initiative to fit a soft iron inner shield to surround the movement. This arrangement in effect became a Faraday Shield, which protected the vulnerable hairspring from strong magnetic fields. For definite, the magnetic field generated by a radio transmitter in close proximity to a watch, would of had a detrimental affect on its timekeeping ability, consequently it has been suggested that the Moeris watches were designed for use by radio operators. In fact there may be some truth to this theory, as radio operators were required by the military to wear or carry watches. The reasoning being that when a radio operator passed a message, the communication would be ended by the sender noting the time of the message. The recipient too would also record incoming messages, checking their currency against his own watch. This example of the Moeris ATP shows signs of service wear and field use. Whilst there is a build up of dirt around the case, it is nevertheless in good condition and working order. Should the Premium Service be requested, all traces of dirt will be cleaned as part of the service. Watch diameter is 33mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Apprentice Armourer's Miniature Signal Cannon This is an interesting miniature cannon, which appears to have been made in antiquity as a functioning item. It is clearly of some age and is likely to be Victorian, as indicated by the struck 'VR' mark at the vent, coupled with the additional ordnance broad arrow. This interesting pheon mark is of a form that can only have been achieved using a proper armourer's punch. Given the presence of the broad arrow on this cannon, this may indicate that it was made for a military purpose, rather than being just a simple novelty item… Perhaps having been made as a means of signalling the start of a military event or competition? Whatever the truth, this tiny cannon has clearly been used and shows some minor wear, with the bore measuring to around .25 calibre. Although a little naive in execution, this cannon has been robustly made to no specific pattern, quite likely by an armoury apprentice. Made of solid brass, with the exception of one old steel screw holding down the cap square, this cannon will make a good contribution to your collection. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 5 inches
Military Armourer\'s Revolver Trigger Test Gauge, c.1957 A rare brass military issue trigger testing gauge by Salter, dated 1957 and army property marked. Basically, this tool is a spring balance calibrated to measure the force needed to fire a service revolver in single action mode. Set to measuring just one pound of trigger pull, this device was used to identify potentially dangerous sidearms, as this amount of trigger pressure would be considered very light indeed. Should a revolver hammer drop within this \"hair-trigger\" measuring range, the revolver would need the immediate attention of the gunsmith. A rare item offered in excellent condition with original leather work. Length of brass body = 3½ inches
Military Bicycle Tools A set of 3 military tools of the type carried on bicycles or motorbikes, with one combination tool bearing a military part number and struck with the broad arrow. All in serviceable condition.
Military D-Lock & Padlock No.168 A military D-lock with original issue padlock number \"LOB 168\" + key. You will receive the single D-lock and padlock shown.
Military D-Lock & Padlock No.192 A military D-lock with original issue padlock number \"LOB 192\" + key. You will receive the single D-lock and padlock shown.
Military D-Lock & Padlock No.200 A military D-lock with original issue padlock number \"LOB 200\" + key. You will receive the single D-lock and padlock shown.
Military Gunpowder Carrier, c.1870 An original late Victorian military Cordite or Gunpowder carrier, made of leather, cork and canvas, with brass fitments. These were used to transport prepacked gunpowder charges up to the cannon. During the mid to late 19th century, muzzle-loading cannon had become obsolete, yet these gunpowder carriers remained, with many being repurposed as cane, swagger stick and umbrella holders, or otherwise used as an interesting hide in the gentleman's study, perhaps used to conceal a bottle of Pusser's Rum or whisky. Some authorities believe that the British Army armorial found on many of these carriers was added later on in service - This would make sense as the crest bears the King's Crown, post-1901. Presented in very good condition, the cork and canvas has just minor chips and scrapes to the original painted surface. Structurally, the carrier remains solid with no breaks or holes and even retains its correct leather handle. Hinge swivels are strong and overall, this example makes for an attractive display item.
Military Inspired Smiths Magnetic Clock, c.1960 A mint example of a Smiths magnetic clock of the type that saw use onboard the military Austin Champ 4x4 vehicles, where these clocks could be easily mounted on the vehicle's steel dash. The popularity of these timepieces among drivers saw these clocks continue to be made for other suitable cars, such as the Mini. Offered in full working order and cosmetically mint condition, this clock is not affected by magnetic fields, thanks to the use of a brass hairspring. A lage centre sweeping hand also provided a usable visual reference of the elapsing seconds and that the clock was running.
Military Inspired Watches - Longines Weems Reissue Pilot's Wristwatch Longines commemorated their links with aviation pioneer, Lt. Commander (U.S.N.) Philip Van Horn Weems, by reintroducing a very limited run of the legendary pilot's watch, originally designed by Weems in the late 1930's. Weems was famous in his lifetime for developing much to do with celestial navigation. He even taught Charles Lindbergh the art of navigation, before his epic transatlantic flight. Click on our images and you will see that the last is of a painting of Lt. Commander P.V.H. Weems. It also appears that he is wearing one of these original watches. To commemorate the daring and bravery of the early aviators, in the 1990's Longines produced only 1000 of these watches. They are exact in every detail to the originals and even have mechanical hand wound Swiss movements. Today, original Weems watches are very much sought after by collectors and their value has soared in recent years. However, this example in near mint condition, can be purchased for well under the asking price of a vintage Weems. Rest assured though, this watch is every bit a Longines, just as the original was. It also benefits from being virtually unworn, however, servicing should always be considered to provide many more years of continued use. This watch will come fitted with a quality leather strap, together with the original Longines buckle. Watch diameter is 33mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Issue - Smiths Army 8-Day Wall Clock This is a genuine and unspoilt example of a Smiths military issue wall clock, dating from the 1950s or 1960s. It is in superb condition throughout, bearing military markings and even the remains of the original label setting out the mounting instructions. The clock is undamaged, however it does show mild signs of age related patination. The winding knob is situated below the brown case, allowing the clock to be easily wound by hand, without the need of a key. Once fully wound the clock will run for a full 8 days, however there is no information available as to when it was last serviced. Overall, a terrific clock that would not look out of place in any gentleman's office.
Military Issue Clasp Kinfe By Myson, c.1970 A Sheffield stainless steel military issue knife by Myson, dated 1970 and bearing NATO stock numbers, together with the MOD broad arrow. The knife is in good condition, featuring a regular EDC blade, together with a marlin spike and can opener.
Military Issue Martini-Henry Brass Mk III Foresight Protector This is a genuine Mark III foresight protector, made to fit over the muzzle of the Martini-Henry rifle, of the pattern which was approved for service in 1879 and remained in use until 1888. It is presented in very good dent free condition, free of any splits and nicely stamped with the an Enfield ordnance inspector's mark. A rifle number is also present. All in all, a very tidy example, suitable for the Martini-Henry rifle of the period.
Military Issue Martini-Henry Cleaning Jag This is a genuine and scarce rifle barrel cleaning jag, made for the Martini-Henry rifle cleaning rod, in service between 1871 - 1888. It is offered in very good condition, crisply stamped with the military broad arrow mark. A lovely example to enhance any quality Martini-Henry rifle of the period.
Military KM Watches - WW2 Kriegsmarine German Navy Issue ZentRa Wristwatch Basically, there are two types of Kriegsmarine general service wristwatch, those that are waterproof and those that are not. Clearly for sea going naval use, the waterproof variety must of ranked at the higher end of the desirability scale, as due to the corrosive environment in which they served, with the saltwater spray awash on the decks, these KM wristwatches rarely appear in a good collectable condition. Fortunately this example of the KM ZentRa waterproof type wristwatch, is in remarkably unspoilt condition. Amazingly the dial looks to be near factory fresh, the case retains much original finish and the movement looks like it has never been touched - but rest assured, this is an original example. Internally the working movement is the ubiquitous AS1130 calibre, often referred to as the "Wermacht movement" due to its prolific usage by the German Army in their wristwatches. Again, the movement is in clean condition, however despite its condition, only the Premium Service can ensure continued performance. Externally the case retains much of the original finish, exhibiting just light speckling and wear around the bezel and to the surfaces closest to the points of contact with the mariner's wrist. All in all, a good example. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Mercury Heavy Duty Bicycle c.1946 A rare military issue \"Heavy Duty Trade Pattern\" bicycle was made just after WW2 by a little-known British company, possibly with government funding, under the name \"Mercury\". The company only lasted several years but its primary purpose was to supply the military with these large bicycles, which is a joy to ride when compared to a parabike! Presented in excellent condition, this bicycle is original but with signs of earlier overpainting. Overall it exhibits service wear but all the components and accessories are age-appropriate military spec, making this an inexpensive way of owning a military vehicle that displays superbly and rides well. Both tyres are likewise period Dunlop Carrier and John Bull types, so consideration needs to be given to preserving these should more than occasional use be contemplated. A bicycle safety check would also be advised for road use. The buyer will need to arrange collection.
Military Navigation Training Set A post WW2 wooden-cased set of military navigation or draughtsman training instruments by B.W.C. Co. (British Watch Company Co.) This is a set of drawing instruments issued for training purposes. It is an identical set to those carried for field use, except they the training sets are in wooden boxes and not a webbing case. The case is clearly struck with a broad arrow. A good useable set require a little cleaning.
Military Pattern 54 Bore Percussion Revolver By Blissett c.1850 This is a scarce large frame military pattern revolver, which carries British proof marks, however the design has not been identified. Nevertheless, this revolver with its solid frame and side mounted rammer, has been retailed by a known gunmaker, Thomas Blissett of Liverpool. The revolver is in generally good original condition and working order, both in double and single action. Presented with a reasonable bore and chambers, the revolver also benefits from having undamaged grips. A little research may reveal details of the design and as is, the revolver is a good buy at this budget price.
Military Presentation Webley Bentley 80 Bore Revolver, c.1860 2019 New Year Special A rare military self cocking revolver won as an army shooting prize by Captain Steel, Newport 1860. Awarded by the 3rd Monmouthshire Rifle Volunteers, this revolver has an attractive nickel silver frame and blue barrel/cylinder combination. Made by the Birmingham gun trade to the designs of Webley-Bentley, this 80 bore percussion revolver features a hammer safety, as well as retaining a very good working action with solid lock up. The presentation inscription on the grip panel gives details of the prize winner, who was Captain Richard James Fye Steel, Esq., who according to the London Gazette of the previous month, had taken command of the 5th Monmouthshire Rifles Volunteers following the resignation of Captain Charles Henry Bird. The paper also gives mention of Charles Conway, Gent., as their Lieutenant - Dated 27th September, 1860. This regiment was formed in response to the threat of invasion by France, following the Orsini affair, where the raising of small units was a precautionary measure authorised by lieutenants of counties in England, Wales and Scotland. The various resulting Monmouthshire Rifles Volunteers Corps were later either disbanded, or for the greater part, absorbed into the regular South Wales Borderers. All in all, a very tidy and presentable military shooting award. Barrel length = 5 inch Overall length = 10 inch
Military Pulsar (Seiko) Chronograph Quartz Watch, c.2014 A superb military issue quartz chronograph by Pulsar (Seiko), dated 2014. This watch is in full working order, showing no sign of service wear. With no scratches, this remarkable example is near perfect, with just some light handling and storage marks evident on the closest scrutiny. This is a stunning example of a scarce watch, which comes on NATO strap representing the tri-colours of the RAF.
Military Radio Spares Tin A good spare parts tin that once comntained radio valves.
Military RAF Clock - 1938 Royal Air Force Mess Room Fusee Clock A pre WW2 RAF fusee mantelpiece clock made by Elliott - having the movement dated to 1938. These much sought after 8 day clocks, served in officers' Mess Rooms at RAF stations. This example has a good and unrestored oak case, which is in excellent condition, having a rich and well figured grain. It is free from damage and repair, although a latch was fitted at some point to the clock's back door panel. The clock retains its original and unrestored silvered dial, as well as having genuine spade and poker hands. Furthermore, the brass bezel has not been polished, so it has retained much of its gilt finish, albeit a little speckled with age. When placed on a level surface, these chain driven and robustly built clocks, are more than capable of delivering accurate timekeeping.
Military Stop Watch - WW1 Royal Navy Issue Split Second Chronograph The Split Second Chronograph is no ordinary stop watch. Sometimes referred to as a rattrapante, such watches were used to time 2 simultaneous events. The complication necessary to build such a timepiece, is regarded as a triumph of horological achievement. This example was issued to the Royal Navy during WW1. Interestingly, the inside of the watch contains a watchmaker's label. On the label it states that the watch was serviced by the, "Central Watch Repair Co. - Glasgow." This company were contractors to the Admiralty and Air Ministry. As such, not only is the watch a rare example of a Split Second Chronograph, but it may well have seen service at Scapa Flow. The watch is offered in very good condition and also has the addition of the Admiralty arrow and Pattern No. 4 designation to the rear of the watch. The case is dent free and over all, the watch is free of damage. Whilst the watch is in good working order, a Premium Service is available to ensure that the watch continues to function efficiently. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Style, Smiths Astral Waterproof Wristwatch, c.1958 A superb example of a military styled Smiths Astral watch, dating to c.1958. Made in England with a waterproof steel and chrome case, this watch shows little sign of any use. Internally the 15 jewel shockproof and manual wind movement, is in top condition. The watch is keeping excellent time, but the calibre 6010 movement has not been serviced. Overall a stunning example in original unspoilt condition. Difficult to improve upon and at a fraction of the price of a Smiths' military issue wristwatch. A Premium Service and 12 month warranty is available.
Military Timepiece Preservation Preservation & Conservation, Service + Warranty At ZMW Militaria we like to preserve and conserve our military timepieces, rather than refinishing them to \'as new\'. This keeps our prices down as generally, cosmetic work is expensive and in many instances, it is unnecessary. What\'s more, if not done to spec, it can leave the customer hugely disappointed and financially out of pocket. Remember, vintage timepieces are only original, once. That is why at ZMW Militaria a decision has been made that the watches we offer from now, will be serviced for you. Our watch service is really a process of preservation and conservation that will not damage existing age patina but it will remove the accumulated dirt and detritous, and keep your military timepiece working. In addition to your statutory rights, our 28-day warranty gives further peace of mind that, in the unlikely event of our watchmaker missing any preexisting fault that causes problems, the watch can be returned for adjustment. As for timekeeping, our watches should be capable of a good standard of accuracy, unless told otherwise in the description. Similarly, features exalted by the jewellery trade regarding water or shock proofing were often exaggerated and a modicum of common sense needs to be taken when
Military Watch Interest - MOD Defence Standards Book Pulication A copy (reprinted in the late 1980s), containing 101 pages from the MOD Defence Standards second issue publication, Def Stan 66-4, Parts 1 to 10. First printed in the 1970s, the publication details the specific requirements for a wide variety of military issue watches used for, navigation, diving, general service and more. The catalogue outlines the patterns, testing and minimum standard to be reached before any watch could be accepted into service. It also outlines the issue markings and stock numbers to be used for the varying categories of watch. An indispensable reference book with softcover and laminated front, bound with a ring spine. Offered in good, new old stock condition. Limited number available.
Military Watch Interest - Wartime Inspired Publication & Watch Adverts A WW2 era or late 1940s publication containing adverts by Rotary, Cortebert, Breitling, Vertex, International Watch Co. and Tavannes (Cyma). Not surprisingly, the companies that are advertising and using the military imagery to capture the interest of potential watch buyers, are the same companies who during the war, supplied the War Department with their military timepieces. The publication concerns itself with informing the general public about the marvel that timepieces are. It briefly summarises the usefulness of the watch as a navigation aid and tool, before going on to describe the function of form of key components. A fascinating insight with illustrations from Omega and Longines in this 60 page booklet.
Military Watch Interest - WW2 Longines 75th Anniversary Watch Catalogue In 1941, on the occasion of their 75th Anniversary, Longines published this black and white catalogue advertising their range of gentlemen's and ladies' watches. Their catalogue is in the form of a fold open document, depicting a number of their special timing watches, including Lindbergh and Weems types. The catalogue is in new old stock condition, but does have some minor wear in places to corners and edges - No other rips or staining evident. When opened up, the catalogue measures 50cm x 32cm. Closed, it becomes a pocket sized leaflet of 16cm x 8.5cm.
Military Watches - WW2 German Army Officer's Zenith Pocket Watch This is a stunning example of a German Army issue (Deutsche Heer marked) pocket watch, c.1939. It is totally original and as close to mint condition as you could hope to find - even down to having retained its inner protective shield. The dial, hands and movement, all look pristine and the watch functions as good as can be expected. Nevertheless, a Premium Service would keep the watch running in top condition, well into the future. Even the bow at the top of the watch is still firm, indicating that it has not been extensively carried. There only exist some very minor marks to the rear of the watch case, caused by previous case opening. Being dent free, the solid nickel case screws up securely and the rear cover even retains traces of the original spun finish, further indicating minimal usage. Zenith is a high end watch manufacturing company, that supplied both the British and German forces with timepieces. However, it was only the German procured pieces which had extra refinements such as found on this pocket watch. These additional features include the already mentioned antimagnetic dust shield, waterproofing and shock protection. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Watches - WW2 Royal Navy 1942 Issue Waltham Pocket Watch This genre of military pocket watch with its 9 jewel Waltham movement, was primarily issued to the Royal Navy during WW2. Based on the serial number of this watch, Waltham records indicate that this watch was manufactured in 1942. Made in the USA, this stunning Waltham watch was probably not issued during the war. Instead, judging by its condition, the watch probably remained in storage, whilst awaiting assignment. Whilst in store, NATO codes (0552) indicating RN stock, plus the encircled (T) mark on the dial, must have been added to the watch. This marking would have been necessary to keep the watch up to date with the latest diktats from the Ministry of Defence. This Waltham is presented in very good condition throughout, showing only a hint of service wear, or storage marks. Furthermore, the issue number on the case back and movement are all matching, making this a very attractive original timepiece. Over all the watch is in very good condition and working order, however the Premium Service needs consideration. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Watches - WW2 Swedish Army Issue Pocket Watch Probably dating to just before WW2, this Swedish Army issue pocket watch is a difficult timepiece to find. During WW2 Sweden maintained an air of neutrality, however the government did permit the German Wermacht to use the railways to ferry troops and munitions through to neighbouring Scandinavian countries. Covertly however, Sweden was aiding the Allies, by passing on military intelligence and also assisting in the training of refugee soldiers from Denmark and Norway - These troops were later used in the liberation of their homelands. From 1943, Sweden permitted the Allies to make use of their airfields. This watch is presented in good used condition, free from damage, but showing signs of service wear. A really good example that will be difficult to improve upon. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Military Webley Bentley 80 Bore "Safety" Revolver, c.1860 A rare military self cocking revolver won as an army shooting prize by Captain Steel, Newport 1860. Awarded by the 3rd Monmouthshire Rifle Volunteers, this revolver has an attractive nickel silver frame and blue barrel/cylinder combination. Made by the Birmingham gun trade to the designs of Webley-Bentley, this 80 bore percussion revolver features a hammer safety, as well as retaining a very good working action with solid lock up. The presentation inscription on the grip panel gives details of the prize winner, who was Captain Richard James Fye Steel, Esq., who according to the London Gazette of the previous month, had taken command of the 5th Monmouthshire Rifles Volunteers following the resignation of Captain Charles Henry Bird. The paper also gives mention of Charles Conway, Gent., as their Lieutenant - Dated 27th September, 1860. This regiment was formed in response to the threat of invasion by France, following the Orsini affair, where the raising of small units was a precautionary measure authorised by lieutenants of counties in England, Wales and Scotland. The various resulting Monmouthshire Rifles Volunteers Corps were later either disbanded, or for the greater part, absorbed into the regular South Wales Borderers. All in all, a very tidy and presentable military shooting award. Barrel length = 5 inch Overall length = 10 inch
Millwall "Thames River Fencibles" Brass Pistol By Mortimer, c.1800 Historically, an island once existed along the Thames bordered by the two largest meanders of the river, separated from the mainland by a thinner strip of water to the north. This island of marsh and wetland, which was once part of the Parish of Poplar, had become known as the "Isle of Dogs." With settlers having tried for centuries, with varying degrees of success, to farm the land for its rich pasture, working the area was always a risk as it was known to be prone to flooding. Eventually though, a wall was built to separate the land from the river and became known as Marshwall. Later, windmills were erected to help with the pumping process, along that part which became, Millwall. Yet despite the best efforts of the inhabitants, the terrain retained some propensity to flooding and inevitably, peoples' livelihoods were blighted when the river breached. A notoriety surrounded the area due to the often checkered character of some of the settlers that had colonised the island. Certainly, many had indeed been forced there through penal servitude. What's more, the area became a site for ever present gibbets along the river's course, which served as warnings to remind undesirables and arriving pirates alike, of the harsh penalty that awaited them should they pursue their illicit trafficking. With Greenwich being located on the opposite bank, the Royal Navy would have literally overseen the execution of many a smuggler and pirate on the hangman's gallow tree. To help with the drainage of the land, the dozen mills built along the Millwall were a valuable asset to the reclamation work and towards the end of the 18th century, the success of their effort saw the area develop into an industrial site with docks, warehouses and shipbuilding being the main trade of the island. Of course the growing prosperity of the area saw a greater influx of newcomers, although most were poorer families looking to improve their lot, hoping to find work within the riparian trade. As time went on, the maritime services offered on the Isle of Dogs became more diverse and the area burgeoned, but despite their contributions, the working class remained poor. Not surprisingly the abundance of rich pickings that the merchant marine brought to the doorstep of the needy, inevitably had its consequences - Crime was rife. Given this social back drop to Millwall, it would be easy to imagine that the Thames River Police and armed watchmen who patrolled the area, might all of had a need for procuring this type of pistol, but in the light of the growing invasion threat from Napoleon Bonaparte, it was a small band of local volunteers, known as the Thames River Fencibles, who actually would have used this superb pocket flintlock. Acquired in the early years of the Napoleonic Wars, when London held a genuine fear of an imminent attack from Napoleon's Army, the Sea and River Fencibles (Defencibles) were a body of volunteer sailors, raised to support the Royal Navy in the defence of Britain, from the threat of French invasion. The Millwall group of Thames River Fencibles were not a standing army, but rather a force of men who would have been the last line of defence to thwart an invasion. They trained with the Royal Navy and several sham invasion scenarios were practised to keep the volunteers in a state of readiness. With medals being awarded for their good work, their history is preserved at the Greenwich Royal Navy Museum. For Millwall these were tense times, and concerns that the guerrilla war for which they had prepared was afoot, Britain prepared her anti-invasion plans in 1803, following reports that Napoleon was once again on the move. It was published at that time that he had said, "All my thoughts are directed towards England. I want only for a favourable wind to plant the Imperial Eagle on the Tower of London". Of course with the majority of the military regiments and volunteer forces being stationed on the south coast, it was down to them, ssisted by the Dover District Volunteers, the Sea Fencibles, plus the Thames River Fencibles at Millwall, to provide what would have been the final line of resistance to thwart Napoleon's fleet from sailing into London. As for this pistol with its solid brass "out in all weather" construction, made this an inspired choice for any a Militia man, whose remit was to harass the enemy, rather than to engage them full on. Made by Mortimer, this concealable pistol was most likely bought and paid for by a wealthy merchant benefactor. The turn off barrel numbered, "Millwall No.44", suggests that a not insignificant supply of weapons was available should the need have ever arisen. The "M 44" numbering is repeated, stamped on the walnut butt, prevented the possibility of mismatching of barrels to frames. This historically important maritime flintlock is presented in full working condition and excellent order throughout. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.25 inches
Ministry of Defence - MOD Police Cap Badge This is the cap badge of the Ministry of Defence Police, established in 1971. The Ministry of Defence Police is a civilian authority that came into being following the merger with; the Air Force Department Constabulary; the Army Department Constabulary and the Admiralty Constabulary. The MDP is staffed by 2,700 constables, most of whom are armed. This MDP cap badge is in very god condition, being free from any obvious signs of wear. The badge is signed, Firmin, London on the reverse.
Ministry Of Defence Police Constabulary Cap Badge The Ministry of Defence police were formed in 1971 when the Air Force Department, the Army Department and the Admiralty Constabularies merged. Whilst the Ministry of Defence Police are a civillian authority they are only superficially similar to other UK police forces. Today their function is more to do with providing armed security at military establishments and a counter terrorism role. This cap badge, made by Firmin of London, is in excellent condition a,d dates to the early formation of the constabulary.
Mint 1849 Tower Coastguard
Mint Vintage Webley Senior Air Pistol A classic Webley Senior in superb, fine condition, showing virtually no sign of any use. The piston plug at the rear is absolutely pristine - Screws unturned. This collector grade Webley retains its factory blue finish and, it is in first class working order. It comes with its original box, which has clear labels, but the corners are a little tatty. Nevertheless, this will be a difficult example of this iconic pistol to better.
Mint Vintage Webley Senior Air Pistol (More Images)
MOD Survival Knife, c.1993 Originally made by Wilkinson Sword and Joseph Rodgers, these hefty knives are still part of the MOD inventory. Designated by the military as "Survival Knives," they are most useful when chopping branches, splitting logs, prying, levering, digging, gouging, drilling, hammering and generally being the most versatile piece of kit when it comes to shelter building. A Jack-of-all-trades, these knives feature a one-piece full-length, 5mm thick tang and blade edge. Being in untouched condition, this knife comes with a factory dull cutting edge but this can be improved upon if required. Offered as new surplus stock, the knife has a protective black phosphate finish to all the steel parts. Grips are made of wood with heavy duty copper rivets and are also stamped with a stock number, plus broad arrow mark and 1993 date - All presented in a leather sheath, just the same as when first produced in the late 1950's. Probably the most robust survival knife on offer. Blade length = 7 inches
Model 1851 Colt Navy - British Service Holster, c.1854 This is a rare British leather service holster made to fit the Colt Navy with 7½" barrel. It is contemporary to the Crimean War period and to the revolver being offered on this site, but it was not obtained with the pistol. The holster is of excellent quality, being made from black and tan double skinned leather, which is still supple. Light wear and surface crazing is evident, but the holster remains functional, despite some separation to the stitching as shown. All in all, a rare holster to add value to your revolver collection. To be sold without the revolver, which is available as a separate listed item.
Model 1883 10.6mm (.44 S&W) Reichsrevolver A very good and totally original Model 1883 Reichsrevolver, issued to the German Army and Navy. These single action revolvers remained in service throughout WW1, before being replaced by the PO8 Luger, right up to 1945. The example on offer here, bears German regimental marks, 1 F.M. 64.17. According to the Militarrevolver book by Rolf H. Muller, it states that revolvers made at Suhl, were distributed by the authorities for whatever reason, to the German Navy. As is, this Suhl revolver is a good and solid example, offered in fine working order with a good bright barrel bore and cylinders. All functions work well and the revolver is evenly patinated, with some original blue finish to sheltered areas. Between the wars, many Reichsrevolvers were shipped to the USA, where they were a popular alternative to the Smith & Wesson .44 Russian revolver. However, this example is not an American import. Instead, this pistol was a war trophy that came to England at the end of WW1. Regrettably though, there are no additional anecdotal accounts to accompany this revolver's capture. All in all, a highly presentable and unmolested example of the sought after military Reichsrevolver, which is an obsolete calibre pistol and may be owned as an antique in the UK, without any certificate.
Model MP21 - Metropolitan Police Whistle, c.1928 Hudson & Co. have been making police issue whistles since at least 1884 and, whilst they may at first glance all appear to be the same, there are many differences between the models. These differences allow collectors to accurately date their whistles, adding historical interest to these once essential items of police equipment. Actually issued to the London, Metropolitan Police, this whistle is correctly marked in the manner that was prescribed in the late 1920s - without any serial number. However the decision to leave any formal identification number off the whistle, was reversed soon after, so the Model MP21 was a short-lived pattern. Presented in near mint and probably unused condition, this whistle is as sharp as they come, with no dents - just some minor storage marks.With no sign of cleaning or polishing, this whistle works very well indeed and would be great to use.
Modelé 1763 A rare .60 calibre Model 1763 Marechausee flintlock pistol in untouched condition, made c.1765 at the government arsenal in Maubeuge. Intended for Gendarmerie issue, the pistol features a well rounded profile, designed to prevent snagging in the pocket or against a cape. Cosmetically, all iron parts are darkly patinated and the lock still bears the etched arsenal name, as well as there being several official inspection stamps evident. The inscribed initial "E.B." are also present to the left side of the woodwork. Showing some signs of service wear to the tip of the frizzen, the flintlock is in a sleepy condition, with a fully functioning lock and original ramrod. Overall, a rare pistol to find in unmolested condition. Ideal for the collector. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length =
Modelé An IX Gendarmerie Pistol, c.1810 Selling on consignment: A rare .60 calibre Modelé An IX Marechausee flintlock pistol in very good condition. Made c.1810 at the government arsenal, these pistols were intended for Gendarmerie issue, although many found themselves being carried by army officers. These attractive pistols feature a rounded profile to prevent snagging in the pocket or cape. On this example, all iron parts are evenly coloured with a salt and pepper patina and the woodwork retains much original finish, with some signs of service wear. Nevertheless, the lock is fully functioning and the pistol retains its original ramrod. Overall, a rare example to find in untouched, collector condition. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 10 inches
Modelé An IX Maubeuge French Gendarmerie Pistol, c.1810 A rare .60 calibre Modelé An IX Marechausee flintlock pistol in untouched condition, made c.1810 at the government arsenal in Maubeuge. Intended for Gendarmerie issue, the pistol features a rounded profile to prevent snagging in the pocket or cape. All iron parts are darkly patinated and the lock still bears the etched arsenal name. Several official inspection stamps are evident, as are the inscribed initial "E.B." Showing some signs of service wear, the flintlock is nevertheless in good sleepy condition, with dark age patina to the ironwork. The lock features a fully functioning lock and the pistol retains its original ramrod. Overall, a rare example to find in untouched, collector condition.
Modelé An IX Maubeuge French Gendarmerie Pistol, c.1810 Consignment Sale: A rare .60 calibre Modelé An IX Marechausee flintlock pistol in untouched condition, made c.1810 at the government arsenal in Maubeuge. Intended for Gendarmerie issue, the pistol features a rounded profile to prevent snagging in the pocket or cape. All iron parts are darkly patinated and the lock still bears the etched arsenal name. Several official inspection stamps are evident, as are the inscribed initial "E.B." Showing some signs of service wear, the flintlock is nevertheless in good sleepy condition, with dark age patina to the ironwork. The lock features a fully functioning lock and the pistol retains its original ramrod. Overall, a rare example to find in untouched, collector condition.
Modern Quartz UDT BuShips "Canteen" Wristwatch An excellent reproduction of a "Canteen" watch, first ordered by the Bureau of Ships for issue to diver's during WW2. These divers were part of the US Navy's Underwater Demolition Teams, a forerunner of the special forces SEALs. Brand new and unworn, this quartz watch comes on a military pattern canvas strap, boxed with a manufacturer's warranty and instructions. There are only two of these watches, which are not generally available in the UK - Offered at a special price, including P&P.
Modified P1842 Constabulary Pistol By Parker Field & Sons When William Parker died in 1841, he left instructions that his gun business should carry on under the name of W. Parker Field & Sons. However, it seems that the "W' part of the name was never adopted and a little later on, the "Sons" element was also dropped from the firm's title: This then helps to date this particular pistol, which is based on a modified Lancer's Pattern of 1842, to that same period in history, when William Parker was supplying many arms to various New Police Constabularies. Given that this Lancer's pistol was never destined to be a military service piece, makes it highly likely that this pistol was instead meant for Police issue, specifically for the Horse Patrols. Measuring a little over 15 inches in length, the pistol is of 16 bore, a traditional calibre for Constabulary firearms of the time. This pistol is in unaltered condition; with perfect woodwork, strong working action and good ironwork that has not been cleaned, just showing small areas of pitting around the hammer and ramrod end. The lock plate and barrel are generally unspoilt, with some age related mottling and surface patina. Untouched screws, good brass furniture, captive swivelling ramrod, a perfect nipple and good bore, all go to suggest that this pistol was carried, but not used. All in all, this is a super sleepy example of a modified Lancer's pistol of 1842, made by the official armourer to the Metropolitan Police.
Moore's Patent Teat-Fire Revolver, c.1864 To escape any possibility of a law suit from Smith & Wesson, gunmaker Daniel Moore designed a unique .32 Teat-Fire cartridge that was loaded into the revolvers chambers from the front of the cylinder. These were manufactured by Moore, together with his partner David Williamson, at their company simply named the, "Fire Arms Co." in Brooklyn N.Y. Teat-Fire revolvers were certainly very popular during the Civil War, among both soldiers as well as civilians, whilst the curiously named system earned its title from the distinctive round they fired. Being a rimless cartridge the backend, that entered the cylinder first, was rounded and from it their protruded a teat. The teat, which contained the fulminate primer, poked through a hole in the back of the cylinder, which in turn was struck by the hammer upon firing. Around 30,000 of these pocket revolvers were produced between, 1864 to 1870, before the company was bought out by Colt. Presented in good condition, the gunmetal frame retains much of its original nickel finish and all the sharp engraved decoration. All patent details and company address are still clear to the barrel and cylinder, and the action is in full working order. Overall, a good example of an interesting Civil War revolver.
