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‘Bitz of Blitz’ Week This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we re-visit and look at some new items related to the British Blitz years of WW2. Don’t forget to Register on the Home Page to receive news of updates, etc. TTFN and happy hunting.
‘From Delhi to Arnhem’: 156 Parachute Battalion. ‘From Delhi to Arnhem’: 156 Parachute Battalion. John O’Reilly First published by Thoroton Publishing Ltd., 2009 (Hardback) ISBN: 978095604402 A detailed study following the 156 Parachute Battalion, one of the first British parachute battalions, from their formation in Delhi to the Battle of Arnhem and its aftermath. With many first-hand accounts. Includes material on Operations Pegasus I and II. With over 350 b/w photographs (many previously unpublished) and 40 colour maps and illustrations. 432 pages. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Go To It!’ The Illustrated History of the 6th Airborne Division. SPECIAL EDITION / Veteran Signed. ‘Go To It!’ The Illustrated History of the 6th Airborne Division. SPECIAL EDITION. Peter Harclerode First published by Bloomsbury in 1990 (Paperback) ISBN 9780747508083 This special edition is profusely illustrated with photos, maps and diagrams and is veteran signed. ‘Homer’ was a member of the RASC, Pegasus veteran and Chelsea Pensioner. Signed at the National Army Museum in exchange for a second copy of the book that had been lent out by him and never returned and accompanied by Homer singing a rendition of ‘Ringing the Bell’, a magical moment. Priced to reflect condition and veteran signature. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Leading the Way to Arnhem’. Very Rare and Hard to Source, An Illustrated History of the 21st Independent Parachute Company, 1942-1946. ‘Leading the Way to Arnhem’. Peter Giibels & David Truesdale Published by R N Sigmond Publishing, Renkum (NL), 2008 An Illustrated History of the 21st Independent Parachute Company, 1942-1946. Based on the Fred Weatherley Files, Official Records and Personal Accounts of Members of the Company. Purchased by myself from the Hartenstein Museum during the 70th Anniversary and now very rare and hard to source. Priced to reflect condition and rarity!! Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Off at Last’: An Illustrated History of the 7th Kings Own Scottish Borderers 1939 to 1945 Author Signed ‘Off at Last’: An Illustrated History of the 7th Kings Own Scottish Borderers 1939 to 1945 Robert Sigmond First published by R N Sigmond in 1997 ISBN: 9789081270328 Hard to source and profusely illustrated with many rare and unseen photos. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Pegasus and Orne Bridges’, Very Rare and Hard to Source, Limited & Numbered Edition. Author and Veteran Signed. ‘Pegasus and Orne Bridges’ Very Rare and Hard to Source Limited & Numbered Edition 3/150 Author and Veteran Signed, via bookplates, with Certificate of Authentication. First published in 2009 by Pen & Sword (Hardcover) ISBN: 9781848840416 The glider-borne operation to capture Pegasus Bridge has an established place in the annals of warfare. Conducted by Major John Howard and his company of Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry it was a superbly daring, brilliantly executed \'coup de main\' assault. Equally brave was the seizure of the Orne bridges by airborne forces and the defence against ferocious German counter attacks over a prolonged period. The author who has a deep specialised knowledge of the area and period uses extensive personal accounts to tell this thrilling and inspiring story. He covers events and operations from Ranville in the East to Benouville in the West and this embraces the fierce fighting by 7th, 12th and 13th Parachute Battalions and reinforcements such as the Commandos, seaborne engineers and the Warwick’s. A gift from the author to myself and as such dedicated to ‘Gary’. A rare chance to own this very sought after version of this publication!! Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Red Berets and Red Crosses’: Story of the Medical Services in the 1st Airborne Division in World War. AUTHOR SIGNED!! ‘Red Berets and Red Crosses’: Story of the Medical Services in the 1st Airborne Division in World War. Naill Cherry First published by R. Sigmond 1999 (Hardcover) ISBN: 978-9080471818 This book is a detailed account of the Medical services in the 1st Airborne division during World War II. It charts the royal Army Medical Corps and tells the history of the formation and training of its airborne units. Purchased by myself from the Hartenstein Museum during the 70th Anniversary and now getting harder to source. Author signed!! Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘The Day the Devils Dropped In’. The 9th Parachute Battalion in Normandy, D-Day to D+6: Merville Battery to the Chateau St Come ‘The Day the Devils Dropped In’ The 9th Parachute Battalion in Normandy D-Day to D+6 Merville Battery to the Chateau St Come Neil Barber First published in 2002 by Pen & Sword (Hardcover) The Allied assault on Hitler\'s Fortress Europe began in the dawn of 6 June 1944 with daring airborne landings by men of the Parachute Regiment. This book tells of the Paras\' first week of intense fighting from the assault on the vital Merville Battery onwards. Through personal accounts and detailed research, a full and dramatic picture is built up of the actions that occurred as the Germans desperately attempted to displace the Allies\' tenuous beachhead. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘When Dragons Flew’. Super Rare & Hard to Source!! An Illustrated History of the 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment, 1939-1945. Second Revised Edition. When Dragons Flew. An Illustrated History of the 1st Battalion The Border Regiment, 1939-1945. S Eastwood, C Gray & A. Green First Published by Silver Link Publishing, 2009 (Hardcover) This new edition is comprehensively illustrated with 388 b/w photographs, illustrations & maps, and 8 colour plates of photographs & maps. 272 pages ISBN: 978-1857943498 The book chronicles the history of the 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment from the outbreak of War in September 1939, through service with the BEF in France, to its training in an independent role, then as part of the 1st Air Landing Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division from October 1941 to October 1945. The Battalion moved to North Africa in May 1943 and took part in the first major Allied glider operation of the Second World War, the landings on Sicily on 9-10 July, when tragically many lives were lost as gliders crashed in the sea. The Battalion went on to serve in Italy, then played a significant and distinguished role defending the western side of the Division’s perimeter at Oosterbeek near Arnhem in the famous Operation Market Garden of September 1944, and it is this action that receives closest attention in the book. In May 1945 the Battalion was sent to Norway to supervise the surrender of German forces. Purchased by myself from the Hartenstein Museum during the 70th Anniversary and now very rare and hard to source. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
‘Without Tradition’: 2 Para 1941-45, Author Signed and Dedicated. Without Tradition: 2 Para 1941-45. Robert Peatling Self-published by Robert Peatling in 1994 (Hardcover) ISBN: 978-0952299202 Without Tradition is compelling and essential reading for anyone wishing to know what made parachute troops tick during WW2. Contents: 1) Enthusiastic Early Days. 2) Into Action - the Bruneval Raid. 3) Preparing for North Africa. 4) Depienne - Haphazard Adventure. 5) Tunisia - 5 Months Bitter Fighting. 6) Into Europe via Sicily. 7) Seven Months in the UK. 8) Arnhem - the Battalion Annihilated. 9) Dutch Courage and Pegasus. 10) 1945 - the Prisoners Return. 11) And 50 Years Later. 12) A Tribute to our Colonel. Appendix: A) Roll of Honour. B) Officers Who Served 2nd Battalion. C) Awards and Decorations Gained. Sadly, missing its dust jacket but author signed and a very interesting dedication worthy of further research. Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
**STOP PRESS** Anti-Gas Week 2: Ancillary Equipment Due to the volume of enquires relating to what would be uploaded next week we have decided to bring Week 2 forward and list items of ancillary equipment early, this includes items such as anti-gas hoods, gas rattles, manuals, etc. In week three we’ll be looking at respirators and haversacks, etc. Over the next few weeks Ack-Ack Militaria will delving into the world of haversacks and respirators. Future themes will include, cycling, tentage and camp furniture, etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
\'A Wartime Christmas\', Compiled by Marla & Andrew Hubert, 1997 Just the tonic for that Christmas afternoon read, lovely stories and photographs from Christmas WW2.
\'Tinnie\'s\' (2) and Tobacco Related Week This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we focus on one of Tommy’s major obsessions, TOBACCO! Continuing on the theme of \'tins\' we add smoking related items, often issued or stored in tins. In addition to tea, cigarettes and tobacco were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. Prices start at only £20 plus P&P. Next week we will slow the pace of listings to focus on ‘webbing sets’. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, home front, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news.
\'Tinnies\' Week 1. This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we are pleased to present \'issued\' rations, etc. that came supplied in tins. Prices start at only £20 plus P&P. Next week we will focus on the same but items that were \'privately purchased\', rather than issued. Future themes will include; smoking and tobacco related items, anti-gas, webbing, cycling, home front, home guard, etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news.
\"Ding Dong the Bells are \'Gonna\' Chime\". Ack-Ack Militaria will be taking a small honeymoon over the end of July and into August. Our next listing will be on Friday 11th August, which will feature: \'HELMETS OF THE HOME FRONT\'. Anything purchased between July 19th and August 5th will be shipped on 10th or 11th August. TTFN
1940’s or 1950’s, British Army, Steel, Tinned Mug. These mugs came from an undated, crows’ foot/broad arrow marked crate. In un-issued condition the mug is undated and would be a welcome addition to any British Army mid-century kit, I have even seen these used for WW1, Home Front and Home Guard displays. Priced to reflect excellent condition but lack of date.
1940’s or 1950’s, British Army, Steel, Tinned Mug. These mugs came from an undated, crows’ foot/broad arrow marked crate. In un-issued condition the mug is undated and would be a welcome addition to any British Army mid-century kit, I have even seen these used for WW1, Home Front and Home Guard displays. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Priced to reflect excellent condition but lack of date.
ADDITIONAL PHOTO\'S: Later War KG3 WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, Northern Europe, Later War KG3 Blanco. PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!!
ADDITIONAL PHOTO\'S: North Africa, ‘Sun Bleached’ Finish WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, North Africa, ‘Sun Bleached’ Finish. PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!!
ADDITIONAL PHOTO\'S: Officers Webbing Set WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern, Officers Webbing Set, Dessert War, 1940-43. PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!!
ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: British Mk IV, General Service Respirator with Ultra Scarce ‘Type D’ Filter, Issued to Republican Forces During the Spanish Civil War. Close up images of the desirable \'Type-D\' filter.
ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: WW2 British, Issue, ‘L2’, Light Pattern Anti-Gas Respirator, 1943. Detailed shots of the L2 respirator
ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: WW2, British, Civilian Duty Respirator and Haversack with Anti-Dim Tin and Cloth.
ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: WW2, British, MK IV, General Service Respirator with Type E, Buff Coded Filter and MK VI Haversack, 1939/40. Detailed images of the mask and filter, etc.
Airborne Book Week (1) This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we present a number of rare, hard to source and desirable publications dedication to British Airborne operations in WWII. Including veteran and author signatures these hard to source publications will enhance any military collection or be of interest to those with a passion for military history. Next week we will present further titles of interest. Don’t forget to register on the Homepage to receive further updates. TTFN and good hunting.
Anti-Gas Week 1: Haversack Contents. Over the next few weeks Ack-Ack Militaria will be delving into the world of Anti-Gas, with the focus this week being the smaller contents of the haversack. Next week we will examine ancillary equipment such as anti-gas hoods, gas rattles, manuals, etc. In week three we’ll be looking at respirators and haversacks, etc. Future themes will include, cycling, tentage and camp furniture, etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
ANTI-GAS WEEK 3: Respirators and Haversacks This week we look at the world of the Respirator and their Haversacks. For the smaller haversack contents and other anti-gas related items visit the last 2 uploads: ANTI-GAS WEEK 1: Haversack contents. ANTI-GAS WEEK 2: Ancillary equipment. *NOTE: Respirators are sold for display purposes only and it is highly recommended that they are not worn to avoid inhaling any toxic substances that may be contained within the filter. Next week we will focus on paper work, ephemera, etc.
Bits of Blitz (2) This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we continue with the Blitz theme and present a number of items related to the Battle of Britain and the Germany bombing campaign against Britain. Items cover relic pieces of German bombs and aircraft, other relics. We would like to take this opportunity to wish all our current and future customers a very Merry and Happy New Year with future listings covering, Battle of Britain aircrew signatures, ‘load bearing equipment, P44 jungle issue, camping and tentage, etc. Don’t forget to register on the Home Page to receive news of new stock, etc. Happy hunting and TTFN.
Blades Week (2): ‘Cutting, Slashing and Shaving’. This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we continue with our examination of all things connected by the use of a blade. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, home front, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
Blades Week (I): The Clasp Knife. This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we enter the world of the British and Commonwealth ‘Clasp Knife\'. Next week we examine other items of kit that cut, slash, dice and shave. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, home front, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
British Mk IV, General Service Respirator with Ultra Scarce ‘Type D’ Filter, Issued to Republican Forces During the Spanish Civil War. In the wake of gas atrocities experienced in WW1, the use of gas during the SCW was a very real fear. Most of the anti-gas equipment issued by the Republican forces was, by the very nature of the Republican cause, imported from countries such as Italy, France, and Britain. This example consists of an unidentified respirator bag, if any customer recognises this could you let me know and I can update the listing, early British manufacture, with the un-threaded, green painted lense bezel, Mk IV, General Service Respirator (GSR) and extremely scarce and early dated ‘Type D’ filter. The respirator bag itself has all its metalwork in place, however the leather closure straps have decayed, but the internal divider is still strong and in place with the remains of a rubber waterproofing inner coating still evident. The respirator mask is somewhat of an anomaly in the sense that it is date stamped 1936 but has the fixed pre-1931 eye lenses with, as stated previously, their green painted bezel. The mask is in good, supple condition; however, the head harness and hose have ‘hardness’ with additional splits to the hose. The Type D filter is clearly dated 25th November 1926, the first year of issue for the new Mk IV, GSR. Sourced in Spain as an item issued to Republican forces during the Spanish Civil War. Price is based on the rarity of the Type D filter, early eye piece bezel and its participation in the SCW. The MK IV General Service Respirator and can be identified by its stockinet cover over the moulded rubber face piece and connecting tube. It was introduced in 1926 and produced in great numbers. It was assembled from several parts; a moulded rubber face piece has x2 splinter less eye pieces held in aluminium rims, of which early pieces were painted olive green whilst later versions were left as bare metal but had the addition of a screw thread that allowed damaged eye pieces to be changed. An outlet valve assembly, where the mouth would be, vented expelled air out of the mask and allowed inhaled breaths to enter the mask via a rubber tube connected to the filter. The filter was contained in a pressed steel ‘box’ carried in the haversack. The tin itself was ribbed to give greater strength with air inlet slits located on the sides to allow air to pass evenly through the filter material. The facepiece was held to the head via a harness assemble that fitted to the rear of the head.
British WW1 MkVI Water Bottle, Somme, \'Battle of Thiepval Ridge\' souvenir. Coming from the effects of G. Moss, Machine Gun Corps, unusual by the addition of stencil applied lettering detailing the user’s participation in the Somme\'s, Battle of the Thiepval Ridge, worthy of future research. Recognisable as of WW1 manufacture by its blue enamel and lack of wire loop, not to be confused with the MkVII which has the wire loop attached. One of three popular variants this bottle has the ‘tin can’ type top and base giving a more rectangular appearance than other more rounded variants with a curved moulded top. With a capacity of two pints this type of water bottle was standard issue during WW1 and was designed to be carried in the 1908 webbing equipment’s. WW10001
British, WW1 Pattern, Brown Leather, Cavalry Boots. A gorgeous pair of British, WW1 pattern cavalry boots in supple brown leather. The boots are in overall good order; however, four of the six leather straps have snapped at some point with some wear to the sole. Both boots have RD70 heel plates in place and appear to have the original soles. The boot pattern was first introduced into the British Army in 1913 and was still being worn throughout the Second World War. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
By Land, Sea and Air: An Illustrated History of the 2nd Battalion the South Staffordshire Regiment 1939-1945 SUPER RARE!! Land, Sea and Air: An Illustrated History of the 2nd Battalion the South Staffordshire Regiment 1939-1945 Alex Junier, Bart Smulders and Jaap Korsloot (Hardback) First published by R N Sigmond in 2003 ISBN: 9789080471863 Purchased by myself from the Hartenstein Museum during the 70th Anniversary and now very rare and hard to source. Priced to reflect rarity of this very sought after publication!! Please study the photos carefully as they form part of the description.
Children, Books and Christmas at War This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we visit the world of children, books and Christmas. Don\'t forget to register on the Home Page to receive updates and news. We would like to take this opportunity to wish all our customers a very Happy Christmas and a very prosperous New Year. Our next upload will be \'Bits of Blitz (2), focusing on relics from the Blitz and Battle of Britain.
Clothing and Footware Week This week we will be listing some interesting items of clothing and footware. To see the full range of available items listed select the \'WW2 British uniform and footware\' category, located above the listings of each shop page. You may also be interested in our other category: WW2 \'Hemets and Headgear\'.
Clothing and Footwear Week This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we revisit some previously listed items of clothing and footwear and present a chance to acquire some new and truly, fresh to the market, outstanding and rarer items of clothing and footwear. Future listings will focus on cycling, jungle kit, first aid, Home Guard, etc. To receive news of listings don’t forget to Register on the home page. TTFN and good hunting.
Early to mid 20th Century grouping of Bugle and Pre-WW1 Book: \'Army Trumpet and Bugle Sounds\'. Copper and Brass bugle, possible REME, with a book of bugle sheet music published just prior to WW1 in 1913. Compiled by C.A. Atherley, Bandmaster 1st Royal Irish Regiment, including War and Peace calls.
EASTER BREW WEEK This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we ask you sit down and have a nice Easter Weekend Cuppa!! We will re-examine and look at some new items related to the world of WW2 beverages. Future topics will include P44, First Aid, Home Guard, tentage and comping, bicycles, etc. If you have not yet registered for news and updates you can do so on the shops home page. TTFN and happy hunting!!
FJR6, High Quality, REPRODUCTION, German Fallschirmjäger Helmet. Produced by one of the members of the prestigious FJR6 German airborne reenactor group this high-quality reproduction has a splinter pattern helmet cover manufactured from original Zeltbahn fabric. Hand stitched interior leather. The outer shell paint is perfect with the correct decals.