More Images - 1856 Pattern .577 Rifled Lancer's Pistol …. More images ….
Muzzle Loading Cannon By William Parker, c.1800 A genuine early 19th Century proofed cannon, signed around the breech section of the cascabel by the gunmaker, William Parker. This miniature firing cannon must be one of his earlier pieces, made at 233 High Holborn and, given the subject matter, may even be a tribute piece made to celebrate the life of Nelson and the Battle of Trafalgar. Certainly the gunmetal barrel has all the astragals, reinforcing rings, raised vent, muzzle and cascabel details of the full-sized Admiralty cannon, as carried on HMS Victory. Even the trunnions are correctly fixed at the lower third for strength, and the barrel bears London proof and view marks. Being clear to the vent, the barrel is bored to accept ball of .40," making it more than just a signal model. The four wheeled truck is also well made, with fully detailed fittings including articulated cap squares, wedge and iron fixings, with one ring being absent. Overall this cannon is a superb and rare, even possibly unique, example of William Parker's work. Presented in very good condition throughout, with some detail loss. Barrel length = 8.5 inches Height at muzzle = 4.5 inches
NAAFI Falkland Islands Plaque A vintage 1980s wall plaque obtained from the Falkland Islands. The wood and metal plaque bears the motto, "Desire the Right" and a NAAFI label on the reverse. Overall in good condition with minor age wear. Overall height = 7 inches
Naval 4-Shot Flintlock Volley Pistol, By T. Ketland, c.1800 Made by Thomas Ketland c.1800, this rare 4 barrelled naval pistol was intended for use during close-quarter boarding action, where all the 60 bore barrels would be fired simultaneously. Never intended to be carried cocked and locked, this large pistol with its centrally mounted cock and frizzen, has no provision for a safety, other than that afforded by the half cock. Clearly signed by the maker to the left of the box lock and "London," to the other side, the pistol is in working order. Exhibiting slightly rubbed London proofs, sparse decoration, together with a dot numbering system on the barrels, all combine to give this flintlock a no nonsense quality. An oversized and contoured bag-shaped butt, which swells around the pommel, also serves to give this fighting man's flintlock, a secure hand-filling grip. Overall, a rare naval volley pistol that has probably seen service during its working life, presented in very good to excellent condition. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 9 inches
Nepal Order \'79 Gurkha Khukuri Parade Knife A British Army issue Gurkha knife, marked on the blade, \"Nepal Order 1 / 79\". This 16 inch horn handled parade knife is in very good condition, complete with its patent leather scabbard, which retains the Chakmak and Karda. Blade length = 10 inches
Nero Lemania Military Stopwatch, c.1970 A near mint military stopwatch, appearing to be unissued and having seen very little use. Presented in full working order this stopwatch was made by Lemania, a top chronograph supplier to the MOD.
New - Enzo Folding EDC Knife The Enzo PK70 is more than a luxury gentleman’s pocket knife. Exceptionally well made, this Finnish knife is UK legal for everyday carry, having a thick 2.5mm non-locking blade that has the flat grind. See below for more details. All in all, a superior EDC pocket knife with a robust flat-ground blade. Blade length = 7cm
New - Scarce Enzo Folding Scandi EDC Knife The Enzo PK70 is more than a luxury gentleman’s pocket knife. Exceptionally well made, this Finnish knife is UK legal for everyday carry, having a thick 2.5mm non-locking blade that has the desirable Scandi grind. Made from high-end S30V steel, renowned for its edge holding durability, this knife was supplied by Enzo without scales. The purpose of this unusual strategy was to give the end-user the opportunity of making their own handles. All other components are included in the carton, comprising of the screws and pocket clip, sealed in their original factory bag - All unused. Looking as though it had been constructed with surgical precision, all components fit flush. Where the knife hinges, the blade is held securely with a two-stage pivot, which positively holds the blade open in use but, should the blade fold unexpectedly a second detent will block the blade from reaching your fingers. More sustained pressure is then required to overcome the second detent to close the blade. Ingenious. All in all, a superior EDC pocket knife with a blade designed for bushcraft. Blade length = 7cm
New Jersey Militia .44 Remington New Model Army Revolver Since the 1850s, the State of New Jersey had among its population, a sizeable and active antislavery community. As such, the sympathetic state was a harbour for many runaway slaves, seeking refuge from the South. Although not keen to enter the Civil War, New Jersey was able to raise 33 regiments of infantry, 4 of militia and 8 of cavalry and artillery, which represented a strength of over 88,000 men. This included 2,900 black New Jerseyans who served in the US Coloured Troop. History records that they fought with distinction in all the major battles of the war, with 26 soldiers being awarded the Medal of Honour. Armed with a range of weapons, the New Jersey militia are noted as taking delivery of 1000 Remington New Model Army revolvers, which upon acceptance were stamped just forward of the frame with the "N.J." property mark, as this example is. Overall this pistol is in very good service condition, with little finish remaining, but now having a good age patina with some light surface frosting and light pitting - Yet it retains its sharp edges and a clear barrel address, with some hints of original blue to sheltered areas. Mechanically the revolver is in perfect working order, with a crisp action, together with a very good bore and chambers. All in all, a rugged and solid example. A rare contract service revolver in unmolested condition and sensibly priced. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14 inches
New Jersey Militia .44 Remington New Model Army Revolver, c.1863 Since the 1850s, the State of New Jersey had among its population, a sizeable and active antislavery community. As such, the sympathetic state was a harbour for many runaway slaves, seeking refuge from the South. Although not keen to enter the Civil War, New Jersey was able to raise 33 regiments of infantry, 4 of militia and 8 of cavalry and artillery, which represented a strength of over 88,000 men. This included 2,900 black New Jerseyans who served in the US Coloured Troop. History records that they fought with distinction in all the major battles of the war, with 26 soldiers being awarded the Medal of Honour. Armed with a range of weapons, the New Jersey militia are noted as taking delivery of 1000 Remington New Model Army revolvers, which upon acceptance were stamped just forward of the frame with the "N.J." property mark, as this example is. Overall this pistol is in very good service condition, with little finish remaining, but now having a good age patina with some light surface frosting and light pitting - Yet it retains its sharp edges and a clear barrel address, with some hints of original blue to sheltered areas. Mechanically the revolver is in perfect working order, with a crisp action, together with a very good bore and chambers. All in all, a rugged and solid example. A rare contract service revolver in unmolested condition and sensibly priced. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14 inches
New Land Flintlock Pistol, c.1800 An interesting British Army, New Land Pattern flintlock pistol, c.1800. This is a genuine military regulation pistol that has undergone official armoury repairs during its working life, most probably in India. This NLP pistol is in good working order but cosmetically it carries the bruises and marks of hard service life, nevertheless, it is an authentic example.
New Land Flintlock Pistol, c.1800 A very good Tower pattern New Land pistol with Storekeeper's mark dated 1800, having its lock engraved with the King's Crown over GR. This example is fully ordnance marked, with broad arrow markings and deep Inspector's marks to the woodwork, including those within the ramrod channel, along with a clear Crowned TA mark to the side plate. The wood is solid with no loss or damage other than light bruising, retaining sharp profiles and a tightly fitted lock. All ironwork is likewise sharp and clearly marked, displaying a uniform mottled patina of greys and browns. Overall, a very good example of a regulation ordnance-issued flintlock pistol.
New Land Pattern Flintlock Tower Pistol, c.1810 A regulation .65 Tower flintlock pistol of New Land Pattern, made c.1810 and presented in very good sleepy condition. The GR marked lock is in good clean condition with clear marking, plus a strong action and functioning bolt safety. The 9 inch round barrel has a very good bore and even age patina, with crisp proof stamps as well as a crowned 4 mark on the tang. A clear storekeeper's mark is present on the woodwork, which is free of any significant damage and no sign of repair to the ramrod channel, with just the usual service wear and minor bumps and grazes. Interestingly, this pistol is engraved on the trigger guard with the number, "K52." A generally very good example of its type, with much to recommend it. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15.5 inches
New Model Remington Police .38RF Revolver c.1870 A fine nickel plated New Model Remington Police pocket revolver, c.1870. These 5-shot revolvers were initially manufactured with percussion cylinders but later examples were sold chambered for the now obsolete .38 Rimfire metallic cartridges. Presented in fine, crisp condition, this revolver is in full working order, functioning as though it were new. It even retains much of its original finish, with just some thinning to the plating to the right of the frame, forward of the perfect grips. All in all, a superior collector grade example.
New Old Stock - British Military Stop Watch, Dated 1997 This is a new old stock Precista Stop Watch made for the British Military in 1997. It is part of a small group of surplus military timers that were released by the MOD, fully marked with NATO stock numbers. It is in immaculate and unused condition. Many of these watches have retained their plastic sleeves. A genuine one-off-watch timer presented in full working order, as well as being one of the more accurate mechanical types that were available to the Royal Navy, Army and Air Force. These watches were capable of recording intervals down to a 1/10th of a second and were a little larger than other issue stopwatches, suggesting that it may have been designed for use with gloved hands? A faultless stopwatch with all its original finish, still capable of providing sterling service, and at a fraction of the price of an equivalent new watch. Calibrated to record time measurement of up to 30 minutes in duration, where the minute hand orbits the dial every 30 seconds. Superb.
New Old Stock - Mk III Prismatic Compass & Case A superb Mark III military prismatic compass dated to 1951, in unissued condition. There are no bubbles or signs of repairs - no putty. A genuine brass compass in working order with its original webbing case that looks as good as when new. Compass calibrated in both degrees and mills.
New Old Stock - Royal Navy ASDIC Stop Watch, Dated 1991 This is a new old stock Precista Stop Watch made for the Royal Navy in 1991. It is part of a small group of surplus military timers that were released by the MOD, fully marked with NATO stock numbers. It is in immaculate and unused condition, still retaining its protective sticker to the rear of the case. A genuine one-off-watch ASDIC timer presented in full working order, capable of recording time intervals of up to 6 seconds. The watch dial is calibrated to convert the time recorded into a measurement of depth or distance, to plot the position of an enemy submarine. A faultless stopwatch with all its original finish and unaffected by any EMP, but now declared obsolete thanks to more modern electronic measuring devices.
New Old Stock - Royal Navy Jack Knife By Rodgers Made by Rodgers of Sheffield, this vintage Jack Knife is in amazing untouched condition - just a hint of age. It is absolutely superb, showing no signs of wear, dirt, rust or pitting - In fact, despite its age, this knife looks to be virtually factory fresh and still retains some faded etched details and broad arrow mark on its stout 3-inch blade, which would ordinarily wipe clean with little use. A great knife for the collector or one for the individual who requires a substantial knife that complies with UK Law for EDC.
New Year Special - Early .442 Revolver of Webley/Tranter Pattern, c.1870 This early military type revolver was made by the Birmingham gun trade c.1870. Large and robustly made, this .442 centre fire revolver borrows from the designs of both Tranter and Webley, with its most distinctive feature being the compound link cartridge extracting lever on the right of the frame: In G. Bruce & C. Reinhart's "Webley Revolver" book, they identify this pattern as being made for the gun trade in the late 1870s. Functioning and indexing well with a smooth action, assisted by a friction brake, this revolver is in good condition with some general signs of campaign wear. Nevertheless, this revolver benefits from having undamaged grips and a good bore. An attractive and scarce pistol for the collector.
New Year Special - Percussion Knife Pistol By J. Rodgers, c.1840 Made by the Sheffield cutler James Rodgers, this combined knife and percussion pistol, has its blade etched with the legend, "Self Protector." Made c.1840, this combo has a nickel barrel which bears Birmingham proofs. Overall, this example is in very good original condition, showing minor handling wear and no significant damage. Even the horn grip scales are crack free, although they do have a small chip on the top edge of the right butt scale. Mechanically the pistol is in working order and the action has a very strong spring. The pistol also features a drop down trigger as well as a pair of tweezers that would be used to pick out spare caps from the discreet butt compartment. A miniature ball mould is also included as part of the pistol's tools, all stored within the grip scales. All marking is good and clear and both the knife blades are equally good and stamped with Rodger's details, as well as being acid etched with a still readable inscription and fancy rope design. Both blades have an original sharp edge, which has been well preserved - With nothing detrimental to note. All in all, an excellent example for the collector. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 6 inches
New Year Special - Rifled .577 1856 Tower Pattern Lancer's Pistol The military Pattern 1842 pistol was upgraded in 1856 with the provision of a rifled barrel for issue to lancers. Made and signed by Thomas Blissett, this pistol is in good original condition with a superb rifled and sighted barrel. The lock has a strong working action and generally smooth ironwork with an even speckled appearance. All woodwork is solid, with just minor bruises and the usual split at the lock retaining screw, but nothing serious to note. All brass work and screws are likewise in very good condition, with rotatable lanyard ring. Overall a collectable example in very good original condition. Barrel length = 10 inch Overall length = 15.5 inch
New York State Militia Remington Rolling Block Rifle A very good example of an original and rare, martially marked Remington Rolling Block Rifle, made c.1872 for the New York State Militia. This example is in crisp condition, with excellent untouched screw heads and a minty bore, with overall mottled grey age patina and factory finish to the wood work. Whilst most of the Union Army were using converted rifles of in-house design, the NYS Militia went ahead and ordered 15,000 .50 - 70 calibre Remington Rolling Block rifles, which remained in service until the 1890s. These were slightly modified Rolling Blocks, which featured the NYS shield crest on the extended hammer and breach block, plus, Remington added a half-cock safety on the militia's orders. This obsolete calibre rifle is in full working order but showing slight signs of service use. Interestingly the rifle is variously marked and has "D 23" stamped on the butt plate, with a further "F2" mark, as well as three sets of inspector's cartouches to the woodwork. A good collector grade example.
Nickel 2½ Inch M1877 Colt .41 Thunderer Revolver, c.1883 1883 Model MODEL 1877 DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER (LIGHTNING 38, THUNDERER 41, AND RAINMAKER 32)
No Listing
Novelty Cap-Firing P38 Keyring Pistol, c.1980 A vintage miniature novelty P38 pistol with working action. Loads plastic caps through the breach. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
Novelty Colt Single Action Revolver, c.1970 A petite keyring novelty, cap firing, metal revolver styled on the Colt SAA. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
Novelty Revolver Lighter & Light, c.1995 A vintage but unused novelty lighter marked with the Colt prancing pony. The gaslighter is operated by cocking the hammer, whilst pulling the trigger illuminates a red bull in the barrel, can be used as an interesting bore light. We have 2 for sale, both in identical unused condition, checked and tested as working. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
Novelty Smith Special Keyring Revolver, c.1990 A novelty revolver closely modelled on the S&W Chief's Special. Side of frame marked, "Smith .38 Special". This cap firing revolver is in very good condition and working order, with no signs of use. There are 2 available for sale in identical condition. For size comparison with a door key, see additional images on this page. Presented in good used condition and working order.
Obsolete Calibre .320 Revolver - VeloDog Style Cyclist's Personal Protection Pistol, c.1900 Made c.1900, this is a very good example of a cyclist's personal protection hammerless revolver, chambered for the .320 C.F. Revolver round, which is an obsolete calibre. This five shot revolver is also profiled to resemble a self loading pistol reminiscent of the 1900 Browning, which would have been in vogue at the time. The simplicity of operation would however, have made the revolver better choice of pistol, for anyone riding a bicycle when confronted by a ferocious dog! Presented in very good condition and working order, this revolver has retained much original blue, with some light speckling and mottling to the surface finish. All functions operate smoothly with good cylinder lock up and both the cylinder chambers plus the rifled bore, are in very good shape. Over all, a very good example at a reasonable price.
Obsolete Gun Interest - Metropolitan Police Firearms Training Manual Dating from 1975, this original and rare vintage Firearms Manual, contains much obsolete material about the weapons and training once adopted by the Metropolitan Police. It is a real eye opener to note just how much the hardware and training have changed over the decades. In these pages, you will see the police using; .762 Enforcer sniper rifles; various shotguns; Webley revolvers, Walther pistols and more. The manual takes you through aspects of the firearms training, early tactics, weapon handling and ammunition. This publication must be one of the first serious manuals to be written for the police in these respects, yet by today's standards, much of what was once top training, would be woefully inadequate against today's armed threats. This 124 page manual is complete in its loose red leafed ring binder, being marked in gold on the front, "Metropolitan Police Firearms Training Manual." It is in good used condition throughout, being free from annotation and tears.
Officer's .65" Holster Percussion Pistol By W. Parker, c.1840 William Parker was not just a supplier of arms to the Board of Ordnance, but his premises at 233 Holborn also saw the patronage of Army Officer's looking to purchase their own pistols. Of course Parker's London shop needed to keep a good selection of quality pistols with which to tempt his military clientele. This particular pistol was made by W. Parker towards the end of his years (d.1842), and is an example of one of his larger belt holster pistols. Possibly made for the Anglo-Afghan campaign, this large pistol incorporates many characteristics that make it an inspired choice for the soldier. These include a long barrel of regulation carbine bore (.65"), a captive ramrod and an oversized trigger guard to accommodate a gloved finger. However, the major benefit of this pistol is its percussion ignition system. At a time when all military pistols still used flintlocks, officers' pistols like this inspired Lovell to develop the Ordnance Pattern 1842 cavalry percussion pistol, which became the first military percussion pistol - but at this time the P1842 was at best still in its initial production stage. Presented in good overall condition the scroll and shell engraving, especially that found around the barrel tang and rear sight, is of premium quality where the engraver has surpassed himself by adding obscure detail to his work. Looking closely, a Four Leaf Clover motif can be found on the threaded end of the lock screw, where it breaks through the lock plate. A detail so tiny that it is easily missed, yet so significant in meaning. Mechanically the pistol is in full working order, retaining some dulled finish with honest sign of campaign carry and use, but no abuse. The action all holds well against a strong spring, which holds firm on both half and full cock. Other notable benefits are the presence of a safety and platinum vent plug as standard. All in all, a good example of a W. Parker officer's pistol fully signed on the barrel flat and lock, with serial numbers stamped on the base of the butt. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 13 inches
Officer's Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock, c.1810 A sleepy example of a London proofed Light Dragoon flintlock. Given the regulation pattern, this pistol was probably intended for a military officer and features simple attractive engraving to the lock. Overall the pistol is in sharp condition retaining a strong functioning action and sharp woodwork, showing little signs of use. A military pattern collector grade flintlock from the Napoleonic era.
Officer\'s Flintlock Pistol By H. Nock, c.1800 An excellent officer's holster pistol by Henry Nock made for an elite cavalry regiment, c.1800 and bearing the rack number "568" on the side plate. Presented in strong working order, this regulation barrelled pistol has survived in sleepy and untouched condition, with a dark age patina to the ironwork and superb furniture. Typical of Nock, this innovative gunmaker has incorporated designs into his military pistols that only became standard on service small arms, years later. By making his pistols with a ramrod pipe, Nock was able to circumvent the problem of split rammer channels associated with the New Land Pattern pistols, commonly used by the British Army. Generally free of damage, this sharp-looking flintlock pistol will enhance any collection.
Officer\'s Pocket Watch & Pouch, c.1900 A superior quality pocket watch cover, probably dating from c.1900 but equally suitable as a WW1 item, with a belt loop designed to be worn on either the cross-strap of a Sam Browne or slipped between the wearer's waist and belt, fastened with a polished bone button. This second option also allowed the pouch to be quickly removed without having to take off the belt. The leather hardshell cover will comfortably accommodate pocket watches of up to around 55 mm diameter. Slightly larger watches may possibly fit but that would depend on the thickness of the watch. The diameter of the window aperture measures 42 mm and the actual opening for the watch is 70 mm wide. Overall the pouch is presented in very good condition, showing only signs of careful service wear - no adaptation or damage. There is no dryness and the stitching is intact throughout. The pouch comes with an antique pin-set cylinder watch dating to c.1900. It is in working order and looks the part with an attractive case, but the glass is slightly frosted. A rare item.
Omega - WW2 British Army Issue Stopwatch Generally speaking, WW2 military stopwatches belonging to the War Department, are not uncommon timepieces. Certainly by the 1940's Lemania and Smiths were supplying the bulk of these timers and in accordance to military spec, the bulk of them were without any brand names. Just some of the Swiss made Lemanias may be found with the company name to the dial - This stop watch is however a little different. Better known for their supply of pilots' wristwatches, this genuine WW2 issue stopwatch was supplied by Omega. It is the only one of its kind that has been found by ZMW Militaria in over 30 years of collecting. According to Omega watch serial number databases, this watch was made in 1943. Furthermore, the dial, case and movement are all marked up with the brand trademark. All in all this is a rare contract stopwatch by Omega, fully marked and bearing the 1/5 Sec. Trade Pattern (TP) mark. This meant that his watch was capable of accurately timing an event down to one fifth of a second. Overall the watch is still running well and functioning correctly, even down to retaining most of its original finish throughout. However, as with other vintage watches offered on this site, there is no information available as to when it was last serviced.
Ordnance Contract Beaumont Adams Military 54 Bore Revolver A genuine Ordnance contract Beaumont Adams 54 bore percussion revolver, made and signed by the London Armoury Company. Only around 5000 of these revolvers were made by the LAC between 1855 - 1863, with the majority being later converted to take the .442 centre fire cartridge. So to find one that has not been adapted or refurbished and retains all matching serial numbers, is rare. Although the finish is worn, it has left a pleasant russet and grey patina, whilst mechanically this revolver is in a very good state of preservation, with no obvious pitting - the lock up is very good and tight. Both single and double actions work perfectly, with strong springs and spot on indexing throughout. Even the bore, nipples and chambers show little sign of use. The undamaged original grips are of the correct standard specification, featuring the lanyard hole to the centre of the woodwork, plus the inspector's acceptance stamp of a Crown over 22, is all still visible to the left top. Inscriptions and stamps are all visible, although with some overall service wear to the engraving. A desirable and rare British Army issue percussion revolver.
Original **Arsenal New** Civil War .50 Maynard's US Army Carbine, c.1864 An amazing, unused and undamaged example of a .50" Maynard Breech Capping Carbine, made in 1864, that is still in original arsenal new condition - As sharp as can be. When the Small Arms Board assessed the suitability of Maynard's Patent carbines, they were impressed with the simplicity of the capping breech system, finding them to be dependable and suitable for military issue. Consequently, an order for 20,000 Maynard's was placed with the manufacturer, the Massachusetts Arms Company, on the 8th June 1863. The board also suggested that the manufacturer should make certain design improvements, which resulted in the production of a second version, which utilised a metallic cap instead of paper priming tape. With the delivery of the carbines, each had to be approved by two government inspectors who added their cartouche to the stock. Later during the war, for expedience, the inspection was conducted by only one official. This means that this Maynard, with its double cartouche, must have been an earlier issue carbine. All in all, this MAC Maynard Carbine is in stunning original, 'Arsenal New' condition. As such, the action is faultless with a firm hinge and tight lock up. The barrel is likewise pristine with a rifled mirror bore, which appears to be unfired, making this carbine a museum grade piece - All totally sharp with no pitting or damage to note. In the field, the Maynard carbine fired via what was called a "Capping Breech" system. Basically this meant that the soldier would need to use an empty brass cartridge case (as supplied with the carbine), to act as a powder scoop. A bullet would then be placed on top to seal the cartridge. The round could then be loaded into the breech, but as it was, it was not fully self contained and lacked any internal means of ignition. Instead however, the cartridge utilised a tiny pin hole in the base of the case, which, once the barrel was shut, presented the rear of the cartridge up against the percussion nipple situated at the breech. Now on firing, with the nipple primed by a regular percussion cap, the resulting cap ignition sent a spark down through the pin hole, which in turn ignited the main charge of gun powder, sending the bullet on its way. A very simple idea, although it was soon superseded by the fully self contained metallic cartridge. Overall a stunning martially marked carbine, which might be impossible to improve upon.
Original Ebony & Brass Revolver Cleaning Rod, c.1855 An excellent ebony and brass cleaning rod to fit a 54 bore revolver, c.1855. The rod has a bun handle suitable for gripping or pushing, with a worm and jag end. All metal to metal parts fit perfectly, and the rod has no damage or wear. Overall length = 8½ inches
Original IWC Schaffhausen Metal & Resin Advertising Display This is original display art, designed and used as advertising by the International Watch Company, of Schaffhausen, Switzerland. The sign itself is quite heavy, as it is made of both aluminium and solid composite material, depicting a watch's movement, which would make a very attractive wall hanging - framed or not. Fully marked "IWC Probes, Scafusia" to the front, as well as having the company details to the rear of the sign, this sign has a raised 3 dimensional presence, showing the metal cogs in both a brushed grey and silvered finish, mounted onto the white background. The modern sign is supplied in two parts, with the largest board measuring, 68 x 47 cm, whilst the smaller one is, 66 x 21 cm approximately. The smaller one has the words, "Made in Switzerland" on one of the components. Both are made to be displayed in close proximity and can be framed as one, or alongside each other with no frame. As is, these represent a versatile and attractive item of watchmaking memorabilia, from one of the foremost watch houses, with a pedigree of fine pilot's watches. Both parts are ex display and so have minor dirt, dust and scuff marks, but much of this could be cleaned.
Original Webley Senior Box A very good and original factory box for a pre war slant gripped Webley Senior. Marked on the label as being for \"The New\" pistol. Presented in generally clean condition with no repairs, tape or glue evident - just some minor age and storage wear showing.
Original WW1 Royal Flying Corps Cap Badge This is an original WW1 RFC cap badge, made of brass and having the split pin retainer to the rear. It shows a little wear, but is otherwise in generally very good condition throughout, with age patina to metal work.
Other Ranks Pocket Watch A post WW1 era \"Railway Timekeeper\" pocket watch made by Plangg & Pfluger in Austria. These so called, \"Dollar\" watches were variously used by persons of more modest means, as they were reliable timekeepers that would keep on going in environments that were perhaps more destructive to finer precision timepieces. As such, many were carried by soldiers and even the South African Railway purchased them for their staff. This example is in working order and while there is no intention to give the watch a full service, all accessible pivot points will be cleaned and lubricated, prior to sale. An inexpensive vintage watch of railway and military interest.
Ottoman Empire Fighting Man's Kabur Flintlock, c.1800 A very good Ottoman Empire kabur (holster) flintlock, bearing Perso-Arabic armourer's stamps and barrel name. Dating to c.1800, this pistol was well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration all over, as well as including a fine silver butt pommel, together with other silver mounts. Extra silver ornamentation, with punched and embossed details has been added to the pistol during its working life. Done in this manner the decoration served to promote the owner's status, as well as to strengthen the furniture. As is, silver was also used as currency throughout the Empire, thereby denoting wealth. This fighting man's pistol is in working order and overall sleepy condition, with dark iron and tarnished silver being evident. The lock is etched with traditional patterning and is in full working order. Woodwork is very good and the Kabur pistol is typical of its type without a ramrod. Good examples of Ottoman Empire pistols are sought after and this one is certainly in collectable condition, easily improved with light cleaning if desired. Barrel length = 12½ inches Overall length = 19½ inches
Ottoman Empire Fighting Man's Kabur Flintlock, c.1800 A good Ottoman Empire kabur (holster) flintlock, dating to c.1800. this pistol is well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration, carved wood and fine silver wire inlayed into the butt, depicting a Shamshir sword, swirl patterns and other artefacts. A large metal emblem can also be found on the butt, which leads down to a brass long eared pommel - one ear having been repaired during its working life. Presented in full working order, this pistol is in overall sleepy condition, with no losses or wood repairs, although silver wire has be wound around the barrel to strengthen the muzzle. Generally the pistol is in good condition with no serious loss or major repair. Basically a sleepy example with dark age patina and traditional faux ramrod. Good examples of Ottoman Empire pistols are sought after and this one is certainly in collectable condition, easily improved with light cleaning if desired. Barrel length = 11 inches Overall length = 19 inches
Ottoman Empire Fighting Man's Kabur Flintlock, c.1800 2019 New Year Special A good Ottoman Empire kabur (holster) flintlock, dating to c.1800. this pistol is well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration, carved wood and fine silver wire inlayed into the butt, depicting a Shamshir sword, swirl patterns and other artefacts. A large metal emblem can also be found on the butt, which leads down to a brass long eared pommel - one ear having been repaired during its working life. Presented in full working order, this pistol is in overall sleepy condition, having silver wire wound around the barrel towards the muzzle. Generally the pistol is in good condition with no serious loss or major repair. Basically a sleepy example with dark age patina and traditional faux ramrod. Good examples of Ottoman Empire pistols are sought after and this one is certainly in collectable condition, easily improved with light cleaning if desired. Barrel length = 11 inches Overall length = 19 inches
Ottoman Empire Fighting Man's Kabur Flintlock, c.1800 A good Ottoman Empire kabur (holster) flintlock, dating to c.1800. this pistol is well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration, carved wood and fine silver wire inlayed into the butt, depicting a Shamshir sword, swirl patterns and other artefacts. A large metal emblem can also be found on the butt, which leads down to a brass long eared pommel - one ear having been repaired during its working life. Presented in full working order, this pistol is in overall sleepy condition, having silver wire wound around the barrel towards the muzzle. Generally the pistol is in good condition with no serious loss or major repair. Basically a sleepy example with dark age patina and traditional faux ramrod. Good examples of Ottoman Empire pistols are sought after and this one is certainly in collectable condition, easily improved with light cleaning if desired. Barrel length = 11 inches Overall length = 19 inches
Ottoman Empire Fighting Man's Kabur Flintlock, c.1800 Consignment sale: A good Ottoman Empire kabur flintlock, dating to c.1800. This pistol is well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration, carved wood and some fine silver wire inlay around the butt, together with a large metal emblem leading to a long-eared pommel. Although functioning with a good strong mainspring, the cock does not hold at half or full-cock, yet the sear can be felt trying to engage. This would be an easy fix. Overall in sleepy condition, with the ironwork exhibiting faded geometric etched decoration throughout and some gold accents to the barrel. In summary, this flintlock is in untouched condition with no serious loss or repair. An untouched example with dark age patina and traditional faux ramrod. Barrel length = 11 inches Overall length = 17 inches
Ottoman Empire Kabur Flintlock Pistol, c.1800 Consignment sale: A good Ottoman Empire kabur flintlock, dating to c.1800. This pistol is well made with traditional Zulfikar decoration, carved wood and etched ironwork. Plus, a superb long-eared butt pommel and attractive cast decoration. Fully functioning, the lock retains a strong mainspring and the cock holds at both half and full-cock. Overall a sleepy pistol with the ironwork exhibiting faded geometric etched decoration, in generally untouched condition, plus a good dark age patina and traditional faux ramrod. Barrel length = 11 inches Overall length = 17 inches
Outstanding 1856 Pattern .577 Rifled Lancer's Pistol An outstanding and totally original .577 Percussion 1856 Pattern Rifled Lancer's Pistol, in what can only be described as, 'Arsenal New Condition.' Retaining all its original finish, the long sighted barrel is fully marked with bold stamps both on top, as well as in concealed areas. There it is additionally marked with more inspection stamps, plus the gunmaker's name of "J. Bourne" and "W.G." initials, together with the bore measurement of, "25." Internally the rifling is pristine, showing no evidence of use at all and the hinged leaf sights are each graduated, "100," "200" or "300" yards. The Tower marked lock is original and in full working order, bearing Crown property markings and more inspection stamps throughout. Overall an exceptional Lancer's pistol in untouched condition. Probably impossible to improve upon. Barrel length = 10 inches Overall length = 16 inches
Overcoat Flintlock Pistol by H. Nock, c.1810 A gentleman's 28 bore flintlock overcoat pistol by Henry Nock, c.1800. Presented in crisp condition, this small-sized, large calibre, genuine Nock pistol has the quality refinements associated with this prestigious gunmaker. It is in full working order with a strong action and lovely figured walnut furniture, showing some overall staining and wear commensurate with use and age - will grade up with careful cleaning. Top barrel flat marked, "London". Overall length = 7¾ inches Barrel length = 3¾ inches
Overcoat Pistol By Conway - Manchester, c.1830 Conway was a supplier of police pistols, with there being several surviving examples known bearing 'Cheshire Constabulary' provenance (see elsewhere on this website). Of those known police pistols, all were found to bear Police Divisional details within the silver escutcheon fitted in the butt - so it is interesting to note that this 16 bore has had lead put over its escutcheon to hide what was formally there. Who knows what secret has been buried under the lead that cleaning will reveal. For my part I have not touched the escutcheon and will leave that to the new owner to carefully reveal its secret. Notwithstanding the possible heritage of this Conway, it was clearly once a quality flintlock pistol that has since undergone an early bolster conversion to percussion: With some minor damage where the rammer enters the stock, this pistol would now benefit from light refurbishing. Nevertheless the action is good with a strong spring and a hammer that holds correctly at both bents. Overall an interesting man stopper pistol with much potential.
Oversized Czech Air Force Pattern Eterna Wristwatch, c.1950 Aviators have always preferred larger than average watches such as this example made by Eterna, which measures 38mm across, or 40mm if you include the winding crown. It is a superior example of a watch first made for the Czechoslovakian Airforce by Longines and later supplied by both Eterna and Lemania. Both mechanically and cosmetically this unrestored Eterna watch is offered in good vintage condition. It is in working order and is keeping time although it has not been serviced. The watch is also being offered complete with a good quality, used, vintage style leather band. This watch although subject to ZMW's usual Terms & Conditions of business, is being sold on behalf of a fellow collector. As such, the usual Premium Service which is offered at our concessionary prices, is not available for this item. However, if servicing and a 12 month warranty are required, this can be arranged at ZMW's normal Premium Service rate.
P. Webley & Sons .442 British Bulldog Revolver, c.1885 An excellent example of the classic Webley "British Bulldog" pocket revolver, chambered for the obsolete .442 CF (aka .44 Webley) cartridge. Made around 1885, this revolver has retained much of its original nickel finish, as well as being crisply marked, "Webley & Son, London & Birmingham," along the ramped barrel flat. Proofed in Birmingham, this Webley Bulldog still has a perfect working action with strong springs, all functioning without fault. Resulting in solid lock up, the well fitting parts have no play, which together with its good bore, indicate that this revolver has seen little sign of use - Showing just a hint of 'thumb' wear to the nickel finish on the left of the frame, indicating some trace of former service carry. Otherwise, the checkered grips are unspoilt. Altogether, a very sharp and iconic Webley for the connoisseur collector. Barrel length = 2½ inches Overall length = 6½ inches
P1888 Lee Metford Enfield Bayonet, c.1899 A scarce and untouched P1888 bayonet, typically used with the Lee Metford and Long Lee Enfield rifles. Having lain undisturbed for decades in a garden shed, this bayonet is in sleepy condition but showing signs of surface rust, which fortunately can be improved with some effort. Remarkably though, the leather scabbard is in terrific and undamaged condition, totally crack and dent-free with solid stitching. Only the steel parts have a coating of surface rust. Overall the blade has remained unsharpened with much evidence of original factory polish and clear inspection marks, "EFD" Enfield stamps, Crown VR, dates, "1899" and "01", as well as the "X" bend test stamp. Woodwork is solid but dirty and the catch is still operational. A great example that can be much improved with careful cleaning. A bayonet with much potential.
P1888 Long Lee Enfield Volunteer Regiment Bayonet, c.1890 A rare and untouched Volunteer Regiment P1888 bayonet, typically used with the Lee Metford and Long Lee Enfield rifles, among others. Interestingly, it has never had any military stamps applied, other than the "Wilkinson" name and the bend test "X" mark. The absence of other military marks indicates that this P1888 was a rare private purchase from Wilkinson - Just a few examples are known. Overall a superb blade that has retained its original factory polish, presented together with a correct Boer War frog, but with its retaining strap broken. A collector grade bayonet.
Pair Of ERII Court Swords By Wilkinson BLOW-OUT PRICE: A pair of identical Wilkinson Court Swords, post-1953, with blades bearing Royal Cypher for ERII. The gilt grip, shell-type guard and pommel are cast metal, showing some wear and loss to the finish, and the blades are etched with some light staining evident, and yellowing lacquer. Overall a good pair of swords that can be improved with careful cleaning.
Pair Of Massive Man-Stopper Pistols By W. Parker Selling on consignment: A formidable pair of 12 bore man-stopper travelling pistols by William Parker, which would have been devastating at close range. Presented in good condition, the pistols are in full working order showing signs of careful use. Fully signed on the locks, both pistols are nicely decorated and the browned twist barrels are marked along the flats, "Gunmaker To His Majesty." Fixed sights, captive ramrods and an overall stocky appearance, make these a purposeful and no nonsense pair. Quality pistols showing minor signs of handling and gentle wear to the ironwork. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9½ inches
Pair of Parker, Field & Sons Belt Pistols, c.1845 An attractive and matched pair of gentlemen's belt pistols, made by Parker, Field and Sons, c.1845. Both pistols have identical serial numbers and are presented cased in a refitted wooden box, complete with period accoutrements and facsimile W. Parker gunmaker's label. Bullet mould stamped "W.C. Waltham." Retaining much original finish, the pistols are in full working order, with the actions functioning well against strong springs, all benefitting from having well fitting and finely chequered walnut bag grips - Just some age and use related bruises and abrasions to the otherwise sharp profiles. Overall, a good pair of pistols by a gunmaker who was known to be a prolific supplier of arms to the constabularies. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 8¼ inches
Pair Of Pocket Flintlocks By Hesketh, c.1810 An attractive and early 19th Century pair of gentleman's pocket flintlock pistols, c.1810. Presented in good order, these pistols are distinguished by the presence of a gold ring band around the muzzles. A stand-of-arms decorates the box locks and both pistols are signed, "Hesketh." The actions are in working order, which feature drop down triggers and locking frizzens. Cosmetically the pistols are in good order, with nicely fitting butts up against the iron frames. With just the vestiges of any original finish remaining, the pistols exhibit an aged salt and pepper patina and just light surface wear with minor pitting. A decent pair of quality pistols. Barrel length = Overall length =
Pair W Parker Travelling Pistols A PAIR OF 40-BORE PERCUSSION TRAVELLING PISTOLS BY PARKER, 4.25inch sighted octagonal barrels engraved MAKER TO HIS MAJESTY LONDON, border and scroll engraved actions signed W.PARKER, full stocked with border and scroll engraved steel mounts, one brass capped wooden ramrod and one horn ramrod. (2)
Palestine Police Port & Marine Unit 8-Day Ship's Clock By Smiths This is a rare pre WW2 brass bodied ship's clock, made by the English clockmaker, Smiths. It was issued to the Palestine Police Port & Marine Unit, a division which was formed in July 1935. Later, during WW2, the PP Marine Unit was taken over by the Senior Naval Officer at Haifa and the boats' crews were bolstered by members of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve. To mark this switch from police to naval duty, the boats flew the RN's White Ensign. One of these boats was also transported to the Sea of Galilee, where it patrolled under Royal Navy colours. At the end of the war, the PP Port & Marine Unit received orders that allowed it to return once again to its former police patrol role, under its own autonomy. Police uniforms were once more to be worn and ties with the Royal Navy were relinquished. This change was felt by many as a sense of loss, as the PP had formed good relations with their RN friends. It is perhaps then why the Marine Unit (unofficially) adopted a Blue Ensign with a PP crest to be flown from their patrol boats' masts, as a mark of respect to their former partners. Part of the role of the PP Port & Marine Unit was to stop smuggling, terrorist insurgence and Jewish refugees from entering Palestine. At least one PP Marine Unit launch was destroyed in an explosion caused by a terrorist group. This Smiths Empire clock is from one of the PP Marine Unit launches, that were operating during the British Mandate up to 1948. The dial shows signs of some wear, but the inscription is genuine. The former owner stated that the clock belonged to an ex Palestine Police Officer, however details of the man were not divulged. Apparently though, through his surviving medals it had been established through the Palestine Police Old Comrades Association, that the man had served with the PP Marine Unit. Now the clock is being presented in working order, showing signs of cosmetic wear and patina to the brass. All hinges and glass are good and strong, but it should be remembered that the clock may not have been serviced. The Premium Service is advised. The clock comes with a key and older styled PPOCA leather and enamel fob. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Parker Field & Sons Constabulary Pistol, c.1850 A rare Constabulary percussion pistol made by Parker Field & Son, c.1850. Although this gunmaker was the appointed armourer for the Metropolitan Police, this style of pistol was issued throughout England by many of the New Police Forces. Given the smaller 38 Bore calibre and acanthus engraved lock, it is quite likely that this pistol was intended for the Duty Officer, who would have been a Police Inspector. Numbered to the base of the butt and being struck with a prominent rack number, "23," indicates that this pistol was part of a larger police order. As is, this is a very good and scarce example with signs of use and a working life repair to the ramrod channel. This has been executed professionally and is not immediately noticeable (see image). Offered in cosmetically untouched condition, with a strong working action and good bore. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 9.5 inches
Parker Hale 12B Snap Cap An interesting vintage 12 Bore snap cap by Birmingham maker Parker Hale, with a black synthetic body, marked, \"Made in England\". In working order and good used condition.
Parker Tranter 80 Bore c.1856 4th Model Parker, William [1790-1840] Shop in Holborn, London. He was the founder of a famous firm of gunmakers. Had the Royal Warrant. Made boxlock flintlock pocket pistols, flintlock holster pistols and brass barel blunderbusses. Under Royal Government contract made flintlock musketoons. In 1829 when Sir Robert Peel organized the London Police, William Parker made flintlock and later percussion pistols for the Police organization. These were marked on the lock plate, 'W. Parker Holborn' and on the barrel the Police Division to which they were issued. The name was changed to Parker, Field & Co 1840-1850 and located at 233 Holborn, London and again changed to Parker Field & Sons at the above address 1850 to 1886. They made flintlock trade guns for the Hudson's Bay Company. Also percussion boxlock pistols, cased naval officers pistols and double barrelled shotguns. Later made percussion pepperboxes and single action .45 calibre percussion revolvers, Adams Patent.
Parker, Field & Sons 233 Holborn - Police \"Beaufort\" Whistle Parker, Field & Sons were a prolific supplier of police hardware to many of the British Constabularies. Much of the equipment that they manufactured was in the form of truncheons, cutlasses, restraints, as well as whistles. Parker, Field were also the official gunmaker to the Metropolitan Police, but they did not become the contracted supplier of police calls for the capital\'s police. The reason for that was simple, as they were not themselves the whistle maker - Joseph Hudson of Birmingham however was. Now, when it came to the Metropolitan Police, the whistle became a personal issue article of equipment (known as an \"appointment\") for the rank and file, in 1884. However, this pattern of whistle, which is sometimes called a Beaufort, is a little earlier in manufacture. This means that this whistle was probably a private purchase item: The name in fact comes from the Duke of Beaufort, who popularised this style of the whistle. This Police whistle is in very good and damage free condition. Although it is a little rubbed, the conical body is free from dents and the supplier\'s name and address are still clear. The whistle is in proper working order and comes with a tunic chain. A super whistle for the collector of police accoutrements and calls.
Parkhurst Prison Guard's Hanger, c.1841 Made by Parker, Field & Sons c.1841, this warder's hanger originally came from the Parkhurst Prison on the Isle of Wight. When originally built in 1778, Parkhurst served as a military hospital and children's asylum, but in 1838 it had become a children's prison, infamously known for the transportation of many Parkhurst Boys, some of whom were just 12 years of age when they were taken to the far colonies of the New World. Known as "Apprentices," these children were not convicts and of those who remained at Parkhurst, some were put to work making bricks for the construction of new block wings. By 1863 Parkhurst had progressed to incarcerating adults, but its harsh treatment of the prisoners, often involving the routine use of leg irons, led to public and political criticism, most notably through Mary Carpenter. Although showing signs of service wear around the grip, the hanger is fully marked to "Parkhurst Prison" in large lettering along the 24½” curved blade. This etching is faded, but it is nevertheless still evident testimony to the turbulent times in which this prison hanger served. A rare item from a dark past.
Patriotic King Edward VII Trench Art Fob A Trench Art profile bust of King Edward VII made from a one penny copper coin, dated 1905. The profile bears part of the Britannia image and the fob is in generally good condition.
Patriotic Queen Victoria Golden Jubilee Spring-Clip, c.1887 A large and excellent "Bulldog" type spring-clip for holding papers together, possibly used by an army officer either on a clipboard or just as a means of keeping documents tidy, showing embossed images relating to Queen Victoria's Reign and her Golden Jubilee in 1887. Made of nickel-plated brass and retaining most of its original plating, the clip features an additional image of the sun rising over a mountain and spears? Possibly an African connection? Overall length = 4½ inches
Pattern 1860 Military Issue WD Rifle Oil Bottle This is a genuine and scarce British made zinc and brass oil bottle, made for the 1853 Enfield rifle, Snider-Enfield rifle and later for the Martini-Henry rifle. The earliest Martini-Henry rifle, would have been in service from 1871. The bottle is offered in excellent condition, complete with oil dibber. It is free of any dents and crisply stamped with the War Department and broad arrow mark. A superb example to enhance any quality Martini-Henry rifle of the period.
Pattern 1860 Military Issue WD Rifle Oil Bottle This is a genuine and scarce British made zinc and brass oil bottle, made for the 1853 Enfield rifle, Snider-Enfield rifle and later for the Martini-Henry rifle. The earliest Martini-Henry rifle, would have been in service from 1871. The bottle is offered in excellent condition, complete with oil dibber. It is free of any dents and crisply stamped with the War Department and broad arrow mark. A superb example to enhance any quality Martini-Henry rifle of the period.
Peabody Rifle Foresight Protector, c.1866 An original and rare foresight protector for the Peabody Rifle. This version features a locking ring to hold the protector in place, rather than being a simple push-on. With the sight protector in place, the rifle could still be fired. Presented in very good original condition, the part is numbered and stamped with an unknown mark.
Penarth Fire Brigade, Captain Morris' 1905 Presentation Silver Whistle Silver presentation whistles made by Hudsons are rare, as they were made and engraved to special order only. It is not known why Captain W. L. Morris' Brigade gave him a silver whistle in September 1905, but perhaps it was to mark his attaining of the rank? Only Captain Morris is recorded later that year, in November, threatening to resign from his post if the Penarth council did not stop wasting tax payer's money on bureaucracy, when his Brigade could better spend the money on new equipment. Additionally, Captain Morris is later noted as proposing to the council, that a telephone be installed at his house. He stated that it could be used in order to alert him immediately, of any emergency. He would then be able to give advice and, then travel direct to the scene without having to rendezvous at his station. Morris argued that his proposal would save valuable time. Clearly Captain Morris was a dedicated professional and with a little effort, more information can no doubt be found about the life and times of this man and, the Penarth Fire Brigade. This fine whistle is made entirely of solid silver, including the diaphragm, and not nickel or brass as other Hudson whistles are. It is in excellent condition and working order, probably used on occasion to signal directions to his firemen. Dent free, this is a superb historic item, worthy of further research. Please note: Hudsons made and retained small stocks of presentation grade whistles, made entirely from Sterling silver. These would bear the manufacturers marks of, [J.H.] [&] [Co.], with further Assay Office hallmarks added later, to coincide with the presentation date. In this instance the customer, being Captain Morris' colleagues on behest of the Brigade, no doubt asked Hudsons for a consideration on the purchase price of the whistle. Evidence suggests that Hudsons probably reduced the cost of the whistle, by waiving the fees of the omitted assay silver test.
Percussion Cap Tin
Percussion Duelling Pistol By Evell c.1840 This antique pistol is the property of a discerning collector, offered here with all the benefits of a business sale. A superb percussion duelling pistol by Evell of London, c.1840. The pistol has much original finish with case hardening colours to the lock; a crisp working action, sharp lines and woodwork with original varnish. A real gem.
Percussion Knife Pistol By J. Rodgers, c.1840 The Sheffield cutler James Rodgers, is probably best known for his pocket knife pistol combo, which were first offered in around 1839, with percussion ignition. Their catalogue of that year also advertised a range of other self-defence blades and the company described their wares as, "Life And Property Preservers," but this pistol blade is etched with the legend, "Self Protector." The maker also claimed that their pistol knives were effective out to a distance of 50 yards! This version of the James Rodgers knife pistol is both solid and very well-built. As a percussion pistol, the nickel barrel is smooth bored to take a diminutive ball and bears Birmingham proofs. Overall, this example is in very good original condition, showing minor handling wear and no significant damage. Even the horn grip scales are crack free, although they do have a small chip on the top edge of the right butt scale. Mechanically the pistol is in working order and the action has a very strong spring. The pistol also features a drop down trigger as well as a pair of tweezers that would be used to pick out spare caps from the discreet butt compartment. A miniature ball mould is also included as part of the pistol's tools, all stored within the grip scales. All marking is good and clear and both the knife blades are equally good and stamped with Rodger's details, as well as being acid etched with a still readable inscription and fancy rope design. Both blades have an original sharp edge, which has been well preserved - With nothing detrimental to note. All in all, an excellent example for the collector. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 6 inches
Percussion Musket / Shotgun Combination Tool, c.1850 A good combination tool, intended for a percussion musket or shotgun. This handy shooting companion incorporates the most basic of tools required in the field, including a "T" nipple wrench, spare nipples with covers, pricker and grease reservoir. All in all the tool is in nice aged condition with good cosmetic appearance.
Percussion Pistol Petrol Lighter, c.1965 A very good vintage petrol lighter in the form of an antique percussion pistol. The novelty lighter is of all-metal construction and has its fuel reservoir located down the barrel. Fuel can be topped up when necessary, by pouring lighter fluid down the muzzle. The pistol lighter is in full working order, operated by pulling the trigger to raise the cock, which ignites the wick - A fresh flint has been fitted. Overall the pistol retains much of its original finish and is quite collectible. Rare to find in working order. Overall length =
Percussion Unwin & Rodgers Combination Knife Pistol, c.1839 A pocket knife pistol combo, probably made by the Sheffield cutlers, Philip Unwin & James Rodgers, who were renowned for their innovative range of personal defence weapons. Made and proofed in Birmingham, these pistols were first offered by the company c.1839, described in their catalogue as, "Life And Property Preservers." They claimed that their knife pistols were effective out to a distance of 50 yards! Although not signed, this early percussion knife pistol is both robust and well-built and features a barrel of around 120 bore. On the whole, this example is in very good condition showing slight handling wear and excellent horn grips. The provision of a trap door compartment within the butt is a useful addition and would have been used to store spare cap 'n' ball. An original iron pincer is also retained within the right grip scale. Mechanically in working order, the action has a strong spring, while the drop-down trigger is manually deployed. Both knife blades are in good condition, but showing age-related staining and no sign of sharpening. Overall, a very good example for an Unwin & Rodgers collector. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 6 inches
Percy Tenantry Volunteers Powder Flask, c.1810 A Northumberland militia leather covered powder flask with the nozzle bearing the crest of the Percy Tenantry Artillery Volunteers, together with "F32" marking, 1805 - 1814. Presented in good overall condition, with some service and age related wear, this flask is in working order with both suspension loops. It also features two horn windows through which the contents of the flask could be viewed. A rare and original flask of historic interest.
Pewter Toy Cannon, c.1830 An interesting antique miniature cannon made of pewter, probably as a boy\'s toy. This cast cannon is slightly distorted with a misshaped muzzle, yet the bore is clear through to the vent. Apparently, this novelty item was found in the silt of the Thames\' mudbanks at Greenwich. Overall length = 1¾ inches
Pierce Waterproof Military Watch Case, c.1945 A genuine and rare military watch case made for the Pierce chronograph. These watches were first accepted into military service during WW2, to be used by all branches of the armed forces. Later during the war, or soon after, an upgraded two-button waterproof version came into service - Note the nomenclature showing the "T.P." or "Temporary Pattern" marking. Postwar, as better watches were again delivered to the military, this watch case was relegated to become part of the MOD's stock of spares, which were eventually sold off when the Chronometer Branch at Herstmonceux Castle closed in 1985. Whether the case was originally received as a viable working watch complete with a movement, or whether it was received by the MOD as just a case to be used in the upgrade of preexisting wartime Pierce movements, is not on record but given that the MOD were recasing other surplus watch movements at this time, the latter must be a strong possibility. Furthermore, when this case was sold off by the MOD it came in a lot bundled together with more of the same new old stock cases, including a quantity of older surplus and used, Pierce spares/repair movements. Presented in near mint condition, the case offered exhibits only light storage marks and it represents an interesting find for the advanced collector researching the development of British military timepieces. All 100% original and complete with waterproof pushers, lead tonneau gasket, screws, glass and crown.
Plymouth City Police Leather Notebook Wallet & Pencil A scarce "Plymouth City Police" issue notebook wallet, used probably in the 1950s, or possibly earlier. Marked on the front cover with the city's armourial crest, the wallet is in excellent condition, with some minor and faint inscriptions done in service, no doubt by the constable on duty. The leather wallet retains a rare police "Station Office" and Crown marked indelible pencil, which would have been used in all weathers to record the constable's original notes. A lovely item in good original condition, with supple leather.
Pocket Compass & Barometer, c.1900 Made in Paris for the British market, this combination compass and barometer is in the form of a pocket watch, where both devices are hinged, back to back. On the one side is a black dialled compass with the needle being jewelled at the centre, which is in working order, whilst on the other is a silvered barometer. Sandwiched in between the two, there is a mirrored surface which may have been utilised as a heliograph. Presented in good condition throughout, this nickel plated pocket instrument appears to be in working order, with just minor wear to the finish.
Pocket Percussion Pistol By Parker, Field & Sons, c.1845 A gentleman's large bore percussion pistol by Parker, Field & Sons. Made c.1845, this pistol is of plain construction without adornment, apart from a vacant escutcheon to the bag shaped grip. Possibly indicting that this may have been made for service use - quite unlike Parker's usual elaborate commercial grade guns. Typically the pistol is engraved with the maker's details on the barrel, which turns off and is of approximately of 45 bore. The box lock action is mechanically in good working order, with strong springs and bearing London proofs. Showing signs of extended pocket carry, this pistol has surface wear to its finish, including scrapes and scuffs to the grips, but no cracks or loss of wood. Overall a good pocket pistol by a celebrated maker, known as a contractor to the government and supplier of police equipment. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.5 inches
Pocket Percussion Pistol, c.1835 A tidy Birmingham proofed percussion pistol made c.1835. This pistol is in untouched condition and appears generally crisp with age patina and some scattered pitting. The boxlock action is working well, retaining robust springs, a hammer that holds firm in both positions and a good nipple.
Police Belt Buckle For Lothian & Borders Constabulary A fine Lothian & Borders Constabulary police belt buckle, made by Hobson & Son of London. These well manufactured chromed belt buckles fit the regular police utility belt, which would carry the cuffs, CS spray and stick.
Police Issue Colt .320 New Pocket Revolver c.1899 Colt's records state that, in 1899 this .320 "New Pocket" revolver was shipped to their agency in England, together with 27 other guns. Although details of Colt's end client are not available, it is known that this snubby revolver was proofed in London, before being marked with a Constabulary inventory number on the frame. Presently the identification of the Constabulary and armoury reference T4651, have not yet been fully researched, but it is interesting to note that this police issue revolver is much smaller than the standard large calibre, .450 Webley Bulldog types more commonly encountered on Division. However, references to .32 Colts being used by the Special Branch, in particular to those detectives assigned to close protection work, are known to have occurred - although, those pistols are believed to have been, Colt Model 1903 self-loaders. As far as police pistols go, this small New Pocket Colt revolver is in very fine condition and possibly unfired. It retains most of its original blue finish, with perfect action, bore and chambers. All in all, an excellent example for the collector. This revolver is chambered to take the obsolete .320 British cartridge, and may be owned as a curio or ornament, without a certificate. Offered complete with its Colt's Historic Archive document. Barrel length = 2.5 inches Overall length = 6.75 inches
Police Issue W. Parker Coat Pocket Pistol, c.1830 Most collectors will already know that William Parker was a prolific supplier of police arms to the constabularies, yet despite the numbers that must have been produced, these pistols are rare to find. Most probably this is largely down to the fact that police pistols were rarely, officially marked. Unlike the pistols owned by the military, constabularies did not have any universally recognisable emblem that meant, "Police Property." After all, although they were a crown servant, they were not a government run agency. Consequently, finding a William Parker police pattern pistol, complete with an issue number, is an exciting find for collectors of law enforcement memorabilia. In this instance this percussion pistol is numbered "64," which suggests that it was once part of a larger police armoury, c.1830. Of course the London Metropolitan Police were established in 1829, but there is no way of knowing for certain just where his pistol actually served. Presented in full working order this pistol is of the exact same pattern, including the distinct hammer, as another W. Parker police pistol sold by auctioneers, Thomas Del Mar, in 2006. Only in that instance the pistol was numbered, "88." Nevertheless, this pistol is a good example of its type, with the usual minor knocks and damage associated with a service weapon from the formative years of the New Police. Retaining much original finish, this pistol comes complete with its correct ramrod. Overall, a compact police pistol that is difficult to source. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 7½ inches
Police Pistol By Parker Field & Sons, c.1845 A rare Constabulary Pattern tunic coat pistol by Parker Field & Sons, c.1845 (See "Police Firearms Officers' Association" website for an identical pistol). It is documented in the police archives that as late as 1856, the Metropolitan Police purchased pistols of this design with swivelling rammers, at a cost of £2 6 shillings apiece, for issue to their Inspectors. Serially numbered and with an impressed rack number on the furniture, this is an overall very good example of its type, although it has a working life repair at the front - This has been very well executed in antiquity. Offered with a strong working action, crisp marking, original barrel colours and good bore. Barrel length = Overall length =
Police Pistol By Parker, Field & Sons, c.1845 A rare Constabulary Pattern tunic coat pistol by Parker, Field & Sons, c.1845 (See "Police Firearms Officers' Association" website for an identical pistol). It is documented in the police archives that as late as 1856, the Metropolitan Police purchased pistols of this design with swivelling rammers, at a cost of £2 6 shillings apiece, for issue to their Inspectors. Serially numbered and with an impressed rack number on the furniture, this is an overall very good example of its type, although it has a working life repair at the front - This has been very well executed in antiquity. Offered with a strong working action, crisp marking, original barrel colours and good bore. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Polish Army Issue PZO 8x30 Binoculars A superb pair of Polish Army binoculars bearing military issue number and \"1970\" date, as well as the \"131\" code identifying the maker as PZO Polskie Zaklady Optyczne (Polish Optical Industries). PZO optics ranks as a manufacturer of superior lenses. Presented in excellent and clean condition, these binoculars have a slight chip on the inside of one of the eye cups, which is not apparent nor does it interfere with comfortable viewing. Along with other PZO lenses of the time, the optics have a slight amber hue due to the light-enhancing coatings used. Additionally, a measuring reticle is present which is used to calculate the distance to and target size. Offered complete with their correct leather neck strap and rain cover.
Polish Citizens\' Militia - MO Police Whistle c.1947 In 1944 a Soviet-sponsored Polish Committee of National Liberation effectively replaced all pre-war authorities. As such, the police no longer existed but in their place, the Committee authorised the Milicja Obywatelska or, Citizens' Militia, to act in the capacity as the government's law enforcement agency. With their training establishment in Legionowo, Poland, the early MO became feared through their use of strong-arm tactics to impose order. Seen by many to be a tough paramilitary force, the MO was not replaced until the 6 April 1990, when it was transformed back into Policja. Offered here is one of the Militia's rare dual chambered whistles. Made of substantial cast and riveted aluminium, these whistles blow extremely loud with a piercing tone. It is all fully marked and in excellent order throughout.
Polish Commemorative Medal - Operation Market Garden Made by the Polish National Mint in 1993, this large bronze medal pays homage to the 1st [Polish] Independent Parachute Brigade and their commanding officer, Major General Stanisław Sosabowski. It is in perfect condition, measuring approximately 70mm in diameter and is marked in Polish, "Battle For Arnhem." Originally established in Scotland in September 1941, the Brigade's purpose was to be dropped into occupied Poland in order to help liberate their country. However, due to other pressing agendas the Poles were required to assist in Operation Market Garden and assist their allies advance. Some were initially landed by glider on 18 September 1943, but due to bad weather, the remainder of the Brigade parachuted in on the 21 September. They suffered significant casualties during the next few days of fighting, but their contribution in engaging enemy forces was significant. A lovely and scarce medal, presented in perfect condition.
Polish Kalashnikov AK-47 Bayonet New Old Stock: This is a Polish Army issue bayonet for the Kalashnikov AK-47. It appears to be unused and in fine condition with only minor age and storage related wear. The black rubber sliding grip is in perfect condition, without any sign of perishing. A collector grade example.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items. Thank you for your cooperation.
POLITE NOTICE - PROOF OF IDENTITY - POLITE NOTICE Would all collectors please note that if you are not personally known to ZMW Militaria, you may be asked for proof of identity before purchasing or making an appointment to view any Age Restricted, or certain other items.
Post War Military Leather Tool Bag A heavy-duty leather tool bag with copper rivets and a reinforced steel box section. Fully marked with "WD" War Department arrow and 1954 dated. Some scuffs and signs of service wear but generally very good.
Post WW1 Blind Soldier's Pocket Watch By Cyma After WW1 when the soldiers returned home, many had been left blinded by the effects of mustard gas. For those men that could afford the luxury of a pocket watch, several watch companies offered special Braille timepieces. These watches have no glass and rely instead on a hinged opening cover to protect he dial. On opening, the user could then run their fingers over the dial to feel the robust hands, without the worry of bending them, as well as the bumps that had replaced the numerals. This example has a quality silver case and fine movement signed, Tavannes - which is also known as Cyma. This is in very good condition and working order, with only the case showing some bruising from handling. As is, it is in better condition than most. Most probably this watch would have belonged to an officer or other well heeled gent. An interesting military orientated timepiece that is difficult to find. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Post WW2 British Officers Military Longines A military pattern Longines made in 1951 and retailed by the West End Watch Co., the watch features fixed lugs indicating that it is one of the company\'s army spec timepieces and very likely saw service in the Middle East - Suez, Aden, etc. This military watch is in original condition, but the crystal is a working-life replacement. It is running well however it will be freshly serviced, but the age old patina will remain. Historical Note: Following India\'s Independence the British Army withdrew from the country and the West End Watch Company lost their most prolific customer. Having previously supplied the British Army with over 50,000 watches (as reported on the watch company\'s website), the West End Watch Co were keen to regain business and so they expanded their trade into Asia and the Middle East, offering these military spec watches to British Army soldiers serving in those areas. Meanwhile, being a Bombay based company, the West End Watch Co also provided other budget watches to the newly established Indian Army, under the brand name Sowar.
Postwar Military Longines, c.1946 An excellent and original steel case Longines watch that takes its design from the pilots watches issued during WW2. Utilising the same hi-grade 12.68N movement, which according to Longines archives shows that it was made in 1946, this watch has no issue markings. As a bonus, it has been serviced and is running very well, keeping time. Interestingly, Longines had by now improved their 12.68 calibre to feature a shock protected balance. All in all, this is a collector grade watch with little sign of use. The watch measures 33mm, excluding the crown. Sold in working order, serviced and regulated. Pictures of the movement were taken prior to servicing.
Postwar Queen\'s Crown Regimental Helmet Plate A scarce white-metal helmet baseplate, forming the universal generic backing on to which a regiment\'s badge would be mounted. This postwar example has never been used and is presented in mint condition, with 3 cast white-metal lugs to the rear.
Pre 1908 Hudson \"The Metropolitan\" Whistle A pre-1908 Hudson police or military type whistle, in crisp and untouched condition with a superb age patina. Works very well.
Pre War .177" Webley Senior Air Pistol, c.1936 In 1935 Webley updated their iconic range of air weapons with the introduction of a slant gripped "Senior" pistol. This pistol was the top of the range until war broke out, at which point production of sporting guns was halted to allow Webley to concentrate on military arms manufacture. This early example, which dates to around 1936, is presented in good condition and strong working order. Retaining strong traces of original blue finish, the rest of the pistol has a wonderful dark age patina and best of all, shows no evidence of abuse. Perfect grips, clear body stamps showing 1925 patent dates, good screw heads and a crisp clean bore, all in all, make this air pistol one for the shooter or collector.
Pre War Naval Saluting Cannon A good pre-WW2 cannon barrel mounted on a nicely constructed teak truck, made in the 1960s to replace one that was damaged, apparently during an air raid. The .50\" calibre barrel is bored through to the vent. Being approximately 7½ inches in length, the turned steel barrel has some nice features, including barrel bands and cascabel, plus sturdy trunnions. All in all, a nice model.
Pre War \"Battle of Britain\" Longines Pilot\'s Watch A very good, Longines pilot's wristwatch of pre-war pattern, supplied to the Air Ministry by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company. According to Longines records, these watches were produced in 1939, making this among the first military wristwatches to reach the Royal Air Force, perhaps even before the Battle of Britain. Purchased from Longines by their London agents, this particular batch of 6B watches differed from later wartime variants. Most noticeably, these utilised "all-steel" cases that housed a decorated commercial-spec 12.68 movement, as well as featuring hand styles and oversized crowns of the type that appear in 1930s Longines' catalogues. As such, this watch is correct, having retained the proper factory, "leaf", blue hands and early big crown. Both these features were later redesigned for the subsequent versions of the Longines' RAF watch. Overall, the watch's steel case shows just minor signs of service wear and has not been polished or restored. The "AM" marking, flying equipment codes, supplier's details and date, whilst a little rubbed, remain clear and legible, as is the wartime dial - Probably refurbished by G&S Co. during their routine servicing of the timepiece. Presented in full working order, this Longines is still keeping excellent time, making it an admirable addition to any collection of historic timepieces, or to wear. Sold complete with a vintage wartime pattern leather strap. A very difficult to find "Battle of Britain" Longines of 1939 spec.