Folio Society WW1 Book Grouping ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’, Edited and introduced by Lyn Macdonald, 2000, Folio Society, London Hardback with slip case in excellent condition. Over 250 pages of First World War Poets, Brooke, Cummings, Graves, et al and profusely illustrated with B&W photographs. ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’, Erich Maria Remarque, 1966 reprint, Folio Society, London. Hardback in excellent condition. Over 180 pages illustrated with 12 lithographs by Charles Keeping. Charles William Keeping (1924 – 1988), English illustrator, Carnegie Medal winner 1970. His lithographs have been exhibited in world-wide and his work can be found in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Helmets of the Home Front WEEK 1 This week and next week we delve into the world of British Home Front Helmets. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
Helmets of the Home Front WEEK 2 This week we continue with our theme and revisit some older and new listings of helmets from the home front. Next week we plan to examine the world of Anti-gas. Future themes will include tents/camping, cycling, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
Inter-war / Early WW2, British, Dunkirk Era Style, ‘Tommy Cooker’. Self-contained \'solid fuel\' version of the WW1 pattern portable stove in a small tin with attachable pot stand. There were similar commercial stoves sold as the ‘Tommy\'s Cooker and the ‘Blackie’. This example is of the Blackie and is in good condition, still containing its shrunken pellet of fuel. There is some conjecture that these Blackie Cookers are of post war manufacture being that packaging refers to the Everest Expedition, however, this may not refer to the 1953 Hillary conquest of the mountain but to one of the British expeditions of the 1920’s e.g., the Mallory attempt of 1924. The final photograph shows a group of British BEF Tommie’s during the Phoney War period ‘brewing up’ with their new pattern mess tins, white enamel mugs, SRD rum ration and using a Tommy Cooker. Priced to reflect the rarity of this much sought after item of kit, photographs of which show use in the trenches of the Phoney war.
Inter-war / Early WW2, British, Dunkirk Era, ‘Blanco Tin’. Exceptionally rare storage tin for “Blanco”, manufactured by Joseph Pickering & Sons Ltd. of Sheffield, including a part reproduction ‘puck’ of No. 97 (Pea Green) Blanco with reproduction wrapper. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. Priced to reflect the rarity of this much sought after item of early war kit.
Inter-war and Battle of France / Dunkirk Week This week we are listing and re-visiting items from the inter and early war period, items will be listed over the weekend period, check for updates as they occur. Other items from the period have been listed previously e.g. \'WW2 British, Pullover, SIZE 1, Dunkirk era, 1940\', to view simply type \'Dunkirk\' into the search bar!!
Inter-War, British, \'Easy Opener\' Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is known to collectors as an ‘easy opener’ and dates from somewhere between the wars. They were contracted by the WD but very rarely are W/lD marked or dated, there is some evidence that they were also contracted to the Scouting movement. Many thanks to Martin Cook for assisting in the identification of this clasp knife. Priced to reflect its missing lanyard ring and the common warpage of the slab fibre grip. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
Inter-War, British, General Service, Cap, 1938. The General Service Cap was produced from khaki serge material similar to that of the Service or Battle Dress. A brown leather chinstrap with brass buckles, which needed to be carefully polished, was held in place by a pair of small brass buttons. The wearers regimental cap badge was also positioned to the front centre. The caps had the capability to be ‘set up’ using a short flat metal strip inserted into a specially provided pocket inside the cap under the oil cloth sweat band. The metal strip was attached to an internal wire grommet that formed the shape of the crown of the cap, this allowed all the fabric to be kept ‘taught’ and uncreased. In good condition it features its original leather strap, two small General Service buttons and is letter date stamped ‘O’ for 1938. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
Late WW2 / Post War British, 1950 Pattern, Khaki Drill Shorts. Issued towards the very end of WW2 this pattern of shorts became official issue in 1950. Utilising a ‘cross belt’ fastening with chrome buckle plates, they are now often referred to as ‘Gurkha Shorts’. The original label is missing, however, its ‘ghost’ can be seen in its correct position to the rear right hip. They proved popular as they had plenty of carrying capacity due to the slash pockets to the side plus two additional pockets to the rear. Due to the style of the waistband the shorts are slightly adjustable and will suit around a 30\" waist. When fastened they measure - Waist – 15 – 16” when laid flat, I would guess that they would fit a 30” waist. Inside leg - 7\" Outside leg – 16” The trousers have a lovely patina to the fabric, would display well and are still, with some work, wearable. There are some mall stains, and signs of wear which are consummate with their age. Please study the pictures as they form part of the description. Priced to reflect their small size and lack of original buckles which could easily be replaced.
Late WW2 / Post War British, 1950 Pattern, Khaki Drill Shorts. Additional images relating to sizing.
Late WW2 Allied Toothbrush and Tooth Powder Grouping. Rare chance to acquire two of the harder objects of personal kit to obtain. Both toothbrush and tooth powder are unopened with the brush still retaining its instruction label stating ‘Do not soak in hot water. You may spoil the handle.’
Late WW2 Allied Toothbrush. Rare chance to acquire one of the harder objects of personal kit to obtain. Price is for ONE toothbrush
Off for a Little Jaunt Ack-Ack Militaria will be away over the weekend so new uploads will be delayed until next week and shipping will be also be delayed until our return. So its sand castles, donkey rides, fish and chips and not forgetting a \'little stick of Blackpool rock\'. TTFN, Gary
Pack and Pocket Filler Week (I). This week we re-visit and add some new items of personal kit and pocket fillers. Don’t forget to Register on the Home Page to receive news, etc. Future uploads will include, camping equipment, P44 equipment, the ‘wash roll’, etc. TTFN.
Pack and Pocket Fillers, Week 2 This week we again look at the world of Pack and Pocket Fillers.
PAPER & EPHEMERA WEEK 1: Military Guides & Notebooks. This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we focus on the world of Paper and Ephemera with a specific topic of ‘Military Guides’. Over the coming uploads we will further examine this fascinating subject with focuses on Propaganda, ARP, etc. Don’t forget to Register on the Home Page to receive news, etc. Future uploads will include, camping equipment, P44 equipment, the ‘wash roll’, etc. TTFN.
Post War Era Tin Khaki Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. We suspect that this tin was manufactured post war, by Quippy of Dunmow, Essex, preliminarily for civilian use.
Post War, British, Second Issue (WW2 Pattern), Royal Navy Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is not dated, however the stores number 21306 stamped to the ricasso dates the knife to the 1960\'s/70\'s, manufactured by Rodgers of Sheffield. **Many thanks to Neil Champion who informed me of the stores number and its date. Please study the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
Post WW2, British, National Service Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of drivi ng licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is dated to 1956 and was manufactured by RBS and has various stampings. Please study the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
Post-War, 1957, Concealment in the Field Cracking little manual with lots of WW2 photographs, explains the art of concealment for the individual, units, aids to concealment, of weapons, vehicles, artillery, and communications. Ideal for re-enactment battle preparation or displays.
Post-War, British, 49 Pattern, Battledress Grouping, 1951 & 1954, National Service. After the Second World War, individual Commonwealth nations developed their Battledress uniform into both a parade and. a field uniform. The new British 1949 Patter Battledress had several changes from its WW2 predecessor. It was given broad lapels with an open collar. It was worn with a collared shirt and tie. The map pocket was moved to the sides. Etc. Priced to sell, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
Post-WW2 British, Anti-Dimming Outfit. The problem of respirator lenses dimming first occurred in WWI and led to the development of Glaso Anti-Dimming Paste that was smeared over the lenses to prevent condensation. In 1938 two new types of anti-dimming samples were tested; Liquid (G1: being a brown, alcohol-water solution) and Paste (P1: based on a substance called Turkey Red Oil), both were found to give good visibility for about an hour, but the paste appeared more practical and became the basis for future outfits. Up until 1945 the issued kits went through four marks, Mk III to Mk VI, with later post-war marks appearing after 1945. This is a Mk 7. and was most commonly found in the Lightweight Respirator haversack which had a special pocket in the base for storage, held by a metal press stud. Priced to reflect later date but outstanding condition.
Post-WW2, British, Dubbin Protective No1, 2 Oz Cat. No. H.A. 13530 Dubbin was used as a protective measure against gas. It was rubbed into the leather to provide a waterproof seal and to prevent the absorbing of gas. This post-war example comes with most of its contents and is in very good condition. Priced to reflect post-war date, contents and good condition.
Pre/Early WW2 British, Complete Album of Cigarette Cards of ‘National Importance’: Air Raid Precautions. A complete album of cigarette cards relating to Air Raid Precautions with a large section relating to Anti-Gas equipment and procedures. Beautiful art work with some superb images relating to anti-gas!!
RARE WW2 British, Denim Overall Blouse, Size 11, 1941. Denim overalls produced early in the war have the same looks as the Battledress Serge, while later they followed similar changes as to the 1940 Austerity Battledress. These two-piece utility uniforms were made from Denim and used removeable, revolving shank buttons to avoid damage whilst laundering. As with the single piece overalls they were designed to be worn over the usual uniform to aid protection. They were most notable and well known as the early issue uniform for the newly formed LDV and Home Guard and were often worn during the Italian campaign. This example has been ‘very lightly’ worn, is in very good condition and comes in a very useful large size No. 11: Height: 6’1” to 6’2” Breast: 39” to 41” Waist: 34” to 36” I have included an image of myself wearing both the Blouse and trousers and I am 6’2” and at the time had a 35” waist. The blouse was manufactured in 1941 by The Osband Knitwear company, having all the original buttons and buckle. There are some very light ‘oil’ stains to the right-hand sleeve and breast pocket plus evidence of insignia being applied to the shoulder epaulette, otherwise the blouse is in exceptional order. Priced to reflect the exceptional condition and sizing of this hard to source item of uniform.
RARE WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, Box of Six, MKI, Anti-Gas Eye Shields, 1938. Eyeshields were a simple plastic visor designed to protect the eyes from gas spray. These are examples of the first of three MK\'s. One packet of six was issued to each man. Clearly marked and dated to November 1938 A rare chance to acquire these now hard to source items!!
RARE WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, Box of Six, MKII, Anti-Gas Eye Shields, 1939. Eye shields were a simple plastic visor designed to protect the eyes from gas spray. These are examples of the second of three MK\'s. One packet of six was issued to each man. Clearly marked and dated to ‘EJB 1939’ it is clear to see by the staining to the envelope, one of the modifications made to the MKII’s that made them different to the MKI’s i.e., a green strip of oil cloth was stapled at the top edge and is backed by a piece of white flannel for added comfort and sweat absorption. Other changes being a one-piece elastic headband and a pressed edge to the plastic giving increased strength. A rare chance to acquire these BOXED and now hard to source items!!
Reproduction (Pegasus Militaria) Cake/Puck of KG97 Khaki Green (Medium) or Pea Green Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. This example is coloured to the shade of KG97 Khaki Green (Medium) or Pea Green and was associated with BEF, Battle of France and Dunkirk. This reproduction item was manufactured some years ago by ‘Pegasus Militaria’ and is highly prized by reenactors of the period. Comes with a reproduction wrapper with instructions for use, also refer to item number 176.
Spanish Civil War Era, ‘Alpargatas’ (Espadrilles). Typical Spanish alpargatas rope and tar-soled, canvas espadrilles as worn by both sides in the conflict but mostly associated with the Republican militias. This ‘salty’ pair from the SCW era, has seen quite a lot of wear; however, the canvas is solid, and they have an interesting field repair of some string to replace one of the canvas straps. A rare chance to acquire a period correct item of footwear that would enhance any Spanish Civil War kit collection. Acquired from Spain during the 1980’s.
SPANISH CIVIL WAR WEEK This week we will be listing a series of Spanish Civil War items of interest and rarity. The following 18 items cover items of helmets and headdress, uniform, equipment and personal items.
Spanish Civil War, Mess tin. As used by both sides in the conflict this 1922 manufactured mess tin would have been carried in the musette bag of which I have a People’s Army of the Republic example for sale elsewhere on the site. Stamped to base with both handles securely in place, perfect to enhance any SCW kit display or for re-enactment purposes.
Spanish Civil War, Patch for the Anarchist C.N.T. The C.N.T. or National Confederation of Labour, was an anarchist, syndicate workers union who formed militia units the fight the fascist, pro-Franco Nationalist forces. Particularly known as one of the militia units fighting in the defence of Madrid. This patch is in mint, un-issued condition and was machine embroidered and manufactured by Tovarra de Saville.
Spanish Civil War, Patch for the Communist U.G.T. The U.G.T. or General Union of Workers, was a communist/socialist workers union who formed militia units the fight the fascist, pro-Franco Nationalist forces. Particularly known as one of the militia units fighting in the defence of Madrid. This patch is in mint, un-issued condition and was machine embroidered and manufactured by Tovarra de Saville.
Spanish Civil War, Patch for the Communist U.G.T. The U.G.T. or General Union of Workers, was a communist/socialist workers union who formed militia units the fight the fascist, pro-Franco Nationalist forces. Particularly known as one of the militia units fighting in the defence of Madrid. This patch is in mint, un-issued condition and was machine embroidered and manufactured by Tovarra de Saville.
Spanish Civil War, People’s Army of the Republic, Musette Bag. AS issued to the People’s Army this ‘salty’ looking musette bag would have held the servicemen’s personal belongings plus mess tin, etc. In the correct pale grey canvas, it retains all its straps, rivets and buckles apart from one eyelet missing from the closure strap. An opportunity to acquire this rare piece of original SCW kit that would display well on a mannequin or for re-enactment purposes.
Spanish Civil War, People’s Army of the Republic, Transmissions (Signaller’s) Badge. A stamped in relief example of the Transmission’s metal badge, with some minor paint loss and still retaining its soldered fixing ‘prongs’ to the rear, often found missing. A rare and much sort after item of insignia, approx. 5cm in diameter.
Spanish Civil War, People’s Army of the Republic, Wallet. Small issue wallet, to the People’s Army of the Republic, designed to hold identity papers, pay slips, letters, etc. A nice, small item of personal kit that would enhance any collection, please note that both sides of the press stud are present, however, one side has pulled through the fabric, I have left this as is and leave it to the purchaser to decide on any restoration. Priced to reflect condition and relative rarity.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, ‘Isabelino’ Barrack Cap with Red Star Insignia of the Peoples Republic. The Barrack Cap known or ‘Isabelino’ was worn by both Nationalist and Republican forces during the conflict, however, Republican service men and women preferred to remove the arm-of-service tassel from the front of the cap. This mint and un-issued example retains its red for infantry piping and is clearly stamped as a size ‘2’, however, it is very small. Retaining its red star insignia to the Army of the People’s Republic. Priced to reflect its rarity in the UK, insignia and it being a rare Republican survivor, as much was destroyed during the Franco period. Acquired from Spain during the 1980’s.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, ‘Mono’, Coveralls. Dark khaki, ‘mono’ coveralls with a fold-down collar and two pleated breast pockets, plus an additional pocket over the right buttock made these items of uniform popular for their large pocket capacity. The addition of ‘epaulettes’ allowed for the easy wear of the M1923/6 leather equipment as they prevented slippage off the shoulder. They became most associated with the Republican militias and foreign volunteers. This example has all its correct wood buttons, to the front chest, shoulder epaulettes and rear pocket with its true composite buttons to the fly also in place. This example in mint, un-worn condition with its original makers stamp and sized to a ‘small’ size ‘3’. A rare chance to obtain a uniform item that could form the basis of a Spanish Civil War mannequin display, cheaper than buying separate shirt/tunic and trousers. Priced to reflect its rarity in the UK, mint condition and being a rare Republican survivor, as much was destroyed during the Franco period. Please note there are one or two areas where the stitching has come loose, I have left these for the purchaser to decide whether to repair or leave the history as is.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, \'Adrian\' Style, M26 French Import Helmet Shell. Many thanks to Hunter Cogle who assisted in the correct identification of this helmet via the Spanish Civil War Weapons and Collectors Facebook group. Hunter also runs the the Military Helmet Collectors Facebook group, the link can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/136355766513124/ In 1926, the French ‘Adrian’ helmet was modified from the M15 into the M26. This new version had a simplified construction and replaced the ventilation hole under the comb, which was a weak point, with a series of smaller holes. Identified as an \'import\' by the lack of the two holes to front that would have been used to apply the French arm of service badge. Most notably identified with Republican forces. This example lacks its liner, however, it retains its original paint finish. Sourced in Spain during the 1980\'s. Priced accordingly to negate loss of liner. The Franco dictatorship led to the destruction of the majority of Republican items making these pieces rare and hard to source.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, Canteen. Canteens were issued to combatants of both sides in the conflict, however, this unusual canteen manufactured from copper, as such, was probably in use by Republican forces. Still retains its original cork stopper with leather and steel chain strap. Acquired from Spain during the 1980’s.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, Card Cartridge Box, 1938. This ‘tatty’, but rare survivor, is an empty cardboard cartridge box of 50 rounds for the Mauser Model 1888 rifle and was manufactured in Seville in July 1938. As can be seen from the photographs it was designed to fit directly into the leather cartridge pouch of the Spanish M1923/6 equipment. Literal translation MILITARY PYROTECHNICS 50 CARTRIDGES OF WAR MODEL 1888 MAUSER MODEL RIFLE DE7% ********* IN July 1938 ********* No SEVILLE Please note that the pouch is NOT included in this listing and is for the card box ONLY. The pouch is available in a separate listing. I have not attempted to repair the box and will leave any restoration to the purchaser. Priced to reflect its rarity in the UK.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, M1923/6 Cartridge Pouch. M1923/6, leather cartridge pouch, as issued by the People’s Army, Militia, and International Brigade. The pouch itself is in good order, however, the rear straps have not fared so well and have ‘field repairs’ of undetermined age. Priced to reflect condition, would display on a mannequin very well or for re-enactment purposes.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, M1923/6 Cartridge Pouch. M1923/6, leather cartridge pouch, as issued by the People’s Army, Militia, and International Brigade. The pouch itself is in good order, however, the rear straps have not fared so well and have ‘field repairs’ of undetermined age. Priced to reflect condition, would display on a mannequin very well or for re-enactment purposes.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, M1923/6 Leather Equipment Set. People’s Army of the Republic, infantry troop leather belt, with correct arm of service buckle, leather support straps and pair of leather pouches. As used by the People’s Army, Militia, and International Brigade personnel. The set is in good order and could be further enhanced by the addition of a third pouch to the rear ‘y-strap’ fixing point to the rear of the belt, I have a field repaired example for sale elsewhere on the site. Please note that this listing is for the leather equipment only.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, Overseas, ‘Isabelino’ Barrack Cap. The Barrack Cap known or ‘Isabelino’ was worn by both Nationalist and Republican forces during the conflict, however, Republican service men and women preferred to remove the arm-of-service tassel from the front of the cap. This mint and un-issued example retains its red for infantry piping, is the paler colour used for overseas caps and is clearly stamped as a size ‘5’, however, it is VERY small. Priced to reflect its rarity in the UK, insignia and it being a rare Republican survivor, as much was destroyed during the Franco period. Acquired from Spain during the 1980’s.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, Ratio 2:3 Military Flag. The flag of the Second Spanish Republic, known in Spanish as ‘la tricolor’, was the official flag of Spain between 1931 and 1939 and was the flag of the Spanish Republican government in exile until 1977. The flag began to be used on April 27, 1931, thirteen days after municipal election results led to the abolition of the monarchy and the proclamation of the Second Spanish Republic. This same flag had been previously displayed by certain Republican groups as an alternative to the red-and-yellow flag that they identified with the Bourbon Monarchy, because of this previous use, the young republic eagerly adopted this symbol. The flag presented to the army of the nation on May 6 with the following words: \"The national uprising against tyranny, victorious since April 14, has hoisted a flag that is invested by means of the feelings of the people with the double representation of the hope of freedom and of its irreversible triumph.\" The flag was formed by three horizontal bands of the same width, red, yellow, and dark purple. The military version of the flag, with a proportion of 2:3 and without the coat of arms was used by Republican Army units, with the International Brigades adding a three-pointed red star to the centre. This ‘salty, battle scarred’ flag is a very, very rare chance to acquire an almost irreplaceable relic of the conflict. Priced to reflect the symbolism and rarity of an extraordinary survivor from the period of Franco’s dictatorship where such objects were destroyed for fear of arrest.
Spanish Civil War, Republican, Red Star and Sergeant’s Insignia. Un-issued Red Star insignia to the Army of the People’s Republic, plus sergeant’s bar, note that these bars were normally worn in pairs. Manufactured in metal with red paint to face and fixing ‘prongs’ to rear, with some minor paint loss.
Spanish Civil War, Spanish, Model M26 Helmet. Used by both Republican and Nationalist forces this M1926, colloquially known as the Trubia, retains much of its original paint finish, original leather and cloth liner and has had field modifications made to the leather chin strap. A good salty example of these increasingly hard, in original condition, helmets to find. Sourced in Spain during the 1980\'s. The Franco dictatorship led to the destruction of the majority of Republican items making these pieces rare and hard to source. I will be listing more Spanish Civil War items soon.
THIS WEEK: ‘If the cap fits, wear it!!’ As the weather draws in and Covid grips the Ack-Ack household we re-examine the wonderful world of of the cap and related items. Please be mindful that orders may be slightly postponed until we are clear to revisit our postal services. To receive further news and updates don’t forget to register on the home page. TTFN and happy hunting!!
This Week: ‘Something for the Weekend’!! This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we delve into the murky world passion. From stockings and condoms to ‘naughty’ postcards, sex was a major preoccupation for the British Squaddie. Don’t forget to Register on the Homepage to receive news of further updates. TTFN and good hunting.
VERY RARE Early WW2 British, Denim Overall Trousers, Pre-mid 1941. Denim overalls produced early in the war have the same looks as the Battledress Serge, while later they followed similar changes as to the 1940 Austerity Battledress. These two-piece utility uniforms were made from Denim and used removeable, revolving shank buttons to avoid damage whilst laundering. As with the single piece overalls they were designed to be worn over the usual uniform to aid protection. They were most notable and well known as the early issue uniform for the newly formed LDV and Home Guard and were often worn during the Italian campaign. These trousers are an early issue example which was only made prior to 1942 when they were superseded by the austerity pattern. The trousers are cut in the same way as their serge counterparts with a wide leg and a high rise. They feature a double pleated first field dressing pocket to the right hip which with NO brass fastening button which dates these to pre-mid 1941. A large map pocket is located to the left thigh and features a covered button which is another notable feature of the early pattern, as are the belt loops fitted around the waist. The fly fastens with stamped zinc buttons, and more are located around the waist to which braces can be attached. Slash pockets are located to each hip which also feature an opening to allow access to clothing worn under the trousers. Tabs are located to the bottom of each leg as are usually found on this early pattern. This example is worn, is in very good condition and comes in a very useful large size: Waist laid flat: 18” (36” waist). Inside leg when laid flat: 31/32”. *Note: I consider from the sizes shown above that this is an original Size 16, and they came with the size 16 Denim BD Blouse that I also have for sale. Size 16 label would have read: Height: 6’1” - 6’2” Waist: 34” – 35” I have included an image of myself wearing both the Blouse and trousers and I am 6’2” and at the time had a 35” waist. The trousers have some minor contemporary repairs to the right-hand leg, map field dressing pocket and first field dressing pocket, a good-sized pair of trousers that would suit the modern reenactor, mannequin display or kit lay out. Priced to reflect the exceptional condition and sizing of this hard to source item of uniform.
VERY RARE Early WW2 British, Denim Overall Trousers, Pre-mid 1941. Additional photographs Giving interior details and sizing.
VERY RARE, WW2 British, Collarless Shirt. As shown with: WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, Northern Europe, Later War KG3 Blanco. The basic garment worn under the battle dress was known as the collarless shirt, was pullover in style, had long sleeves and was made from Angola wool. The shirt had no pockets, and it was very long at the back. The neck area had a khaki drill material lining to prevent it from rubbing the neck of the wearer. The front normally had three small, pressed metal buttons to close the area from the chest to the neck with the sleeve ending in a small cuff with a single button. A softer version of the shirt was also produced from Flannel but was otherwise identical to the Angola version. Both patterns did have a small buttonhole at the rear of the neck to take a small collar stud, originally placed there for the use of officers who wore collars and ties, note that towards the end of the war regulations were relaxed with some units allowing other ranks to wear, ‘when walking out’, collar and ties. This example is in a very, very large size, unfortunately I cannot find any kind of labelling, when laid flat the measurements are: Arm pit to arm pit: 24” Back of collar to base of shirt tale: 38” It is in excellent wearable condition with only 5 minute holes to the base of the tail and a very small almost invisible stain to the lower right chest. I am no expert, but I consider the fabric to be the softer Flannel type, or it could be that the rougher Angola fabric has softened with age? Priced to reflect larger sizing, I am 6’2” and the length is fine, and excellent overall condition.
VERY RARE, WW2 British, Collarless Shirt. Extra pictures These pictures illustrate the interior of the shirt and show that the cloth is clean and the collar and cuffs show little to no wear. They also give details of sizing and minor damage and staining.
Webbing Week (1) This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we dip into the world of British and Commonwealth webbing, Blanco and associated items. In this upload we focus on individual items and small ‘sets’, revisit some previously listed items with a webbing connection, whilst next week we focus on larger, fuller sets. Prices start at only £15 plus P&P. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, home front, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
Webbing Week (2) This week at Ack-Ack Militaria we again dip again into the world of British webbing and as promised focus on the larger ‘Battle Order’ sets. The next upload will focus on the humble ‘jack knife’. Future themes will include anti-gas, cycling, home front, Home Guard, ARP etc. If you have a particular theme you would like to see presented drop us a line at the email address shown at the top of the home page. Don\'t forget to register on the home page to receive email regarding stock updates and news. TTFN and good hunting.
WW1 / WW2 Era, ‘Private Purchase’, Cutthroat Razor. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. Manufactured by Henry Hobson and Son’s, Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition, would enhance any WW1 or WW2 collection or display. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW1 & WW2 Era Toothbrush. First half of the 20th Century unmarked toothbrush that would make an excellent addition to any wash roll or kit layout. In good unused condition, however, it is recommended that for hygiene purposes it is used for display only.
WW1 British / Commonwealth Service Number & Unit Marked Fork and Spoon. A good clean pair of what appear to be private purchase fork and spoon, service number and unit marked: PLY (possibly Royal Marines Plymouth Division RMLI) FS 22183 The fork was manufactured by Hutton’s of Sheffield with the markers mark for the spoon being obscured but appears to have been made in Birmingham. Worthy of some future research.
WW1 British Army, ‘Issue’, Cutthroat Razor. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. This example is W /I D marked, has the owner’s abbreviated service number and was manufactured by Hunter and Son, Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW1 British, 1874 Pattern, Mess Tins. In the First World War, the British Army used a metal, two-piece, kidney shaped mess tin. The 1874-model was made of tinplated steel and had a \"D\" plan view with rounded corners. The tray or cup piece had a folding handle that opened to the side. The tray also functioned as a deep lid for the pan. This example has no apparent date, the ‘tinning’ is rather thick, however, it has the narrow metal loop, on the lower pan, to secure the mess tin strap, missing from post-war examples. The mess tin cover, which has obviously been with the tin for many years, also has the correct translucent horn button, not dissimilar to the colour of the fabric. In good overall condition. Priced to reflect lack of stampings, acceptance marks, etc.
WW1 British, 1908 Pattern Haversack Third Issue, 1918 (with 1919 dated Brace Strap). The Haversack would have carried: rations, a mess tin, a white towel, wool shirt, wool socks, a holdall, and a rifle cleaning kit. The pack is in good used condition, front closure straps are excellent and side buckles and straps are good. The rear is in good order and complete with original straps and buckles to base and sides. The inside is in good condition with minor dirt and dust and is complete with internal divide. The underside of the closure flap is maker marked ME CO 1918. This haversack comes with a 1919 dated brace strap and has, I suspect, a layer of later applied KG3 Blanco. Please check my other listings for ‘pack fillers’ that could be added to enhance this small collection of ‘Tommie’s’ personal kit.
WW1 British, Holdall (Wash roll), 1917. The holdall would have carried a spoon, knife, fork, button stick, shaving brush, hair comb, toothbrush, razor, a bar of soap, and spare boot laces. This example still carries its razor, shaving brush and button stick, with both holdall and contents having the same service number: 74589. The holdall itself is in used condition with some surface dirt but has no tears, rips, or holes. It is clearly stamped dated 1917 with both ties in place. Please check my other listings for ‘pack fillers’ that could be added to enhance this small collection of ‘Tommie’s’ personal kit.
WW1 British, original ‘pack-filler’ grouping. Three private purchase items that could have graced any WW1 ‘Tommie’s’ haversack. The group consists of: Boxed small tin of Wynter Bros. Foot Paste with advertising flyer, essential for treating blisters and corns caused by the constant wearing of the B5 leather boots. Tin of Vaseline petroleum jelly for treating dry or chapped skin from exposure in the trenches. Regesall Shaving Stick tin (modern stick of shaving soap included) for the regulation morning shave. An excellent way to enhance a WWI haversack display.
WW1 British, original ‘pack-filler’, Comforts Tea and Sugar tin. After the war, reflecting on the Allied victory, some authors cited the restorative effects of tea as part of a winning strategy. In 1921, British neurologist M. Allen Starr noted: ‘During the war English troops were freely supplied with tea and carried it instead of water in their canteens’. The British Army’s Surgeon-General Annesley de Renzy wrote: ‘All I can say is that on a long march, and where troops are exposed to great hardships, a cup of Assam tea is one of the most sustaining and invigorating beverages a soldier could have’. More recently, authors Ian and Iris MacFarlane have suggested tea was both stimulating and relaxing: ‘The caffeine stimulates and relaxes both the mind and body, adds to the confidence of the drinker, and so makes him more efficient as a fighter. The caffeine also combats stress and injury; hence the immediate response of most British people after any accident is to offer or drink a hot cup of sweet tea’. Sectioned in the middle with embossed lids to each end: ‘Tea and Sugar Box’. Plated ‘silver to the outside and ‘gold’ to the inner, some rust spotting but in overall good condition. I have period tea for sale else where on the site!!
WW1 British, Polish Grouping; Tins of \'The Soldiers Friend\' & \'Cherry Blossom Boot Polish\'. A nice little grouping of essential items for the British Tommy. Polish for brass-work and boots. Just what you need to finish off that kit layout.
WW1 Era, ‘Private Purchase’, Cutthroat Razor with box. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. Manufactured by Hunter and Son, Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition and box, would enhance any WW1 or WW2 collection or display. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW1 Era, British, Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is not dated, has an unclear manufacture, does not have the marlin spike, however, it comes with the lanyard loop. As was common with WW1 period knives the blade is approx.’ 1 inch longer than found in WW2. Please study the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW1 or WW2 (Dunkirk era), British, White Enamel Mug. A good example of the standard British white enamel mug. Not dated, however, this example has the tell tale triple spur marks to base. As issued during WW1 and during the early years of WW2 an essential addition to any small pack.
WW1 or WW2 (Dunkirk era), British, White Enamel Mug. A good example of the standard British white enamel mug. Not dated, however, this example has the tell-tale triple spur marks to base. As issued during WW1 and during the early years of WW2, an essential addition to any small pack. The final photograph shows a group of British BEF Tommie’s during the Phoney War period ‘brewing up’ with their new pattern mess tins, white enamel mugs, SRD rum ration and using a Tommy Cooker.
WW1 Period, British, 1908 Pattern Webbing, Large Pack Cross Strap, 1919. A good example of the 1908 Pattern Webbing, Large Pack Cross Strap. Manufactured in 1919 by ‘MECo’ (Mills Equipment Co) it retains its buckle and brass end tab. It retains a light coat of period Blanco. Priced to reflect condition and post war date.
WW1 Unissued ‘Field Service Postcard’. Field Service Postcards were used by soldiers on active service to send messages home without any need for censoring by officers. The purpose of the card was to reassure loved ones that their loved one was safe, alive, and well and to confirm that post was moving in both directions. The soldier was allowed to delete as appropriate from a selection of pre-printed options, if anything other than date and signature was added the card was destroyed. I good overall condition with some foxing and minor sun damage to edge.
WW1, British, ‘Acting’ Sergeant Armband. These ‘Acting Sgt’ stripes/chevrons came from the effects of G. Moss, Machine Gun Corps who saw action during the Somme campaign on Thiepval Ridge 26th - 30th September. They appear to be field made from part of a tunic sleeve, utilising a tunic button and what appears to be a button from a mess tin cover? Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description. A rare and unusual item worthy of further research.
WW1, British, ‘The Young Officers Guide to Knowledge’, Harrison & Sons Ltd, 1917. A good copy, written Capt. C.G. Massie Blomfeld, in its Fifth and Enlarged addition.
WW1, British, Silver SIXPENCE, 1918. A WW1, British silver ‘Sixpence’ dated 1918. A great little pocket filler or would be a great addition for a vintage Christmas Pudding. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW1/2 British SRD (Supply Reserve Depot) Rum Jar. Soldiers on active service could be issued with 2.5 fluid ounces (1/8 of a pint) of rum at the discretion of their commander or on the recommendation of their medical officer. It was commonly issued during or after the dawn ‘stand-to’. Marked with the letters SRD which stood for ‘Supply Reserve Depot’; other, more ironic interpretations of the initials have included: ‘Seldon Reaches Destination’, Service Rum Diluted’ and ‘Soon Runs Dry’. In good condition with no maker mark, appears to have been abraded away from the bottom surface.
WW2 British ‘Excavated’, Hudson ARP, Relic Whistle with Provenance (working!!). A rare survivor of the Southampton Blitz, this ARP whistle, manufactured by Hudson & Co. of Barr Street, Hockley, Birmingham was recovered in the early 1960’s during the restoration of Quilter Vault that was used as an air raid shelter. The item comes with written and photographic provenance (refer to final photo), which will be forwarded to the purchaser along with the whistle. The item has a fantastic patina and will display really nicely!! Quilters Vault is located on the West side of the lower end of the High Street, Southampton, between Porters Lane and Broad Lane. The Royal George Hotel at 88-89 High Street used to stand above it. It became known as the “Quilters” after the landlord and landlady of that name who ran the Royal George in the 19th century. The vault was probably erected during the late 13th century and is internally semi-circular of rubble construction. It is 18.7 metres long by 6.2 metres wide running east to west. The hotel above the vault, when the vault was being used as a shelter, was destroyed during the blitz of 1940 and the vault is now on open land. In itself not an unusual item, however, please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity and provenance, worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!! Copy the links below, you will need to cut and paste, for an interesting film about the Southampton Blitz, the last of which specifically shows the vaults: https://youtu.be/1lQrInAeYBw https://youtu.be/YxnWQTbyGcw https://youtu.be/0WiwapOIpD4
WW2 British ‘Respirator, Anti-Gas, Light’ Storage Corks. Rare and often found missing today, a pair of Lightweight Respirator storage corks to prevent water, moisture and dust entering the new compact filter. When not in use the plugs were carried in the haversack carrier and secured by passing the tape under the flap of the anti-dim pocket. Generally missing from all but the most advanced collections. Broad arrow marked to tape. GAG0003
WW2 British Aluminium Early Pattern Mess Tin, Dunkirk Era, 1939. The British Army on introduction of the 37 Pattern Kit decided to replace the older D-shaped mess tin for something more suitable to modern warfare. They adopted a rectangular pair of nesting aluminium tins with a folding steel handle. These proved to be lighter and more hygienic than the older model, however, these were quickly withdrawn to use the aluminium for aircraft production. This single tin, being the smaller \'inner\' tin of the pair, is a very rare survivor. Manufactured by E&C in 1939 it is Broad Arrow marked and has the even rarer welded fixture. One small hole to the corner edge, refer to photo\'s, and priced accordingly. I will be listing a pair of the same pattern early aluminium mess tins their mess tin bag soon.
WW2 British Army ‘Camp’ Safety Matches. An essential pack or pocket filler; dated stamp September 1941, ‘Camp Safety Matches’, with some contents. Body and draw constructed from timber and paper. Priced to reflect rarity of acceptance date stamp.
WW2 British Army ‘Tent Heater’. British army tent heater comprising porcelain burner, shield, copper heating element and storage tin. Dated 1943 with tin manufactured by the Metal Box company. A rare piece of kit designed to heat the British ‘Pup Tent’ by the burner heating the copper mesh which would then radiate heat. Also used to ‘brew-up’ by placing the standard enamel mug on the top, refer to listed ‘Tea Ration’ tin listed on the site.
WW2 British Army Bush, ‘Slouch’ Hat, 1942, Size 6 ½, Badged to Royal Engineers. Colloquially known as the ‘Slouch Hat’, ‘Wide Awake’ or ‘Smasher’, the ‘Bush Hat’ was the most highly prized of British tropical headwear. Introduced at the start of the 20th Century it soldiers were particularly fond of it as it shielded the eyes from the sun, sheltered the wearer from the rain and on patrol kept leeches away from the neck. Ventilation was provided by plain, painted steel eyelets placed on either side of the crown, around which the ‘Puggaree’, a long length of muslin wound around its circumference, could be wetted to keep the wearer cool via evaporation. The left side of the brim could be raised and fastened up by a pressure stud, allowing for easier carrying of the rifle. Arm of service flashes were often sewn onto the upturned side of the upturned brim. Most of these hats were manufactured in the UK. This example is in outstanding condition with little to no moth damage, maintains its original leather liner and chin strap and was manufactured by Elliot & Co. in 1942. Sized at 6 ½ it also still retains the owner’s addition of a SMLE stripper clip to keep the crown crease nice and sharp. Difficult to up-grade, an excellent example of this much sort after piece of headwear.
WW2 British Army Cigarette ‘Compo’ Ration Tin (Larger Format; Cylindrical). The grey cigarette tin was included in the 14 man ‘compo’ ration issued to troops in the field. The tin contained 50 cigarettes and was designed to be opened and distributed between the men on the battlefield. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. Priced to reflect rarity and fair condition.
WW2 British Army Cigarette Ration Tin (Larger Format) Grouping. An example of the larger sized, issue, ration tin with some contents. Contains a complete packet of ‘Mogul’ cigarettes and a larger box of the very rare ‘Bryant & May’s, Royal Wax Vestas’ period matches. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. Priced to reflect condition and period contents.