Pre WW1 8-Day Dashboard Clock-Watch A vintage instrument clock-watch complete with its original brass housing, which would have been mounted on the instrument panel of the automobile or even, an aeroplane. While many clock watches used a basic zero or low jewel movement to them more resistant to damage from knocks, at the expense of accuracy, this substantial timepiece was constructed using a high-quality fully jewelled Swiss movement. it runs well and keeps good time and the dial and crystal are undamaged. The robust brass mount retains its original padded lining, all in collector-grade condition and working order.
Pre WW1 Army Bugle A very good copper and brass army bugle made in London by Henry Potter & Co. and dated to 1909. Military bugles often led a hard life and few remain in such sound condition. Exhibiting only minor service dents, the trumpet end of the bugle is undamaged, with overall great age related patina. Completely original, this bugle is capable of delivering a good range of sound and comes with its issue mouthpiece, also signed to Potter. All in all, a lovely example of a British Army bugle, together with the issue tassels.
Pre WW1 Ship Captain\'s Log Watch By Zenith A rare pre-WW1 Ship Captain\'s \"Log Watch\" made by Zenith and retailed by the maritime engineering company of James Weir, Glasgow. This silver hallmarked watch was originally sold as a \"waterproof\" timepiece, given that it comes in an early 1900s silver case intended for marine use. This design was the best, whereby the watch movement was given greater protection from the elements thanks to a close-fitting bezel that would need to be unscrewed first should a watchmaker require access. As a \"Log Watch\", its role was to be carried by the Captain who would refer to its timekeeping when noting critical events - it therefore needed to be very accurate. Overall the case and watch show light signs of service wear but it remains in excellent condition throughout with a perfect dial bearing the company name and legend, \"Log Watch\". The watch is currently awaiting a service, which will make it suitable for regular use. Our service work is suitable for historic timepieces as it maintains the watch\'s integrity and originality, which removes dirt and lubricates the movement before regulating it for best performance. Any pleasing age patina is maintained whenever possible.
Pre WW1 Short & Mason Magnapole Compass Originally designed by Major Gilbert Legh in 1896, "The Magnapole" is the trade name used by Short & Mason to market a range of marching compasses. Made for professional use, Magnapole compasses were constructed in sturdy blackened brass cases, making them suitable for army officers to acquire, among other private equipment purchases. Over the years different versions were produced as improvements were introduced, although this one incorporates early features such as a rotatable luminous direction-of-travel arrow within the lid that operates in conjunction with the magnetic needle. Another indicator denoting early manufacture is the stamped legend, "Patent Applied For". Overall, this is a fine example of The Magnapole, which is in full working order just showing some age wear to the black lacquer. The actual dry card itself, upon which you find the compass points, is in clean condition, with the compass protected in its original leather pouch.
Pre WW2 Air Ministry 'Time Of Trip' Aircraft Clock This desirable 'Time of Trip' clock was made for the Royal Air Force in 1937 and could have been fitted to a range of aircraft in service at the time. These clocks remained in service throughout WW2, although their high price and complicated movements forced the Air Ministry to source alternative clocks for the war effort. Fully stamped on the back with the King's Crown and A.M. mark, this clock was designated as the 'Mark III A' and further engraved on the dial with various stores reference numbers and the embossed supplier's details are given as, 'Smiths & Son (MA) Ltd.,' yet despite this name, the clock itself was made by Jaeger LeCoultre, a top end Swiss manufacturer. As such, the clock is of the finest quality with some additional complications. These come in the form of a dual 'time dial' feature, which records the elapsing hours, minutes and seconds during a flight. To work the chronograph three separate controls exist which are set at the commencement of a flight. All in all, this 'Time of Trip' clock is totally original, retaining most of the painted finish, with minor scuffs and usage marks. Interestingly there are also some 1939 dated Maintenance Unit Repair markings, which can be seen on the dial - with a little research it might be possible to identify where this MU was situated. The clock is of course fully operational and keeping excellent time however, as with any 75 year old timepiece it may require servicing at some point. Furthermore, in its past the clock was fitted beautifully into a mahogany Napoleon's hat case. This has not affected the clock and has served to preserve the rear brackets, which are the ones that secured the clock originally to its instrument panel. The case makes the clock easy to display but if desired, it can also be easily removed.
Pre WW2 Air Ministry Adjustable Spanner c.1931 A very good adjustable pocket spanner bearing the King's Crown Air Ministry stamp and 1931 date. It is a versatile and useful tool to collect or use. As this is an early spanner from the Abingdon firm, the owner of the business stamped his products with portrait images of his show-winning bulldog, "King Dick" which lent its name to the company. Offered in working order with good jaws.
Pre WW2 Coal Miner's 25 Years Long Service Award - Presentation Pocket Watch Throughout the world, mining must rank as one of the most hazardous occupations that a person can be employed in. Certainly in any pre WW2 European country, the mining industry would have supplied coal not only for domestic needs, but also would have been providing heavy industry with valuable resources to generate the power necessary for manufacturing to take place. As a sign of sincere appreciation to mark a coal miner's faithful service, after 25 years of duty in those pre war years in Poland, miners were awarded with a specially commissioned Swiss pocket watch. This watch, in this instance made by the Doxa watch company, would have been presented as an esteemed symbol of recognition of the miner's achievement. Every such watch was marked with a laurel garland surrounding the trade tools of a hammer and pick. The number 25 together with the acronym PW are also present and denote, "Przemysl Wegiel," which translates to "Coal Industry." The 15 jewel Doxa watch itself is offered in good working order and condition, only exhibiting slight external signs of service wear to the case. Although the watch works, the Premium Service needs to be considered. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Pre WW2 Hauptner Trick Ball-Lock Knife, c.1935 This is a UK Legal EDC knife as there is nothing to prevent the blade from immediately folding - The term "Ball-Lock" refers to the system which prevents the blade from opening in the first instance. In 1901 the German knife maker Heinrich Hauptner of Solingen started a business making surgical and precision bladed instruments. By the 1930s, their range of medical blades extended to the production of nazi daggers, as well as this interesting advertising example made for a British Veterinarian Company as advertised on one scale and bearing the "Hauptner - Solingen" details on the other. Having no nail nick to facilitate opening, this rare vintage pocket knife features a "Trick" or "Ball-Lock" slip joint, requiring the user to hold the knife vertically whilst depressing the blade's spine against spring pressure. This action then releases a ball-bearing lock, allowing the blade to disengage and move out from between the scales, sufficiently far to allow it to be fully opened with one hand. Closing the blade requires it to be folded back on itself but this time the knife has to point downwards. Overall, it is a very well-made precision knife but the blade has been shortened and shows signs of sharpening. Overall length open = 11 cm Blade length = 3.9 cm Length closed = 7.2 cm
Pre WW2 L.O.P.P. Airman's Badge Although Poland had pilots during WW1, the build up of a true airforce did not occur until after Poland gained independence in 1918, and even then its formation was a slow affair. However, there was also a linked paramilitary group known as the L.O.P.P., "Ligii Obrony Powietyrznej i Przeciwgazowej." This was an organisation that was started in 1928 and translated, their full title reads, "Airborne & Antigas Defence League." It was broadly made up of aviators, plus ballooning and communications enthusiasts. Thanks to the efforts of the League and with their sense of duty and national pride, the L.O.P.P. purchased aviation equipment and even helped further the development of new aircraft. They constructed airfields, parachute towers and throughout the 1930s, created activities to focus youth involvement. They were in essence a training camp, which by 1939 was supplying the Polish Air Force with many of their new recruit pilots. This small winged propellor badge is one of the insignia of the L.O.P.P. As can be seen the style borrows heavily from the white and red checkered square of the Polish Air Force. The badge is in very good condition, retaining the screw back fastener. It measures 31mm wing tip to tip. The badge comes with a box may be the original carton.
Pre WW2 Longines 'Time Of Trip' Aircraft Clock, c.1938 A rare Longines aviation instrument bearing serial numbers which date its manufacture to 1938. According to the Longines, this watch was then supplied to Messrs. Weissblüht, who were their agent in Bucarest and known supplier to the Romanian Air Force. During WW2 the Romanian Air Force worked with the Luftwaffe, flying hundreds of missions against the USSR and recapturing Northern Bucovina and Basarabia, which had been occupied by the Soviet Union the previous year. Equipped with 621 aircraft, Romanian pilots were well trained and a number of Longines watches were delivered for their disposal. This cockpit watch features a high grade Longines calibre 19.71N, 16 jewels movement, which is in its aluminium housing complete with a time of trip indicator. It is in overall excellent condition and keeping time, although it has not been serviced. Interestingly, the watch has retained all its sprung mounts, which were fitted in antiquity to a clear acrylic plate - This quite feasibly might have been part of the aircraft canopy? A rare to find item of aviation interest.
Pre WW2 Longines Deck Watch & Box An immaculate Royal Navy issue Longines Deck Watch of the first pattern, complete with its original box. These pre-WW2 non-gimballed watches were received by the Admiralty in time for the start of the war and as such, few remain and even less are still together with their factory protective numbered boxes. In fact, this is the only example known to still be with its box. Presented in pristine condition, the watch is in full working order - Undamaged and untouched - keeping excellent time. The dial, movement and box all bear the broad arrow, as well as the same serial numbers and production numbers, dating the watch's manufacture to 1938. Whilst the second pattern issued in 1944 is more plentiful, this earlier watch is a difficult version to find, let alone in this outstanding and complete condition.
Pre WW2 Military Bugle By Henry Potter A top quality bugle by Henry Potter of London, presented in excellent untouched condition and proper working order. This type of bugle is seldom seen as they were a little more expensive to manufacture, differing from the regular issue bugles through the feature of having ribbing that guarded the tubes from accidental knocks, suggesting that the bugle was ordered by a premier regiment in 1930. Fully engraved and dated on the bell, this copper and brass bugle shows only light signs of service wear and minimal dings, with the metalwork having taken on a rich, dark patina. The original mouthpiece also bears Potter's name, in addition to a broad arrow mark. Having been recently played by a competent musician, this bugle is a lovely example to both collect and use.
Pre WW2 Optimus No.8 Stove A very good and original pre-war Optimus No.8 alcohol-burning stove. Swedish-made, these popular stoves have an excellent reputation among explorers as being hardy, compact and lightweight pieces of kit. Not surprisingly, over the years many have been used by the armed forces, particularly in Arctic environments. When closed, they are about the size of a sandwich box. This Optimus stove has not been restored. It is set free and retains its original finish, together with a factory leaflet and accompanying tools. Whilst the stove appears to function, care should be taken to properly assess its capability before relying fully on the valve and seals, however, a home test using methanol (wood alcohol) suggests that the jet is clear and there is some degree of flame-control. Overall a great item in wonderful condition.
Pre WW2 Patriotic Polish Army Doxa Pocket Watch A superb open face Doxa pocket watch dating from c.1930, featuring the Polish national emblem of a crowned eagle to the rear of the nickel silver case. This eagle emblem is in contemporary to the pre war date of the watch and as such, was likely intended as a patriotic display by the original watch owner. Doxa watches were certainly very popular in europe at this time. Being regarded as high quality timepieces, many were purchased by the armed forces of several nations. This example is in excellent order with a perfect dial, keeping time and functioning as it should, although it has not been serviced. Undoubtably the watch would have belonged to a man of substance - almost certainly a military professional. A fine timepiece.
Pre WW2 Pocket Kukri This pre-WW2 kukri-inspired pocket sheath knife was purchased in the Colonies, before going on to accompany its original owner, a British Civil Servant, through the war in India and believed also in the African campaign. It is well made featuring extensive wood carving, having been sharpened in service. A nice item. Overall length = 7¼ inches Blade = 4 inches
Pre WW2 Polish Army Roskopf Watch, c.1935 A rare prewar Polish Army pocket watch of cavalry interest, awarded in 1935 at the NCO\'s School to the farrier coming top of the class. Presented to a named individual of the 4 P.A.C. (4th Division Heavy Artillery) who were stationed in Łodz near Warsaw. The watch itself is a railroad Roskopf, which is in full working order, running well and keeping time but with minor signs of service wear and honest age patina. Having survived in basically untouched condition, this watch comes with its original owner\'s Military Service Certificate. A rare opportunity to own a most interesting Polish Army watch of cavalry interest.
Pre WW2 Polish Eagle Vis 35 Radom Holster An original pre-war Polish Army holster for the 9mm Vis 35 self-loading pistol. This holster was an attic find, discovered with two other Radom holsters. It is in untouched condition, having an interesting wartime back story. This holster was found in good condition, together with two others, each complete with pistols and some accessories. This one has good leatherwork, although displaying a light bloom of mildew, which has been left untouched. A second holster has been lightly cleaned with excellent results, so there is every reason to believe this example will also shine up. Inside was a spare magazine and original brass cleaning rod, which will remain with this holster. The spare mag is of Polish manufacture and has the letter "E" stamped on its heel. Likewise, the brass rod bears issue marks. A lovely example of a rare and desirable Polish "kabura" hard leather holster, with rare accessories. All the Radom pistols are now appropriately in the hands of a Section 5 RFD, so please don't ask. Regarding the back story, which I have no reason to disbelieve, tells me that the house in which these holsters were found, was close to an RAF airfield used by the SOE. The RFD told me that hanging in the house was also a group photo, which relatives stated showed their grandfather, together with Tito's Partisans, on one of his incursions into Yugoslavia. Some details have been withheld. The last photo shows all the holsters, including additional pre-war cross straps that were found separately in the attic, wrapped in a Woolworths bag. These are not included in this sale.
Pre WW2 Polish Military - M.S. Wojsk - Radio Room Clock On 1st September 1939, when Poland was invaded and its armed forces were stretched to their limits, timepieces like this one were being utilised in military command posts as radio room clocks. Conforming to military practice, the frantic radio operators were required to note the times when receiving or sending radio messages and that was the purpose of this clock-watch. This large Lemania timepiece was supplied c.1938 by the firm of J. Jeznacki in Warsaw, a known supplier of military equipment. It is clearly marked as being the property of the Polish Army (M.S. Wojsk) and it is a very rare survivor of its type, having been removed from the instrument panel of a military radio installation before being overrun by occupying forces. The bezel would have been unscrewed to release the watch casing from its mount. Presented in excellent original condition throughout, this watch is in good working order, keeping time. It is also interesting to note that the Lemania name has been changed to "Arma" for retail purposes. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Pre WW2 RLM B-Uhr Wristwatch, c.1935 A very rare and early German RLM pilot or navigator's wristwatch, worn as part of the issue flying equipment. This watch is presented in near mint condition and good working order. The Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) was formed in 1933, tasked with the development and production of all German aircraft. Under the charge of the Minister, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, civil aircraft designs were made to be adaptable to fulfil future roles in military operations. This was also true of the Nav. B-Uhr (Navigation Beobachtungsuhr) watches that they developed, which were adopted in 1935 by the newly emerging Luftwaffe. The RLM nevertheless continued to exist throughout WW2, advancing the needs of the Luftwaffe. This pilot's watch was constructed c.1935. It is a large wristwatch, meant to be worn around the arm of a bulky flying suit, which essentially used a Swiss pocket watch movement at its core. Such earlier watches, with their traditional 12-hour dial layout, would have been worn by the Luftwaffe during the Spanish Civil War, but later recommendations saw the dial design change during WW2. The second pattern of B-Uhr watch featured a more prominent outer seconds track, together with a smaller inner-hour-dial. With its low serial number, this early RLM timepiece existed before the outbreak of hostilities and as such, would likely have been one of the first Luftwaffe timepieces to have seen combat in an aerial campaign. Yet the watch remains in excellent and original cosmetic condition, working and keeping time, although it has not been serviced. However, a Premium Service option complete with a 12-month warranty is available. This 55 mm diameter watch retains most of its original grey coated finish, making this watch a good example for the collector of these fast appreciating chronometers.
Pre WW2 Rolex GS MkII Pocket Watch, c.1938 A rare pre WW2, War Department contract pocket watch made by Rolex. An outstanding military issue pocket watch, made by Rolex and beautifully original throughout. This watch conforms to the military specifications as determined by the War Department and as such, is designated as the General Service Mark II. These watches were purchased for the British Army but, once hostilities commenced, Swiss watch companies became naturally apprehensive about providing watches to the belligerents, which put a halt on their supply. This was injurious to the Allies who required as well as being bad business for the Swiss, so an understanding was reached to maintain a trade of baser watches but only to the jewellery trade. This resulted in the ubiquitous "GS Trade Pattern" being created. The upshot was that supply of the superior GS Mark II watches had come to an abrupt halt and as a consequence, these are now much rarer. Clearly, their superiority over the GS/TP timepieces comes from the fact that they utilised top quality movements, black luminous dials, hermetic screw-up cases of nickel silver and unbreakable crystals as standard. And, from the discerning collector's perspective, this Rolex has retained all of those features in a very near mint package, showing just minimal signs of wear, including bright gold accents to the dial and large luminous numerals remaining intact - with just some minor nibbling to the enamel on the dial edges, which isn't noticeable with the bezel fitted. Mechanically this Rolex is fully functioning and keeping excellent time - in fact, this is the same movement as Rolex used in the production of the Italian frogmen's Panerai wristwatches; it has not been serviced. A rare item that is now near impossible to find in such an untouched condition, with no sign of tampering or inappropriate case opening - Simply stunning.
Pre WW2 Royal Doulton RAF Tea Cup Getting rarer to find, this quality bone china cup was once used in a Royal Air Force officer's mess. Made by Royal Doulton, the cup would likely have been used throughout WW2. With its cobalt blue rim and gilt details, this cup was of the finest quality. Although complete and still useable, this china cup does have some age crazing, as well as a hairline from the rim, past the RAF crest to the left, but no restoration.
Pre WW2 Royal Navy Issue Admiralty Pattern 301 Wristwatch Early examples of this oversized wristwatch, date from WW1 and can be found with the supplier's name "Poole" engraved on them. Such military watches were no more than a pocket watch fixed to a strap. Those first timepieces, just as the one presented here, also bore the Royal Naval version of the broad arrow. However, the watch being offered here, also bears an Admiralty Pattern number, 301. Presumably then, these military wristwatches were of sufficiently contributory use that they were allotted their own unique reference number. It is also interesting to note that the preceding AP 300 reference number was also assigned to a Royal Navy issue pocket watch. So, both the AP300 and AP301, are watches made for Royal Navy use. AP300, was a standard type of pocket watch, yet different to the army issue General Service patterns, whilst AP301 was a wristwatch of pocket watch proportions. An unissued example of the AP301 was once encountered on a long two piece pigskin strap. This suggests that the AP301 was worn around the arm, possibly of a coat or gauntlet. Certainly that example was from WW2 surplus stock, which again suggests a supply date from around this period. Unfortunately so far however, the use these big Admiralty Pattern 301 wristwatches, evades research. Nevertheless, they are real and in this instance, they were supplied through Helvetia. Although not signed by the maker, the watch's movement has been identified as Helvetia's calibre 32A. If it follows that the Admiralty Pattern inventory followed a logical listing, then the AP300 and 301, likely shared the same role, although worn differently. From the outset, the Admiralty's use of pocket watches has been dominated by timepieces which were technically more advanced in terms of precision - Deck Watches were navigational tools, but these AP300/1s are not. Instead, the AP300 has a heavy duty screw up case and a 15 jewel movement, whilst the AP301 uses a 7 jewel movement in a standard snap together case. Together their form suggests a usage where these AP timepieces needed to be robust, against the elements and from the potential of knocks. This ruggedness was achieved simply by either making the watch case more substantially resilient to the ingress of sea water and strong enough to take the knocks, or by simply elevating the watch onto the wearer's wrist out of harms way. As you look at the Admiralty Pattern 301 you will notice that the watch uses a movement that places the subsidiary seconds hand into the correct position for the watch to be worn on a wrist. Also, the dial numbering is configured in such a way that the time can be glanced in the same way as a modern wristwatch would be. Should the AP301 have used a regular pocket watch movement, the dial would be out of kilter with the winder and the wearer's orientation to the dial would be skewed. All that is known for certain is that this oversized wristwatch was supplied by Helvetia, on these wire lugs. They were intended for RN service, and have been supplied from WW1. Of course there exist accounts from the battle fields of the Boer War, of soldiers strapping pocket watches to their wrists. Most notably it appears that those engaged with artillery first appear to have adopted that practice. Also, noting just how long the strap of the unissued watch that was encountered, would also suggest that the watch would have needed to have been worn around the sleeve. So, perhaps those engaged in gunnery with the Royal Navy, may have been the intended recipients of this watch? However, it is believed that more examples would exist if this were so. Suggestions have also been made that due to size, that these were early aviator's watches - yet we have plenty of surviving watches that were used by Fleet Air Arm, precisely for that purpose - so that seems an unlikely use for the AP301. Intriguingly, a belief now exists that both the AP300 and AP301 were designed for submarine use. This possibility raises certain questions, which are currently under investigation. This watch is in good condition and working order, having just minor edge cracks at 6 o'clock - these could be cleaned and their appearance reduced during the Premium Service. All in all, a good example of a rare to find watch. Watch diameter is 48mm, excluding the winder. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Pre WW2 Smiths 8-Day Ship\'s Clock, c.1932 This is an early Smiths 8-day ship's clock dating from c.1932 when the Cricklewood NW2 factory bought out the time-honoured "Astral" Coventry brand. This Smiths clock is in full working order and very good cosmetic condition, having been manufactured with several additional maritime features not found altogether on other ship's clocks. Apart from having a movement capable of delivering time for a full 8-days (many marine clocks run for 48 hours) this Astral movement has a low serial number "166" and benefits from being housed in a heavy industrial gauge brass case. A cover has also been factory fitted to provide extra protection to the balance mechanism. (Interestingly, a clock repairer's mark can be seen on the movement plate showing a service date of 1942). Additionally, the case has a bezel lock that prevents the clock from accidental opening, especially in rough seas. The same key is then used to wind the movement through the front of the perfect enamel dial, which was preferred to the option of a pressed metal type, as the enamel resisted staining in a salty atmosphere. One other feature is the use of a sweeping seconds hand and, whilst not unique, added to the functionality of this clock as a desirable marine timepiece. Presently this clock runs and keeps time but servicing is probably overdue. A complete strip-down Premium Service for this clock can be purchased as an extra for the price of £90, which comes with a 12-month warranty.
Precista Stop Watch Cost £10
Premium Service Dear Collectors, Vintage watches, in particular Military Timepieces, have continued to rise significantly in value over the past year. This is a good sign for the investor, but on the downside, the cost of spares as well as their availability for repairs, has been affected. With this in mind ZMW Militaria has to announce that from 2018 the cost of some of our service work (e.g. W.W.W. watches) will need to be reviewed, just to keep pace with our overheads. In most instances however, prices will not be affected. We will nevertheless aim to keep pricing as reasonable as possible and, genuinely believe that our Premium Service work coupled with a 12 month warranty, will continue to represent excellent value for the collector. Yours sincerely, Ziggy M. Wesolowski
Premium Service - 2017 Price Increase Dear Collectors, Vintage watches, in particular Military Timepieces, have risen significantly in value over the past few years. This is a good sign for the investor, but on the downside, the cost of spares and their availability, has also been affected. With this in mind, ZMW Militaria has to announce that from 2017 the cost of all our service work, will increase to keep pace with our overheads. Nevertheless, we do genuinely believe that our Premium Service and 12 month warranty, will continue to represent excellent value for the collector. Yours sincerely, Ziggy M. Wesolowski
PREMIUM SERVICE WORK - SPECIAL CONCESSIONARY PRICE Optional Premium Service work is available on most watches offered here. This gives customers real peace of mind when buying a vintage watch from ZMW MILITARIA as our servicing work provides your heirloom timepiece with a 12 month warranty. When a Premium Service is requested at the time of purchase, or within 21 days (see our Terms & Conditions), you will be receiving the service at half the usual cost. Premium Service prices are published for each eligible timepiece. With the discount, the typical charge for the work starts at only £60.
PREMIUM SERVICE WORK - SPECIAL CONCESSIONARY PRICE ZMW Militaria offers a Premium Service option for the clocks and watches sold here: The Premium Service is designed to provide longevity to timepieces and, to give customers real peace of mind when buying from us, backed up by a 12 month warranty for your heirloom. The Premium Service prices quoted at the end of every eligible watch, are shown at a special concessionary rate available only at the time, or within 21 days of purchase (see Terms & Conditions). These charges represent a saving of 50% off of the regular price.
PREMIUM SERVICE WORK - SPECIAL CONCESSIONARY PRICE ZMW Militaria offers a Premium Service option for the clocks and watches sold here: The Premium Service is designed to provide longevity to timepieces and, to give customers real peace of mind when buying from us, backed up by a 12 month warranty for your heirloom. The Premium Service prices quoted at the end of every eligible watch, are shown at a special concessionary rate available only at the time, or within 21 days of purchase (see Terms & Conditions). These charges represent a saving of 50% off of the regular price.
PREMIUM SERVICE WORK - SPECIAL CONCESSIONARY PRICE Optional Premium Service work is available on most watches offered here. This gives customers real peace of mind when buying a vintage watch from ZMW MILITARIA as our servicing work provides your heirloom timepiece with a 12 month warranty. When a Premium Service is requested at the time of purchase, or within 3 months (see our Terms & Conditions), you will be receiving the service at half the usual cost. Premium Service prices are published for each eligible timepiece. With the discount, the typical charge for the work starts at only £60.
Presentation Binoculars SS Barpeta, c.1912 A fine pair of Ross binoculars with silver mounted plaque, presented by the Government of India to Commander H. F. Minett of the SS Barpeta, in recognition of his services in the \"suppression of arms Traffic 1912\". These binoculars are complete with their original case, all in excellent cosmetic condition, showing light signs of service wear but retaining clear working optics.
Presentation Grade .442 Webley No.1 Gate Loading Revolver This is a superior presentation grade No.1 gate loading revolver, made by Webley c.1868. This would have been made to special order, all hand engraved at their factory and then nickel plated and finish off with the ivory grips before being retailed by T. Miller of Sunderland and marked on the top strap. No doubt this would have been made for a well heeled gentleman, possibly serving as his personal protection revolver, quite likely accompanying him on travels overseas, where the smooth cool grips and protective finish would have been an asset in a hot climate. This type of Webley revolver seldom comes to the market and in this condition, it would prove to be a fine addition to a collection. Fully working with positive lock up and good spring action, the revolver retains much of its original finish. The bore and chambers are all in good condition throughout. Only the grip has an old well executed period repair to the right side. Chambered for the obsolete .442 calibre, this Webley may be owned without a certificate, provided it is held as part of a gun collection without ammunition.
Prewar Webley Mark 1 .177 Air Pistol c.1937 In 1935 Webley updated their iconic range of air weapons with the introduction of a slant gripped Mark 1 pistol. Production then continued until war broke out, at which point the manufacture of sporting guns was suspended to allow Webley to concentrate on military arms. After the war air pistol production restarted, but the later versions differed somewhat in a number of respects, making these prewar examples highly sought after. This prewar .177 Webley Mark 1 air pistol dates to around 1937, complete with its original box - all in near excellent condition with much original blue finish. An advice label, targets and vintage pellets accompany the pistol, which retains its perfect black unsigned grips, clear body stamps showing 1925 patent dates, good screw heads and a crisp, clean bore. All in all, this air pistol is one for the shooter, or collector.
Prison Guard's Rifled "Close Quarter" Percussion Carbine c.1845 This is not a cut down musket but rather, a rare and genuine "Close Quarter" carbine, with a very short 13 inch rifled barrel of .577 calibre. It is absolutely characteristic of the short carbines carried by prison warders and the guards entrusted with prisoner security during transportation. This is a weapon capable of being retained in a struggle with both hands at close quarter, yet just long enough to be a formidable and potentially accurate shooter at longer distances too. A professional's choice that was far better than a pistol, which could never be readied without risk of being lost, with deadly consequences. At the start of the 19th Century, Gaols and Houses of Correction, had confined within their unsanitary surroundings all manner of violent persons, held together with debtors, as well as petty offending men, women and children, whose only respite from the grim conditions rested simply in their ability to be able to bribe the guards - Corruption was rife. However, reformers were working to improve conditions, but this was a slow process that would take many more decades to inflict change on an established institution. Punishments, such as the "Treadmill" and "Crank" continued to be metered out for seemingly petty infringements, often at the whim of misguided guards, which became known as, "Screws." A nickname stemming from these pointless hard labour activities, which were only abolished in 1898. Certainly by the middle of the Victorian era, society was increasingly concerned with the ever rising crime rate, yet there remained mixed feelings towards the Prison Service being the proper institution to rehabilitate offenders. So perhaps this is why gunmakers chose not to identify, or broadcast their association within prisons? Preferring instead to distance themselves from that darkly necessary world of bars and high walls, cushioning themselves from public perception, whatever that may have been. Only the trademark of these prison weapons, is not so much a mark but rather, a deliberate absence of any signature or making these guns totally unattributed in nature. No maker and no supplier's marks that could lead to the identification of the companies involved in this ungentlemanly business. Furthermore, about this close quarter carbine's short barrel, it is safe to say that this carbine has only ever been equipped with a bead foresight and no rear sight. This again demonstrates that this weapon was never anything longer, as any regular chopped carbine or musket would have had a rear sight… or at least would have left a trace of where one had existed previously. There is no such evidence. The overall working and cosmetic condition of this short carbine is very good, especially considering its history. The uniformly patinated ironwork has a strong action and a rifled bore, with only the woodwork showing some signs of old distress. A good opportunity to acquire a historic arm, which has hung on the wall of a family collection of antique weapons, for the past 50 years.
Prison Guard's Rifled "Close Quarter" Percussion Carbine c.1845 This is not a cut down musket but rather, a rare and genuine "Close Quarter" carbine, with a very short 13 inch rifled barrel of .577 calibre. It is an example of the short carbines carried by prison guards entrusted with prisoner security during transportation. The overall working and cosmetic condition of this short carbine is very good, especially considering its history. The uniformly patinated ironwork has a strong action and a rifled bore, with only the woodwork showing some signs of old distress. A good opportunity to acquire a historic arm, which has hung on the wall of a family collection of antique weapons, for the past 50 years. Barrel length = 13 inches Overall length =
Provincial Birmingham Gun Trade Pocket Pistol, c.1840 This unsigned .45" calibre turn-off barrel pocket pistol was made in the provinces and proofed in Birmingham. It was made to a good standard of gunsmithing and has its iron work decorated with with scroll engraving. Overall, the pistol appears to be in good condition, with an even patina showing just light surface staining and minor oxidisation. The action works well and the unusually long spurred hammer holds in both positions, plus, the nipple is good. A traditional walnut bag shape butt is fitted with a vacant escutcheon, all nicely checkered and fitting well, with no cracks. Overall, an attractive pocket pistol. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7.25 inches
Provincial Gun Trade Pocket Pistol, c.1830 An unattributed provincial turn-off barrel pocket pistol, made c.1830, with simple acanthus leaf decoration and Birmingham proofs. The walnut slab sided grips are undamaged and all pistol springs are good, with the box lock remaining in serviceable condition. All in all, the pistol is working and cosmetically it is in good condition, with some minor tool abrasions around the barrel. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 7 inches
PZO Polish Military 7x45Z Binoculars, c.1985 A scarce pair of PZO Polish Special Forces binoculars. These robust binoculars have a green finish with black armour - an all-black version was made for Counter Terrorist Police use. Their 7x45 size was chosen to bridge the gap between day and night viewing and were optically coated to provide bright views in a variety of conditions. They also feature twin dioptre eyepieces, which once properly set, allow the binoculars to be used focus-free with clear views. A reticle scale allows for rapid measuring of the distance and size of targets. Presented in very good condition, the rubber armour is intact and has not perished, and the binoculars retain their issue leather neck strap.
Quality Case For Webley Senior Air Pistol A very well made case fashioned to hold any of the range of Mark 1, Senior or Premier Webley air pistols. Complete with vintage oil can and provision for a pellet tin, the wooden case is presented with a vacant escutcheon to the lid, brass corner hinges and a working lock with key. A very good box for your precious Webley air pistol, with clean green baize lining and accessories as shown.
Quantity of Military & Railway Surplus Items TO CLEAR - A good quantity of miscellaneous military, police and railway badges, buttons and associated surplus, including a good vintage sovereign holder in the form of a 12B cartridge, a webbing pouch and a quantity of cadet \"escape\" compasses (most with bubbles).