WW2 British Army Cigarette Ration Tin (Larger Format). An example of the issue, pocket-sized cigarette ration tin in extremely good condition. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. Priced to reflect the good condition of this much sought after ration tin.
WW2 British Army Cigarette Ration Tin (Smaller Format) Grouping. An extremally rare example of this issue, smaller pocket-sized ration tin with some contents. Contains an extremely rare packet of the infamous ‘Victory’ cigarettes, manufactured in India and shipped to Europe, and a book of period matches. Pressed metal construction, manufactured by the Metal Box Company with hinged lid and striker to base in worn condition. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. Priced to reflect condition and contents, although worn and damaged still a much sought after and desirable grouping.
WW2 British Army Housewife, 1943. The WW2 British army Housewife, or ‘Hussif’, was issued to all troops to enable them to carry out running repairs in the field. This example has no markings; however, it does contain a 1943 dated packet of 5 needles, 4 for sewing and one for darning. It also contains two balls of darning wool, fifty yards of sewing thread, ‘Bakelite’ thimble and a range of brass and steel buttons from various manufactures. With some external storage marks an excellent addition to any small pack collection.
WW2 British Army Issue Soap Grouping. British army 44 pattern issue soap tin with an original bar of ‘Lifebuoy’ soap. Tin is broad arrow stamped and dated 1945
WW2 British Army One Pint Ceramic Tea Mug, 1943. A rare survivor, this ceramic, one pint tea mug is dated 1943 with a clear George VI cipher, manufactured by Barker Brothers Ltd. of Derby as part of their Royal Tudor Ware range. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Priced to reflect good condition and would make an excellent addition for any display of army NAAFI or barrack life.
WW2 British Army Tea Ration Tin One of the rarer and more sought after ration tins. To overcome providing ‘Tommy’ with hot brew in the front lines an instant tea was issued with milk and sugar already included in the mix, so a soldier just had to add water. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Manufactured from pressed steel and issued in the standard sized tin used for emergency rations, cigarettes etc: I also have the opportunity for you to purchase unopened packets of WW2, 4 Oz, Ty-Phoo Tea, which can also be found in ‘WW2 British personal kit, pack fillers and comfort’. *Note: no contents.
WW2 British Army Tea Ration Tin One of the rarer and more sought-after ration tins. To overcome providing ‘Tommy’ with hot brew in the front lines an instant tea was issued with milk and sugar already included in the mix, so a soldier just had to add water. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Manufactured from pressed steel and issued in the standard sized tin used for emergency rations, cigarettes etc: I also have the opportunity for you to purchase unopened packets of WW2, 4 Oz, Ty-Phoo Tea, which can also be found in ‘WW2 British personal kit, pack fillers and comfort’. *Note: no contents.
WW2 British Army Toilet Roll A rare broad arrow stamped and 1943 dated ‘Lipton’s’ toilet roll. Rare indeed as in the field each man’s ration was only x3 sheets. Manufactured under war time conditions following contemporary printing regulations. 35 GBP
WW2 British Army, ‘Issue’, “Compactum” KFS, 1945. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Towards the end of the war a new lightweight stackable set of eating utensils was developed, but few were issued, and it is now considered part of the 44 Pattern equipment. These three-piece sets were made from steel and die cast aluminium with a clasp at the end of the spoon handle to hold the set together when stacked. They were designed to be as light as possible, being half the weight of previous issue sets and unlike previous issues could fit inside the standard issue mess tin. This example is W /I D marked, clearly dated 1945 and was manufactured by Richards of Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition, would be a welcome addition for any reenactors kit or for a collector’s ‘wash roll’ display. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British Army, ‘Issue’, Safety Razor, 1943. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. This example is W /I D marked, clearly dated 1943 and comes with a full packet of ten ‘KLEEN’ razor blades, manufactured by W.R. SWANN & CO LTD, Sheffield, England. Priced to reflect unissued condition, full packet of blades and very early date for this model. Would be a welcome addition for any reenactors kit or for a collector’s ‘wash roll’ display. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British Army, Machete and Scabbard, 1945. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. During WW2 British and Commonwealth forces were issued with machete’s as opposed to an axe or smaller hatchet for field use and could be used for most tasks short of cutting down trees. This late war machete was part of the 44 Pattern equipment, designed for jungle use in the Far East, and featured an American style webbing scabbard with wire hanging loops designed to work with the grommets found on 44 Pattern belts and haversacks. The blade was 17.5” long with an overall length of 22.5”. The machete itself has black plastic grips and marked with a code of ‘AF 0100’. At least six British manufactures have been identified during 1945. Priced to reflect rarity and condition with some minor ‘discolouration’ to the blade and a mint unissued scabbard. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British Army, Scissors, 1944. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. A pair of British army scissors, probably medical issue, broad arrow marked, clearly dated 1944 and manufactured by T. Turner & Co. of Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British Army, ULTRA-RARE ‘Craven’, Cigarette Ration Tin (Larger Format). An extremely desirable example, the ultra-rare, issue, ‘Craven “Plain” Cigarettes’, pocket-sized cigarette ration tin. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. Priced to reflect the ultra-rare status of this much sought after ration tin.
WW2 British Army, Wire Cutters and Frog. Several patterns of wire cutters were available to troops for cutting wire which could vary from thicker barbed wire to thinner telephone cable. They could be used for creating defensive works or cutting through enemy wire. These smaller examples have sometimes, because of their size, been called ‘Airborne’ or SOE cutters. This example is W /I D marked, clearly dated 1943 and comes with a webbing frog and string. Priced to reflect condition which shows some minor ‘pitting’ and the addition of the frog and string. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Army, Woodworking Gouges, 1939. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. A pair of British Army, cast steel, woodworking gouges, broad arrow marked, clearly dated 1939 and manufactured by ADDIS. Priced to reflect good overall condition. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British Civil Defence Gas Decontamination MKII Helmet, 1939. A good example of a Civil Defence gas \'Decontamination\' British MKII helmet with a large 7 ¼ sized liner comprising the early foam pad and is dated 1939, some minor rust to inner rim, however the outer surface has only minor crazing and scratched with a clear \'DC\' hand painted to front. A very desirable Civil Defence item that will display well. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British Home Front ‘Coin Grouping’. A fantastic grouping of pre-1945 coins with a WWII era coin purse. A great pocket filler!! Farthing: x1, 1944 Pennies: x4, 1928, 30, 36 & 40 ‘Threepenny Bit’: x1, 1937 ‘Silver’ Three Pence: x4, 1931, 34, 39 & 40 ‘Silver’ Sixpence: x2, 1929 & 43 ‘Silver’ Shilling: x1, 1939 ‘Silver’ Half Crown: x1, 1931 Priced as a multiple of current individual coin values as of October 2023. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Home Front ‘Ticket Grouping’. An unusual set of WWII dated public transport tickets with their original ‘cottage industry’ manufactured copper ticket holder. A great pocket filler!! Priced to reflect rarity. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Homefront ARP ‘Paragon’ First Aid Shoulder Bag with Contents. An excellent, clean example of the canvas, ARP ‘Paragon’ First Aid shoulder bag with supple leather straps and contents. Contents include Shell Dressing, various bandages, Safety pins, torniquet, etc. Also includes a superb St. Johns triangular bandage with beautiful instructional graphics.
WW2 British Issue ‘Lifebuoy’ Soap An unissued bar of issue ‘Lifebuoy’ soap, we think that this was of ‘Victorian’ manufacture but would have been held in stores and issued through WWI and into WWII. X2 available Priced to reflect rarity. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue Shaving Brush, 1944. A mint and unissued, bristle and horsehair shaving brush, still retaining its cellophane cover held in. place by its original twine, manufactured in 1944 by Hamilton & Co. Priced to reflect mint condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue Shaving Brush, 1944. A mint and unissued, bristle and horsehair shaving brush, manufactured in 1944 by Britton Brush Co Ltd. Priced to reflect mint condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue, ‘BOURJOIS’ Shaving Soap. A rare and still wrapped partially stick of issue ‘BOURJOIS’ British Army shaving soap that would enhance any small pack or wash roll display. X2 available Priced to reflect rarity and unissued condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue, Handkerchief, 1943. A mint and unissued, 1943 dated and broad arrow marked, handkerchief that would enhance any small pack or wash roll display. Priced to reflect mint condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue, ULTRA-RARE FIRST ISSUE, Water Sterilizing Kit. A ‘grubby’ on the outside but ‘ultra-rare’, first issue, Water Sterilizing Kit as identified by the early cork stoppers. Later issue bottles having metal screw caps. Priced to reflect rarity. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Issue, ULTRA-RARE, Toothbrush, 1943. One of the hardest pieces of British personal kit to source this mint, 1943 dated and ‘broad arrow’ marked toothbrush that would enhance any small pack or wash roll display. Priced to reflect rarity and unissued mint condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Private Purchase, Toothpaste. A rare and still boxed partially used tube of ‘Nicota Tooth Paste’ that would enhance any small pack or wash roll display. Priced to reflect its relative rarity. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British Publication: ‘The Enemy’, 1943. ‘The Enemy; The German Army in Photographs, edited by Capt. A. Pryce-Jones, 1943, paperback, published by John Murry, London. A wartime publication consisting of over 70 interesting photographs accompanied with text. In very good condition, some slight damage and foxing to spine, glossy pages.
WW2 British Soldier\'s ‘Tommy Pipe’ Lighter. In addition to tea, smoking was one of the most important comforts available to troops. Small petrol lighters were not issue items but were carried, at least by the end of the war, in the pockets of most Tommy’s. Being able to light a flame is a very useful thing for a soldier so that he can smoke a cigarette, ‘brew-up, heat through some food or give himself some light. This example is of the rarer ‘pipe’ lighter, who’s top, unlike the normal lighter, didn’t come off but when pulled up left a hole that could be placed over the bowl of the pipe. Not tested.
WW2 British Soldier\'s Tobacco Pouch with Integral Cigarette Roller Grouping. Although not an issue item this interesting tobacco pouch and roller was obviously manufactured with service personnel in mind. Manufactured from khaki canvas by ‘Rizla’, as the ‘One Handed Roller’, the grouping contains a period packet of cigarette papers and an unopened 1 Oz. packet of Players ‘Airman” Mixture tobacco and is maker stamped. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. Priced to reflect rarity and condition of the interesting ‘comfort’ item.
WW2 British Unissued Wash Roll, Various Dates. Rare and unissued WW2 British army wash roll showing various dates between 1941/3 and 1945. Wash roll dated 1941/4. Razor in original packing dated 1944 manufactured by A.S. & Co. Toothbrush in original packing dated 1943. Shaving soap stick. Howard, packet of double-edged razor blades. Shaving brush ion original packing dated 1945 manufactured by Briton Brush Co Ltd. Wash roll dated 1941/4. In mint condition with items still in their original packing, the tooth brush alone accounts for two thirds of the value.
WW2 British Universal Pattern Service Field Cap, 1941. Colloquially called the ‘forage’ or ‘side’ cap this universal pattern was reintroduced into the British army at the same time as the Battledress, 1937. Officers’ models were often produced in barathea whilst other ranks were manufactured from plain khaki drab serge. The cap was required to be worn one size larger than other head-dress in order that a proper fit was secured. When worn correctly the cap was placed on the right side of the wearers head with the front of the cap positioned over the right eye, often seen being worn at a very ‘rakish’ angle. Regimental badges were worn to the left-hand side with two small brass buttons used to fasten the ends of the curtain flaps, which during cold weather could be dropped to afford some protection to the ears. This example is a generous 7 ¾, perfect for a modern larger head size, dated 1941 and in clean crisp condition. Would suit a mannequin display or ideal for the reenactor who wants to wear original kit.
WW2 British Universal Pattern Service Field Cap, Badged to Royal Engineers. Colloquially called the ‘forage’ or ‘side’ cap this universal pattern was reintroduced into the British army at the same time as the Battledress, 1937. Officers’ models were often produced in barathea whilst other ranks were manufactured from plain khaki drab serge. The cap was required to be worn one size larger than other head-dress in order that a proper fit was secured. When worn correctly the cap was placed on the right side of the wearers head with the front of the cap positioned over the right eye, often seen being worn at a very ‘rakish’ angle. Regimental badges were worn to the left-hand side with two small brass buttons used to fasten the ends of the curtain flaps, which during cold weather could be dropped to afford some protection to the ears. This example is badged to the Royal Engineers, sized to a 7 and has a lovely worn in salty patina that will display very well.
WW2 British Water Sterilizing Outfit. Complete with both, later war, metal capped bottles of the \'Sterilising Tablets\' and the \'Thio Tablets\', to take away the taste of the sterilising. Outer tin I good order with only minor scratched consummate with age, has full instructions to lid, still has the corrugated card packer. Not recommended for use and sold as a display item. I\'ll soon be listing the sought after kit with the cork stoppers and a grubby but original water filter bag... Register on the homepage to receive shop updates.
WW2 British, UNIQUE, Civil Defence Anti-Gas Course Lecture Notes, Borough of Kettering, 1941. A rare set of typed and ‘Riso’ copied Anti-Gas course lecture notes, War Gas Charts and test paper relating to the Borough of Kettering, with one paper dated 1941 and belonging to ‘A.W. Gravestock’, contained in ‘TBM Quick-Folder’ with additional handwritten annotation in pencil. As can be seen the folder is quite thick and contains numerous sheets coving a wide range of subjects. Contents includes: Introduction. Nature and properties of war gasses. Protection-individual. Respirators. Charts of war Gases Protection of the body Test paper Etc. A very rare survivor and priced to reflect this.
WW2 British, ‘A Home Guard Drill Book & Field Service Manual’ by John Brophy, 1942. John Brophy was an Anglo-Irish soldier, journalist and writer who wrote over 40 books and during WW2 served as a member of the Home Guard, for which he wrote a series of commercially available manuals. This handbook includes details regarding squad and arms drill, field operations, map-reading, weapons instruction, etc. An April 1942 reprint of the November 1940 first edition in good overall condition with some staining to cover and foxing to some pages.
WW2 British, ‘Air Raid Precautions Handbook No.4: Decontamination of Materials’, 1939. An essential publication in the understanding of decontamination procedures for war gases, covers, amongst other things: General Principles of Decontamination. Duties of Decontamination. Decontamination of Roads. Decontamination of Buildings. Glossary of Technical Terms. Etc. Priced to reflect condition and rarity. This item would accompany the Decontamination MkII steel helmet I also have for sale in the shop.
WW2 British, ‘Chocolate and Boiled Sweets’ Tin, 1944 Packed by D. & H. Ltd in June 1944, approx. 6” x 8” x 2”. Tin manufactured by the Metal Box Company with a lacquered inner to prevent rust. The tin, when packed, would have been sealed with white tape. The tin formed part of the 14 man ‘composite’ or compo’ ration, which came in a number of variations but always included at least one of these tins. An exceptional example in near mint condition, I doubt you will be able to find better.
WW2 British, ‘Compo’ Ration Biscuit Tin, 3Lbs. 6 Oz. 1945. British army biscuits of WW2 were unsalted, hard and dry, and were descended from the ‘hard tack’ biscuits that had been used by military forces for centuries. Made simply from flour, salt and water they could, if kept correctly, keep for decades. They had little flavour and could easily break the teeth so were often soaked in water or tea before consumption; often used to make a porridge that could be flavoured with jam, etc. These large, 3 Lbs. 6 Oz. tins were issued as part of the 24 hour, 14 man ,‘compo’ ration (refer to last image). This example was manufactured by U.B.C.S. Ltd in January 1945, is clearly marked, and is in good condition with only one largish dent, some minor dents and scratches consummate with age. *PLEASE NOTE: Supplied with the tin are reproduction ‘hard tack’ biscuits supplied by the wonderful Frank and his good lady at ‘Pegasus Drive’. Intended for display purposes and not recommended for consumption. Priced to reflect the rarity of tins in this condition.
WW2 British, ‘Ditty’ Bag. Ditty bags were used to hold small, loose personal items and rations to be held in the small pack. This example was issued via the ‘Red Cross & St. John, War Organisation, London. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, ‘Field Service Pocket Book No.8: Protection Against Gas’ 1939. An essential officers training manual that covers instructions for gas training, it covers, amongst other things: Types of gas weapon. Anti-Gas protection. Decontamination. When used in conjunction with the ‘Gas Training’ Manual, June 1942, of which I have a copy for sale, will give comprehensive knowledge of Anti-Gas warfare.
WW2 British, ‘Gas Training’ Manual, June 1942. An essential officers training manual that covers instructions for gas training, it covers, amongst other things: Types of war gases. Equipment. Respirator drill. Gas duties. When used in conjunction with the ‘Field Service Pocket Book No.8: Protection Against Gas’, of which I have a copy for sale, will give comprehensive knowledge of Anti-Gas warfare.
WW2 British, ‘GAS-MASK CONTAINER’, Elkes Biscuits. Gas masks were issued in simple but sturdy cardboard boxes with a strip of linen or string to be worn over the shoulder. Commercial and cottage industry manufactures got into the act producing a variety of cases, bags, boxes and tins to hold the civilian respirator. Perhaps one of the most bizarre was of this example; the ‘Elkes Biscuits’, GAS-MASK CONTAINER, painted a cheerful red and once full of biscuits, it also lists the four ‘do nots’: 1. Do not expose to strong light or heat. 2. Do not let get wet. 3. Do not scratch or bend the window. 4. Do not carry or hang the gas-mask by the straps. Still containing its original civilian respirator and in fair to good condition this sought after, and unusual tin, manufactured by Barringer, Wallis and Manners, of Mansfield, would grace any collection of home front anti-gas paraphernalia. Priced to reflect condition and rarity. *NOTE: This item is sold for display purposes only and it is highly recommended that it is not worn to avoid inhaling any toxic substances that may be contained within the filter.
WW2 British, ‘Home Guard, A Handbook’ by John Brophy, 1941. John Brophy was an Anglo-Irish soldier, journalist and writer who wrote over 40 books and during WW2 served as a member of the Home Guard, for which he wrote a series of commercially available manuals. This handbook includes details regarding how to best resist the invader, aircraft recognition, anti-tank defences, arms of the LDV and use of the rifle. An October 1941 reprint of the September 1940 first edition in good overall condition with some staining to cover and foxing to some pages.
WW2 British, ‘Horlicks Tablets’, 24 Hour, Ration Tin. These commercially produced tins were issued and carried by some British aircrew, commando and airborne forces in WW2, the Horlicks Tablets 24 Hour tin contained 7 packets of 9 (63 in total) solid Horlicks tablets which could sustain a serviceman for 24 hours. The tins were vacuum packed, came complete with striking graphics, rubber seal inside the lid to keep the contents sealed and fresh and a special vent hole to the base that allowed the lid to be removed. I also have a smaller ‘private purchase’ tin of these tablets that will be listed soon. Priced to reflect rarity and condition. *Note: no contents.
WW2 British, \'Girls\' Crystal\' Annual 1944 A nice example of the \'Girls Crystal\' Annual, 1944 that would have ended up in many a girls Christmas stocking. In fair to good condition with usual discolouring to pages and some rubbing to spine and cover. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, 11 Bn. The Royal Northumberland Fus\', Christmas Card, 1940 Lovely Christmas card from the 11 Bn. The Royal Northumberland Fus\', 1940. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Cartridge Carriers, Dunkirk Era. When issued the Cartridge Carriers were worn in pairs to replace the Basic Pouches. Each of the carriers consisted of two pockets, covered by a flap that was held by a brass snap that could be fixed in x2 positions. Each pocket could hold x2 .303 rifle stripper clips of 5 rounds per clip, 20 rounds per carrier and 40 rounds in total for the pair. A one-inch web strip was sewn onto the centre rear of each carrier, ended with an identical brass buckle as found on the basic pouch it provided a fixing point to the webbing shoulder braces. A brass loop can also be found below the buckle which enabled the carrier to be attached to other pieces of equipment. As with the Basic Pouch a pair of brass fixings can be found to the rear; enabling the carrier to be fixed to the Web Waist Belt. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. Unfortunately, this pair has dates and maker marks that have become illegible; however, we believe that they can be dated to the early war years due to the application of KG 97 (Khaki Green, Medium) Blanco or more colloquially known as ‘pea-green’; most associated with the BEF and Battle of France campaign of 1940. Apart from the ‘faded’ maker marks and Blanco the pair are in very good sound condition with all straps, buckles and snaps in place. Priced to reflect condition and early war production.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Large Pack and Cross Straps, 1940, Dunkirk Era. The Webbing Large Pack and its’ cross straps are survivors from the 1908 Pattern Webbing. Unlike the Webbing Small Pack, it has no internal dividers leaving it large to transport the Greatcoat (ref’ item 155) and could be carried in the unit’s baggage caravan until needed. The back has a pair of web tabs for attachment of the ‘L’ Straps, which would be removed from the Small Pack and worn on the left side of the body, attached to the end of the Equipment Braces. A pair of one inch Webbing Straps are fitted so that they cross the outside of the pack and can be used to carry the helmet. The ‘L’ straps came in left and right orientation so that they would hand around the wearer’s body to attach to the braces. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. This example was manufactured in 1940 and comes with a pair of 1940 dated cross straps manufactured by ‘H S Ltd’ (Hampton and Sons Ltd.). Both pack and straps appear to be in unissued condition with only minor storage marks, priced to reflect early war date and excellent condition.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Large Pack and Pair of ‘L’ Straps, 1940, Dunkirk Era. The Webbing Large Pack and its’ cross straps are survivors from the 1908 Pattern Webbing. Unlike the Webbing Small Pack, it has no internal dividers leaving it large to transport the Greatcoat (ref’ item 155) and could be carried in the unit’s baggage caravan until needed. The back has a pair of web tabs for attachment of the ‘L’ Straps, which would be removed from the Small Pack and worn on the left side of the body, attached to the end of the Equipment Braces. A pair of one inch Webbing Straps are fitted so that they cross the outside of the pack and can be used to carry the helmet. The ‘L’ straps came in left and right orientation so that they would hand around the wearer’s body to attach to the braces. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. These examples were all manufactured by ‘MECo’ (Mills Equipment Co) in 1940. Both pack and ‘L’ straps appear to be in unissued condition with only minor storage marks, priced to reflect early war date and excellent condition.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Mk. III, Basic Pouches. The Basic Pouches were usually worn as a pair on the chest and were interchangeable. Rectangular in shape they have a hinged lid held by a brass ‘snap’, have a pair of brass buckles to the rear to allow fixing to the Web Equipment Braces and a set of double hooks for fixing to the Web Waist Belt. At least three different Mk’s. exist, the difference between Mk’s. 1 & 2 being that the fixing for the double hook was moved down; it was found that in the original design that the bottom of the Pouch interfered with the wearer’s waist and thigh, moving the double hook down had the effect of raising the base of the pouch up. The Mk. III differed only in that the height was raised to accommodate the new ‘Sten’ gun magazines, however, some later war and post-war examples have a quick release closure that replaced the brass snap fixing. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. A good matching pair, albeit that they have x2 different dates and manufactures: Bagcraft Bagcraft Ltd. 1942 MK III A.C. Associated Cutters 1943 MK III Both in excellent, ‘un-Blancoed’ and in unused condition. Priced to reflect mint condition.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Pistol and Ammunition Pouch, 1943. There were two standard patterns of Web Pistol Cases produced during the war. The larger being produced for the larger .455 chambered weapons and the smaller for produced for those chambered for .380, the main difference being that the larger case had a curved flap whilst the smaller was square. Both patterns had an internal sheath for a cleaning rod, brass snap fastener and three double hook fasteners fixed to the rear. The Ammunition Pouch is of a box shape with a square lid and single snap fastener. On the rear it had a pair of hooks for fixing to the belt, a web fitting that allowed the pouch to be attached to the pistol case and a webbing flap to accept the shoulder brace. The pouch would accept two 12 round boxes of both .455 and .380 ammunition. This pairing has a light coat of KG3 Blanco, I cannot make out the makers marks for either, however the Pistol Case is clearly dated 1943.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Pouch, ‘SMG Magazine Adaptation’, 1942. A rare variant of the Mk. III basic pouch are these pouches converted by the addition of ‘dividers’ to hold x3 sub-machine gun magazines. These originated as cut down Lanchester pouches with later war examples being manufactured as items in their own right. The Basic Pouches were usually worn as a pair on the chest and were interchangeable. Rectangular in shape they have a hinged lid held by a brass ‘snap’, have a pair of brass buckles to the rear to allow fixing to the Web Equipment Braces and a set of double hooks for fixing to the Web Waist Belt. At least three different Mk’s. exist, the difference between Mk’s. 1 & 2 being that the fixing for the double hook was moved down; it was found that in the original design that the bottom of the Pouch interfered with the wearer’s waist and thigh, moving the double hook down had the effect of raising the base of the pouch up. The Mk. III differed only in that the height was raised to accommodate the new ‘Sten’ gun magazines, however, some later war and post-war examples have a quick release closure that replaced the brass snap fixing. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. A good matching pair, albeit that they have x2 different manufactures, but in excellent, ‘un-Blancoed’ and in almost unused condition. Priced to reflect rarity and very good condition.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Small Pack and Pair of ‘L’ Straps, 1940, Dunkirk Era. The Webbing Small pack is a small haversack designed to be worn by soldiers ‘going on the line’. The inside has two dividers, one crosses the inside length of the pack whilst the other fixes from the centre of the cross divider to the centre of the outside wall. This orientation forms one larger rear pockets and two smaller front pockets which are both sized to hold a water bottle or mess tin. The rear pocket was used to hold such items as Hussif (Housewife sewing kit; refer to items 23 & 174), Holdall (Wash roll; refer to item 38), pullover (refer to item 93), etc. Often the ground sheets folded flat and stored under the closing flap, helping to keep the contents dry. A common practice was for soldiers to attach the drinking mug to the closing straps of the pack, freeing up space that would otherwise be lost. The back has a pair of web tabs for attachment of the ‘L’ Straps which came in left and right orientation so that they would hand around the wearer’s body to attach to the braces and to two small buckles to the base. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. These examples were all manufactured by ‘MECo’ (Mills Equipment Co) in 1940. Both pack and ‘L’ straps have a light application of KG3 Blanco, however, when held to the light the small pack also appears to have patches of KG 97 (Khaki Green, Medium) Blanco, or ‘Pea-green’, most associated with the BEF, Battle of France and Dunkirk. Priced to reflect early war date and overall excellent condition with no rips or tears and with all buckles, straps and tabs firmly in place.
WW2 British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Waist Belt, Ultra Scarce Size ‘L’, 1940, Dunkirk Era. The Webbing Waist belt formed the core of the whole 1937 webbing concept; being that most other items of the equipment were fixed, either directly or indirectly, to it or suspended from it. The belt was manufactured in three official sizes: Normal or ‘N’: 44 inches long. Large or ‘L’: 50 inches long. Extra-large or ‘XL’: 56 inches long. Standard height of: 2.25 inches. Note: These sizes are end to end which is longer than the effective size available for the belt e.g., as with this example the 50 inches is suitable up to approx. 44”. The belt has a ‘hook and loop brass clasp’ buckle to the front and a pair of brass buckles to the rear, angles to receive the web equipment braces. The overall size of the belt can be adjusted using a series of loops and hooks located on the inner surface of the belt. The Pattern 1937 web equipment was designed for the most part as an improved version of the Pattern 1908 web equipment. Straps were narrowed down from two inches; new pouches reduced the surface area of webbing in contact with the body and new items were introduced to accommodate new weapons and equipment. This example is clearly marked ‘MECo’ (Mills Equipment Co), sized ‘L’ and dated ‘1940’, is in very good overall condition with all its buckles, hooks and loops in place with some minor stains consummate with the age of the belt. Priced to reflect its early war date and large size suited to the modern reenactor and highly prized by those who wish to portray BEF, Battle of France and Dunkirk.
WW2 British, Anti-Dimming Outfit, Mk. V. The problem of respirator lenses dimming first occurred in WWI and led to the development of Glaso Anti-Dimming Paste that was smeared over the lenses to prevent condensation. In 1938 two new types of anti-dimming samples were tested; Liquid (G1: being a brown, alcohol-water solution) and Paste (P1: based on a substance called Turkey Red Oil), both were found to give good visibility for about an hour, but the paste appeared more practical and became the basis for future outfits. Up until 1945 the issued kits went through four marks, Mk III to Mk VI. This example is printed as a Mk V to its main body and date stamped to the end caps as -/1/39 and manufactured by BW&M. Ltd. Priced to reflect condition and early war Dunkirk period dating.
WW2 British, Anti-Dimming Outfit, Mk.VI. The problem of respirator lenses dimming first occurred in WWI and led to the development of Glaso Anti-Dimming Paste that was smeared over the lenses to prevent condensation. In 1938 two new types of anti-dimming samples were tested; Liquid (G1: being a brown, alcohol-water solution) and Paste (P1: based on a substance called Turkey Red Oil), both were found to give good visibility for about an hour, but the paste appeared more practical and became the basis for future outfits. Up until 1945 the issued kits went through four marks, Mk III to Mk VI. This is a Mk VI and was most commonly found in the Mk VII haversack and Lightweight Respirator which had a special pocket in the base for storage, held by a metal press stud. Unlike previous outfits the instructions can be found printed onto the impregnated cloth.
WW2 British, Army Issue, Ointment Anti-Gas No.2, Tube Variant Tin, Coloured Coded ‘Cream’. Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. Personnel were issued with two tins; one to be stored in the haversack and the other in the pocket of the anti-gas cape. The ointment itself was predominantly manufactured by ‘British Drug Houses’ (sometimes stamped BDH) with most of the tins being made by the ‘Metal Box Co. and stamped with MB or the number 12. Ointment Anti-Gas No.2 is by far the most common anti-gas ointment used in WW2 and could even be purchased in a civilian form via chemists. Initially supplied in a glass jars, using white or brown glass, with a metal lid and later replaced by tubes held in a flat rectangular tin. The glass jars continued to be issued to Police and civilian organisations whilst the tins were issued to the armed forces. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream with the date of filling stamped to the inner lid of the colour coded ‘cream’ tin. The front and rear of the of the tin had printed instructions and diagrams for its use, something that remained consistent for all subsequent Mk’s of the tin. This example is date stamped ‘21 MAR 41’ and is priced to reflect its good condition with 7 of its 8 Mk II tubes, Mk I tubes had a screw cap, still in place and in excellent condition.
WW2 British, Army Issue, Ointment Anti-Gas No.5, Tube Variant Tin, Coloured Coded ‘Grey/Blue’, WITH CONTENTS!! Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. Personnel were issued with two tins; one to be stored in the haversack and the other in the pocket of the anti-gas cape. The ointment itself was predominantly manufactured by ‘British Drug Houses’ (sometimes stamped BDH) with most of the tins being made by the ‘Metal Box Co. and stamped with MB or the number 12. Ointment Anti-Gas No.5, there is no evidence that a No.4 existed, was issued prior to D-Day. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream and was held in plain tubes without labels. This empty example dates stamped ‘6/42’, early for No.5 and contains its contents. I have purposely not attempted to restore the inside and will leave this to the owner, I have a near mint N0.5 tin also for sale to which the contents of this tin could be transferred. Priced to reflect fair to poor condition of tin but having its contents intact.
WW2 British, Army Issue, Ointment Anti-Gas No.5, Tube Variant Tin, Coloured Coded ‘Grey/Blue’. Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. Personnel were issued with two tins; one to be stored in the haversack and the other in the pocket of the anti-gas cape. The ointment itself was predominantly manufactured by ‘British Drug Houses’ (sometimes stamped BDH) with most of the tins being made by the ‘Metal Box Co. and stamped with MB or the number 12. Ointment Anti-Gas No.5, there is no evidence that a No.4 existed, was issued prior to D-Day. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream and was held in plain tubes without labels. This empty example is date stamped ‘OCT 13 1942’ and is priced to reflect its outstanding condition, albeit that it has no contents.
WW2 British, Army Issue, Ointment Anti-Gas No.6, Tube Variant Tin, Coloured Coded ‘Green’. Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. Personnel were issued with two tins; one to be stored in the haversack and the other in the pocket of the anti-gas cape. The ointment itself was predominantly manufactured by ‘British Drug Houses’ (sometimes stamped BDH) with most of the tins being made by the ‘Metal Box Co. and stamped with MB or the number 12. Ointment Anti-Gas No.6 was issued from mid 1944 onwards. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream and was held in plain tubes without labels. This empty example is date stamped 45 (re-issued in 53) and is further ‘over’ stamped in red to the lid ‘FOR TROPICAL USE’ (developed for use in countries with higher ambient temperatures and humidity). It is priced to reflect its some paint loss, albeit that it has no contents.
WW2 British, Arnhem Related, Mid-War, Red/Brown Enamelled Mug. Recovered by myself during the 65th Anniversary events around Arnhem and was gifted to me by a resident of Oosterbeek, who claimed it had been in their ‘outhouse’ since the war ended. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Priced to reflect its Arnhem link and would enhance any Airborne, Arnhem, mid-late war kit, NAAFI or barrack life display. IF ONLY OBJECTS COULD TALK!!
WW2 British, ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service), Slacks, 1942 An original and exquisite pair of 1942 dated Auxiliary Territorial Service slacks. Labelled and dated to 1942 they were manufactured by ‘Norman Taylor & Co. Ltd. and have a further acceptance stamp of 20th April 1942 and a War Office date stamp of ‘O’. Manufactured to Size 5 with specific measurements of: Waist 31” to 32’’ Hips 42” to 43” HISTORY: The trousers were introduced with a matching battledress towards the start of the war. Made from a lightweight Saxony serge they feature a four-button closure to the left hip, later patterns having only three buttons. The rear waist is elasticated. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, North Africa, ‘Sun Bleached’ Finish. This set represents a typical, North Africa, ‘sun bleached’ webbing set as worn by British front-line troops during the war in the Western Desert. The set consists of: Waistbelt ? Shoulder braces 1943 Basic pouches 1943 Bayonet frog 08 pattern Water bottle carrier 1940 Water bottle Inter/early war, blue enamel. Haversack 1940 ‘L’ straps. ? *Note: (I) This set does NOT contain the entrenching carrier and tool. (II) This sale does not include the shirt and is for the webbing set only. The shirt is available on the site; item number 117. 37 pattern webbing sets were made from pre-shrunk woven webbing, dyed and waterproofed in the yarn. The webbing was integrally woven (meaning single pieces could be woven to different widths along their length) with a salvaged edge (a woven rather than cut edge that resists fraying) accompanied by high quality brass fixings. Later in the war some elements were manufactured from webbing of differing widths sewn together e.g., shoulder braces. Sets could be adapted and changed depending on the requirements of the user, for example, personnel armed only with a pistol could replace the basic pouches with brace attachments, pistol case and cartridge pouch. These items are available in the shop e.g., pistol case and cartridge pouch, item 223. The set is in very good overall condition, has a washed-out finish with good matching colour and is priced to reflect this. These larger sizes will suit the modern re-enactor who wishes to portray in original kit!! PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!!
WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, Northern Europe, Later War KG3 Blanco. This set represents a typical, late war, KG3 Blancoed webbing set as worn by British front-line troops during the Battle for Europe. The set consists of: Waistbelt Shoulder braces Basic pouches Bayonet frog Bayonet Water bottle carrier Water bottle Haversack ‘L’ straps. *Note: (I) This set does NOT contain the entrenching carrier and tool. (II) This sale does not include the shirt and is for the webbing set only. The shirt is available on the site; item number 95 & 96. 37 pattern webbing sets were made from pre-shrunk woven webbing, dyed and waterproofed in the yarn. The webbing was integrally woven (meaning single pieces could be woven to different widths along their length) with a salvaged edge (a woven rather than cut edge that resists fraying) accompanied by high quality brass fixings. Later in the war some elements were manufactured from webbing of differing widths sewn together e.g., shoulder braces. Sets could be adapted and changed depending on the requirements of the user, for example, personnel armed only with a pistol could replace the basic pouches with brace attachments, pistol case and cartridge pouch. These items are available in the shop e.g., pistol case and cartridge pouch, item 223. Mud was removed using a soft brush, whilst a uniform colour was achieved via the application of Blanco of which I have a selection available in the shop (items 215, 176, 216, 214, & 211). **Note: Due to the inclusion of the bayonet in this set proof of age will be required e.g., a scan/photo of Passport, Driving Licence, Birth Certificate, etc. The set is in very good overall condition, has a light application of KG3 Blanco and is priced to reflect this plus the lack of some dates. These larger sizes will suit the modern reenactor who wishes to portray in original kit!! PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!!
WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern, Officers Webbing Set, Dessert War, 1940-43. This represents a typical webbing set as worn by British front-line officers during the Desert War. The set consists of: Waistbelt 1940 Ultra-rare XL size Shoulder braces 1940 LONG Brace attachments 1943 Pistol carrier 1940 Cartridge pouch 1940 Binocular case 1940 Compass case 1940 Water bottle carrier 1943 Water bottle Inter/early war, blue enamel. Officers’ valise 1941 Map case 1940 *Note: This sale does not include the shirt and is for the webbing set only. The shirt is available on the site; item number 117. 37 pattern webbing sets were made from pre-shrunk woven webbing, dyed and waterproofed in the yarn. The webbing was integrally woven (meaning single pieces could be woven to different widths along their length) with a salvaged edge (a woven rather than cut edge that resists fraying) accompanied by high quality brass fixings. Later in the war some elements were manufactured from webbing of differing widths sewn together e.g., shoulder braces. The set is in ‘mint’ unissued condition, predominately 1940 dated, un-Blancoed, good matching colour and is priced to reflect this. These larger sizes will suit the modern re-enactor who wishes to portray in original kit!! PLEASE STUDY PHOTO’S CAREFULLY AS THEY FORM PART OF THE DESCRIPTION!! DIFFICULT TO UPGRADE!!