R. Aeronautica Award Watch By Longines c.1940 A wholly original and elegant Italian Air Force Officer's Pocket Watch, by Longines. In the 1930s the leading nations of Europe competed for air supremacy, investing in acquiring the trophies and prestige that came with winning major aviation events. The racing spirit of the pilots and the industry that supported them were celebrated names, so not surprisingly they were hailed as heroic figures by the media and their impressionable fans. To this end, the Italian Regia Aeronautica was proud to boast of a High-Speed Wing within its airforce. As a result, their endeavours led to aviation advancement, public adoration and personal decoration. At this pivotal point, Longines was a significant player in the field of aviation, so when it came to teams purchasing aviation timepieces, they were a natural choice for the R. Aeronautica. As world-class performers and popular Italian crowd-pleasers, their pilots held many ground-breaking achievements and their public appearance, wearing suave uniforms, generated much admiration. Not surprisingly Duce Mussolini allocated considerable funding and high calibre watches were part of the reward. According to Longines archive records, this splendid and rare pocket watch was delivered to A. Cairelli, their agent in Rome, before being passed to the R. Aeronautica. The watch is in fine and untouched condition, retaining sharp details and a factory fresh movement - All fully working and keeping excellent time. Engraved and numbered, the recipient was no doubt honoured to receive such a significant gift during the glory years of the airforce - Possibly from the Duce himself. Presented in perfect working order, this officer's Longines is in outstanding cosmetic condition. Marked "A. Cairelli, Roma" on the inner case, this watch has been officially sanctioned and numbered "855" to the case, but displaying only the last two digits, "55" on the dial, together with the "R. Aeronautica" name and their crowned, spread-winged eagle. This is repeated with fine engraving to the rear of the watch, which shows signs of just light wear and rubbing. Internally the Longines movement looks bright and factory fresh, running well and keeping excellent time. Overall, a highly impressive and beautiful watch that is a joy to hold. One for the military timepiece or passionate R. Aeronautica collector.
R. Aeronautica Award Watch By Longines c.1940 Additional image
RA Gunner's Horn & Brass Priming Flask, c.1800 A splendid gunner's priming flask marked for the 9th Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Artillery, c.1800. These flasks would have been in service between 1790 - 1815 and were made of polished horn with brass mounts. The pouring nozzle has a fully functioning spring cut-off, whilst the brass basal cap is property marked to the, "9RAB.6.1." Amazingly this flask is in pristine condition, being totally ding, dent and crack free. Other examples of these flasks exist at the Royal Armouries, Fort Nelson: See Blackmore 1976, p. 182, no. 270. Overall length = 8¼ inches
Radway Green .303 Military Drill Rounds Production of the D Mark 10 .303 drill round commenced at Radway Green in 1950, although the cartridge was not accepted into service until 1954. The cartridge was similar to its predecessors but the bullet was traditionally seated using a crimped rim. In continuous use, this seating method soon allowed the bullet to recede into the case. The clip has four drill rounds - three are dated 1950, whilst the other is 1951 dated. All are in used condition, however two have some dints and one of the heads has started to recede.
Radway Green .303 Military Drill Rounds Production of the D Mark 10 .303 drill round commenced at Radway Green in 1950, although the cartridge was not accepted into service until 1954. The cartridge was similar to its predecessors but the bullet was traditionally seated using a crimped rim. In continuous use, this seating method soon allowed the bullet to recede into the case. The clip has four drill rounds - three are dated 1950, whilst the other is 1951 dated. All are in used condition, however two have some dints and one of the heads has started to recede.
RAF / SAS Escape Knife By Joseph Rodgers An unusual escape knife by Joseph Rodgers, with a hooked concave blade, for use in emergency scenarios to cut free from entangled harness belts, parachute or abseiling lines. These knives were typically held in a scabbard which was sewn to the flying suit, worn high up on the chest to facilitate easy reach. They were also used by soldiers of the SAS when wearing their black assault rigs - Famously used in 1980 during the Iranian Embassy Siege. Presented in good condition, this knife is fully marked with the maker's details and RAF stores number. No scabbard.
RAF Centenary Bear By Merrythought, 1918 - 2018 To celebrate 100 years of the Royal Air Force, Merrythought, Britain's only traditional soft toy manufacturer, marks the occasion with its release of a handsome, fully articulated teddy bear. Much like the mascots carried by aviator's, these lovely "RAF100 Appeal" teddy bears will also help raise funds for RAF charities. Hand-crafted in Shropshire using the softest pure mohair and cotton velvet, in a beautiful milk chocolate colour, this delightful character features a friendly smile and a tactile, bean-filled tummy. Standing about 10 inches tall, each bear wears an elegant scarlet satin ribbon, adorned with the RAF100 Appeal logo and comes in its own luxury cotton bag. The sale of this teddy bear raises essential funds for the following RAF charities; The RAF Benevolent Fund, RAF Charitable Trust, RAF Museum and the RAF Association. The Merrythought RAF Bears are now in stock and available - post free. RRP: £99
RAF Commemorative Matchbox Holder, c.1940 A Royal Air Force commemorative matchbox holder dating to 1940, paying tribute to, "The Few." Presented in good overall condition, with some staining and oxidisation of metal parts. Price includes P&P
RAF Fighter Command - Presentation Pewter Tankard This interesting English made pewter tankard and a "Penny Spitfire," come from the estate of Wing Commander C. L. Moye and are being offered separately. Moye is known to have served as an RAF pilot during WW2. This tankard was presented by the Officers of HQ Fighter Command and is in good condition with some light impressions, grey patina and mild wear from use. On the base it bears the maker's mark of Roberts & Dore Ltd. Well worthy of further research.
RAF Issue Jaeger LeCoultre Pocket Watch c.1942 This particular Jaeger LeCoultre pocket watch is of the design termed as the, "General Service Trade Pattern." Such GSTP pocket watches were of course meant for army issue during WW2 however, this example somehow found its way into the hands of the Royal Air Force, making it a rarity for military watch collectors. Of course, the Air Ministry were expecting to receive pocket watches from Jaeger LeCoutre, but their preferred design called for a non-luminous dial. This kind of anomaly then, can probably be best explained by the fact that the RAF had either not yet received their expected JLC watches, or, had received an insufficient number to meet their needs. Consequently, it would have been expedient for the War Department to hand over a quantity of army watches for use by the RAF. Examples of this kind of cooperation between services is not unique in wartime, but it does nevertheless make for an interesting variation. Fully engraved on the back of the watch, with RAF issue codes. Presented in working order, this JLC watch shows only light signs of careful service wear. Cosmetically the watch has some light rubbing to the edges, but it is still an excellent example with an original and unrestored dial. Keeping time, the signed 15 jewel movement is brightly gilded and all functions are as good as one might expect, plus, a warranty and service option is available at a concessionary rate. A Premium Service and 12 month warranty are available at a cost of just £60.
RAF Issue Navigator's Watch - Type A-11 By Waltham c.1942 During WW2 the RAF issued its pilots and navigators with wristwatches, supplied mainly by Swiss makers. These timepieces were designated as Mark VII and Mark VIIa patterns and featured white dials. However, when America joined the war in 1942 they brought with them their own watches, which to the US Army Air Force were known as the Type A-11 Hack Watch, but to the RAF they became the Mark VIII. Unlike the Swiss watches that had been issued since 1939, these new Mark VIII timepieces had black dials and movements that were designed to stop running during hand setting (a feature called 'hacking'). This made them simple to synchronise accurately during pre flight briefings and in particular, navigators appreciated them as good working tools. This particular example was made by Waltham and delivered to the Air Ministry with a plain steel back. It was then engraved with the RAF property code, where the 6B identified the item as flying equipment and the 234 denoted that the watch was issued to a navigator. Undoubtably, this watch would have served in Bomber Command. Presented in good original condition, this Waltham is in working order - including the Hack. Although the watch has seen combat service, it has not been abused and, whilst it may not have been its first, the watch has even retained a rare original US military issue strap which looks excellent. Sold in working order, but consideration should be given to having the watch serviced. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
RAF Navigator Issue Split-Chronograph Stop Watch, c.1938 A pre WW2 Air Ministry issue stop watch, featuring the rare Split-Chronograph movement by Lemania. A true sleeper in mint condition, having survived all this time in its wartime storage carton. Even the inner case has retained a clear and original "G.S. & Co. Ltd." (Goldsmiths & Silversmiths) importer's ink stamp! The watch itself is in full working order, with a factory fresh looking movement. These watches are a little larger than the more common RAF stop watches that followed, and incorporated two sweeping hands that were started simultaneously. However, a feature of the split timers, was their ability to record more than one event simultaneously. To do this, an oversized button in the watch band could be depressed and this allowed the red centre hand to be stopped independently, whilst the main blue hand kept timing. This enabled the navigator to note elapsed time intervals without interfering with the pre prepared, Flight Plan. Any subsequent push of the auxiliary button would cause the sweeping hands to 'catchup' with each other, whilst any depression of the main winding crown button stopped the watch timing entirely and reset the movement. In this manner an infinite number of time [split] readings could be taken by the navigator, without the watch having to be reset between flight operation. This was indeed a valuable precision made tool and an expensive one at that, which could no longer be readily (or at least openly) supplied by the Swiss following the outbreak of WW2. Consequently, the Air Ministry had little option but to accept more rudimentary military timers from other suppliers. Offered in mint condition, the watch has no dings dents or dial damage, only the carton has some surface scuffs and tears to its corners. The brown box is plain and without any manufacturer's details, other than some obscure handwritten references. Overall, a mint example with good age patina, in working order.
RAF Pilot\'s 6B Hamilton Watch c.1968 A scarce RAF first pattern Hamilton 6B wristwatch, issued to pilot\'s in the 1960s as an alternative to the International, Jaeger Le Coultre and Omega Mark 11 watches. This Hamilton is in excellent condition, keeping good time, probably as a result of the strict maintenance schedule that was demanded by the Air Force. However, as the service history is not known, this watch will undergo a full service before sale. Retaining all its original features, this Hamilton is a great timepiece for those collectors who wish to wear their military watches. With its 37mm diameter steel case, it is perfect for modern life. Currently this watch is on a vintage leather strap, quite possibly fitted soon after the watch was new. A NATO strap will accompany this watch. In keeping with our philosophy to keep our military timepieces authentic, this watch will be cleaned but not polished. As it is, the case is in first class condition, showing just minor signs of careful service wear, which will remain.
RAF Survival Escape Kit Compass - Wristwatch Type It was the armourer's duty to ensure that the pilot's ejector seat was working properly and also kitted out with the prescribed survival equipment in the event of a bail out. This issue wristwatch type compass was part of the survival equipment that was stowed in a pack with the ejector seat of an RAF jet fighter. According to the original armourer who removed this item when the plane became surplus to RAF requirements and scrapped, some 20 years ago... he stated that it was removed in its original sealed pack, which would have also held an emergency saw and food rations. This compass appears to be in new old stock condition and comes complete with strap, showing no signs of ever having been worn. Everything is in full working order.
RAF Watches - WW2 Air Ministry King's Crown Marked Pocket watch There is something special about seeing the Air Ministry mark on the back of a RAF pocket watch, when it incorporates the King's Crown design. The Crowned AM marking is normally only found on early RAF clocks and some stop watches; however if you were looking for a regular personal issue timepiece with that same characteristic marking, you would be indeed hard pressed to find one. Basically, Weems wristwatches and it seems only a small handful of pocket watches appear to have been marked up in this manner. They are rare. Issued in 1941, this is just such an evocatively engraved pocket timepiece, presented in good working order. The marking is clear and genuine. For all intents and purposes, the watch is identical to the early army issue General Service Mark II pocket watches, as it features a solid nickel three piece screw up case. Again, most other RAF watches all had snap back cases, so it just might be that this watch somehow was forgotten about and issued later than it might otherwise have been. Who knows? The watch has some light signs of service wear, but internally the movement looks to be crisp and working well. Nevertheless, you would need to consider the benefits of a Premium Service on a vintage timepiece. A good example of this rare pattern RAF pocket watch. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
RAF Weeton - WW2 Navigation & Drawing Instruments A good WW2 cased set of navigator\'s instruments by Thornton. Originally used at RAF Weeton, each instrument is marked with either an Air Force code, King\'s Crown, broad arrow or AM mark dated 1941. While this is a genuine set some smaller accessories might have been added during its working life, but each item is in good working order with some tarnish evident. The wooden case is solid and clean but the lock and an escutcheon to the lid is lacking. Sold complete with an original wartime humorous hand-drawn \"Diploma\" bearing the motto \"Ad Captandum Vulgus\" (in order to please the mob), welcoming a new member to \"No.8 S. of T.T. Technical Wallahs, RAF Weeton\". A lovely item worthy of research
Railway Guards North East Region Railway Guard's Whistle, c.1880 A superb example of an NER railway guard's whistle, from the by-gone days of steam. The cow horn whistle is presented in excellent, damage free condition, complete with its original iron ring and good clear, N.E.R. stamp. Altogether a loud and shrill whistle, in full working order with original pea.
Railway Watch - Waltham Railway Locomotive Pocket Watch A good clean example of a Railway Man's Waltham pocket watch. According to Waltham watch company records this large, 18 size, timepiece was made in 1906 yet the 15 jewel movement appears to be in factory fresh condition. The gold filled heavy duty screw back case is of standard railway form and approved large size, bearing a very good rendition of a locomotive in steam. The movement is the 1883 model, first manufactured in that year, albeit the production date of this piece was some years after. Due to its reliable construction, many railway companies in England chose to use Waltham watches as their standard timekeepers. This example however would have been a private purchase by a wealthy gentleman, most likely having railway connections. The case is gold filled and in very good condition, free from any signs of excessive wear and no base metal showing through either. Whilst the movement looks to be in fine condition, the Premium Service will help to make this a reliable timekeeper well into the future. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare "Millwall Militia" Brass Pistol By Mortimer, c.1800 Historically, an island once existed along the Thames bordered by the two largest meanders of the river, separated from the mainland by a thinner strip of water to the north. This island of marsh and wetland, which was once part of the Parish of Poplar, became known as the Isle of Dogs. Settlers had for centuries before tried with varying degrees of success to maintain the area for its rich pasture and farming land. Eventually then, a wall was built to separate the land from the river (Marshwall) and in turn windmills were erected to help with the pumping process (Millwall), but the terrain was always prone to flooding and inevitably, peoples' lives were lost when the river breached their defences. Over time, a notoriety grew concerning the checkered character of some of the new settlers that occupied the island, many of whom were forced there through penal servitude and in this way a colony was soon established. What's more, the area had an association with ever present gibbets along the river's course, which served as warnings to remind undesirables and arriving pirates alike, of the harsh penalty that awaited them should they pursue their illicit trafficking. Certainly with Greenwich being located on the opposite bank, the Royal Navy would have literally overseen the execution of many a smuggler and pirate on the hangman's gallow tree. To help with the drainage of the land, over time around a dozen mills were built along the Millwall as part of the land reclamation project. Towards the end of the 18th century, the success of their effort saw the area developing into an industrial site with docks, warehouses and shipbuilding being the main trades of the island. Of course the area was now subject to a greater influx of lower class newcomers, who saw an opportunity to settle among the established residents. As time went on, the services the maritime traders offered on the Isle of Dogs became more diverse and the area prospered, yet the working class remained poor despite their contributions. Not surprisingly the abundance of rich pickings that the merchant marine brought to the doorstep of the needy, inevitably had its consequences and crime was rife. So, given this social back drop to Millwall, it would be easy to imagine that the Thames River Police and armed watchmen patrolled the area, as well they might have, but the main reason for procuring this pistol was the fear of invasion from Napoleon Bonaparte. This flintlock pistol was acquired in the early years of the Napoleonic Wars, when London held a genuine fear of an imminent attack from Napoleon's Army. In response to this crisis the Duke of York put out a nationwide call to arms that saw a tremendous response: Furthermore, an infantry of territorially based Militia was to be raised to be used solely for home defence. The Millwall Militia was not a standing army, but rather a force of men raised by ballot, which the government held in December 1802. The ballot was run locally by churchwardens and overseers of the poor in each parish, who drew up a list of men aged between eighteen and forty five. There were however certain exemptions of service, which included seamen and Thames watermen. Also exempt were those who preferred to pay a financial penalty not to fight, or for those selected individuals who managed to find a person willing to stand in their place. Lists of the balloted men were then posted on the front of the parish church door for all to take note. For Millwall, these were tense times and concerns that the guerrilla war for which they had prepared was afoot, were raised to a all time high when British anti-invasion plans were put into place in 1803, following reports that Napoleon was once again on the move. It was also published that he said, "All my thoughts are directed towards England. I want only for a favourable wind to plant the Imperial Eagle on the Tower of London". Of course with the majority of the military regiments and volunteer forces being stationed on the south coast, it was down to the Millwall Militia to provide what would have been the final line of resistance to thwart Napoleon's fleet from sailing into London. Still, this pistol with its solid brass "out in all weather" construction, was an inspired choice for a Militia man, whose remit, in the event of invasion, was to harass the enemy rather than to engage them full on. Made by Mortimer, this concealable pocket pistol was most likely bought and paid for by a wealthy merchant benefactor, as this London gunmaker was already a highly respected supplier of arms to the King and nobility. The turn off barrel numbered, "Millwall 44", suggests that a not insignificant supply of weapons was available should the need have ever arisen. Whilst the number "M 44" which is stamped on the walnut butt, prevented the possibility of mismatching of barrels to frames. This historically important flintlock is presented in full working condition and excellent order throughout.
Rare "Poke" Ring Sundial Circa 1700 A complete Post Medieval "Poke" Ring Sundial presented in complete and excellent condition. Made of a copper or brass alloy, this ring sundial would have been made in England at some point between the 17th or 18th century, before mechanical timepieces became more widely available. The sundial is of the simple ring type, consisting of a broad, flat, ring with a channel cut into the centre of the outer wall, all along its circumference. This holds a captive sliding collar with a pinhole calibrated for use in British or European latitudes. The exterior has two rows of initials either side of the channel, indicating the months of the year set in groups of six arranged to indicate I [J] F M A M I to one side, for the first months of the year and below these are the remaining initials, D N O S A I. The interior is marked by twelve numerals, each representing the hours of the day from, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10, 11 and 12 [midday] through to, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 at the sunset end of the scale. The surface of the ring dial has a fabulous age patina and has not been polished. These sundial rings were simple to use and became known as poke dials; "poke" being an archaic word for pocket. Alternatively the ring could be worn on the finger or around the neck, for when in use, it would need to be suspended on a string with the sliding collar marker set to indicate the correct month of the year. Then, as the dial was suspended vertically, the sun would shine through the pinhole and a dot of light would shine onto the interior of the ring. The time could then be read by looking at the closest illuminated hour. A truly simple device in museum grade condition, which would have been used to give a rough indication of the time of day and would have been utilised by travelers and field workers and anyone else who needed to know the time where a mechanical timepiece was not available.
Rare & Important Longines Explorer's Pocket Watch, c.1895 Longines has a tradition of being an innovative watch company, keen to associate itself with all manner of world record breaking achievements. As such, Longines was often chosen by pioneering greats to assist in their endeavours. Whether it was on the railways, or far off Antarctic exploration, aerial conquest, ocean navigation... and the list goes on, Longines was always involved. However, one area of particular interest for the watch historian has been in the pursuit of military issue Longines watches - particularly in the diver's watch category where they do indeed hold a notable wartime intrigue. Yet their speciality waterproof watches can be traced right back to watches such as this extremely rare Longines' Explorer's Pocket Watch. Dating to 1895, this Longines Explorer is for all intents, the missing link - an ancestor of the Special Forces diver's watches issued to the first Allied frogmen in WW2: Starting out as a waterproof silver pocket watch with the distinctive canteen screw down cover to seal the watch winder, the resulting dive-watches evolved by the mere addition of strap lugs to an improved watertight case. This particular Longines watch is also identical to the Explorers' Watches designed for the the Royal Geographic Society in the late Victorian era. Many of these are documented by the RGS as having served on notable scientific and surveying expeditions, which add considerable worth to them. The Longines Explorer's Watch being offered here, was made for the London firm of Searle & Co. It was made entirely at the Longines' factory at Saint Imier, a fact which can be confirmed by the presence of Longines serial numbers inside the watch case. Furthermore, this watch is presented in remarkably good condition, free from significant service wear, showing only signs of careful carry, with just one barely obvious hairline in the vicinity of the stylised Roman IIII. The early original leather seals are also still intact, which would have been packed with wax and grease to ensure a hermetic seal. The silver hallmarked case screws up very securely and houses the excellent Longines Lepine 'Adjusted' movement, jewelled to the centre and looking factory fresh. Working well and keeping good time, the watch shows no sign of any inappropriate meddling - nor has it been serviced. A truly beautiful sleeper that could be a special one of a kind, made by Longines on a commission. Worthy of further research, this Longines Explorer's Watch would certainly be an important addition to a collection of early watertight timepieces and, being dent free and altogether in premium condition, will be next to impossible to improve upon.
Rare & Important Longines Explorer\'s Pocket Watch, c.1895 Longines has a tradition of being an innovative watch company, keen to associate itself with all manner of world record breaking achievements. As such, Longines was often chosen by pioneering greats to assist in their endeavours. Whether it was on the railways, or far off Antarctic exploration, aerial conquest, ocean navigation... and the list goes on, Longines was always involved. However, one area of particular interest for the watch historian has been in the pursuit of military issue Longines watches - particularly in the diver's watch category where they do indeed hold a notable wartime intrigue. Yet their speciality waterproof watches can be traced right back to watches such as this extremely rare Longines' Explorer's Pocket Watch. Dating to 1895, this Longines Explorer is for all intents, the missing link - an ancestor of the Special Forces diver's watches issued to the first Allied frogmen in WW2: Starting out as a waterproof silver pocket watch with the distinctive canteen screw down cover to seal the watch winder, the resulting dive-watches evolved by the mere addition of strap lugs to an improved watertight case. This particular Longines watch is also identical to the Explorers' Watches designed for the the Royal Geographic Society in the late Victorian era. Many of these are documented by the RGS as having served on notable scientific and surveying expeditions, which add considerable worth to them. The Longines Explorer's Watch being offered here, was made for the London firm of Searle & Co. It was made entirely at the Longines' factory at Saint Imier, a fact which can be confirmed by the presence of Longines serial numbers inside the watch case. Furthermore, this watch is presented in remarkably good condition, free from significant service wear, showing only signs of careful carry, with just one barely obvious hairline in the vicinity of the stylised Roman IIII. The early original leather seals are also still intact, which would have been packed with wax and grease to ensure a hermetic seal. The silver hallmarked case screws up very securely and houses the excellent Longines Lepine 'Adjusted' movement, jewelled to the centre and looking factory fresh. Working well and keeping good time, the watch shows no sign of any inappropriate meddling - nor has it been serviced. A truly beautiful sleeper that could be a special one of a kind, made by Longines on a commission. Worthy of further research, this Longines Explorer's Watch would certainly be an important addition to a collection of early watertight timepieces and, being dent free and altogether in premium condition, will be next to impossible to improve upon.
Rare .442 Webley "Metropolitan" RIC No.2 Revolver c.1870 Webley's range of RIC revolvers were first offered for sale in 1868 and became an immediate success with both the police and civilians alike. These large calibre medium sized revolvers also found favour with military officers alike, both as their service sidearm and also as a back-up. In some quarters however, these pistols were still too obtrusive for convenient carry and, before the advent of the Webley Bulldog, the only option without compromising on firepower or cylinder capacity, was to purchase one of these rarer short barrelled variants that Webley offered. These were listed in their catalogue as their, "Metropolitan" model. With its short 3 inch barrel and a truncated and rounded butt, this revolver was an effective concealment pistol that would have suited an army officer on campaign. As is, this Webley shows clear signs of extended carry and use, far more than it would have if it had merely spent its life in the drawer of a gentleman's writing desk! Presented in good but used condition, this short .442 Webley is in full working order, functioning well with good indexing and strong springs. Only the finish is worn, yet a fair amount of original bluing is still evident as well as clear marking, including the winged bullet W&S trademark. Likewise the walnut grips look very good and the revolver is overall, an attractive looking and well proportioned piece. As is, the Webley is clearly of an early pattern, which can be identified from the style of its cylinder stops and humped rear sight. A rare example of an early Webley RIC revolver for the collector. Barrel length = 3 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
Rare 1859 Webley Solid Frame 54 Bore Percussion Revolver Webley Solid Frame revolvers were a natural development to the already successful Wedge Frame models of 1857. However, by the time these robust revolvers were introduced in 1859 they were already using an outmoded ignition system. The metallic cartridge era had arrived and the Webley Solid Frames became obsolete during this transitional era - Consequently they are rare to find today. This heavy five shot 54 bore Webley Solid Frame revolver is complete and in good working order. It has strong springs throughout and works well in both single and double action, with just a little rotational play. The grips are intact and the overall finish shows a dark age mottled appearance with clear line engravings, serial number and top strap marked with the retailers name of, Thos. Blissett, South Castle Street, Liverpool. The bore and chambers are in comparable, good condition with some wear around the nipples. In short, a hard to find Webley Solid Frame at an attractive price.
Rare 1906 Metropolitan Police Issue Chronograph Pocket Watch In 1906, to counter the growing problem of speeding motorists in the capital, the Metropolitan Police were issued with a small number of chronograph pocket watches - they were to be used in the first ever speed traps. Imported by Stauffer & Co., these fine timepieces were chosen not only because they were the chosen official motor racing timers for the Gordon Bennett Cup, but Stauffer were also winners of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd chronometer prizes awarded by the Kew Observatory in 1905-1906. These watches were indeed the best that there was. Perhaps that is why the inside back cover of this watch is engraved with the image of the Flying Lady Gordon Bennett Trophy. The name on the dial is that of the London jeweller and watch supplier to the police, John Meader. Internally the movement is marked with the S&Co. crowned emblem and throughout, the condition of this watch is superb. It is absolutely free from any case dings or dents and is a reliable timekeeper. In fact, this same watch underwent a Premium Service within the past 2 years, so at least the mechanism is free from decades of accumulated dirt - However, a fresh Premium Service should be considered soon. From a historical point in 1906, a debate was held at the House of Commons, as some believed that these watches were an unnecessary expense: MR. MARKHAM "I beg to ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, seeing that at the recent Olympic Games the time of every race was correctly taken to one-tenth of a second, he will say if with a system of electric signals the speed of motor vehicles could be accurately taken; whether any application has been made by the Commissioner to him for money to install such electric appliances to prevent the law being daily broken by motorists; and whether he will see 1216 that any moneys necessary to enforce the law are granted to the Commissioner." MR. HERBERT SAMUEL "The chronographs used by the Metropolitan police, which time accurately to one-fifth of a second, were adopted after full consideration of various electrical and other timing appliances. In the opinion of the Commissioner timing by chronograph is the method best adapted to the needs of the Metropolitan Police and the conditions under which timing is effected by them." MR. MARKHAM "Is the right honourable gentleman aware that the Commissioner of Police, in a letter to the honourable Member for the Mansfield Division, said he allowed four miles an hour over and above the legal limit owing to the difficulty of marking the exact time?" MR. HERBERT SAMUEL "I am not aware." It seems that even with such fine timepieces, the police would still need to err on the side of caution as operator handling was a questionable factor. These watches remained in use for a number of decades, well after the Second World War. The watch is completely original and even retains the original glass which shows some minor sign of edge chipping, but remains too good to replace. The Crown and MP stamp to the rear was hand engraved prior to issue. Over all a most desirable timepiece that will be difficult to improve upon. My final image shows plain clothed officers and the obligatory uniformed constable to stop the car, seemingly discussing the finer points of such a watch. **************************************************************************** This is a rare Charles Nicolet chronograph, retailed by Stauffer & Co. silver pocket chronograph watch. It is running and the stop watch functions appear to work - however, the watch is running slow. As is, this is one of my projects that I acquired for myself, but have now decided that I have no spare time, nor the inclination to complete the work. With the stop/start and rest functions all operating well via the top pusher, this watch would make a good addition to any collection. I say that this watch is associated with motor racing because in 1903, Stauffer & Son became the official timekeepers for "The Gordon Bennett Cup" international automobile races held in Ireland over several years. Stauffer actually supplied identical chronograph watches for the timing of these races. Many police forces also purchased Stauffer chronographs and you can read more about these at the ZMWMILITARIA.COM website. The silver case is marked "C.N.," which is Charles Nicolet's maker's mark, registered at the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in London. A hallmark date letter M, also identifies the assay date of the watch to be 1907. The case is in good condition with the two rear covers snapping shut firmly. Generally, the case and the watch overall, is in good cosmetic condition with just minor signs of age related wear and no nasty dents. **************************************************************************** This is a rare Charles Nicolet chronograph, retailed by Stauffer & Co. silver pocket chronograph watch. It is running and the stop watch functions appear to work - however, the watch is running slow. As is, this is one of my projects that I acquired for myself, but have now decided that I have no spare time, nor the inclination to complete the work. With the stop/start and rest functions all operating well via the top pusher, this watch would make a good addition to any collection. I say that this watch is associated with motor racing because in 1903, Stauffer & Son became the official timekeepers for "The Gordon Bennett Cup" international automobile races held in Ireland over several years. Stauffer actually supplied identical chronograph watches for the timing of these races. Many police forces also purchased Stauffer chronographs and you can read more about these at the ZMWMILITARIA.COM website. The silver case is marked "C.N.," which is Charles Nicolet's maker's mark, registered at the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in London. A hallmark date letter M, also identifies the assay date of the watch to be 1907. The case is in good condition with the two rear covers snapping shut firmly. Generally, the case and the watch overall, is in good cosmetic condition with just minor signs of age related wear and no nasty dents.
Rare 4" Ejectorless M1877 Colt .41 Revolver Selling on consignment: An unusual and rare 4 inch Colt Thunderer revolver, dated to . Marketed by Colt as their lightweight standard M1877 revolver, known as the "Ejectorless," this rare revolver has a longer barrel than the more typical, "Storekeeper." lighter with sharp profiles and much original case colour and factory blue - Showing some signs of thinning finish to the cylinder and muzzle, which appears to be commensurate to holster carry. Nevertheless, this Thunderer is a tight locking example presented in full working order, with strong springs as well as a full-length extractor rod. All matching serial numbers, good grips, decent screws, good bore and chambers, together with a clear address and patent dates, make this iconic Colt, one for the collector. Barrel length = 4 inches Overall length = 8½ inches
Rare c.1900 Imperial German Army Pocket Watch Made pre WW1, this watch is a very good example of an Imperial German patriotic pocket watch, bearing the heraldic image of the Empire Eagle. It is guaranteed to be an authentic original and not a personalised timepiece with applied badges. This type of factory constructed timepiece is rare. The 53mm nickel case is beautifully ornate, bearing the national eagle, which was most likely intended for a military gentleman of some standing. What's more, given the turbulent times it is interesting to note that the dial bears 'Patent London' markings. Furthermore, the cylinder movement has a low serial number of, '412,' suggesting that few of these watches might have been made. All of this is original to the watch. Mechanically and timekeeping wise, the watch is working well although there is no indication as to when it was last serviced. Overall, a superb German military styled pocket watch that has minor damage to the dial, but this is adequately reflected by the price.