WW2 British, Battledress, Blouse, 1940 Pattern, SIZE 16, 1943. Introduced on 5th June 1942 the blouse followed the same cut as the previous patterns but with modifications that made it more economic to manufacture, both in material and time. All the buttons are visible, patch pockets are no longer pleated, two buttons now connect the blouse. This example is worn but very good condition with only one very minor moth ‘graze’ and comes in a large size: Height: 6’1” to 6’2” Breast: 39” to 40” Waist: 34” to 25” It was manufactured in 1943 by Jackson the Tailor, having all the original buttons and buckle. Some evidence of insignia being removed. The chance to own a very good example that displays well or can be used, with our modern larger body frame, for WW2 re-enactment. Priced is set to reflect condition and larger sizing.
WW2 British, Battledress, Blouse, 1940 Pattern, SIZE 16, 1943. Additional photographs giving inner details and sizing.
WW2 British, BEF Christmas Card 1939 Lovely early war Christmas card. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Beret, RAMC, 1944. Of Canadian manufacture this beret is badges to the RAMC and came with the uniform grouping also listed. The beret was produced by Dorothea Hats Ltd, Ontario, in 1944 and is a good size 1 ½. Berets featured a black or brown leather sweat band around the rim that was hollow to allow for a cloth tape to fine tune the size. Two metal grommeted holes to the right allowed for some limited ventilation that included a small rectangle of leather to prevent the metal from tearing the wool. The beret was worn sloping from a high left to a low righthand side with a Regimental cap badge positioned over the left eye. HISTORY: The beret was first adopted into service by the Royal tank Corps in 1924, followed by the 11th Hussars in1928, Royal Armoured Corps in 1941 and the Airborne forces, Special Service Brigade and Recce’ Corps in 1942. Other units began to adopt the beret so that by the 1950’s it became the standard headdress for most of the British Army. The Canadian army replaced their field service caps with khaki berets in 1943, of which this is a 1944 example. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Board Game, Monopoly. A nice complete WW2 issue of the popular board game \'Monopoly\'. Manufactured under war time conditions and would have sat under many a Christmas tree on Britains Home Front. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description. The game appears to be complete, with both its longer and shorter rules, counters, cards, etc.
WW2 British, Book \'Mighty Midget\', No.40, Dick Whittington & His Cat. The \'Mighty Midgets\' were sold by Woolworths during the war at less than cost price. Small and subsidised so that children could have them in their pockets when rushing for shelter during the Blitz, popular Christmas stocking fillers for both girls and boys. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book, The Changing Face of Britain by Fougasse, 1940 A very popular Christmas present on the Home Front of Britain in 1940. A lovely book that contrasts life before and after the beginning of hostilities, of its time but very funny. \'Fougasse\' was the pen name for British cartoonist Cyril Kenneth Bird (1887 - 1965) who created cartoons for the popular magazine \'Punch\'. He also created many of the well know posters of WW2 e.g. the \'Careless Talk Costs Lives\' series. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book; \'London Watches\', 1941. Poems by Sagittarius (Olga Katzin), photo\'s of the London Blitz by G.Wren Howard. A lovely copy of the 1941, popular Christmas present that chronicles life in the London Blitz. Full of beautiful images and poems that chronicle the strange beauty of destruction, essential reading for anyone interested in the Blitz and Home Front of WW2. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book: \'Air of Glory\' A Wartime Scrapbook, Cecil Beaton, 1941. A beautiful book from one of Britains leading photographers and another popular Christmas book from 1941. Lavishly illustrated with images of wartime Britain, with some minor damage to dust jacket this copy is in excellent condition. Cecil Beaton (1904 - 1980): Beaton was one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, best known for his elegant and unusual shots of celebrities and royalty. His fascination with glamour and high society continued throughout his life and he was considered a style leader in his own right, known for his easy charm and wit as well as his flamboyance of dress and waspish comments on celebrity figures, a trait that prompted the writer Jean Cocteau to dub him \"Malice in Wonderland\". He was also a prominent innovator in the relatively new field of fashion photography, an accomplished photojournalist, the winner of two Oscars for his costume design, and a prolific writer publishing numerous texts, including six volumes of his own diaries. Extremely ambitious, Beaton\'s superb aesthetic eye and flair for the theatrical allowed him to remain relevant over a 50-year career during which he regularly reinvented himself and his style. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book: \'Bomber\'s Moon\', Negley Farson, 1941. A lovely copy of Negley Farson\'s, Bomber\'s Moon with 48 illustrations by artist Tom Purvis. Published in 1941 by Victor Gollancz Another popular present for the Christmas of 1941, beautifully illustrated stories of war time Home front Britain. Rare to find intact as many books have been \'split\' for the illustrations. Minus its dust jacket but still a lovely copy!! Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book: \'Mighty Midget, No.47, Puss in Boots. The \'Mighty Midgets\' were sold by Woolworths during the war at less than cost price. Small and subsidised so that children could have them in their pockets when rushing for shelter during the Blitz, popular Christmas stocking fillers for both girls and boys. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Book: \'Mighty Midget\', No.13, Aladdin. The \'Mighty Midgets\' were sold by Woolworths during the war at less than cost price. Small and subsidised so that children could have them in their pockets when rushing for shelter during the Blitz, popular Christmas stocking fillers for both girls and boys. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Box of Six, MKIII, Anti-Gas Eye Shields, 1943 (re-packed 1955). Eye shields were a simple plastic visor designed to protect the eyes from gas spray. These are examples of the third of three MK\'s. One packet of six was issued to each man. The MKIII’s differed from the MKII’s by having, in an effort to save material, a smaller section of elasticated material. The green oil cloth was also replaced by a strip of black cotton. This MK also differed from the MKI’s in that three of the six pairs were manufactured from tinted plastic. It should also be noted that the box packaging has now been replaced by a much sturdier card envelope which has decontamination instructions printed to its outer surface. These instructions followed the procedure known as ‘COECDO’. C: cotton waste. O: ointment. E: eye shields. C: clothing. D: detectors. O: ointment again. A chance to obtain a full set in very good condition.
WW2 British, Bush (Aertex) Shirt, LARGE Size. Synonymous with the \'Desert Rat\' in the North African Campaign. Patterns vary immensely as many were made by local contractors and shops. Most of the shirts had integral collars with buttons halfway down the front, were a pullover style, worn tucked into trousers or shorts and had two pleated breast pockets. The buttons are made from hard rubber with shoulder straps being held by loops that allowed them to be removed. The shirt was manufactured by R.E.H. & Co. Ltd. in army shirt size 4, unfortunately no marking exists to explain the sizing or date, named to ‘HURT’; however, it is in a useful larger size, ideal for the re-enactor or larger modern mannequin. Collar: 15” to 16” Width, armpit to armpit: 21” to 22” Length, top of collar to bottom hem: 36” to 37” Inner arm, armpit to cuff: 19” to 20” Please ensure that you refer to the photographs as they form part of the description, there are a few marks consummate with age and one minor hole that can be easily repaired. Priced to reflect larger size and overall, very good condition. Perfect for the reenactor or modern mannequin display. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Bush (Aertex) Shirt, SMALL/MEDIUM Size. As shown with: WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern, Officers Webbing Set, Dessert War, 1940-43. AND WW2 British, Battle Order, 37 Pattern Webbing Set, North Africa, ‘Sun Bleached’ Finish. Synonymous with the \'Desert Rat\' in the North African Campaign. Patterns vary immensely as many were made by local contractors and shops. Most of the shirts had integral collars with buttons halfway down the front, were a pullover style, worn tucked into trousers or shorts and had two pleated breast pockets. The buttons are made from hard rubber with shoulder straps being held by loops that allowed them to be removed. Unfortunately, no markings exist on this example that pertain to date, manufacture, or size: Collar: 14” Width, armpit to armpit: 22” Length, top of collar to bottom hem: 31” Inner arm, armpit to cuff: 18” Please ensure that you refer to the photographs as they form part of the description, priced to reflect a smaller size with some ‘spotting’ to the aertex fabric. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Children\'s \'Forever England\' Annual, 1941. A lovely copy of the patriotic children\'s Christmas annual: \'Forever England\' A Young People\'s Story of the Battle for Britain and the Men Who Fought It\', 1941. Packed full of images, many in colour, stirring stuff!! Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Children\'s Book: \'The Snow Goose (a story of Dunkirk)\'. First published in 1941 this is a Twelfth impression from 1944 of the popular children\'s book \'The Snow Goose (a story of Dunkirk)\', Given a s a present at Christmas 44\' a good copy with its rare, albeit torn to rear, dust jacket. Please study the photo as it forms part of the description.
WW2 British, Childs Christmas Book, \' Eye\'s Right! \', 1944. One of the favourite items from my collection and given as a Christmas present in 1944, published by Tuck Book\'s its full title being \'Eyes Right! The Army of Today\'. Jam packed with fantastic illustrations!! Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Christmas 1940, London Bus and Street Map Essential for traveling the blacked out streets of London during the second winter of the war. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Civil ‘Fire Guard’ Armlet, Post August 1941. In August 1941 a new national organisation was formed to replace the locally organised Supplementary/Street Fire Parties and was known as the ‘Fire Guard’. Although still controlled by local authorities’ members now became trained to national standards. Manufactured from dark blue cotton with printed yellow title ‘Fire Guard, this example is in used condition with some staining to both front and rear.
WW2 British, Civil ‘Supplementary/Street Fire Party’ Armlet, August 1940 – August 1941. In August 1940 Supplementary Fire Parties organised by fire brigades were issued with a blue cloth armlet, bearing the red letters SFP, and the issue was extended in September 1940 to the Street Fire Parties organised by wardens. Manufactured from dark blue cotton with printed red letters SFP, this example is in used clean condition.
WW2 British, Civil Defence Anti-Gas Helmet Cover, 1939. A rare example of the Civil Defence Anti-Gas Helmet Cover in mint unissued condition. The helmet cover was issued as part of the anti-gas equipment and was fitted and over the helmet shell being secured by tucking between the inner shell and liner. Dated and marked 1939 with the Royal Crest and PC approved. Missing from the all but the most advanced Home Front or Ant-gas collections.
WW2 British, Civil Defence, MKII, Double Decal Fire Service, Sector 28 (Bolton) Helmet, 1938. An extremely rare opportunity to acquire a ‘double decal’ Auxiliary Fire Service and National Fire Service, MKII helmet. The shell and liner are stamped 1938, with the shell manufactured by HBH (Harrison Bros & Howson, Sheffield) and issued to number 28, Bolton District. Appears to have the fire service number 2Y9735, worthy of future research. The shell has its original ‘olive green’ factory applied paint, the decals are crisp and clear, and it has the early fitted liner with the foam pad. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Civilian ARP Issue Bleach Ointment. Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. This example is the civilian ARP issue equivalent of the Service ‘Ointment Anti-Gas No.2’ which by far the most common anti-gas ointment used in WW2 and could also be purchased in a civilian form via chemists. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream with this example being manufactured by ‘SPUN’. This example is undated, but we suspect is pre or early war, as evidenced by the golden colour of the tin and is priced to reflect condition, full contents and rarity of the civilian
WW2 British, Civilian Respirator Tin (with relic mask). Gas masks were issued in simple but sturdy cardboard boxes with a strip of linen or string to be worn over the shoulder. Commercial and cottage industry manufactures got into the act producing a variety of cases, bags, boxes and tins to hold the civilian respirator. Still containing its original civilian respirator, all be it in poor condition, this tin, manufactured by Barringer, Wallis and Manners, of Mansfield, is priced to reflect its good condition. *NOTE: This item is sold for display purposes only and it is highly recommended that it is not worn to avoid inhaling any toxic substances that may be contained within the filter.
WW2 British, Clasp Knife, ‘Dunkirk Period’,1940. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will all have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or in initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or navel personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to all clasp knives were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is an extremely early dated example, 1940, of the new pattern that replaced the 1905 pattern most associated with WW1. NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British, Decontamination Cotton Waste (I). Cotton waste was designed to soak up blister gas agents before the anti-gas ointment was applied. As the name suggests it was a by-product from mill and garment manufactures and was issued in bundles of 1oz (28g) per man to be broken up with half stored in the haversack whilst the other half could be found in the gas cape pocket. Missing from many haversack collections and priced to reflect this rarity.
WW2 British, Decontamination Cotton Waste (II). Cotton waste was designed to soak up blister gas agents before the anti-gas ointment was applied. As the name suggests it was a by-product from mill and garment manufactures and was issued in bundles of 1oz (28g) per man to be broken up with half stored in the haversack whilst the other half could be found in the gas cape pocket. Interesting in the fact that it is held in a period brown paper bag/envelope and appears to be made from the waste produced from helmet nets. Missing from many haversack collections and priced to reflect this rarity.
WW2 British, Detector, Vapour, Pocket, MKII Kit PLUS Pump and Canvas Carrying Pouch. **We understand that the pump would be hung from a belt but assume that the tin would be carried in the haversack. A complete, 1943 dated, example of the Pocket Vapour Detector Kit containing an array of detector papers used to check liquids suspected of being blistering agents e.g. Mustard Gas. This grouping also includes the small pump with a 1944 dated carrying pouch and the often missing SO pencil. A must for any anti-gas or civil defence collector.
WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, Cap Comforter. Broad arrow-marked, manufactured by A. Yates and Co, Leicester and dated 1940 and in excellent condition. Manufacture from a 32-inch tube of pure wool sewn at each end and having the paler khaki colour often associated with early war items. An item of headgear often associated with Commandos, would also suit a Battle of France or Dunkirk collection. HHG0001
WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, Economy, Toothbrush, 1940. One of the hardest pieces of kit to obtain in good order this ‘economy’ wooden handled, un-issued toothbrush this brush was manufactured by \'Arrow Ltd\' and is clearly dated 1940. Period painted to make the wood more palatable in the mouth. Priced to reflect rarity and condition.
WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, MKII Helmet, 1939. An outstanding example of an early war, Dunkirk era, MKII British helmet. Manufactured by Briggs Motor Bodies Ltd of Dagenham in 1939 it has early pattern liner with the foam pad, in a good size 7, made by Vero (Everett W. Vero & Co of London) and dated 1938. Still having its factory applied paint to shell and correct elasticated chin strap, hard to upgrade, it will display extremely well.
WW2 British, Dunkirk Era, Shaving Brush, 1938. British army regulations stipulated, after 1916, that servicemen needed to shave each day. An essential item of kit and carried in the haversack or wash roll this beautiful example would grace any collection of British personal kit. Broad arrow marked and manufactured in 1938 by ‘C.H. LENG & SONS’. Priced to reflect condition and early date, hard to source a better example.
WW2 British, Dunkirk Period, Rain Cape/Ground Sheet, 1940. Early war rain capes were made from lightweight rubber coated canvas. Like early ground sheets they had metal grommets running around the perimeter, these were used to fasten cords to the edges to make basic shelters. The cape doubled as a ground sheet and had a base rectangle of 33.5” by 6’2” wide. Buttons are used to close the neck combined with metal hooks and eyes. Early war examples are known to be of a ‘chocolate brown’ colour, whilst a limited number had green paint applied to create a camouflaged garment. This example is of the ‘plain’ chocolate brown colour, has one button missing (the spare is still in place and could be used to replace the missing button to the top front), and is clearly broad arrow marked, dated 1940 and manufactured by Greengate and Irwell Co. Ltd. Some storage marks consummate with age. Priced to reflect the rarity of this early war pattern in supple condition.
WW2 British, Dunkirk Period, SUPER RARE, Camouflaged Rain Cape/Ground Sheet. Early war rain capes were made from lightweight rubber coated canvas. Like early ground sheets they had metal grommets running around the perimeter, these were used to fasten cords to the edges to make basic shelters. The cape doubled as a ground sheet and had a base rectangle of 33.5” by 6’2” wide. Buttons are used to close the neck combined with metal hooks and eyes. Early war examples are known to be of a ‘chocolate brown’ colour, whilst a limited number had green paint applied to create a camouflaged garment. This example is of the very rare, camouflaged pattern, has all its buttons in place and is faint, but broad arrow marked. Priced to reflect some areas of brittleness, however, the item is extremely rare displays well on a mannequin.
WW2 British, Early War / Dunkirk Period, Field Dressing, 1939. A clean early example of the Field dressing, manufactured in March 1939 by Johnson and Johnson Ltd. Priced to reflect excellent condition and very early date.
WW2 British, Early War / Dunkirk Period, General Service Cap. The General Service Cap was produced from khaki serge material similar to that of the Service or Battle Dress. A brown leather chinstrap with brass buckles, which needed to be carefully polished, was held in place by a pair of small brass buttons. The wearers regimental cap badge was also positioned to the front centre. The caps had the capability to be ‘set up’ using a short flat metal strip inserted into a specially provided pocket inside the cap under the oil cloth sweat band. The metal strip was attached to an internal wire grommet that formed the shape of the crown of the cap, this allowed all the fabric to be kept ‘taught’ and uncreased. This example can be identified as early, rather than pre-war, by the lack of parallel stitched lines to the brim. Badged to the Royal Engineers the cap is in remarkably good condition. I also have available, in the shop, an officers GS cap, also badged to the Royal Engineers.
WW2 British, Early War / Dunkirk Period, Shell Dressing, 1940. A clean early example of the Field dressing, manufactured in November 1940 by Johnson and Johnson Ltd. At some point one of the ties has come away and the dressings outer ‘pouch’ is held with a safety pin. Priced to reflect condition and very early date.
WW2 British, Early War, Foot Powder Tin. Foot powder was an essential issue of the British army and was used to soldiers to keep their feet dry and free from fungal infections. All the standard tins held 1.75 ounces of powder and can be found in oval, rectangular and oval tins. Identified as early war period by its ‘gold’ colour and black letting, later tins were coloured dark green with lighter green lettering, this tin still contains its foot powder and is in clear bright condition. Priced to reflect ‘poor’ condition.
WW2 British, Early War, Foot Powder Tin. Foot powder was an essential issue of the British army and was used to soldiers to keep their feet dry and free from fungal infections. All the standard tins held 1.75 ounces of powder and can be found in oval, rectangular and oval tins. Identified as early war period by its ‘gold’ colour and black letting, later tins were coloured dark green with lighter green lettering, this tin still contains its foot powder and is in clear bright condition. Priced to reflect ‘good’ condition.