Rare c.1944 French Made Cupillard - US Army Military Issue Wristwatch Rare c.1944 French Made Cupillard - US Army Military Issue Wristwatch This is a most unusual and rare French made Cupillard military watch dating from the WW2 era. Initially Cupillard made watches for the French Army, however when France came under Nazi occupation, Cupillard "Etanche" [Waterproof] watches were requisitioned by the Wermacht. Then in 1944, following the Liberation of Paris, the remaining stores of military Cupillards were gratefully given over to the US Army. These later "Liberation" examples are the rarest of the Cupillard trilogy of military timepieces, especially in this excellent original condition. The watch is offered in working order, with the movement looking to be in factory bright condition, but that does not mean that the watch has been serviced. All in all, this rare military watch, presented in excellent collector grade condition, showing little evidence of any service wear. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare Cased "Webley & Sons" 120 Bore Revolver, c.1858 2019 New Year Special Early Webley signed revolvers are rare simply because most of the arms made in their formative years, were sold to the wider guntrade. Consequently, although they made many pistols, most only bear the name of the retailers. Certainly, when Webley & Sons were established in 1854 they did well, but their significant successes came some years after as a result of their innovation towards breach loading firearms. Thanks to the run of government contracts that followed, the Webley name gained acclaim worldwide as gunmakers of established repute. From then on Webley routinely commenced to marking their arms with their details. This means that to find an early percussion pistol parked as retailed by "Webley & Sons," is something of a rarity. Presented here is just such a signed "Webley & Sons" wedge frame revolver of around 120 bore, complete with its case and period accoutrements. It is offered in near excellent condition, showing little sign of use and retaining much original finish, good micro bore and chambers. Mechanically the action is fully working, with perfect timing and good lock up. The period wooden case all appears to be original and in excellent condition, although no gun maker label is present - In fact it looks to have never had a label. The case has its original olive felt lining and the compartment contains accoutrements comprising of; a nipple wrench with pricker, pincer ball mould marked "100," a cap tin, two piece cleaning rod with worm and jag, a powder flask and an oil bottle, the latter of which is probably a quality replacement. A quantity of bullets are also present. Overall, a good looking outfit for the Webley connoisseur. Barrel length = Overall length =
Rare Double Trigger - KM Model 1883 10.6mm Reichsrevolver The rare "Double Trigger" version of the Model 1883 Reichsrevolver, was originally intended for issue to Kriegsmarine Officers. Made by Dreyse, these DA revolvers were refined models with polished actions that could be operated single handedly to cock, whilst also allowing the shooter to take a considered aimed shot by virtue of its twin triggers. A hooked trigger guard and finely checkered grips completed the design, which was equally at home on either the battlefield or at the target gallery. These revolvers served until eventually replaced by the 9mm Luger self loader in 1908. Some of these revolvers were however later reissued to troops during WW1. As is, this double action 10.6mm [S&W .44 Russian] Reichsrevolver is a good and solid example offered in fine working order, with a good bright barrel bore and cylinders. All functions work very well and the revolver is evenly patinated, with some traces of original blue finish to sheltered areas and perfect grips. All in all, a highly presentable and unmolested example of what is the rarest pattern of German military Reichsrevolver. It is also an obsolete calibre pistol and may be owned in the UK as an antique, without any certificate. Offered with an associated period leather holster. A difficult to find revolver in unmolested collector grade condition.
Rare Dutch Navy Longines Deck Watch During WW2 the Royal Netherlands Navy survived the occupation by rapidly relocating from their homeland to establish a new HQ in London and Western Austrailia, with smaller bases in Ceylon. Their effort was largely centred around the Dutch East Indies, where in 1942 they suffered heavy losses, virtually wiping out their naval fleet. After the war the Netherlands joined NATO, working in close collaboration with her allies to once again establish a modern navy. To that end the Netherlands' Royal Naval Institute, which is part of the Nederlandse Defensie Academie, enrol between 100 - 150 naval officers annually. Of course after such a devastating conflict it was not only men that were required, but new equipment too. Post war, a number of the watches were supplied to the Netherlands' armed forces by the British Ministry of Defence. This large lever chronometer deck watch was however purchased from Longines on 14th October 1954, by their client Nederlandsche Horlogehendel. The watch has been deliberately made oversized to fit the 60mm housing used to protect naval chronometers when used in service. Furthermore, the movement is of a rare 37.9N calibre, used earlier in the production of the Lindbergh airman's navigational watch - it looks factory fresh. All in all, this Longines is in fine original condition, keeping excellent time, but a service should always be considered. N.B. Dial colour is bright and not yellowed The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare Early Limehouse Issue Thames River Police Flintlock Pistol, c.1798 A rare Thames River Police flintlock pistol, made by Wheeler and marked for issue to Limehouse, c.1798. The Thames River Police are recognised as being among the first professional police forces that the world has ever seen. Originally formed by the Magistrate Patrick Colquhoun and Master Mariner John Harriott in 1798, the River Police eventually merged into the Metropolitan Police in 1839. However this pistol hails from those first years of the River Police, whose remit was to tackle theft and looting from ships anchored in the Pool of London and around the docks of the Thames. These were difficult times with smugglers and other offenders facing harsh penalties in law. If apprehended, wrong doers would just as likely be sentenced to death for theft, just as they would if they had committed murder. Not surprisingly then, many a criminal would fight when cornered, as they had nothing to lose. Typically then, a constable on the Thames beat would likely be patrolling well armed with a service pistol drawn from their armoury, together most likely with other privately owned weapons. This flintlock is one of those service pistols that the River Police would have carried. It is a very good example of its type, with a 9" round barrel of .65 bore, nicely engraved to the top, "Thames River Police No. 42." The strong working lock is signed by the maker, Wheeler and the brass butt cap is engraved "Limehouse 42." The trigger guard is again similarly numbered. All in all this is a very good example of a rare Police issue pistol, with good metal and woodwork, exhibiting some service and age related wear but no significant damage. A difficult to find historic Police flintlock.
Rare German Afrika Korps Military Contract Wristwatch c.1943 Rare German Afrika Korps Military Contract Wristwatch c.1943 There has been much debate and speculation over the years concerning the topic as to whether DI **** H marked wristwatches were actually military issue or not. Certainly when the book, "A Concise Guide to Military Timepieces" was written, little was known about this scarce variant and, whilst the watch was correctly recognised as being of German Military procurement, its proper attributes were not adequately identified. However, with the benefit of the worldwide internet community and some reasoned hearsay over the years, I believe that ZMW Militaria can now reveal the truth about this military contract watch enigma. It is known that the German Army (Deutsch Heer) issued watches to its troops bearing the DH property stamp. However, just as with the British Commonwealth Forces, the Germans also had variations to their regular marking codes when it came to property issued to their foreign troops - namely, the armed forces of the Italian fascist regime under Mussolini. Certainly, right from the onset of war, the German military presence in North Africa had steadily grown to protect their interests and strategic foothold in the area. Eventually then, the Afrika Korps became an amalgamated force of German and Italian forces who had assembled in the region 1941. Jointly then, the combined forces became known as the Panzergruppe Afrika. By 1942 the coalition had reorganised under Rommel and were now referred to as the Deutsch-Italienische Panzerarmee; a name which was soon to be again modified, to the Heeresgruppe Afrika. Therefor DI **** H marked wristwatches ordered from the Helvetia watch company during this 1942-43 period, simply reflect the requirement to property mark these for the Deutsch-Italienische Heergruppe [Afrika]. Consequently, we see watches just as the one being offered here, marked up and issue numbered to the German Italian Army. However, the mystery has not entirely been solved, as the German authorities apparently cancelled their watch contract when the Italian fascist government was overthrown. It is very likely that when that happened, many wristwatches remained at Helvetia, no doubt in varying stages of completion. Some witnesses have since testified that empty surplus DI **** H cases existed post war. Today, as the Helvetia watch company is no longer in existence, it is no longer possible to determine precisely what happened the DI **** H watches that were ordered by the Wermacht, or how many were actually supplied to the Deutsch-Italienische Heer, but it may also a possibility that these watches (or a good proportion) never made it through to the German authorities. Certainly of the DI **** H watches that do surface, there are considerable variations of dial design and two movements may be found with sub seconds or sweeping second dials. Clearly, today it seems very obvious that the wristwatches which have the sweeping seconds hands, are built on a movement of post WW2 manufacture; albeit the watches that use the older sub seconds movement are very much of wartime design. Of those wristwatches that could be considered as contenders for genuine 1943 Afrika Korps issue, it is most likely that these watches would have been supplied the Wermacht with a military spec luminous dial. Once again though, of the older watches that do surface, most have non standard dials signed either, "Helvetia" or "General." Once again, if the dial is not of military spec, the watch is not army issue… although in all instances the cases were part of the German military contract. So what's left as a true contender for a WW2 Afrika Korps issue watch? Well, ZMWMilitaria.Com believes that the seldom encountered DI****H watches with white dials, bearing luminous Arabic numerals and having the sub seconds movement, are the actual watches that served with the Deutsch-Italienische Heer Gruppe Now, given these variables, ZMW Militaria believes that most DI **** H marked watches never made it to the military. Instead then, they were released onto the commercial market to minimise the company’s losses, either sold in their military guise (luminous dials and sub seconds) or veiled to look in other ways more suitable for the commercial jewellery trade (non luminous, gold dot markers, sweep seconds). This transition from military timepiece to civilian watch would have occurred during the war, or certainly very soon after. For sure, one known DI **** H watch with a personalised inscription "From Thelma to Bob, 1947" example exists, indicating that the sweep second arabic numerated version existed just post war. What ZMW Militaria can state, is that this genre of Helvetia watch [case} was a Nazi contract for issue to the German Italian forces in North Africa. Unfortunately though, that does not indicate that all DI **** H watches that turn up today were military issued… but some very early pieces may have found their way to the coalition forces, and if they were they probably had subsidiary second hands as per the German requirement for their DH marked Helvetia watches. Furthermore from a long time collector's perspective and having now observed many DI **** H stamped watches, it is noted that many examples have a faint number engraved in the space between DI and the H mark. However, what is less common is the presence of a similarly place serial number that has been more heavily struck and is immediately visible to the eye without the need of any close inspection. This duality of serial numbering raises more questions, but it could just be that the watches were to be supplied in two batches… some having possibly arrived earlier. For this version of the military DI **** H watch being offered here, what can be stated is that this watch is in very good working order and keeping time, although not serviced. A further interesting feature to note, is that the balance has an early shock absorber fitted, of a type that was patented in 1938. Cosmetically, the watch is in good used condition featuring the later sweep second movement. ******************* If you happen to have one of these watches already, please check whether your watch has the lighter stamped number or the heavier applied serial number situated between the DI****H. If you would be kind enough to e-mail me which type you own and whether your has the sweep or sub second dial…. and finally, Most importantly, if your DI***H wristwatch has the older sub second movement does it have a dial of military style with luminous numerals? Details like this could help to develop or solve this military enigma watch once and for all. Any meaningful results will be published here for collectors to draw their own conclusions. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare German Military 8-Day Mantlepiece Chronometer Transponder Clock By Mercer This rare chronometer is from a series of just 5 clocks. All were purchased from Mercer in 1931 by their German client, Lidecke of Geestemünde. Lidecke, a noted chronometer maker in their own right, was supplying special contract timepieces to the German military, of which a number had already been sourced from England. The serial number of this 8-day detent chronometer, 705, identifies this clock from Mercer’s own records, as a "Control Chronometer." One and two day chronometers are special in their own way, but what singles this clock out is not just its capacity for 8-day autonomy, but also the extraordinary ability for this clock to be connected to a wireless transmitter. This information comes from a variety of Mercer references and the patent office records from 1926. Mercer records further identify the chronometer as being part of a limited production run of "Industrial clocks." Indeed, the 700 series were precisely that - Industrial, highly accurate, no frills utility clocks, with a twist. Measuring 27 x 25 x 13cm and weighing 5Kg, this is a precision chronometer specially selected and refined with some extra and most unusual technical additions. It is these additions that make this clock a milestone of historical importance. This clock could be used as an aeronautical transponder or beacon, sending out a radio signal via an electrical contact. Every second, for 9 consecutive seconds, this clock emits an electric pulse followed by one second of silence. That same cycle then resumes with its ongoing cycle of transmission. Furthermore, a mechanical device is also fitted to the escapement which sends a rapid signal every ¼ second. The sides of the wooden case show where the brass electrical terminals for both the 1 SEC and 1/4 SEC leads attach. Although Mercer believed and indeed constructed their timekeeper to be used as a mantelpiece chronometer, it was nevertheless fitted out with additional brackets. These brackets act as anchor points on each corner of the heavy timepiece. This adaptation to the case may have been done by Lidecke, for their client, the Deutsche Seewarte. It should also be noted that this type of modification has been seen on other aviation transponders which allowed chronometers to be securely suspended and braced within a sprung mounting frame, as if it were on gimbals. By way of an historical note, in the mid 1920's the Luftwaffe were experimenting, testing and developing transponders and radio beacons. All this was part of their plan to gain air superiority, making air travel safer by aiding efficient navigation. This was to be of great importance, as the Germans government and later the Nazis, wanted to lead the world in long range air travel. A number of references to this fact exist and the author Konrad Knirim, pictures Luftwaffe aviation clocks, which appear to be very much like this Mercer 8-Day Chronometer, both in function and in the mounting frame arrangement. In 100% original and working order, this fine Mercer chronometer is in excellent condition. Having been previously owned for many years by a former Mercer employee, this clock comes with copies of Patent Record Office documents, fully explaining details of "the improvements," complete with schematic drawings. The silvered dial is excellent, with just a hint of light age patina. Hands are blued steel, all original and perfect. The wood case is generally excellent, but it does have some minor service wear marks as shown in the images - certainly nothing nasty. All the bevelled glass is perfect and original. The up/down, or power reserve indicator is calibrated for 8 days running duration. As with other detent chronometers, these beat at a rate of 2 oscillations per second - although the balance wheel, with its free sprung helical hairspring, also controls the ¼ second time function. An ingenious set up. All is working well, however there is no record as to when this chronometer was last serviced. So chronometer grade accuracy is not guaranteed. Nevertheless there is no sign of abuse - yet cleaning is recommended for this precision movement. Furthermore, the wiring has not been tested, but this is not necessary for the mechanical function of the chronometer. Internally the mechanically operated chronometer detent movement looks superb. Not polished, but totally original with Mercer's "Industrial Grade" finish. Totally original and authentic, the industrial finish has a brush applied polish which is untouched. The delicate chronometer balance can also be isolated, blocked from functioning by means of a mechanical corking device. The clock is supplied with its own correct chronometer key. In 1931 this clock cost £26 - A huge amount of money for the German economy! Clearly this chronometer was intended for a serious application. Lidecke sources confirm that chronometer 705 was tested in 1931 - However there is no mention of the name "Mercer" in their records. Lidecke references show that chronometer 705 was examined by the Deutsche Seewarte in 1932, what happened to it after that, can only be speculated on. Due to the highly specialised nature of this chronometer, the Premium Service is not immediately available. However, if servicing is required, this can be arranged at additional cost.
Rare Jaeger LeCoultre Pilot Issue Wristwatch c.1945 In Switzerland the firms of Jaeger and LeCoultre amalgamated their watch houses, but, when JLC came to expand their interest to the USA, they found that they were unable to call themselves by their new european brandname. This was simply because the company of "Jaeger" already existed in The States as an instrument manufacturer. So, in order to cut through American bureaucracy, JLC simply called their US branch, "LeCoultre." They are nevertheless, one and the same company. During the late 1930's and early 40's, at a time when America's home watch companies were just about managing to fulfil government contracts, LeCoultre were also helping by offering high grade timepieces to aviators. The LeCoultre watches, that is to say the Weems patents, were supplied in limited numbers to the USAAF. However, an even smaller number of aviation equipped LeCoultre watches were also provided, which featured a Faraday shield, giving the watch additional antimagnetic properties. This is one of those rarer LeCoultres which can be easily identified with the presence of the iron bezel ring, rather than the more familiar brass type. These watches were all of the highest quality and utilised the same movements as supplied to the sister [premier] watch company, Vacheron & Constantine, which was already a seasoned supplier of military timepieces to the US Forces. What's more, impressed by the calibre 450 movement's capability, Vacheron & Constantine went on to use the same ebauche in their chronometer rated timepieces. As is, the movement of this wristwatch bears the additional US authority granted code lettering of,"VXN," on top of the balance bridge: These three unique letters were an obligatory means to identify any watch as being a sanctioned import into the US. All US agency approved watch importers had their own unique code.... With Vacheron & Constantine's being, "VXN." Precisely how many of these LeCoultre pilots' watches were actually made is not known, but very few are ever encountered on the commercial markets. Although none of them have ever been found bearing any USAF marking, a study of the brand by the watch historian Zaf Basha, has concluded that they were indeed military issue timepieces. Presented in very good and original condition, this watch differs to other wartime LeCoultres, as it makes use of an all steel and iron case - unlike those supplied to the RAF. This example is also in very good condition, retaining the original large diameter crown, again of the same pattern as used on the Weems watches. Likewise the dial and hands are all of the military pattern and these too are in excellent order. Even the celluloid crystal is of the correct pattern, which gives the otherwise off-white dial, its more yellowish hue. Internally the 17 jewel VXN movement is signed by LeCoultre, This is in very good working condition and it keeps time, however it has not been serviced. A Premium Service is offered. All in all, a very rare and highly desirable military JLC pilot's wristwatch.
Rare London & South West Railway Train Guard's Whistle The London & South West Railway existed between the years 1838 - 1922, when following a major regrouping, they were absorbed into what became the Southern Region. In their time, the L&SWR were responsible for the rebuilding of London's Waterloo Station, into what is a world famous terminus. This rare guard's whistle dates from a time in L&SWR's history, when their resources and logistical savvy were tested to extremes. Not only did they mange to maintain a public service, but during WW1 the L&SWR also catered for the troop and supply movements down to the South Coast. This is the era from whence this whistle hails. Most L&SWR whistles encountered are the black horn type, however this example is a Hudsons' Thunderer. The whistle itself is in particularly fine condition, being dent free and unpolished - appearing sharp and virtually factory new, with only some light oxidisation to the split ring. A railway whistle that will be near impossible to better.
Rare Mark II Admiralty & RAE Pilot's Cockpit Watch, c.1913 Created in 1912, the Royal Naval Air Service had a total of 95 aircraft and blimps, which were hand-me-downs from the army. These aircraft were primarily used for shipping patrols, but the RNAS were also expected to engage enemy vessels, and to harass their coastlines. They were also tasked with locating and bombing Zeppelins stationed at their German airfields, in contrast to the Royal Flying Corps, who were expected to engage the airborne Zeps. Nevertheless, the two air wings worked together to good effect: This mutual cooperation between the two wings is highlighted on this watch, as it not only bears the Admiralty Department marking on the dial, but also the 'RAE, 'Royal Aircraft Establishment 'Repair' details of Farnborough, as well as War Department stamps! Remarkably then, this RNAS Mark II 8-day cockpit watch has retained not only all the original features associated with these pre WW1 cockpit watches, but is also cosmetically in excellent, damage free condition. Even beneath the painted numbers, the dial enamel is pristine: Whilst ZMW Militaria prefers to display the watches in their pure, 'as found' state, the individual tastes of the collector can be catered for after purchase. Mechanically, whilst this rare watch is in working order, the movement has not been serviced and if the watch is to be used regularly, servicing is recommended. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60. Please note that the cost of the Premium Service will be going up in 2016.
Rare Maybach Panzer Factory Stop Watch by Hanhart, c.1938 This is a rare pre WW2 Hanhart military spec stop watch, formerly used at the research and industrial plant of Maybach Motorenbau. The watch itself is in excellent condition and working order, although it has not been serviced. It does show some minor signs of service wear, yet it remains essentially ding and dent free and comes complete with a period unbreakable celluloid glass. Designed to time events of up to 30 minutes, the outer dial is calibrated to show any interval of less than 1 minute duration, as a decimal reading. Such decimal stop watches were useful where they were required to measure a time component for an equation, where 100 units equals 60 seconds. Originally founded in 1909 by Wilhelm Maybach, together with his son Karl, the luxury car manufacturer started business as a subsidiary of Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH. However, by 1912 they had established themselves as an independent company, under the title of Maybach-Motorenbau, using their initials within a rounded triangle, as a logo. The company was soon contracted to supply the Maybach Mb.IVa engines as they were needed for use in German aeroplanes and airships of WW1. After the war, to raise their profile as a manufacturer of opulent automobiles, MM set about building an experimental car, which they showcased at the Berlin Motor Show in 1921. At around the same time, Maybach also found a use for their aero engines on the international motor racing circuit - Today, these cars are much prized by collectors. However, in tandem with the luxury side of the business, MM were also involved in the development and manufacture of heavy duty Diesel engines for both marine and railway use. With another war looming, Maybach was compelled to produce engines for Nazi Germany's Panzer tanks, at their engine plant in Friedrichshafen, which, together with other industries in the area, became a frequent objective for bombing raids. After WW2, car manufacturing was never restarted and the company was eventually sold in 1960, to Daimler Benz, where their new owner went on to use Maybach's talents in the construction of their high end, hand-built Mercedes cars. An interesting Hanhart stop watch, of both military and motoring significance.
Rare Metropolitan Police Issue Pocket Stop Watch & Case The Metropolitan Police first used pocket chronograph watches in 1906, although those early watches were considered to be very expensive tools. Typically the Police Commissioner was heavily criticised for their purchase, but he argued that they were necessary to combat the growing number of speeding motorists. So, when the police next purchased more timepieces in the 1950s, they were to be regular stop watches, as this one is. This watch is marked M.P.104 on the dial, movement and leather watch case. It additionally is engraved with the Queen's Crown and MP mark to the rear. It is presented n very good condition and working order, although not checked for precise accuracy. Interestingly the movement has a special compartment, which was used to conceal spare watch parts. Such movements were made by the Swiss company, Excelsior Park. A good example of a rare Metropolitan Police issue watch.
Rare Parker Field & Sons Constabulary Manstopper Percussion Pistol c.1856 A rare Constabulary Pattern tunic coat pistol ordered from Parker Field & Sons c.1856. (See "Police Firearms Officers' Association" website for an identical pistol and an earlier W.Parker version is elsewhere on this website). Since the early years of the 19th Century, William Parker had been the armourer to the Bow Street Runners. Then in 1842 when William died, his son under his married name of Parker Field, took over the business and again in later years, the company underwent another name change to Parker Field & Sons and once again they in turn became the contracted gunmaker, sword and police accoutrement supplier to the Metropolitan Police. A prestigious appointment indeed. That same year, an order was placed with Parker Field & Sons for constabulary pistols with swivelling rammers for issue to Metropolitan Police Inspectors. This in itself was an unusual choice for the Met at that time, as by now most British police forces had equipped themselves with revolvers. In fact the police patrolling the Thames Dockyards were themselves already in receipt of Colt revolvers. Yet, the Receiver for the Metropolitan Police did place the order requiring the arms to be supplied between 1857 - 1859. Police ledgers show that the pistols cost £2 6 shillings apiece. By 1866 the pistols were declared as obsolete and withdrawn from service. The prominent rack number, "23," and butt serial numbers, indicate that this pistol was part of a larger police order, but it is only circumstances that suggest that this pistol was part of the Metropolitan contract. Parker Field may indeed have been supplying other forces at this time too. As is, this is a very good and scarce example of its type and in an untouched condition that should please collectors. Offered with a strong working action and good bore.
Rare Police Issue Coastguard Pattern Pistol By Wilkinson, c.1850 Coastguard pattern pistols were a popular choice among the various official government and quasi, military and civilian organisations that existed during the 19th century. As such, it is not difficult to understand that many pistols of this pattern were adopted by the new police. Being a legal authority, the police administration was run in a manner much in keeping with military practice. So private double inspection stamps on the butt, together with Birmingham proofs on the barrel, can be found on this issue gun. Certainly this civilian version of the Coastguard pistol, which was retailed in c.1850, was used as a Constabulary weapon in Australia. Being the property of a Crown authority, the pistol was not surprisingly impressed with an extra Queen's Crown emblem to the butt, just below the trigger guard tang. This identified the pistol as being official police property, which came from the ordnance contractor, Wilkinson, who at this same time is known to have been also supplying Brunswick rifles to the Victoria Constabulary. The pistol offered here is additionally marked "P-2" on the trigger guard, which was a police designator for an area within V.C. territory. All that is known at this time is that pistols of the Coastguard pattern are sometimes found marked, "P-1," which has been attributed to the lake area of Victoria. Presumably then, P-2 was an adjoining district. This police pistol is presented in near excellent cosmetic condition, being free from damage other than minor bruises to the wood. All completely original with much remaining finish to the barrel and lock. It is of course in full working order. A difficult example to find or to improve upon. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Rare Police Superintendent\'s Nickel Silver Tipstaff, c.1850 A rare nickel silver tipstaff reserved for the higher ranks in the New Police. Issued to Superintendents and above, this tipstaff was made by Parker Field & Sons, 233 Holborn London. It is in excellent original condition, with a heavy cast and well-detailed Queen's Crown, mounted on a nickel and turned ebony grip. The top unscrews to reveal the inner compartment, which would originally have held the Warrant giving the holder's details. With just minor wear, this tipstaff is in original collector grade condition, now having a light age related bloom to the nickel. This could be cleaned to reveal the underlying silver metal but looks good as is. Overall length = 7¼ inches
Rare Polish Cyma - LOPP Balloon/Pilot's Wristwatch c.1928 Although Poland had pilots during WW1, the build up of a true airforce did not occur until after Poland gained her independence in 1918. Even then its formation was a slow affair, assisted by the efforts of a paramilitary group who were established in 1928, becoming known as the, "Ligii Obrony Powietyrznej i Przeciwgazowej," or "Airborne & Antigas Defence League." The L.O.P.P. was broadly made up of aviators, including ballooning and communications experts, who through their sense of duty and national pride, ran the League to help with the development of new aircraft as well as the purchase of aviation equipment, including the construction of new airfields and parachute towers. Throughout the 1930s the League focused on youth involvement through their activities, in essence becoming a training camp for young pilots, which by 1939 was supplying the Polish Air Force with many of their new recruits. This genuinely rare and early Polish Air Force watch from the late 1920's, has the rear cover engraved, with the now lightly rubbed details stating, "Okrag. Woj. L.O.P.P. Poznan." This inscription gives you the details of the unit which served near the German lines at Poznan. It is also numbered, "52," indicating that a small batch were purchased and engraved before issue. It is not a private purchase watch and therefore it was most likely for a principal figure within the League. This Cyma is of typical pilot size, measuring a big 38mm across, excluding the crown, lugs etc. Despite probably many years of wear, this watch is in excellent condition. The dial is all original and perfect with correct hands and a perfect glass crystal. The articulating lugs were a useful feature that allowed the watch to flex with the wrists providing not only comfort in use, but also assisted in the retention of the watch, where it might otherwise be torn from the wrist. All the hinges are good and firm, and the watch is in perfect running order keeping good time. This watch has been serviced in the past 5 years. A truly gorgeous and historic timepiece that will be impossible to replace. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare Princeton Sherrif's Department .41 Colt SAA Revolver, c.1901 Originally Princeton, New Jersey, had a marshall appointed in 1813 under State legislature, but not much changed until the town expanded. Being the midway point between two of the largest cities, New York and Philadelphia, Princeton grew and eventually the conditions called for a more effective police service be established. At public meetings, citizens demanded that a, "Society for pursuing and detecting thieves," should be put in place. In turn, ordinance [bye laws] were passed against, "Those who run fast horses through town," and a Night Police was started to keep the peace. The full time Princeton Police Department was not however established until 1886, bringing a proficient law and order authority to the now burgeoning city. This superb Colt Single Action Army revolver is one of Princeton Sheriff's Department issue pistols. No doubt carried extensively in a holster, which has provided some protection to this rare police issue piece. Offered in full working order, with good bore and chambers, this revolver shows typical signs of professional wear, but no abuse. Clearly this Colt has been well maintained and is in perfect working order, with a superb action in all respects. Sold with all matching numbers, the revolver has some original finish with the bluing having dulled. Nevertheless, the markings are crisp, with perfect grips showing nothing but the rubbing of a grateful sheriff's hand. An exciting and rare, first generation .41 Colt SAA for the collector. Barrel length = 5.5 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Rare Queensland Government Police - .442 Webley RIC No.3 Revolver c.1878 Genuine government issue Webley revolvers, other that the .455 service revolver, are extremely rare to find, let alone in this untouched condition. This particular Webley No.3 RIC, is one of only a small number that were issued to the Queensland Police, with the first 100 being delivered in 1875. Successive small batches were then delivered over the next few years. As with the others, this example is chambered for the obsolete .442 cartridge, which allows it to be owned as a curio without any certificate. An interesting feature of these police revolvers is the additional ejector rod, housed in the butt. Whilst the quick release cylinder axis pin was generally utilised as an ejector in the course of routine filed stripping of the weapon, the supplementary ejector would be used in preference during any live fire situation, giving a tactical option of employing 'top up reloads.' This was a valuable feature during any prolonged or multiple assailant shoot out in the bush, which did occur. In fact, the capture of Ned Kelly would be a prime example of one such violent encounter. Overall this Webley is in excellent condition. It is typical of a well maintained issue revolver, being mechanically perfect with an excellent bright bore and chambers, but with much loss of surface finish. Nevertheless the barrel and sheltered areas due show the original blue, whilst the rest is to a plum brown and black. The top strap is marked P. Webley, Birmingham and the frame has additional QG and broad arrow marking. A superb government issue revolver for the collector. Barrel length - 4 inches Overall length - 9 inches
Rare Signed "Webley & Sons" 120 Bore Revolver, c.1858 Early Webley signed revolvers are rare simply because most of the arms made in their formative years, were sold to the wider guntrade. Consequently, although they made many pistols, most only bear the name of the retailers. Certainly, when Webley & Sons were established in 1854 they did well, but their significant successes came some years after as a result of their innovation towards breach loading firearms. Thanks to the run of government contracts that followed, the Webley name gained acclaim worldwide as gunmakers of established repute. From then on Webley routinely commenced to marking their arms with their details. This means that to find an early percussion pistol parked as retailed by "Webley & Sons," is something of a rarity. Presented here is just such a signed "Webley & Sons" wedge frame revolver of around 120 bore, complete with its case and period accoutrements. It is offered in near excellent condition, showing little sign of use and retaining much original finish, good micro bore and chambers. Mechanically the action is fully working, with perfect timing and good lock up. The period wooden case all appears to be original and in excellent condition, although no gun maker label is present - In fact it looks to have never had a label. The case has its original olive felt lining and the compartment contains accoutrements comprising of; a nipple wrench with pricker, pincer ball mould marked "100," a cap tin, two piece cleaning rod with worm and jag, a powder flask and an oil bottle, the latter of which is probably a quality replacement. A quantity of bullets are also present. Overall, a good looking outfit for the Webley connoisseur. Barrel length = Overall length =
Rare Victorian Police Alarm Rattle - West Midlands Police The alarm rattle was first used by watchmen in the late 17th or early 18th century and in turn, was also carried by the New Police Constables. Swung around, the rattle proved to be a highly effective way of gaining the attention of a crowd, as the wooden slats clacked loudly against a ratchet. However, the rattle was cumbersome and prone to damage but more worryingly, many constables were assaulted with them. In consequence, by 1884 the Metropolitan Police adopted a police whistle, which became the modern way of summoning assistance and its 'call,' could be heard over half a mile (across Hounslow Heath) which was twice the distance of a rattle. Rattles were then withdrawn from Met service in 1887, although provincial areas likely kept theirs for a while longer. Beautifully marked with the Victorian Crown and bearing details of "Bilston," this rattle is dated, "1898." However, this rattle was could have been made earlier, which means that it might have been property marked on instruction or officer's whim, some years thereafter. Interestingly though, the old Bilston Police Station near Wolverhampton was built in 1840 as a prisoner holding gaol. This would be a good reason to retain the services of a rattle, perhaps being used to gain the attention of brawling inmates? Anyway, Bilston was the only station in England to have a deep dry moat encircling it, which the prisoners were allowed to exercise in. When the Victorian station was finally closed in 2011, it was put up for public sale and its historic contents were put into the local museum at Ironbridge, including this rattle. Unfortunately the museum also closed a few years thereafter and their wonderful collection of social artefacts were sold at auction. Bilston police station itself, is now a block of flats. Presented in full working order, this rattle shows typical signs of service wear, but has been treated and waxed to preserve its integrity. Some minor wear to one of the wooden slats, but otherwise a solid example of wonderfully early police kit.
Rare Webley No. 2 RIC .320CF Revolver & Holster c.1914 Webley catalogued this small frame No.2 revolver, with its fluted cylinder and flat base butt, as their model "RIC." However, unlike the larger Royal Irish Constabulary counterparts, these revolvers were never stamped with the acronym. Production of this gate loading model ran alongside the more modern hinged frame Webley Pockets, before being halted just prior to 1915 with serial numbers of around 100,000 being recorded. As was, this RIC version with its smaller dimensions proved to be a popular back-up weapon chosen by army officers and carried alongside their service revolver. A number of these are held as exhibits by the Imperial War Museum. Chambered for the now obsolete .320 Centre Fire cartridge, this RIC was retailed by W. Griffiths of Manchester and judging by the serial number range, it would appear to be one of the later revolvers of its type. This particular Webley RIC is in excellent and original condition throughout, complete with an original period holster. The metalwork has faded to a dull grey and blue patina, leaving traces of original finish surviving. All springs are working well and the cylinder rotates and indexes smoothly with positive lock up. The chambers and bore are all in at least excellent condition. A wonderful example of a difficult to find wartime Webley RIC revolver and holster.