WW2 British, Emergency Ration Tin. Carried by British soldiers throughout WW2, the Emergency Ration tin contained a slab of caffeine-enriched chocolate, which would be consumed by the soldier only on order of an officer. The tins came complete with a golden weatherproofing lacquer, rubber seal inside the lid to keep the contents fresh and a metal sealing band around the outside: the following information embossed into the lid: Purpose of contents. To be consumed only when no other rations of any kind are procurable. To open strip off band, insert coin in corner groove and turn. Notice: not to be opened except by order of an officer. A Canadian pamphlet from 1939 described the emergency ration as: The Emergency Ration is for men temporarily out of reach of any other source of food. In order to save weight, it is made as small and light as possible. Its purpose is only to ward off hunger and exhaustion for a period of about 24 hours. It does not purport to be a complete day’s food. It weighs ½ lb. This example has it metal sealing band missing, however, it still contains its original contents. Priced to reflect rarity and condition.
WW2 British, Foot Powder Tin, 1 3/4 Oz, Mid/Later War Period. Foot powder was an essential issue of the British army and was used by soldiers to keep their feet dry and free from fungal infections. All the standard tins held 1 3/4 ounces of powder and can be found in round, rectangular and oval tins. Not dated, but came from a 1943 dated crate, of the oval variety and clearly marked with the makers initial R & C Ltd it still contains its original contents and is in good condition.
WW2 British, Fork from the KFS set, Dunkirk Period, 1939. A three-piece eating utensil set was issued to all personnel, along with mess tins and drinking mug. The most common set being the separate knife, fork, and spoon, however, the knife was not commonly carried in the field as the issue clasp knife could be used and the missing knife saved both space and weight. Most were manufactured from nickel silver or nickel stainless and were usually marked with make name or initials and sometimes the date. Due to the huge range of manufactures, there are a vast range of slightly differing patterns. Rare, as an early dated example of British kit, it is broad arrow marked, dated 1939 and was manufactured by ‘BISBY’. Priced to reflect the rarity and condition of the item. I also have 1939 examples of the knife and spoon available in the shop.
WW2 British, Gas Warning Rattle (MkI). A wooden rattle was issued to every platoon and subunit HQ to warn of detection of gas by the gas sentry. The gas sentry was a throwback to WWI and was fairly redundant by 1944 when the possibility of gas attack had diminished. Larger camps were issued with a ‘siren’ of which a continues blast warned of gas. This 1940 dated example, re-stamped ROC 1944, is typical of the style used in WWII that, unlike earlier versions, were wider and fitted with a metal panel to increase sound levels. Priced to reflect its cleanness, many were painted in team colours post war to be used at sports matches, and good condition.
WW2 British, Gas Warning Rattle (MkII) A wooden rattle was issued to every platoon and subunit HQ to warn of detection of gas by the gas sentry. The gas sentry was a throwback to WWI and was fairly redundant by 1944 when the possibility of gas attack had diminished. Larger camps were issued with a ‘siren’ of which a continues blast warned of gas. This 1941 dated example, manufactured by M. Bros, is typical of the style used in WWII that, unlike earlier versions, were wider but as an economy measure is not fitted with a metal panel to increase sound levels. Priced to reflect its cleanness, many were painted in team colours post war to be used at sports matches, and good condition. However, even though NOT painted post-war with team it bears the signs of being used by a ‘speedway’ fan as evidenced by the written names of famous riders from yesteryear e.g., Dent Oliver who appeared in the world finals at Wembley in 1949,50 & 53, etc.
WW2 British, General Service Cap, Badged to Royal Engineers, 1945 As a wartime measure to save on time and materials it was decided to introduce a universal khaki cloth cap made on the beret pattern. Known as the \'Cap-General Service\' it was quickly nicknamed the \'Cap Ridiculous\'. Correctly worn with the band in a level position one inch above the eyebrows with the crown of the cap pulled to the right. The badge was worn over the left eye with the badge position centrally between the headband and crown of the cap. This example is in good condition with very minor moth nips, was manufactured in 1945 by Gelfer of Glasgow and is made to size 6 3/4 with the addition of the late war plastic economy cap badge. A nice clean example that will display very well.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘AFS’ (Auxiliary Fire Service), Zuckerman Helmet. This ‘Zuckerman’ was manufactured by PSC (Pressed Steel Company), dates to 194,1 with the application of AFS (Auxiliary Fire Service) to front with the addition of the number ‘5’ applied to the sides. The helmet is in good order apart from the ‘lace’ holding the liner in place which has almost rotted away, I am leaving ‘as is’ and will let the new owner decide on whether to replace the lace. The AFS was in existence until August 1941 when superseded by the NFS (National Fire Service), unusual in the fact that AFS helmets are usually MkII’s, however, this may have been used as a stop gap or even used by a civilian volunteer with the AFS? Priced to reflect condition and unknown provenance. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘Zuckerman Helmet History’ below: ZUCKERMAN HELMET HISTORY: The Zuckerman helmet, officially designated the Civilian Protective Helmet, was a designed for use by civil defence organisations and the general public. It was developed and designed by Solly Zuckerman, Derman Christopherson and Hugh Cairns. Zuckerman and Cairns first started looking into a design for a helmet to aid civil defence in mid-1940. Their aim was to provide a helmet that could deal with impact from falling and flying masonry and provide more coverage for the head and the neck areas. After the War Office accepted their design, the Civilian Protective Helmet went into circulation in December 1940 and throughout 1941, the vast majority therefore being dated 1941. Helmets were made from pressed mild steel or manganese steel (known for its impact resistance) in two sizes only and sometimes marked with either M (medium) or L (large) on the inside of the brim. The design of the high dome was to allow the helmet to withstand impact and still protect the wearer. Many have two single holes opposite each other on the brim. The marking details the amount of resistance the helmet offered to ballistic impact (that being the lowest and therefore not for use as a frontline helmet). The helmet was available in several colours: white, black, grey and olive green. A helmet liner made of leather and webbing was attached to the helmet with string, lace or leather thong that was threaded through 16 pre-drilled slightly angled holes around the helmet to hold it in place. Small loops were incorporated on the helmet for attaching a chinstrap, but no official strap was issued though many used the Mk II helmet chinstrap. Consequently, helmets can be found with numerous chin strap variations. Zuckerman helmets were issued to Civil Defence personnel such as Fire Guards, Street Fire Parties and factory workers. They were also on sale to the general public for 5 shillings and sixpence (5s 6d). When used by Fire Guards and Street Fire Party personnel, the helmets were marked accordingly with FG or SFP. Bands around the helmet (often in black) would denote seniority within the Fire Guard service. The helmet was manufactured by a number of companies such as the Austin Motor Co. and Morris Motors.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘FG’ (FIRE GUARD), Zuckerman Helmet. Externally painted white, over the factory grey finish, with one, ½ inch, narrow black band identifies this example as one belonging to a ‘Block Leader’. The shell and liner both date to 1941 with the shell being manufactured by ‘VM’, to size ‘M’, and the liner by M & Co to size 7. Has an additional ‘DIY’ homemade chinstrap of riveted rubber. Fire Guards came into effect towards the end of 1943 when they replaced the Supplementary/Street Fire Parties. Priced to reflect rank and excellent condition. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘Zuckerman Helmet History’ below: ZUCKERMAN HELMET HISTORY: The Zuckerman helmet, officially designated the Civilian Protective Helmet, was a designed for use by civil defence organisations and the general public. It was researched and designed by Solly Zuckerman, Derman Christopherson and Hugh Cairns. Zuckerman and Cairns first started looking into a design for a helmet to aid civil defence in mid-1940. Their aim was to provide a helmet that could deal with impact from falling and flying masonry and provide more coverage for the head and the neck areas. After the War Office accepted their design, the Civilian Protective Helmet went into circulation in December 1940 and throughout 1941, the vast majority therefore being dated 1941. Helmets were made from pressed mild steel or manganese steel (known for its impact resistance) in two sizes only and sometimes marked with either M (medium) or L (large) on the inside of the brim. The design of the high dome was to allow the helmet to withstand impact and still protect the wearer. Many have two single holes opposite each other on the brim. The marking details the amount of resistance the helmet offered to ballistic impact (that being the lowest and therefore not for use as a frontline helmet). The helmet was available in several colours: white, black, grey and olive green. A helmet liner made of leather and webbing was attached to the helmet with string, lace or leather thong that was threaded through 16 pre-drilled slightly angled holes around the helmet to hold it in place. Small loops were incorporated on the helmet for attaching a chinstrap, but no official strap was issued though many used the Mk II helmet chinstrap. Consequently, helmets can be found with numerous chin strap variations. Zuckerman helmets were issued to Civil Defence personnel such as Fire Guards, Street Fire Parties and factory workers. They were also on sale to the general public for 5 shillings and sixpence (5s 6d). When used by Fire Guards and Street Fire Party personnel, the helmets were marked accordingly with FG or SFP. Bands around the helmet (often in black) would denote seniority within the Fire Guard service.4 The helmet was manufactured by a number of companies such as the Austin Motor Co. and Morris Motors.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘GPO’ (General Post Office), MkII Helmet. This General Post Office helmet, as designated by the application to the centre front by the letters ‘GPO’ has a 1940, size 7 ¼ liner manufactured by S.E. Norris Ltd. (Dagenham). Priced to reflect paint loss to dome and some wear. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘If The Invader Comes’ Leaflet, June, 1940. The British government faced a terrifying prospect in the summer of 1940. Following the rapid advance of Nazi troops into Western Europe, they feared an invasion. This threat had been secretly discussed since October 1939, but it was not until defeat in the battle for France, however, that it was treated as a serious possibility. And the situation was such that ‘the invasion of Great Britain’ was discussed at 19 War Cabinet meetings during the first three weeks of Winston Churchill’s premiership. One of the greatest difficulties facing the government was the need to explain the situation to the public. This was the responsibility of the Ministry of Information’s ‘Emergency Planning Committee’, and it was asked to produce a leaflet of instructions explaining the steps that should be taken in the event of an invasion. Now the story behind these instructions has been uncovered by the Institute of English Studies project ‘A Communication History of the Ministry of Information, 1939-45’. It highlights the extent of confusion which existed at the top of government at one of the most significant moments in British history. The main difficulty was the different motives of those involved. The Home Office wanted to avoid panic by stopping ‘responsible people’ from ‘running away’. Military authorities wanted to ensure that possible battle sites were kept clear for troops and pushed for civilian evacuation. The Ministry of Information, by contrast, wanted to ‘rouse the public’ by encouraging resistance. Officials working for the Ministry of Information hoped to do this by including instructions about ‘harassing the enemy’ and ending with the lines: ‘Be clever. Be brave’. The final version of the leaflet was an unhappy compromise. Its tone oscillated between confident assertions that any invading force would be ‘driven out’ and dire warnings that ‘If you run away … you will be machine-gunned from the air’. Advice about making roadblocks and defending factories was retained in a shortened form. Other points were simply left out. On 18 June 1940, some 15 million copies of the finished leaflet were printed under the title If the Invader Comes. Every household in Britain received a copy during the next three days. Poster-sized versions were sent to local councils, Winston Churchill introduced its content in his ‘Finest Hour’ speech, and the press reproduced most of its seven rules in full. However, the Ministry of Information found that the public’s reaction was mixed. A poll commissioned by its Home Intelligence Division concluded that ‘the leaflet has not been taken seriously’. A non-official report by Mass Observation (which was employed by the Ministry) was even more critical. It called the leaflet’s tone ‘out of touch with common sense’ and suggested that the public were being treated as ‘blithering idiots’. Britain was not invaded in the summer of 1940. But the Ministry of Information’s reputation would be tarnished by the leaflet issued under its name for years to come. This shows the difficulty of its task. The Ministry was presented as an authoritative source of information but lacked the authority to make this responsibility a success. In clean but ‘brittle’ condition a chance to own a classic piece of Home Front ephemera, priced to reflect condition.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘Penelope’s Service’ Knitting Pattern. Hand-knitting was at a peak in Britain in the 1940s. During the Second World War, women on the home front were encouraged to contribute to the war effort by knitting for the troops, which was promoted as public duty. Advertising at the time stated: \"England expects – knit your bit\". Many knitting patterns were given away free, while wool was also sent to schools so that children could knit gloves, scarves, and balaclava helmets for the forces. Wool was also supplied to organisations such as the Women\'s Institutes of England and Wales, who made over 22 million knitted garments for the Red Cross (an average of 67 garments per member). Parcels of their knitwear were sent to prisoners of war, as well as to troops. The warmth of woollen garments also made them popular for civilians who were faced with a shortage of heating fuel. In the face of wool rationing, knitters were encouraged to unravel old sweaters. This ‘Penelope’s Service’ pattern, No K 1094, was published by WM. Briggs & Co. Ltd. Of Manchester and was one of their ‘Service Woolies’ series.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘Plasfort’ Composite Helmet. Several commercially manufactured helmets were targeted towards the civilian market during WW2. Some were adopted by factory workers, especially those working in munitions as sparks could be avoided. Emulating the shape of the MkII steel helmet they provided rudimentary protection but had a psychological benefit. Some were made from Bakelite and others from lightweight alloy or composite fibre. The ‘Plasfort’ design dates to 1940, the shell was compression moulded from phenol formaldehyde with a raised moulded logo, ‘REGD PLASFORT PAT APPLIED FOR’, on the underside of the rim. It was thicker than the usual steel helmet but utilised some component parts used in military helmets such as liner and chin strap. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description, priced to reflect overall good condition.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘POLICE’, MkII Helmet. This shell and liner example dates to 1939 with other components dating from 1938 (refer to images). The shell was manufacture by Harrison Bros. & Howson (Sheffield) with the liner being manufactured by Helmets Ltd (Wheathampstead). The shell still retains its original factory ‘constabulary blue paint’ with the word ‘POLICE’ being applied to the front. Priced to reflect some rust spotting and minor paint loss. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘R’ (Rescue), MkII Helmet. This example has a size ‘7’ liner, dates to 1939 and was manufactured by Everett W Vero & Co. The shell still retains its original black paint, which has obscured the shells manufacturer, with the letter ‘R’ for Rescue being applied to the front. Priced to reflect some rust spotting and minor paint loss. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘SFP’ (Supplementary/Street Fire Parties), Zuckerman Helmet. This example retains its factory grey green finish with the addition of ‘SFP’ stencilled to the front. The liner dates to 1941 and was manufactured by ‘M.M.’ to a good size 6 ¾. Supplementary/Street Fire Parties were active until the end of 1943 when replaced by Fire Guards. Priced to reflect rank and excellent condition. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more specific information please refer to ‘Zuckerman Helmet History’ below: ZUCKERMAN HELMET HISTORY: The Zuckerman helmet, officially designated the Civilian Protective Helmet, was a designed for use by civil defence organisations and the general public. It was researched and designed by Solly Zuckerman, Derman Christopherson and Hugh Cairns. Zuckerman and Cairns first started looking into a design for a helmet to aid civil defence in mid-1940. Their aim was to provide a helmet that could deal with impact from falling and flying masonry and provide more coverage for the head and the neck areas. After the War Office accepted their design, the Civilian Protective Helmet went into circulation in December 1940 and throughout 1941, the vast majority therefore being dated 1941. Helmets were made from pressed mild steel or manganese steel (known for its impact resistance) in two sizes only and sometimes marked with either M (medium) or L (large) on the inside of the brim. The design of the high dome was to allow the helmet to withstand impact and still protect the wearer. Many have two single holes opposite each other on the brim. The marking details the amount of resistance the helmet offered to ballistic impact (that being the lowest and therefore not for use as a frontline helmet). The helmet was available in several colours: white, black, grey and olive green. A helmet liner made of leather and webbing was attached to the helmet with string, lace or leather thong that was threaded through 16 pre-drilled slightly angled holes around the helmet to hold it in place. Small loops were incorporated on the helmet for attaching a chinstrap, but no official strap was issued though many used the Mk II helmet chinstrap. Consequently, helmets can be found with numerous chin strap variations. Zuckerman helmets were issued to Civil Defence personnel such as Fire Guards, Street Fire Parties and factory workers. They were also on sale to the general public for 5 shillings and sixpence (5s 6d). When used by Fire Guards and Street Fire Party personnel, the helmets were marked accordingly with FG or SFP. Bands around the helmet (often in black) would denote seniority within the Fire Guard service.4 The helmet was manufactured by a number of companies such as the Austin Motor Co. and Morris Motors.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘W’ (Warden, London), MkII Helmet. This Wardens helmet, as designated by the application to the centre front by the letter ‘W’, London helmets had the addition of an additional designation to the rear of the helmet, has a 1939 manufactured shell made by Harrison Bros. & Howson (Sheffield). Priced to reflect excellent condition of liner, double decal and minor paint loss. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more specific information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘W’ (Warden, Outside London), MkII Helmet A Warden’s helmet from outside London, as designated by having the logo placed to the front of the helmet only, in ‘salty’ condition with some paint loss but with bags of character, if only it could tell a story!! With a good sized 7 liner produced by ‘VERO’ in 1939 (the helmet maker mark is obscured) it displays very well. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘W’ (Warden), MkII Helmet. This No.2C shell, designated ‘2C’ by the addition of three holes to each side of the brim and being made from an inferior steel, was manufactured by BMB (Briggs Motor Bodies Ltd of Dagenham) in 1940 with a size 7 liner manufactured in 1939 by J Compton Sons & Webb Ltd (London). Retaining its original factory grey green paint with ‘W’ stencilled to the front and ‘K’ to the front and rear inner rim, I presume these stands for post K? Priced to reflect very good overall condition with ‘minor wear’ and limited paint chipping. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more general information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, Home Front, ‘Woollies for the Royal Navy’ Knitting Pattern. Hand-knitting was at a peak in Britain in the 1940s. During the Second World War, women on the home front were encouraged to contribute to the war effort by knitting for the troops, which was promoted as public duty. Advertising at the time stated: \"England expects – knit your bit\". Many knitting patterns were given away free, while wool was also sent to schools so that children could knit gloves, scarves, and balaclava helmets for the forces. Wool was also supplied to organisations such as the Women\'s Institutes of England and Wales, who made over 22 million knitted garments for the Red Cross (an average of 67 garments per member). Parcels of their knitwear were sent to prisoners of war, as well as to troops. The warmth of woollen garments also made them popular for civilians who were faced with a shortage of heating fuel. In the face of wool rationing, knitters were encouraged to unravel old sweaters. This ‘Woollies for the Navy’ pattern, Knitting Series No.12, was published by Weldon’s. It contains patterns for Pullover’s, Scarves, Gloves, Socks, etc.
WW2 British, Home Front, \'After the Raid\' Leaflet, 1940. Issued by the Ministry of Home Security, this leaflet gives details to home owners as what to do if effected by air raids in a number of ways. Priced to reflect overall good condition, a small but are and sought after leaflet.