Rare William IV Enfield Coastguard Pistol, c.1831 An early and rare Enfield signed Coastguard pistol, bearing William IV King's Crown marking, plus a Board of Ordnance mark and a plethora of inspector's stamps, c.1831. This pistol has seen much service use, yet the action is still working with strong springs. However, at some point in the past the pistol has undergone armoury repairs to the hammer, together with the addition of a raised foresight, and a replaced ramrod. Fortunately all of this previous work could be improved with little effort - So, selling as is, or for remedial attention. A rare WR Coastguard pistol with good marking and plenty of potential for improvement. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Rare WW1 Air Ministry Issue Zenith 'White Dial' Mark V - Gun Camera Watch During WW1, when the Mark V 36 Hour timepieces became the standard aeroplane instrument watches issued to the Royal Flying Corps, the dial specification dictated that only black dials would be used. Not to be confused by the earlier Mark IV 8 Day watches that were available with both black and white dials, the Mark V watches demanded black dials following field tests where it was decided that white numerals on a black ground gave consistently clearer contrast and thus, better legibility at a glance. After the introduction of the Mark V, many of the Mark IV watches had their white dials replaced, upgrading them to the modern spec. Such upgraded watches can be identified as having had a retro black dial fitted, as they retain their earlier 8 Day movement, whilst their new black dials bear the Mark V designation. This dial reworking was generally carried out during routine services, post 1915. Given the above information, where the Royal Flying Corps chose to implement a programme of updating white dials to black, from that moment it became very unusual to see a Mark V timepiece bearing a white dial - but there is of course a reason for this anomaly. Whilst black was the dial colour that gave pilots the best scope for instrument reading at a glance, white became the preferred dial colour for timepieces which were destined to be used in aerial gun cameras. This Mark V Zenith is in fact a very early RFC/RAF issue watch used in their gun cameras and what's more, the watch comes complete with its original Air Ministry stamped spirit level which was used alongside the watch. The spirit level is actually an angle of bank indicator, showing 0 for level flight, as well as 1, 2 and rate 3 turns. As photographs were taken, the watch face together with the bank indicator would be simultaneously imprinted onto the photo negative image. The time was obviously an important factor in reconnaissance, but the angle of bank was also crucial to giving an indication of the camera's attitude to the target as a skewed image could distort the shape or dimensions of objects. Whilst period pictures exist showing these white dialled Mark V watches imprinted on reconnaissance photos, the timepieces themselves are very rare to find, especially in this original unaltered state. The complete watch is in excellent condition throughout, keeping time and looking good, despite not being serviced. The Zenith is offered complete with the angle of bank indicator. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare WW1 Canadian Army Expeditionary Force Whistle This is a rare 1913 dated, Canadian Army Expeditionary Force whistle, used during WW1. When Britain declared war on Germany in 1914, as a Sovereign Dominion, Canada spontaneously became involved in the same conflict, declaring war the following day. Being a nation of French and English speaking citizens, they argued that they had a duty to fight and not surprisingly, the Canadian Army raised its own Expeditionary Force. For the first time in history, the Canadian Army fought as an independent force during WW1. Out of a force of 620,000, by the end of the Great War, 67,000 had been killed in action and a further 250,000 were wounded. Canada’s military attainments during the war came at, Somme, Vimy and Passchendaele battles. This Canadian Army whistle itself, shows signs of extended pocket carry, however there are no nasty dents and the whistle is in sound condition and working order. It bears the 1913 date and Canadian military property stamp.
Rare WW1 Military Trench Pattern Wrist-Compass Although it looks similar to the many smaller army issue pocket compasses of WW1, this unmarked wrist-compass was likely made as a private purchase item for the soldier. Compasses like this were of course popular, not only because of their handiness as a utility tool, but also because they mimicked the other valuable accessory that many men could not afford - A timepiece. As such, they have often become associated with NCO's, who might prefer to wear the wrist compass in lieu of the wristwatch, which had become so very popular among the younger officers during the Great War. Measuring a generous 47mm in diameter (not including the push button), this compass is in working order despite showing signs of service use and some field repair. Nevertheless the slightly dented top cover is still attached at the hinge, which has become a little loose due to it having been over extended and then bent back as a 'fix.' As such, the cover still serves as a protective lid over the glass. Internally though, the compass itself is in good cosmetic condition and working order. The leather band is still supple and useable and although old, may have been adapted from another wider military strap. Interestingly, similar wrist compasses were also issued to the SOE during WW2. A rare item of WW1 field equipment.
Rare WW1 RN Issue Waltham Riverside Hermetic Pocket watch This high quality military pocket watch, made by the Waltham Watch Company, is documented to have been made in 1914 and was probably procured for service by the Royal Navy, as there was an acute shortage of navigational timepieces at this point of the war. This watch case design seals the movement, giving the watch enhanced protection from the elements, thanks to the well fitted nickel case - the case is also signed Waltham. Shielded within the hermetic case, the 19 jewel Waltham Riverside movement is marked that it has been Adjusted in 5 Positions. These "adjustments" are a special feature, indicating that the movement has been optimised to give a high degree of exact timekeeping. Before the watch left Waltham, it would have been tested in the Dial Up, Dial Down, Pendant Up, Pendant Left and Pendant Right positions, with adjustments being made at each turn to give the watch its best possible rate of timekeeping, whatever its attitude. Another touch of class is Waltham's use of gold in the manufacture of the movement. Apart from the gold jewel chatons and balance timing screws, there is also gold centre wheel, which is the preferred metal used in the production of high grade timepieces, as the softer metal meshes more positively with the watch's other gears. Interestingly this watch has not been stamped with any military marks to the outside of the watch, however the movement was engraved with a broad arrow and H.W.1055. As is, this watch is in fine condition, working well and keeping time, however the Premium Service should be considered for this specially timed watch. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare WW1 Silver Trench Wristlet c.1917 Despite their popularity among young officers, wristwatches were not immediately issued to British soldiers during the Great War. Although, contemporary military publications had been advocating wristlets as an, "Indispensable item for an officer's kit," if you wanted a suitable wristwatch, you would have needed to purchase one privately. Eventually however, given military advances in strategy that required soldiers to be able to tell the time at a glance, often whilst carrying a rifle, the British Army took stock of a quantity of wristwatches in 1917. These were the first wristwatches to be issued and were intended for use by NCO's. Due to the volume required, these early military wristlets could not all be supplied by any one company. Instead, a number had to be purchased from different sources, resulting in several variations existing. Most typically though, the Swiss firm of Gallet-Electa produced many of the first examples, which were housed in an English made Dennison waterproof case - Some of these were solid nickel, whilst others were of sterling silver. Gallet-Electa was already a noted supplier of cockpit watches to the Royal Flying Corps. Through the exigency of the war, it appears that no sooner had the watches arrived, many of the wristlets were distributed from the War Department, without being property marked with the obligatory broad arrow. This detail was later rectified on many watches as they were returned for routine servicing. Although this watch is not military property marked, it does nevertheless conform to every detail of those timepieces that were first issued. The Dennison silver case is hallmarked to 1917 and the 17 jewel movement is the high grade ebauche that was supplied by Gallet-Electa. Slightly yellowed with age, the watch has even retained its correct unbreakable crystal, which is made of durable celluloid. Perhaps thanks to its original silver Mesh Guard, the watch dial has also survived intact and damage free. Rare to find genuine trench watches that are this good and dent free. Offered in full working order, this watch is in overall excellent condition, keeping time and running strong, but without having been serviced. A full Premium Service is nevertheless available. All in all, a great example of the first British Army wristwatch issued.
Rare WW2 BBC Sound Recording Of A Spitfire An incredible WW2 vintage 78 rpm recording from the British Broadcasting Corporation, featuring the original sound of a Spitfire aeroplane, running in a variety of modes, both on the ground and in the air, including; a Spitfire engine on tick over, revving up, diving with whine, firing machine guns, etc. All in all, a truly superb and evocative sound recording, formerly used by the Beeb and kept at their sound effects library in Bristol. A truly nostalgic experience just listening to it. The BBC would have used the sound effects to add noise to otherwise silent newsreel footage. This record is in working order and generally good used condition. No cracks, but there are some light surface marks.
Rare WW2 CGTAS Longines Weems - Pilot Issue Watch, c.1943 This is an extremely rare and important WW2 Longines Weems airforce issue pilot's watch, with attributed history relating to the CGTAS. Supplied with a fleet of just 6 converted Lancaster bombers, the "Canadian Government Transatlantic Air Service" was established in 1943 to aid the British war effort. With not all urgent or time critical supply drops being possible by sea, Canadian pilots would instead have to fly the route from Montreal to Prestwick in Scotland, on a hazardous twelve and a half hour route across the ocean. For operational necessity, these Lancasters were stripped of any extra weight, resulting in the aircraft being unarmed. Ferrying up to 3 passengers at a time, usually formed of high ranking officials, the planes could also airlift equipment or mail to a maximum 26,000 pound payload. The Lancasters were certainly reliable, if not slow and lumbering machines, which provided the pilots with the experience that was to serve the airline industry in the future transatlantic years. Certainly up to 1945, the CGTAS had flown in excess of 500 missions. Presented in 100% original and beautiful condition, this Longines has just been fully serviced by its previous owner. It is running without fault and is already an appreciating asset, with other wartime Weems watches routinely being offered at over £5k. Checked against Longines' archives for 1942, this watch is confirmed as being supplied to the Longines Wittnauer company. Interestingly, this watch then left the factory with this military pattern face, comprising of luminous hands and 12, 3,6 and 9 numerals, as well as dot markers - This was the military spec dial for the Royal Canadian Air Force. All winding and locking crowns are original, as is the rotating bezel, which would have been used to synchronise the seconds hand against a time signal during the pre flight briefing. Even the webbing strap is the correct pattern. All in all, this is a superb opportunity to acquire a stunning and untouched watch with substantial aviation interest.
Rare WW2 German Luftwaffe Issue Longines c.1944 A genuine and authenticated Luftwaffe issue Longines wristwatch - One of only a few known survivors worldwide. The earliest known surviving German Army (DH) Longines wristwatches, bears a movement serial number that dates their first supply to 1941. Following on from this, a casual study of other Longines DH case numbers suggests that around 5000 of the DH watches were produced, up to 1942. After this time there appear to be no other Deutsch Heer Longines watches ordered. Then on the 9th October 1944, Longines supplied one more batch of wristwatches, handing them over to the Wermacht via their Berlin agent. However, on that occasion what is believed to be no more than 500 (though it might be as little as only 400) military wristwatches were delivered to the Luftwaffe. This Longines watch is one of those very rare variants. Marked correctly and numbered 77 to the case back, this watch's issue number is properly prefixed with the letter "D." When seen on its own like this prefixing a number, the D mark indicates that this wristwatch was a "Dienst" watch. Dienst watches were issued to the Luftwaffe, as this fact has been recorded in former Soldbuchs, documenting their use among Luftwaffe personnel. Longines D77 is in very good condition, both cosmetically and mechanically, having been recently serviced within the past month. However, whilst this work was undertaken by a reputable third party and appears to have been well executed as the watch is running very well, no extended Premium Service warranty applies. Nevertheless, all functions are as good as can be expected. Longines has a long association with aviation and this watch maintains that tradition. It is certainly a beautiful and rare military variant, with a 15 jewel shock protected movement. The watch comes on an old vintage new old stock leather strap that is very much in keeping with the cut and style of the original band. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Rare WW2 RAF Exigency Issue Wristwatch c.1942 This rare wristwatch is an example of RAF ingenuity, which served to bolster their supply of much needed military timepieces during WW2. Originally this watch was conceived as a gun camera watch. This meant that it was specifically made to be fitted into an aircraft camera and was to be used in a reconnaissance role. These cameras took aerial photos with the integrally mounted image of the watch dial being superimposed onto the film negative each time a photo was taken. However, such are the exigencies of wartime, that the role of this watch was officially changed. As a gun camera watch, this Swiss movement was housed in an English Dennison case. Then, when the RAF was struggling to supply a sufficient number of timepieces to its personnel and the interim supply of watches secured from the army became insufficient to meet demand, the RAF adapted a supply of 14A/1102 watches for wrist wear, thereby converting them into wristwatches. Sufficient examples of this modified watch exist to be able to assert that this was an in-house fix by the Air Ministry c.1942/43. The case of course still bears the original equipment code 14A/1102, which identified its foremost function as a gun camera timepiece. Other differences in these timepieces, when compared to the regular issue watch include; the winding crown set at the 9 o’clock position and the very unusual, yet original, black dial configuration. All in all, the watch is in good condition and working order, keeping time. However, the optional Premier Service is recommended. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Regulation Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock, c.1800 A Light Dragoon flintlock pistol of regulation pattern, having the standard round tapering barrel. The flat lock is fully marked to the with a Crown GR emblem, as well as benefitting from having good springs and a sparking frizzen. Cosmetically the pistol shows some light signs of service use, but is nevertheless an honest and unmolested representation of the ubiquitous Light Dragoon flintlock. Working well and holding in half clock, this flintlock is in solid condition throughout, with some patina to the lock, whilst the barrel has a uniform salt and pepper speckled surface. Only the old ramrod appears to be a replacement, which is of appropriate fit and quality. A good collector grade Light Dragoon flintlock. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15.25 inches
Regulation Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock, c.1810 A Light Dragoon flintlock pistol of military pattern, having the standard round tapering barrel of regulation bore. All fully working with a crisp action, the flat-lock holds well in both positions and bears a Crown GR emblem. All springs are strong and the frizzen sparks. The full stocked woodwork is undamaged, showing only minor age related wear and the usual small knocks. Cosmetically the pistol is an honest and unmolested example of this Light Dragoon design. Only the old ramrod appears to be a replacement, which is of appropriate fit and quality. A good collector grade Light Dragoon flintlock. Barrel length = 9 inches Overall length = 15.25 inches
Regulation Military Pattern Flintlock Pistol A circa 1790 military pattern flintlock pistol of regulation type, having a 9 inch barrel and lightly radiused GR marked lock. This pistol is offered in good functioning order with strong springs throughout, showing signs of previous service repairs, sustained during what was likely a long working life - Possibly suggesting service within the ranks of a volunteer militia. A good pistol with nice patina and speckling, with potential for improvement.
Regulation Pattern Light Dragoon Flintlock Pistol c.1800 A Light Dragoon flintlock pistol of regulation pattern, having the standard round 9 inch tapering barrel. The pistol is presented in fully functioning order, benefiting from a Tower and Crown GR marked flat lock, with strong springs and a sparking frizzen. Cosmetically the pistol shows signs of active service use, as well as some loss to the furniture towards the rear of the lock. A very well executed and sturdy repair at the mid point of the stock, meant that this pistol had an extended service life with its Volunteer Regiment. All in all, this pistol is an honest and unmolested representation of the ubiquitous Light Dragoon flintlock. It remains in working order and solid condition throughout, with a good dark patina to the lock, whilst the barrel has a uniformly salt and pepper finish, being lightly pitted along the length of its surface. Although used in the service of a Volunteer Regiment, this Light Dragoon flintlock remains a good example at a competitive price.
Reigate Borough 1914 Commemorative Police Truncheon During the outbreak of WW1, the police in areas south of London were severely stretched with additional work, fearing an influx of refugees fleeing the city. As the military began to assemble, they too required billeting whilst they waited for transport to take them to the front. To that end, Surrey Constabulary were able to rapidly secure additional accommodation for around 58,000 persons, but this number grew three fold by the end of the first year. As the evacuation of London was underway, many undesirable characters took advantage of the situation and an additional 4,000 extra Special Constables were appointed to help. They were detailed to keep order in the villages, however, one of their more unusual duties was that of helping out with the rendezvous of all cattle in Richmond Park. Realising that the military had no provision to guard their lines of communication, including the railway, the Chief Constable arranged a guard of armed civilians to assist the police at strategic locations, until relieved by Territorial soldiers two months later. At Reigate Borough, in a gesture of gratitude, the Police Constables who had been in service from the outbreak of war, were recognised for their hard work and were issued a commemorative truncheon, individually numbered to the officer. This example, made by Hiatt, is in excellent condition and it bears the legend, "Reigate Borough 1914 - 177." This is written in black on a near black Lignum Vitae truncheon, making it difficult to photograph, however the writing is clear and not worn in the slightest. All manufacturer's stamps are likewise good and clear. Showing just minor surface wear from carry and no damage to the hardwood, this heavy weight WW1 police truncheon is an excellent item for the collector. Overall length = 15 inches
REME Belt Buckle By JR Gaunt A good and early ERII belt clasp by J.R. Gaunt. This solid nickel clasp incorporates the postwar REME badge, which replaced the wartime design that was viewed as being somewhat uninspiring. Presented in good original condition, with plenty of patina. Marked to the reverse as \"Clasp by JR Gaunt\" and also, \"Belt by Hobson\".
Remington .31 New Model Pocket Percussion Revolver, c.1865 An excellent Remington New Model Pocket Revolver, which as the name suggests, was designed for unobtrusive pocket carry. However, the slightly longer barrelled revolvers were sometimes worn in a holster concealed in the waistband at the small of the back. They were distinctive, robust 5 shot revolvers with sheathed triggers and a slim profile, making them ideal for self protection, or for use as a back-up. The first New Model Pockets appeared in 1865 and used percussion ignition. Soon after though, Remington began to offer the same revolvers but with a modified breech loading cylinder, chambered for the .32 Rimfire cartridge. Remington continued to manufacture the converted revolvers until 1873, making a total of of around 25,000. Today, finding a Remington percussion Pocket revolver that has not been converted is scarce, and finding one in such excellent condition is rare indeed. Cosmetically, this example retains much original finish to the barrel, with dulled blue to the cylinder and fading colouring/patina around the frame; whilst mechanically the action works crisply and has solid timing with lock-up. Only the grip plate to the right shows sign of repair, which is common on this model due to the slim nature of the grip, but this has been executed well (as shown). Bore, chambers and all nipples are in good order and the profiles and engravings are all sharp - Difficult to improve upon. An excellent example of a classic muzzle loader. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8 inches
Remington .36 Model Navy Percussion Revolver, c.1863 The Remington .36 revolver, which is often referred to as the "Model 1858" due to the patent date marked on the barrel, was a quality mid-frame firearm of Navy calibre. It did not become readily available until 1861, after which several modifications emerged over the following two years, each one incorporating an improvement suggested by the military - This included the addition of safety stops in 1863, as found in this example. That same year, Remington went on to introduce a "New Model" that had all of these features but the older conical foresight was changed to a blade type. As such, this Navy revolver with its earlier sight can be precisely dated to the middle of the Civil War and subsequent Colt factory fire, which resulted in the Remington mark becoming the second most issued handgun among the belligerents. Presented in honest and untouched condition, this Navy is in full working order, whilst cosmetically the ironwork exhibits an even and mottled aged tone, leaving clear engraving of the barrel address. A good bore, nipples, screws and grips, all suggest that this revolver has been carried and used, but not abused. Some minor working-life modification is apparent, in so much the single action has been gunsmith honed for a lighter let-off, as well as the trigger guard being marginally oversized to accommodate gloved use. All-in-all, a well maintained and genuine Civil War era Remington revolver.
Remington 1863 New Model Army .44 Percussion Revolver Remington 1863 New Model Army .44 Percussion Revolver The earlier Remington .44 [Old] Army percussion revolver of 1861 was a design based on Fordyce Beal's patents, which in 1863 evolved into the New Model Army, following the suggestions of the U.S. Ordnance Department. The end result was a classic - more reliable and altogether safer pistol for the troopers to use. Both the Remington Army revolvers feature a solid frame, which creates strength and stops frame stretching caused through heavy use. It also permits faster replacement of any preloaded cylinder - although the US Army did not supply spare cylinders to its soldiers. Additional New Model improvements saw the "Old" action simplified and safety notches were added to the cylinder, allowing the hammer to rest between chambers, effectively locking the cylinder to prevent accidental discharge. Few pistols of the era could boast this level of reliability, ease of operation and safety. The example being offered here is in excellent condition throughout, with some typical sign of service use and dings, yet retaining a tight and strong working action that indexes perfectly with crisp precision; a pleasing finish that retains a good percentage of original blueing, with the rest to a dark patina; sharp lines, angles and unmolested screw heads; clear stamping and a superb bore, all in all make this a very impressive piece. Correctly marked with matching numbers, this NMA has one set of inspector's stamps, a practice that was first adopted during the war in 1863 to expedite the delivery of revolvers to the Army. This is evidenced by seeing just the Principal Inspector's initials on the left grip, who in this instance was Oliver W. Ainsworth. In total, 122,000 NMA revolvers were produced at Remington, up until 1875, which includes commercial as well as the various breech loading alternatives. A superb example for the collector. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14 inches
Remington 1863 New Model Army .44 Percussion Revolver The earlier Remington .44 [Old] Army percussion revolver of 1861 was a design based on Fordyce Beal's patents, which in 1863 evolved into the New Model Army, following the suggestions of the U.S. Ordnance Department. The end result was a classic - more reliable and altogether safer pistol for the troopers to use. The example being offered here is in excellent condition throughout, with some typical sign of service use and dings, yet retaining a tight and strong working action that indexes perfectly with crisp precision; a pleasing finish that retains a good percentage of original blueing, with the rest to a dark patina; sharp lines, angles and unmolested screw heads; clear stamping and a superb bore, all in all make this a very impressive piece. Correctly marked with matching numbers, this NMA was first adopted during the Civil War in 1863. As such, it bears the Government Inspector's initials Oliver W. Ainsworth. A superb example for the collector. Barrel length = 8 inches Overall length = 14 inches
Remington 1863 New Model Police .38 Rimfire Revolver This scarce 1863 pattern 'New Model Police' revolver was Remington's answer to Colt's Police model of the previous year. Yet despite Remington's advantages over the Colt whereby the user could swap cylinders between percussion and rimfire - depending on ammunition availability, Colt firearms dominated the industry due their many government contracts. This made it difficult for innovators like Remington to break into the developing law enforcement market. Despite this, Remington was a serious contender manufacturing 18,000 of these revolvers during a 15 year production run. Light and handy, this revolver was mainly appreciated in the cities where its unobtrusive sleek profile allowed it to be comfortably carried, plus, with the short 3.5 inch barrel it was ideal for those who depended on a personal protection weapon, which had a calibre bigger than the Navy guns and yet remained concealable. Chambered for five .38 rimfire cartridges, this Remington is in very good original condition, retaining much of its factory finish. With a crisp action and tight lock up, this revolver shows signs of actual carry and use, but has nevertheless survived with a good bore and chambers, with some light pitting. Sharp angles, perfect grips with much original lacquer, together with a clear barrel address, make this a good collector grade piece. Overall a lovely example of a scarce Police revolver.
Remington 1863 New Model Police .38 Rimfire Revolver This scarce 1863 pattern 'New Model Police' revolver was Remington's answer to Colt's Police model of the previous year. Yet despite Remington's advantages over the Colt whereby the user could swap cylinders between percussion and rimfire, depending on ammunition availability, Colt firearms dominated the industry due to their many government contracts. This made it difficult for innovators like Remington to break into the developing law enforcement market. Despite this, Remington was a serious contender manufacturing 18,000 of these revolvers during a 15 year production run. Light and handy, this revolver was mainly appreciated in the cities where its unobtrusive sleek profile allowed it to be comfortably carried, plus, with the short barrel it was ideal for those who depended on a personal protection weapon, which had a calibre bigger than the Navy guns and yet remained concealable. Chambered for five .38 rimfire cartridges, this Remington is in very good original condition, retaining much of its factory finish. With a crisp action and tight lock up, this revolver shows signs of actual carry and use, but has nevertheless survived with a good bore and chambers, with some light pitting. Sharp angles, perfect grips with much original lacquer, together with a clear barrel address, make this a good collector grade piece. Overall a lovely example of a scarce Police revolver. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
Remington 1863 New Model Police .38 Rimfire Revolver This scarce 1863 pattern 'New Model Police' revolver was Remington's answer to Colt's Police model of the previous year. It is offered in fine condition throughout. Light and handy, this revolver was appreciated in the city where the sleek profile, provided comfortable covert carry. Together with the short barrel, it was ideal for those who required an unobtrusive weapon, equal in calibre to the bigger Navy guns. Chambered for five .38 rimfire cartridges, this Remington is in fine original condition, retaining much of its factory nickel finish with just some thinning to the plating around the grip and frame, but no flaking, scratching or pitting. With a crisp action and tight lock up, this revolver generally shows minimal signs of actual use, having survived with an excellent bore and chambers. Sharp angles, unspoilt grips and a clear barrel address, make this an excellent collector grade piece that would be difficult to improve upon. A wonderful example of a scarce Remington Police revolver. Barrel length = 3.5 inches Overall length = 8.5 inches
Remington New Police .36 Percussion Revolver, c.1863 An early Remington New Model Police revolver, c.1863, presented in crisp condition with sharp profiles. Having just a 5-shot capacity, such midsize revolvers with their smaller .36" calibre cylinder and reduced weight, became popular belt carry weapons. With most being converted into cartridge firing, this makes the original percussion revolvers rare to find. Offered in full working order, this example has clear signs of carry but it remains a very well cared for revolver - probably having been professionally maintained. The ironwork has been reduced to a dark grey age patina, yet the barrel address and lines are all clear, straight and in cosmetically untouched condition. Grips, screw heads, nipples and bore are all tidy. Barrel length = 5½ inches Overall length = 10½ inches
Remington New Police .36 Percussion Revolver, c.1863 A scarce early Remington New Model Police revolver, c.1863, presented in good condition with sharp profiles. Having just a 5-shot capacity, these midsize revolvers with their .36" calibre cylinder and reduced weight, became popular belt carry weapons. With most being converted to cartridge firing, this first percussion version makes this revolver a rare find. Offered in full working order, this example shows signs of carry but it remains a well cared for revolver - probably having been professionally maintained. The ironwork has been reduced to a dark age patina, with thin traces of original blue finish remaining. All the barrel address details are all clear, being straight and in cosmetically untouched condition with good traces of silver plating. Grips, screw heads, nipples and bore are all tidy. A scarce and desirable police model revolver for the collector. Barrel length = 4½ inches Overall length = 9½ inches
Remington RB Swedish Remington Model 1869 Breechloading Engineer & Artillery Musketoon s/n 2511, in obsolete 12.7 mm rimfire calibre with 18 inch barrel. Serial number 2511is in very good condition, showing its original production date of 1869 on the right hand side of the receiver. The receiver bears the Crown / C marking for the Carl Gustaf arsenal. The receiver, forend and barrel all bear serial number 2511, as well as other arsenal markings. The lovely beech wood stock is light honey in colour and it comes with its original 1869 cleaning rod under the barrel. There is also a swivel on the butt. The swivel on the forend barrel band is missing. There is a large brass circular disc (measuring 31mm in diameter ) inlaid into the butt-stock. This is a Classic European License-made Remington Rolling Block Musketoon Model 1869,that was manufactured by the government arsenal of Carl Gustafs Stads Gevärsfaktori (“Rifle Factory of Carl Gustaf’s town”) for the Swedish Army. The original caliber was 12.17×42mm rimfire and production continued until 1884. It has a full military configuration, with strong rifling. Excellent condition and in good working order.
Remington Rolling Block Hunting Carbine, c.1875 A scarce Remington Rolling Block carbine chambered for the obsolete .32 rimfire cartridge. Having a fully working action, good woodwork and a heavy hexagonal barrel that is fitted with adjustable sights. With signs of service wear, this carbine has seen a lot of use but remains cosmetically good and in decent overall condition with clear Remington address and patent details.
Remington Smoot .30 RF Pocket Revolver, c.1870 A very good Remington Smoot pocket revolver chambered for the obsolete calibre, .30 Rimfire cartridge. Presented in working order, this lovely revolver is in sharp condition retaining much of its original nickel finish. Offered complete with undamaged grips. A collector grade example.
Replica - Winchester 1866 Saddle Ring Carbine Selling on consignment: A full-size replica Winchester saddle ring carbine. Appears to be in working order and generally good cosmetic condition with most factory finish - Just some minor ageing to the nickel finish on the receiver. All wood work is good and screws have not been messed with. We are unable to determine who the maker is, but the carbine is marked, "Made in Japan," and it's UK legal non-firing replica.
Reproduction - NATO Wooden Chronometer Deck Watch Case All Royal Navy chronometers and deck watches were originally carried in protective cases. These days however, such wooden boxes are very difficult to come by and cost a premium when available. Nevertheless an opportunity exists to purchase a custom made chronometer box, that will fit an HS3 deck watch. The box faithfully reproduces the design of those used at Herstmonceaux Castle, when the Royal Greenwich Observatory occupied the premises as the Admiralty's chronometer testing and repair facility, up to 1990. This chronometer box has the wider opening for the American Hamilton, Elgin or Waltham type watch with the wide railroad bow. Another identical case is available for the narrow necked Swiss Longines or Zenith watches. ZMW Militaria has only four of these cases to offer. Deck Watch is not included.
Reproduction WW1 .455" Prideaux Loader A virtually perfect copy of a WW1 Prideaux Loader, complete with issue and inspector's stamps. Made from spring steel with age patina, the loader is in good working order and overall excellent condition. Museum grade copy.
Rifled .577 1856 Pattern Lancer's Pistol By T. Blissett The military Pattern 1842 pistol was upgraded in 1856 with the provision of a rifled barrel for issue to lancers. The same two patterns were also adopted by some British constabularies for issue to mounted officers, with many being exported to the Australian Police who were disappointed, given that revolvers were by now in common use, to receive single shot pistols. Although this pistol is not police marked as such, a brass plate was fitted to enable a rack number to be aded, suggesting that a quantity of these weapons must have been held in an armoury. Made and signed by Thomas Blissett, this pistol is in good original condition with a superb rifled and sighted barrel. The lock has a strong working action and generally smooth ironwork with an even speckled appearance. All woodwork is solid, with just minor bruises and the usual split at the lock retaining screw, but nothing serious to note. All brass work and screws are likewise in very good condition, with fully rotatable lanyard ring. Overall a collectable example in very good original condition. Barrel length = 10 inch Overall length = 15.5 inch
Rigby Dublin PWG A Rigby Police or Customs Pistol. Stock Code: r031 A Rigby Police or Customs Pistol. 10 ½” overall, 5” carbine bore barrel, stamped ‘Dublin PWG’ on the top flat. Stepped, flat lockplate, signed W & J Rigby with ring neck cock and semi waterproof pan with roller on the frizzen spring. Brass mounts comprising elongated butt cap, trigger guard, side nail cups and ramrod pipe. Walnut full stock with swivel ramrod. With its original leather light dragoon style holster . Circa 1830. In good condition, holster very rare. Provenance Robert E Brooker Jr Collection author of British Military Pistols 1603-1888.
RN Issue Deck Knife By J. Clarke c.1966 A scarce Royal Navy issue deck knife with its leather scabbard, by the Sheffield cutler "John Clarke & Son Ltd." The blade is marked with these details, together with the broad arrow. 1966 date and issue number. These engravings are worn but still evident at the proper angle. Cosmetically the blade shows stains and evidence of maritime use but remains a good example. Blade Length = 4¼ inches Overall Length = 8 inches
RN Issue Knife By J. Rodgers An excellent example of a Royal Navy issue knife, signed by the maker, J. Rodgers. It features a full profile blade showing little to no signs of use, complete with the rope lanyard. A full-size folding knife that is EDC compliant.
RN Watches - WW2 Royal Navy Issue Admiralty Pattern 300 Pocket Watch Here we have the Admiralty Pattern 300, Royal Navy issue pocket watch. It dates to c.1940 and is of the lend lease type, supplied to the British from the USA. Both during the First World War and in the Second, the Americans lent or gave the British War Department, equipment and supplies, prior to getting involved in the conflict themselves. This "Aristo Import Co. Incorporated" pocket watch was originally shipped over to the States, as nothing more than watch parts from Switzerland. Aristo was the importer and their company then assembled the watch movements at their American factory, before shipping them over to England for the war effort. It had to be done that way, as the American government have strict rules about importing foreign products that were otherwise already being manufactured in the USA. In reality this meant that the US government was looking out for its own watch making industry, preventing their market from being flooded out with cheaper Swiss imports. However, the loop hole was that Aristo did not import watches, rather they dodged the rules by only importing watch parts and they paid American citizens a wage to assemble the movements. Once made, the Aristo watch movements were sent to England where they were cased. Only now were the watches ready to be supplied to the Royal Navy for the war effort. This Admiralty Pattern 300 watch is itself in excellent original condition, having retained a perfect dial, factory fresh movement and the classic thick bevelled crystal. The heavy duty case also screws up tightly and the whole watch is a real find in top condition. Yet despite its stunning sharp appearance, the Premium Service needs to be considered before the watch is pressed further into a new life of service. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
RNAS/RFC Equal Distance Bomb Sight Timer c.1916 Early bomb sights were generally simple instruments that required an aviator to use the device by leaning out to the side of the cockpit, whilst simultaneously flying straight at low level. Needless to say, it was dangerous and the sights were of limited use as they made no allowance for wind drift, although such instruments were used mainly by the Royal Naval Air Service when flying on their anti submarine patrols. In 1916 improvements to bomb aiming methods resulted in the introduction of a new "Equal Distance Bomb Sight" that required a special auxiliary timer to function properly. This bomb sight was mounted within the cockpit, so once the bomb run criteria of altitude and speed, were entered into the sight's mechanical computer, the pilot only needed his timer to identify the precise moment of bomb release. This system found favour not only in Britain and Russia, where their War Departments used the same Birch & Gaydon timers, but also in Italy where a version made by Minerva for the Regia Aeronautica, remained in service until the 1940s. The US Army Airforce also utilised similar watches over the same period. This watch is in working order and generally in good cosmetic condition, however it has been adapted in service and modified from its original specification. Nevertheless the watch as is, is still a viable stop watch, despite the reversing function being inoperative. The steel case is in very good condition, as is the movement and rotating bezel. Both pushers function to stop, start and reset the movement, which operates clockwise only. A very rare find at a fraction of the usual.
RNIB Unitas Pocket Watch A very clean example of a Braille pocket watch, marked \"R.N.I.B.\" - Royal National Institute for the Blind. Made with a Swiss Unitas 15 jewel movement, this watch is fully working and keeping time. Braille watches first came about in 1915 to aid blind war veterans, but this example dates from c.1980. Today, such watches are rare as electronic technology has made these virtually, obsolete.
Robbins & Lawrence Breech Loading Percussion Revolver, 1851 A percussion breech loading pistol of unique design, based on the 1849 patent of George Leonard, Junior. Made and marked on the barrel by Robbins & Lawrence, this rare "revolver" was only made for three years, from 1851. Although at first glance this pistol appears to have revolving barrels or perhaps a revolving cylinder, the reality is that this 5-shot pistol relies on an internal rotating striker. That makes this multi shot pistol a revolver of sorts, with the striker indexing around in turn to each nipple, whenever the cocking ring is pulled. However, to fire the shot, the actual trigger in front of the cocking ring, had also to be pulled. A clever de-cocking feature was also incorporated, which involved the simple depression of a button within the backstrap. Loading the revolver is easily achieved by breaking open the hinged chamber and extending the barrel assembly on its axis pin. This allowed it to be loaded as a muzzle loading cylinder for a typical percussion revolver, with caps being placed over the nipples - A design that, to a degree, kept the action concealed from the elements. Offered in full working order, this revolver is marked with the manufacturer's details along the top barrel flat, along with, "Windsor VT" and "Patent 1849." Attractive scroll type engraving around the frame and latch is all clear, with good grips and matching numbers. Barrel length = 3¾ inches Overall length = 9¼ inches
Rogers & Spencer Piers W. G. Helps 01926 62414(2)or(7?) HELPSATWASPERTONONLY@BTINTERNET.COM The Old Barn Wesperton Warwick CV35 8EB
Rogers & Spencer US Cavalry Percussion Revolver, c.1865 In 1865, gunmakers Rogers & Spencer were contracted by the US government to supply their .44 percussion revolvers to the US Army. These superior solid revolvers stood out among their competition, yet despite clear advantages of design, less than 5,000 were delivered before the end of the Civil War, including 1000 of the Navy model. Few were ever issued and in fact, most of the revolvers were put into government storage, to be held in reserve. And in storage they remained, as newer breech loading pistols were procured the Rogers & Spencers became out-moded, until 1901 when they were sold as scrap to the firm of Francis Bannerman & Son. Bearing the martial inspector's cartouche to the grip, the Rogers & Spencer revolver offered here is in excellent condition, with little signs of use. The robust action works without fault and cylinder timing is all crisp and positive, locking correctly. Cosmetically, sharp angles have been retained and the solid frame and iron work throughout, retain a good amount of original factory blue finish, with the rest fading. A good bore, nipples and chambers, make this overall an excellent example of its type. A true classic that was the result of a culmination of best gun making improvements, which sadly came too late for Rodgers & Spencer. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 14 inches
Rogers & Spencer US Cavalry Percussion Revolver, c.1865 In 1865, gunmakers Rogers & Spencer were contracted by the US government to supply .44 percussion revolvers to the US Army. These superior solid frame revolvers stood out among their competition, yet despite clear advantages of design, less than 5,000 were delivered before the end of the Civil War - including 1000 of the Navy model. Only a few were issued, whilst most were put into government storage, held in reserve until they were sold to the firm of Francis Bannerman & Son in 1901. Of those that went that route, Bannerman had them profusely branded with a "B" letter stamp. Interestingly however, this example does not have these same "B" marks. Stamped with the US Government Inspector's cartouche, this Rogers & Spencer revolver has been marked on the cylinder, frame and barrel, with "H" letter stamps. It is all matching and offered in good condition, with much original finish remaining. Nevertheless this revolver does show signs of service wear, with some surface scuffing to the ironwork and grips. The action works and generally the revolver retains a good profile, with decent bore, nipples and chambers, making this an overall collectable example of its type. A true classic that was the result of a culmination of best gun making improvements, which sadly came too late for Rodgers & Spencer. Barrel length = 7.5 inches Overall length = 14 inches
Rolex British Army GS Mark II Pocket Watch, c.1938 Before WW2, the Swiss were at liberty to trade with any country they chose and as such, they did supply some very fine military grade timepieces to the British Army, including this rare Rolex pocket watch. Unlike the wartime General ServiceTrade Pattern watches, which were inferior to the GS Mark II watches of the pre war years, this Rolex features a premium 15 jewel watch movement, protected in a nickel hermetic case. But the real beauty of this watch is the outstanding condition in which it has survived in, with all matching numbers and perfect enamel dial. Presented in little used condition, this Rolex looks stunning with only minor signs of service wear and no unsightly dents. Internally the movement is near mint, as is the case, which has never been inappropriately opened with the wrong tools - as this is a screw cased watch, many such timepieces show harsh treatment at the hands of the inexperienced, but not this Rolex! Keeping time and working well, the watch was serviced a couple of years ago and all its operating functions are still smooth. A wonderful watch in almost untouched condition with superb hands, dial and an original yellowing celluloid glass. Rare to find this good. A Premium Service option is available for this watch, plus a 12 month warranty.
Royal Air Force Pilot's Issue Longines Wristwatch This is a scarce Air Ministry property marked Longines wristwatch, issued to an RAF pilot during WW2. Amazingly this watch, which dates to 1942, has retained its original leather strap. These were crude pig skin straps, which are nowadays rarely seen simply because they did not last. The replacement straps issued at the time were equally crude and came as a one piece band of leather. Rest assured though, this one is the original strap - guaranteed. Fortunately it is still remarkably supple and wearable. The Longines movement is in full working order, having been previously serviced at ZMW Militaria some 15 years previously. But that's not to say that the watch will continue to run forever, but at least it is testimony that the previous owner had looked after this watch very carefully, wearing it sparingly. Getting harder to find. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Knife By Wilkinson Sword A rare and excellent Wilkinson Sword hunting knife, with ERII Royal Warrant details and RCMP stamp, together with Bison Crest badge intricately marked \"Maintiens le Droit\" to blade. All in all, an impressive knife with a comfortable ergonomic grip ideally suited to outdoor tasks, yet showing no use from previous owners. Complete with its original leather sheath. Blade length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
Royal Doulton - British Airways First Class Cabin, Cup & Saucer A little touch of aviation luxury - Made for British Airways and used in their long haul First Class cabin, these fine bone china cups and saucers were made by Royal Doulton. Each item is fully marked and in mint, possibly unused condition. Cup and saucer match, with cobalt blue rim and gold embellishment. Although the Cup & Saucer are being sold together as a single set (one of each item), there are currently several identical sets available. All items are genuine and in mint condition with free domestic P&P.
Royal Horse Guards Carl Zeiss Binoculars, c.1900 A very good pair of Carl Zeiss Jena binoculars marked \"Feldstrecher\". These were designed in 1896 as compact binoculars of the highest quality, characterised by their sloping shoulders. However, most were produced with a lower magnification of 4, 6 or 8 power, but these are marked as \"Verger 10\" (10x power). By 1904 Carl Zeiss remodelled the binoculars replacing the stylish slopes with more typical flat plates. Retailed by Ross of London, these binoculars are factory engraved with the owner\'s details, \"A. Rose R.H.Gds\". Adrian was a young Lieutenant in the Royal Horse Guards, serving in the Boer War together with his older brother. A good amount of information is known about both men as Adrian Rose was promoted to the rank of Captain. Presented in very good condition, the glass is still capable of delivering sharp and bright images. No sign of dust or fungus.
Royal Italian Army Model 1889 Bodeo Revolver First made in 1889, this Italian military service revolver was named after its designer, Carlo Bodeo. Officially made for the military in two different styles, either with a folding trigger or with a trigger guard. It continued in production up until 1925 and also found acceptance as a police sidearm. This version was considered to be the more refined model with the trigger guard and was reserved for commissioned officers. As is, the Bodeo was of straightforward construction which field stripped easily and offered other advanced features over similar revolvers of their day. Commonly referred to by the Royal Italian Army as, "The Leg of Mutton," the Bodeo was made by a variety of manufacturers, each one making cosmetic adaptations to the overall style, seemingly on their whim. Hence today a range of differences exist for what was basically a standard issue revolver of its time. Bodeo revolvers were issued for several decades and saw service in World War 1 as well as other interwar colonial conflicts. During WW2, these revolvers were also used by the German Army in the North Africa campaign, with the Wermacht designating the revolver as the Model 680(i). The Bodeo revolver offered here, is one of the later examples made in the 1920's. It is stamped on the frame with the crowned RE emblem of the Royal Italian Army (Regio Esercito) and is presented in a remarkable state of preservation, showing little evidence of service wear. It is totally original with most factory finish being intact, as well as having the action functioning correctly with tight lock up - It is only the bore that shows some signs of having been stored presumably without having been adequately cleaned after use. Nevertheless, the bore is good and today, as it is chambered for the obsolete Italian 10.35mm cartridge, this revolver may be owned without a firearm certificate, provided it is not fired and no ammunition is held. A superb collector's example of a Bodeo Regio Esercito service revolver - a type that saw extensive service through both World Wars and other major conflicts.
Royal Mail Guard's Travelling Post Office Railway Watch, c.1877 Once the Royal Mail saw that the use of coach and horses was a viable means of delivering letters from city to city, the post office could at last offer express services, the likes of which could not be achieved by the vulnerable and slower 'post-boys.' Hiring contractors to drive the carriages, it was only the trusted guard who was an employee of the Royal Mail. Well armed, the guard also carried a reliable pocket watch which he needed to observe, to give advance warning of the mail coach's impending arrival to towns on route. As they were travelling at speeds of 7 - 10 miles per hour, the carriage would rattle through the street, horn blowing and mail sacks being thrown or collected on the move from open windows. This all relied on good judgement and careful timing, as the coach did not stop. When, with the advent of the railway, the Travelling Post Office (TPO) modernised their delivery methods in 1838, their first train coaches were made from converted horse boxes, liveried in black and red, and bearing the Royal cypher. In these carriages, staff could sort the letters as they travelled and just as before, the guard remained responsible for timing the drops and collections, which were now conducted at a much faster pace! But it was still a crude arrangement. In the same way that the first coach and horse services were run from London to Bristol, so to were the first special postal trains. These were operated by the Great Western Railway, with the inaugural train running on 1 February 1855, leaving Paddington station at 20:46, and arriving at Bristol at 00:30. In 1866, advanced apparatus for picking up and setting down mailbags without stopping was installed at Slough and Maidenhead. By now, the system was better than ever, but it still called for split second timing, which had to be monitored by the Post Office staff during their journey. For this, mail staff again required quality timepieces and again, the guard had to keep an eye on his issue watch. Of course GWR staff also carried watches, but these were for a different purpose as their duty was to safeguard the train and its passengers, rather than to ensure that the mail was handled on time. That responsibility remained with the Royal Mail guard who oversaw every mail sack drop and collection. Made by Gillet, Bland & Co. of Croydon, this rare timepiece offered here an example of a Royal Mail guard's TPO pocket watch. It is a massive fusee watch of railway style, made c.1877 and bears the Queen's Crown and Royal cypher, together with an issue number of just "53." The watch is in full working order, having been serviced around 7 years ago. All in all, an impressive fusee pocket watch which keeps good time and comes complete with a key.
Royal Marine Issue Short Sea Service Pistol, c.1847 Traditionally, working alongside the Royal Navy aboard His Majesty's Ships, the Royal Marines were there to perform a dual role: Firstly, they would act to maintain discipline among the ship's crew, as well as providing protection to the naval officers; whilst secondly in battle, the RM would become the ship's fighting force, in which they would engage the enemy with suppressing small arms fire before taking up any boarding action. However, by the mid 1800s such close naval actions had become part of the RM's history, rather than a continued practice. Marked on the brass butt tang, "RM 7," this Tower Short Sea Service pistol is nevertheless a rare example of a Royal Marines marked small arm. It is dated on the early style stepped lock to 1847, which chronologically suggests that it might have been deployed on any of the many amphibious landings and encounters that took place during the Crimea, or Opium Wars of the era. Although another scenario, which to my mind ticks all the boxes, would be that this pistol was once part of the RM's shore base arsenal, of which there were just a few. Most likely then, this would have been in 1848 when the Portsmouth Division of the Royal Marines took up residency in Forton Barracks, Gosport, where this pistol would have been part of the guards' new armoury. Fully impressed with the Board of Ordnance mark and numerous inspection stamps, both on the iron work and more lightly on the wood. Presented in full working order with strong springs, this percussion pistol is generally in excellent order throughout, but does have one tiny fracture at the tail end of the lock. A very good example for the collector, with rarely seen "RM" marking. Barrel length = 5 inches Overall length = 12 inches
Royal Navy AP301 Clasp Knife Selling on consignment: A good pre WW1 Admiralty Pattern clasp knife by Harrison Brothers & Howson. Presented in good order with firm joints, this knife has strong springs providing a crisp snap action, plus lovely stag horn grips.
Royal Navy Clasp Knife By Rodgers This Royal Navy pattern clasp knife appears to be in very good condition. It is of full metal construction and is signed by Rodgers of Sheffield. The knife shows just minor signs of service wear, retaining a full blade profile with a good sharp edge, together with a marlinspike, flat end screwdriver and lanyard ring. This substantial knife is numbered "21306" and is in collector grade condition. Blade length = 7.3 cm (Just sub 3 inches) Overall length = 12.4 cm
Royal Navy Deck Knife, c.1984 A superb Royal Navy issue deck knife by J. Nowill and dated, \"1984\". This knife is in pristine condition, never sharpened or used, bearing additional military markings to the blade and a deep-struck broad arrow on the wood scales. The black leather sheath is likewise, perfect. The best example I\'ve ever had.
Royal Navy Issue Brass Chronometer Container c.1914 This WW1 era brass mounted casing, is an original container for a deck watch used by the Royal Navy. In Admiralty parlance, the watch would have been referred to as a 'Rated Chronometer' and would have required protecting, so it was kept in one of these tubs and placed within a wooden box. Housed this way also prevented the watch from undergoing any inadvertent time setting changes. The screw bezel can be undone to access the tub, which will easily hold a watch of up to 55mm in diameter. The back of the case also has 3 original screw holes and a drain. All in all, this is a rare item seldom seen and a must have to display any Royal Naval chronometer. It is in excellent condition throughout.
Royal Navy Issue Corkscrew A superb corkscrew from the days of "Grog" in the Royal Navy. Made by John Watts of Sheffield and bearing a broad arrow, this corkscrew would have been used to pull the corks from the flagons that supplied sailors with their daily ration, half a gill of Pusser's rum - A practice that lasted for hundreds of years, finally ending in 1973. Presented in excellent condition, this corkscrew is probably from WW2 but might be earlier.
Royal Navy Issue Deck Knife By J. Rodgers A good Royal Navy issue deck knife by Joseph Rodgers. Fully ordnance marked and complete with its leather sheath. The knife blade shows evidence of previous sharpening and surface staining but it remains in good serviceable condition. Blade Length = 4¼ inches Overall Length = 8 inches
Royal Navy Issue Knife By Harrison Fisher & Co. A Royal Navy knife of all-metal construction and of a pattern first issued in 1938, these "Jack" knives continued to be issued through to 1983. Marked on the blade Harrison Fisher & Co. Ltd., this knife is in good used condition, showing evidence of its former service life and slight play at the pivot. Nevertheless, the blade has plenty of life left in it. These large robust knives fall within the category of being UK legal for EDC.
Royal Navy Issue Lemania ASDIC Stop Watch, c.1969 This is a new old stock Lemania Stop Watch made for the Royal Navy in 1969 and sold by the MOD at the end of the Cold War era. The watch comes fully marked with NATO stock numbers and is in near immaculate and unused condition. Only the crystal has a slight stress crack but otherwise, it still remains fully serviceable. Used in conjunction with other anti-submarine detection devices, these stopwatches are capable of recording time intervals of up to 6 seconds, which equates to distances calibrated in yards. A quality stopwatch with all its original finish that would be unaffected by any EMP in the event of Nuclear War - Now declared obsolete thanks to more modern electronic measuring devices.
Royal Navy Lemania Chronograph - Pre Nuclear, c.1955 A very good example of an earlier Royal Navy issue chronograph wristwatch, which predates the nuclear submarine issue variants. As such, it features a luminous "T" marked dial. This watch is in excellent working order, with all the chronograph functions operating crisply. The high-grade signed movement is keeping time and the watch is overall, looking very nice indeed. A great example for the investor, collector and everyday user of top-end watches.
Royal Navy Zenith Deck Watch c.1920 Having demanded navigational chronometers of excellence, the Royal Navy was faced with a dilemma during the Great War when watchmakers were unable to meet the demand for premium timepieces and an acute shortage arose. Certainly, the very best English made gimballed chronometers used on board battleships were regarded as second to none, but an alternative supply for good timekeepers needed to be sourced. Furthermore, the boxed chronometers which used what is known as a "detent escapement," were of little use on smaller vessels whenever any violent rolling motion of the sea was encountered - this played havoc with their more delicate mechanisms. As it was, battleships could keep a gimballed chronometer in the navigation room below decks in an attempt to minimise these adverse effects, but for the smaller and faster vessels this was a serious mechanical problem. So, not only was there an insufficient number of chronometers available for the fleet, but also their suitability for use in sea warfare came into question. In order to tackle both problems, the Royal Naval Chronometer Branch considered the use of high quality pocket watches for use as navigational instruments. They were not affected by pitching decks and they provided good timekeeping potential, despite their daily rate not being as consistent as the more elaborate detent chronometer was capable of in perfect conditions. Importantly though, sufficient numbers of the new genre of "Deck Watch" were available, having met with the approval of the Admiralty. As WW1 progressed, the higher jeweling specification of the early deck watch was reviewed and "lever" movements with just 15 jewels were found to be adequate for navigational purposes. These watches were designated by the Hydrographic Survey as being, H.S.3 grade deck watches; with H.S.1 being boxed gimballed detent chronometers and H.S.2 being, the highest quality boxed lever escapement pocket watch. Having proved their worth on board many a destroyer, corvette or smaller faster MTB, these H.S.3 deck watches have seen extended service use and presumably, some action. Certainly, this Zenith pocket watch, which was made in the wake of WW1, would have still been in use during WW2. Originally the watch was simply marked with a hand painted broad arrow and issue number (which were derived from the last 4 digits of the movement number) together with the simple hand struck broad arrow, with the H.S.3 mark being added a few years later probably when the watch went to a chronometer france for routine servicing a few years later. Many of these early lever deck watches have long since had the dial marking erased and never had the benefit of being brought up to specification by the addition of the H.S.3 classification being added to them. These little details make this Zenith watch a lovely find. Of course it is also in very good condition all round, keeping time despite there being no indication of any recent servicing. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Russell Canadian Belt Knife c.1958 From the first year of production, an original Russell Belt Knife, dated to 1958. In 1957, following a request by Canadian authorities for a hunting and trapping knife, the cutler Rudolf Grohmann collaborated with the government official Deane H. Russell, to design this classic knife. At first glance, this unique design is unlike other traditional knives, and yet, it is superbly balanced and handles exceptionally well, being ideally suitable for many in-the-field applications. Presented in very good condition, this knife shows little sign of wear and some age patina. Offered complete with its correct scabbard and dangler. Overall length = 8 ½ inches Blade length = 4 inches
Russian Bolshevik Military Officer\'s Wrist Watch A scarce Russian officer's wristwatch of the early revolutionary pattern. Fully working and in excellent condition throughout. Typically, these watches were made for the Bolsheviks out of the many watches that had been seized from the wealthy aristocracy. Most likely this high-end watch would once have been a gold Hunter cased pocket watch, however, precious metals were scrapped to provide much-needed currency whilst any desirable movements were converted into military wristwatches. Other surviving examples all show the same pattern of distinctive 3 piece nickel-plated cases, with characteristic swinging lugs. This pattern of watch continued in service with the Red Army and Air Force, throughout WW2. Presented in good working order, this watch is a fine and original example marked on the dial, "Henry Watch", believed to be the work of Henri Hoffman, who signed some of his dials in this manner, possibly with a view to veil his Jewish heritage in an antisemitic Europe. English would, of course, have been a language well known to the Russian intellectual nobility who were usually raised by British nannies. The dial is very clean, with just the slightest hairlines on the outer edge by the "20" marker. Retaining its original bevelled glass and winding crown. All in all, this is a most fascinating timepiece that has probably served in many roles and with different masters throughout its history. The movement has been oiled around key jewel pivots before being tested. It was then found to be a reliable running watch but no guarantee is implied. A full Premium Service can be requested if necessary. Diameter excluding crown = 46 mm
Rye Coastguard Pocket Watch, c.1885 A rare "Coastguard Watch" bearing the watchmaker's details, "J. N. Masters, Rye." Presumably the watch remained in Rye, East Sussex, where the Coastguard still exist today. For centuries, smuggling (known locally as "Owling") was very much a part of everyday life around the busy harbours of the British coastline. Rye was no different, although one notorious group known as the Hawkhurst Gang, stood out. Nevertheless, despite this criminal activity, smuggling offered many folk an alternative to poverty. With the building of Coastguard Cottages, used to house a growing number of men of the preventive authorities, an eventual downturn in the smugglers' trade was brought about and, by the middle of the 19th century, the Coastguard were increasingly becoming a sea rescue and life saving service. Dating from the late 1800's, this silver Coastguard's pocket watch had to be wound daily with a key (supplied). Once fully wound, the timekeeping of this robust watch was excellent, thanks to its twin spring barrel movement, which is a scarce feature reserved for timepieces that required to be accurate. Even today, this watch is still capable of providing good timekeeping, although it has not been serviced. The sturdy "Double Bottomed" case is another design feature used to protect the watch from routine knocks and bangs which can be expected, without undue detriment to the movement. As such, the case shows handling wear, but no dents! By depressing the button at the top of the watch, the case back may be opened for winding. This also reveals the name of a former owner, "John Richards," neatly engraved into the back. To set the hands, the front of the watch can be opened with a thumb nail and the same winding key used to set the time by turning the square arbour at the centre of the dial. A small lock at the bottom of the dial serves to release the movement from the case, which can then be lifted out for a watchmaker's inspection. The movement also has one more additional brass cover, presenting one more barrier to the elements. The glass and dial are all original and in a remarkable state of preservation, making this watch an overall rarity as a working man's timepiece. Despite the age of the watch, ZMW Militaria is able to offer additional aftercare and servicing, backed up by our 12 month warranty. Diameter = 50mm
S&SNCB Coal Mining Deputy's Yardstick A genuine and scarce coal miner's yardstick, used as a tool and later, carried as a badge of office by the mining deputy. Traditionally yardsticks had various uses, but perhaps most poignantly, as a tool of the lamp-men engaged in the hazardous practice of suspending a lantern from the bulbous end, so that it could be raised high above the miners' heads, up into a roof cavity. If the lamp flared or the flame otherwise reacted to the air pocket, it was seen as an indication that coal gas was building in the tunnels. The sticks could also be used as a rail gauge. Being cut to measure a yard in length, they were used to determine the width of the underground colliery haulage tracks. Other uses for the sticks saw them employed as raps, where the bulbous end was knocked against pit walls and ceiling, whilst a critical ear listened to changes in sound that might indicate a fault with the pit props. Shotfirers also used sticks to check that charges were seated properly. In more modern times, this particular mining deputy's yardstick was used by the National Coal Board - probably from the Stoke & Staffordshire mining region. It is in excellent condition, with brass ferrule and undamaged wood. Heritage dating from the declining decades of British coal mining, which eventually lead up to the Miners' Strike of the 1980's and ultimate closure of the pits. A modern antique of the future and symbol of a lost industry.
S&W K Frame Revolver Grips A good pair of American Smith & Wesson wood grips, made for a K frame revolver. Grips show some service wear and although they are a pair, the right side has darkened more. Sold with original grip screw.
S&W Model 1½ .32" RF Second Issue Revolver, c.1868 This fine Smith & Wesson Model 1½ revolver represented an improvement over the original tip-up barrel design, as it was upgraded to chambered the larger .32 Rimfire cartridge. The reference to the "Second Issue" refers to the company's introduction of a fluted cylinder, which was available from 1868. In this guise, these revolvers became a hugely popular choice as a self-defence or back-up weapon. Presented in fine and crisp condition, this revolver has a near perfect bright bore, as well as a tight working action. Cosmetically most of the original plated finish remains and this revolver shows just minimal wear - possibly being unfired. The grips are in good condition, retaining their factory varnish and the screw heads are clean throughout. A superb collector grade example at a very reasonable price. Barrel length = 3½ inches Overall length = 8 inches
S&W No.2 Army Revolver, c.1861 Smith & Wesson introduced their Model No.2 Army revolver in 1861, which became a very popular handgun among both Union and Confederate forces. In fact, these revolvers were so sought after that many copies were spawned from unauthorised gunmakers. However, this No.2 revolver is guaranteed to be genuine. Chambered for the obsolete .32 rimfire round, this revolver is in good condition throughout, with some traces of original finish remaining in sheltered areas, whilst the rest of the ironwork displays an attractive aged salt and pepper patina. All engraving is clear, including the patent dates around the cylinder and the action works crisply. The bore shows clear rifling, with some pitting. The grips are good, retaining some original varnish. Overall this classic S&W revolver is in very good condition, with no sign of abuse. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
S&W No.3 An excellent S&W No.3 revolver - Reserved for "RS." Deposit only to be paid. £1000 deposit paid by Robert Sharp before 20/3/19
S&W No.3 Single Action .44 Russian Revolver Consignment sale: Considered by many to be the best single action pistol of the cowboy era, this Smith & Wesson Model No.3 is in very good condition, showing some evidence of carry but virtually no signs of use. Offered in original conditon throughout, this revolver retains most of its factory finish, together with perfect grips. It is chambered for the obsolete .44 Russian cartridge. The action is fully working, with solid lock up and precise timing. Overall this revolver is a good example for the collector with signs of professional carry, yet mechanically it is as good as new. Barrel length = 6.5 inches Overall length = 12.5 inches
S&W Pattern .32 Rimfire Army Revolver c.1861 Smith & Wesson introduced their Model No.2 Army revolver in 1861, which became an immediate success that spawned numerous unauthorised copies. Like this example, many of them were made to a very high standard and many went on to see service among Confederate forces. To mimic the originals and yet evade copyright laws, this revolver was labeled by the unknown gunmaker along the barrel rib as, "Smith & Wesson's Pattern Mass." and even the cylinder was marked with corresponding patent dates. Overall this revolver is in very good condition, with sharp lines, excellent bore, chambers and a tight working action, with some factory finish remaining amid areas of russet patina. A superb example of a classic revolver. Barrel length = 6 inches Overall length = 11 inches
S&W Russian 6\" Barrel Tan Leather Holster An original and very good supple leather holster for the Smith & Wesson Russian revolver, with a 6" barrel. Cosmetically the leather is a little scuffed on the surface but the holster remains perfectly useable and good looking. Whilst this holster may fit other similar revolvers, it did originally have an S&W First Model Russian revolver in it, which fits perfectly. One of the images shows an S&W DA Russian in the holster. The revolver is not included.
Sambar Stag & Damasteel Rustic Knife By Alan Wood ZMW Militaria is pleased to offer a small collection of high-class custom made knives. A stunning Damasteel version of Alan Wood's Rustic knife seldom seen with Sambar stag scales, enhanced by red liners and complete with its leather belt sheath. Mint condition. Blade length = 3 inches Overall length = 6¾ inches
Sargent\'s Combination Tool For Snider Rifle c.1860 Consignment Sale: This is a rare tool designed specifically for the Snider rifle. Issued to armourer's and sargents, these combinbation tools were similar to those used for the Enfield muskets but they had dispensed with the requirement for a nipple pricker. This item is genuine, rare and in very good condition.
Scarce 1939 Dated British Army Whistle Hudsons have been supplying dated military whistles to the British Army since 1887. This whistle is a very good example, which is dated to 1939. It is unpolished, retaining an honest lightly patinated appearance and no nasty dents. One of the scarcer dates to find.
Scarce 7mm Rimfire Tranter's Patent Parlour Pistol c.1860 Gallery, Saloon and Parlour guns all gained their popularity in the mid Victorian era, thanks to the growing availability of the various metallic cartridges. Typically then, this genre of pistol with its single shot capability, was ideally suited for after dinner informal target practice which would have taken place in one of the large rooms or corridors of a grand house, often converted into a private dedicated shooting gallery. Made in England c.1860 and retailed by G. H. Webb of High Street Oxford, this Tranter's Patent parlour pistol was chambered for the low powered 7mm rimfire cartridge. The overall design of this parlour pistol is further characterised by the long heavy barrel, adjustable rear sight and overall high quality of gun finishing which has stood the test of time; retaining much original blued finish to the barrel and greying case hardening colours, this pistol has a strong crisp action and excellent bore. A fine example.
Scarce British Railways (Scotland) Train Guards Pocket Watch c.1950 In 1948, following the amalgamation of the major rail networks throughout the United Kingdom, British Railways came into existence. At this time the ex London, Midland & Scottish railway and the London & North East Railway collaborated to form the BR(Sc). This Selex pocket watch is from those early years of British Railways (Scottish Region). Whilst most railway watches have seen a hard life, this one is presented in good condition with a perfect dial and a good clear set of markings, showing only minor signs of general duty wear. Being free from abuse, this robust watch comes in a case which features a screw on bezel and case back. Internally the movement is working well and the watch keeps time. However, these railway watches were often exposed to adverse environments, steam and smoke, which could be detrimental to the long term well being of the watch, so the the Premium Service is offered at half price, to give peace of mind. All in all, a good example of a railway watch from the bygone era of steam. The recommended Premium Service, including a 12 month warranty, is offered for this timepiece for only £60.
Scarce Military Watch Collector\'s Zippo Lighter, c.1999 This is a scarce new old stock example of a Zippo lighter, made with the depiction of the USAAF Type A-11 pilot's hack wristwatch. It is in first class condition for the military watch collector who appreciates a good petrol lighter. This Zippo is absolutely in 'new' old stock condition with its original box and papers. It has never been used.
Scarce Pennsylvania Rail Road Guard's Whistle Founded in 1846, the Pennsylvania Rail Road was a premiere Class 1 railway, which at one time employed nearly 250,000 staff and operated on a finical budget larger than that of the U.S. Governments. In 1968 the PRR merged with New York Central to form the Penn Central Transportation Company but within two years they had gone bankrupt. This whistle likely dates from the 1950s and is marked with the PRR initials set on a corner stone, the symbol of Pennsylvania. It is in very good damage free condition and loud working order. A scarce find.
Scarce Pre WW2 Hudsons Whistle With Gadget Knife Combination An interesting pre WW2 combination gadget whistle, with an inbuilt folding penknife blade. Although not signed, there are certain features about this whistle that confirm it was made in the 1930s by Hudsons. The tube body is in good dent free condition, with a brass lined channel to hold the knife blade. The folding blade is now a little shorter and shows signs of age discolouration. Over all, a good example of its kind, with the whistle still blowing loudly.
Scarce Victorian Truncheon Marked R.L. This Victorian constabulary pattern truncheon is marked with an incised Queen's Crown and the stylised initials, "RL," the significance of which is not known. There is some conjecture that the truncheon might be linked to the Royal London, which is a hospital. This is of course possible, but whether they had an asylum in the mid 1800s, is not known. Speculation aside, this truncheon is 17.5" in length and in generally very good condition with no cracks or damage.
Scarce WW2 Ebel ATP Hermetic Wristwatch During WW2 Ebel supplied the British Army with two very different patterns of ATP wristwatch. One version of the Ebel came in a regular screw back case, which typically required a watchmaker's bench and case opener to access the movement, whilst the second pattern utilised a male and female case assembly and required no special tools to open it. The watch offered here is of that second type, where the movement is enclosed within a special capsule which is then friction fitted into the outer part of the hermetic case. Such a case in theory, could be disassembled by brute force and no additional tools. Although whilst the merits of the unique design can be appreciated, the fact that most watch companies use a traditional screw back for their watches, suggests that any benefits conveyed by the design were of no significant advantage. Regardless though of the merits of one design over another, this example of t