WW2 British, Home Front, \'Masking Your Windows\' Leaflet, 1939. Published by the Lord Privy Seal starting in July 1939, prior to the formation of the Ministry of Home Security, this is one of a series of leaflets aimed at preparing the public for a possible war with Germany. All leaflets bore the rubric: \'Read this and keep it carefully. You may need it.\' This example covers the preparation of window glass to prevent injury during bombing raids. A rare survivor in good condition.
WW2 British, Home Front, \'The Protection of your Home Against Air Raids\' Booklet, 1938. Published by HMSO in 1938, this small booklet gives details to the public as to how to prepare their homes against air raids, gas attack, etc. Priced to reflect its near MINT condition.
WW2 British, Home Front, ARP Clasp Knife, 1939. WW2 British, Home Front, ARP Clasp Knife, 1939. Uncommon 1939 ARP clasp knife by the Davenport Cutlery Company of Sheffield, rather than the more commonly encountered examples by George Gill & Sons of Sheffield. Single bladed stainless steel bodied clasp knife with marlin spike and lanyard ring. Clearly manufacturer marked and dated to body, Sheffield, England to the base of blade. This pattern ceased to be made in 1939. Blade and spike both lightly patinated. Good overall condition and fully functional. A chance to acquire this now scarce and hard to source pattern of clasp knife. Sold as a historical collectable only. 18+ only and proof of age may be required if you are unknown to me. Will only post to a UK address.
WW2 British, Home Front, ARP, Handbook No.1, 1938 ARP HandbookNo.1, \'PERSONAL PROTECTION AGAINST GAS\', published by HMSO, 1938. The Home Office ARP Dept. published a series of handbooks for the ARP that were regularly updated. These handbooks were published from the birth of the department in 1935 and formed a series that was expanded and developed as the war progressed, with some running into several editions. With the worry of gas attacks causing a major concern during this period many of the first editions covered gas safety. This edition covers, amongst other things, detection of gas, protection of the eyes and lungs, anti-gas treatment, respirator drill, etc.
WW2 British, Home Front, Employment Documentation Group, 1941 & 1942. An interesting pair of employment documents; ‘Regular Unemployment Book. YOUNG MAN’ and a ‘National Health and Pensions Insurance Contribution Card’. Containing numerous stamps and carriers’ details, would enhance any Home Front display.
WW2 British, Home Front, First Aid Notes, un-dated. During the war a vast array of leaflets and booklets offered basic instruction as to first aid. These rare survivors consist of a \'folded leaflet\' coving basic fist aid knowledge plus a locally produced note, typed in red ink, giving details as to the contents of first aid tins or boxes. Priced to reflect foxing to the first aid leaflet.
WW2 British, Home Front, Salute the Soldier: Birmingham, Lapel Badge in Contemporary Storage Box. Salute the Soldier Weeks were British National Savings campaigns with the aim of British Army equipment being sponsored by individual civil/town/city communities, hence, on this example, the designation Birmingham. Each county was set a target of money to raise with a plaque being awarded for fund raising efforts. Prior to Salute the Soldier, War Weapons Weeks helped pay for the lost equipment from Dunkirk and other campaigns such as Wings for Victory and Warship Week raised funds for other arms of service. In total, Salute the Soldier Weeks raised over £628,000000, equivalent to over £28 billion today. This example must have had some significance for the owner as it has been carefully preserved in a small box and is in good condition. I also have available a ‘cut-down’ version of ‘War Savings Commemorative Plaques’.
WW2 British, Home Front, Zuckerman Helmet Shell. Zuckerman helmet shell in good order, please note that the liner is missing but displays well and would make a cracking and cheap addition to any collection. Manufactured by the Press Steel Company as shown by the stamped PSC logo in 1941 to size \'M\'. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more specific information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: ZUCKERMAN HELMET HISTORY: The Zuckerman helmet, officially designated the Civilian Protective Helmet, was a designed for use by civil defence organisations and the general public. It was researched and designed by Solly Zuckerman, Derman Christopherson and Hugh Cairns. Zuckerman and Cairns first started looking into a design for a helmet to aid civil defence in mid-1940. Their aim was to provide a helmet that could deal with impact from falling and flying masonry and provide more coverage for the head and the neck areas. After the War Office accepted their design, the Civilian Protective Helmet went into circulation in December 1940 and throughout 1941, the vast majority therefore being dated 1941. Helmets were made from pressed mild steel or manganese steel (known for its impact resistance) in two sizes only and sometimes marked with either M (medium) or L (large) on the inside of the brim. The design of the high dome was to allow the helmet to withstand impact and still protect the wearer. Many have two single holes opposite each other on the brim. The marking details the amount of resistance the helmet offered to ballistic impact (that being the lowest and therefore not for use as a frontline helmet). The helmet was available in several colours: white, black, grey and olive green. A helmet liner made of leather and webbing was attached to the helmet with string, lace or leather thong that was threaded through 16 pre-drilled slightly angled holes around the helmet to hold it in place. Small loops were incorporated on the helmet for attaching a chinstrap, but no official strap was issued though many used the Mk II helmet chinstrap. Consequently, helmets can be found with numerous chin strap variations. Zuckerman helmets were issued to Civil Defence personnel such as Fire Guards, Street Fire Parties and factory workers. They were also on sale to the general public for 5 shillings and sixpence (5s 6d). When used by Fire Guards and Street Fire Party personnel, the helmets were marked accordingly with FG or SFP. Bands around the helmet (often in black) would denote seniority within the Fire Guard service.4 The helmet was manufactured by a number of companies such as the Austin Motor Co. and Morris Motors.
WW2 British, Home Guard Instruction No. 17 - 1940. One of a series of instructions used to coordinate the response of the Home Guard to German attack. This example covers \'Anti-Aircraft Training\' using notes, maps and silhouettes. A must for anyone interested in WW2 home defence or those planning an interesting Home Guard display or reenactment. Priced to reflect some yellowing and crispness to the paper with some minor creasing.
WW2 British, Home Guard, ‘From Dusk Till Dawn’, A.G. Street, 1943. First edition (Feb’ 1943) this is a first edition reprint of June 1943, 136 numbered pages. Published under the Book Production War Economy standard with black and white plates. It is the classic first real telling of the founding of the Home Guard, latterly the Local Defence Volunteers. Hardcover condition: ‘good’ (red boards with gilded letters) Dust Jacket condition: ‘good’. Some very minor foxing, overall a very good copy of this famous and much sought after book in this printing and condition.
WW2 British, Home Guard, ‘Small Arms Manual’ by Lt. Col. J. A. BARLOW, S.A.C. 1942 During the Second World War, Barlow was Director of Artillery Small Arms in the Ministry of Supply, Artillery Division. Prior to WW2, in 1921, he had joined the West Yorkshire Regiment and reached the rank of Brigadier. Just like his father he took an interest in musketry winning medals at Bisley in 1930, 1933, 1936, winning the Queens Prize Gold Medal in 1934 and 1938. After WW2 he wrote the Army’s new Small Arms Training Manual. This manual has chapters covering rifles, light & medium machine guns, machine carbines, revolvers, and pistols. A February 1942 reprint of the January 1942 first edition in average condition with some creasing with WW2 era pencil notes to some pages.
WW2 British, Homefront, Propaganda Figurine of Winston Churchill. Cast in plaster and hand painted propaganda figurine of Winston Churchill, still retaining his iconic cigar. Striking a defiant pose with bow tie and handkerchief in top pocket this is a must have item for any Homefront collection.
WW2 British, Homefront, Sweet Packaging, Christmas, 1939. Striking the pose and silhouette of a typical British ‘Tommy’ and reminiscent of ‘Old Bill’ this figurine was manufactured to contain sweets and sold in the run up to Christmas 1939. One of four designs available; sailor, airman, policeman and soldier, this soldier was by far the most popular. Manufactured from papier Mache and hand painted it stands in very good condition.
WW2 British, Hurlock Stove, PLUS FREE GIFT!! A good clean example of the British Hurlock \'Primus\' pressure stove. Item consists of the stove, with all its legs and wind shield, spare parts tin and main storage tin. In clean, straight and untested condition, plus the addition of a free set of seals and washers. A must for the \'vintage camper\' or \'re-enactor\' who wants that authentic method of cooking in the field.
WW2 British, Indian Made Khaki Drill Trousers. An original pair of British, Khaki Drill Trousers manufactured by C & D, India and clearly dated 1944. This pattern of trousers came into issue with the British Army and RAF towards the end of the Second World War and featured the ‘cross belt’ closure to the waist, like that of ‘Gurkha Shorts’, and slash pockets to the hips. Inside the trousers retain their original makers stamps. The standard Indian circular stamp is present, a second larger stamp is also present which states the manufacture as D & Co 1944, and stamped size 4. The trousers do not retain their original metal Indian pattern buttons to the waist adjusters or the fly which have been replaced by metal buttons like those found on jeans. The waist buckles aren\'t present with the trousers, but these can be sourced. The consider the trousers to be a small size with some slight adjustment at the waist due to the cross-belt design Waist – 15 – 16” when laid flat, I would guess that they would fit a 30” waist. Inside leg - 28\" Outside leg – 38” *Note: the sizes stated above are for guidance only and The trousers have a lovely patina to the fabric, would display well and are still, with some work, wearable. There are some mall stains, and signs of wear which are consummate with their age. Please study the pictures as they form part of the description. Priced to reflect their small size, lack of buckles and replaced fly buttons.
WW2 British, Indian Made Khaki Drill Trousers. Additional images relating to size.
WW2 British, Inter- War / Early War / Dunkirk Period, 1905 Pattern, Clasp Knife, 1938. Summer sale item 10% off, new price £85 The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will all have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or in initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to all clasp knives were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example inter-war, early war example is one of the 1905 patterns, manufactured to the standard British pattern 6353/1905, as modified in 1913 with changed dimensions for the tin opener. The hilt of the knife has two chequered pattern sides secured by five metal rivets. The underside of the hilt has two recesses to allow storage of the blade and the tin opener. A tapered steel Marline spike is mounted on the other side of the hilt, pivoting at the opposite end to the blade and tin opener. A copper wire shackle is also secured at this end of the hilt that was used to attach the knife to a lanyard or belt clip. A fingernail indentation is located near the top of one side of the blade. The tin opener has bevelled edges tapered to a point on one side, with a steel post mounted in the middle of the other side. A rare opportunity to acquire this much sought after item of kit for those wanting to portray the ‘old salt’ during the Battle of France and Dunkirk. NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (1). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in September 1943 by J.P. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with darker ‘khaki’ background. This example is in ‘VERY GOOD’ condition, with only minor scratches consummate with age and few if any ‘dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect rarity and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (2). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in May 1944 by J.B.B. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with dark ‘khaki’ background. This example is in ‘POORER’ condition, overall rust spotting consummate with age and few if any dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect rarity and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (4). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in September 1943 by W. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with dark ‘khaki’ background. This example is in ‘GOOD’ condition, with mostly minor scratches consummate with age and few if any ‘dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (5). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in October 1942 by N. Ltd. Earlier war pattern with smaller font size in ‘pea green’ with darker ‘olive green’ background. This example is in ‘GOOD’ condition, with only minor scratches and some rust spotting consummate with age and few if any ‘dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect the rarity of having the month ‘written, and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (6). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in May 1943 by T.R. Ltd. Earlier war pattern with smaller font size in ‘pea green’ with slightly darker ‘olive green’ background. This example is in ‘FAIR/GOOD’ condition, with only minor scratches consummate with age and few if any ‘dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect rarity as an early verion and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (7). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in February 1943 by J.P. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with dark ‘khaki’ background This example is in ‘FAIR’ condition, with overall rust spotting and scratches consummate with age and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect rarity and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Boiled Sweets’ Ration Tin (8). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in April 1944 by C.N. & C. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with dark ‘khaki’ background This example is in ‘POOR’ condition, with scratching and rust spotting consummate with age, few if any ‘dents’ and fading to the lettering, is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect rarity and condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘Housewife’ Needles, 1945. An unissued packet of issue ‘Hussif’ sewing needles, Crows Foot marked and manufactured by Guillaume & Sons Ltd in 1945. Would enhance any display of personal kit. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Issue, ‘L2’, Light Pattern Anti-Gas Respirator, 1943. The Light Respirator was introduced in 1943 and was to replace the General Service Respirator. Available sizes were ‘Small’, ‘Normal’ and ‘Large’ and can be identified by the word being moulded onto the outer mask. The harness was, to save on rubber, from cotton webbing with elastic straps sewn directly onto it. The container filter consists of a metal drum with a threaded neck on one end with a 1” inlet hole on the other. This early example has a dated filter of 6th July 1943 with the L2, MkII, designation moulded into the inner mask. The rubber is in good, clean and supple condition. The L2 had some minor modifications from the L1 and was introduced on 27th March 1943 by the army council and was soon being issued to all troops and was the most common type used by troops on D-Day. *NOTE: This item is sold for display purposes only and it is highly recommended that it is not worn to avoid inhaling any toxic substances that may be contained within the filter.
WW2 British, Issue, Anti-Gas Wallet (I). The Anti-gas wallet was, like the anti-gas cape, made from oil cloth and made to protect the AB64 and other small personnel effects such photo’s, etc. The first pattern was 12 ½ “ by 8 “, when fully open and 12 by 4 when folded once and 6 by 4 when folded twice to fit into the breast pocket of the battle dress blouse or trouser pocket. The closure flap ran the entire length of the wallet with a 4” overlap to be fastened by a metal press stud. Later patterns dispensed with the press studs as the overlap was deemed sufficient to keep a good seal. By 1942 they were deemed unnecessary and ceased to be issued. This example has, like many, suffered from some hardening, one or two very tiny holes (refer to photographs) and the ‘pocket’ cannot be accessed. Priced to reflect rarity and condition.
WW2 British, Issue, Anti-Gas Wallet (II). The Anti-gas wallet was, like the anti-gas cape, made from oil cloth and made to protect the AB64 and other small personnel effects such photo’s, etc. The first pattern was 12 ½ “ by 8 “, when fully open and 12 by 4 when folded once and 6 by 4 when folded twice to fit into the breast pocket of the battle dress blouse or trouser pocket. The closure flap ran the entire length of the wallet with a 4” overlap to be fastened by a metal press stud. Later patterns dispensed with the press studs as the overlap was deemed sufficient to keep a good seal. By 1942 they were deemed unnecessary and ceased to be issued. This example has, like many, suffered from the becoming ‘over sticky’ and whilst the cloth is still supple and able to fold it has resulted in a ‘tear hole to the flap, refer to photographs. I have retained the pieces to enable future restoration. Priced to reflect rarity and condition.
WW2 British, Issue, Civilian Respirator Box. Gas masks were issued in simple but sturdy cardboard boxes with a strip of linen or string to be worn over the shoulder. This example is in good order with the inside being mint and the exterior having only some crossing out to an address on the lid. Priced to reflect condition, and good piece to upgrade a tatty box and will display
WW2 British, Issue, Housewife, 1942 The WW2 British army Housewife, or ‘Hussif’, was issued to all troops to enable them to carry out running repairs in the field. This example is of Indian manufacture, 1942, and includes, amongst the issue items, a private purchase pair of scissors and packet of needles. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Issue, Rarer, ‘Boiled Sweets, Salt & Matches’ Ration Tin (3). British ‘Boiled Sweets’ issue ration tin, 5-ozs, packed in November 1943 by W. Ltd. Later war pattern with larger font size in ‘pea green’ with dark ‘khaki’ background. This example is in ‘GOOD’ condition, with only minor scratches consummate with age and few if any ‘dents’ and is now a rare survivor; many were kept to store cigarettes and other ‘pocket’ items that needed to be kept dry. Priced to reflect the rarity of this much sought after version, with the addition of ‘slat and matches’, and good condition. The Metal Box Company Ltd who manufactured, amongst other things, Boyes Anti-tank Rifles and Verey Pistols produced many of these metal tins. The base and lid are pressed from single sheets of metal negating the use for a soldered joint and allowing them, when taped, to be watertight. Inner surfaces were ‘tinned’ to prevent rust. Sized at: Length: 10.5cm (4”) Height: 8cm (3”) Thickness: 2.5 cm (1”) *Sizes are approx. The sweets were issued to provide a concentrated energy boost in the field i.e., the sugars in the sweet were quickly converted into energy. The sweets also kept a soldier’s mouth moist, by producing saliva, reducing the need to drink water. *Note: no contents and the last image with the ruler is for sizing and may not show the tin for that listing.
WW2 British, Khaki Drill Shorts, Size 16, 1941 Pattern, 1943. Synonymous with the \'Desert Rat\' in the North African Campaign. ‘Khaki Drill’ clothing was supplied to soldiers serving in India and the Far East at the outbreak of WW2. Up until this point shorts had been available to troops as private purchase items and worn at the discretion of the Regimental Command. The only official issue being KD trousers, and it wasn’t until 1941, when stocks of the trousers were exhausted that shorts became the standard issue. The first issue shorts still had a longer length but had large turn ups and became known as ‘Bombay Bloomers’. These were replaced by the 40’ Pattern which in effect was a modified version of the longer Bombay Bloomers, they had a field dressing pocket on the upper right thigh and slash type pockets to the hips. They were closed at the front by a series of buttons and two cloth strips that fasten into buckles. Three button-up belt loops attach to the waist. The 41’ Pattern khaki drill shorts had a longer length than the previous issue. They retained the same principal features of the earlier patterns in terms of belt loops, buttons, and the waist closure. Manufacturer variations will include different types of buckle and buttons. This example is un-issued condition with minor storage marks and odd rust spots to the steel buckles. The shorts are a size 16: Height: 6’1” to 6’2” Waist: 34” to 35” Breach: 40” to 41” They were manufactured by Chas. Williams & Co Ltd. In 1943, priced to reflect large size and un-issued condition. Perfect for the reenactor or modern mannequin display. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Late War RELIC Tea Ration Tin, 1945 A nice little display piece or pack filler, 1945 dated relic Tea ration tin. Cheap as chips but nice to have, I\'ll be listing some larger unopened tins soon!! Maker marked and dated to the base: S.C.W.S. PKD. 8/5 so just catching the end of the war.
WW2 British, Late War, Issue, ‘SOLID FUEL COOKER’. Often cited as being part of the new P44 kit, intended for the Far East, this late war cooker is becoming harder and harder to source. Comprises its storage tin, with clear ‘decals and the majority of its paint intact, and two-piece folding cooker the item is in very good condition. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Please note that we cannot vouch for the authenticity of the solid fuel blocks. Priced to reflect the growing rarity of this item.
WW2 British, Late War, Rifle Cleaning Kit and Storage Tin, 1945. Mint and un-issued, late war, rifle cleaning kit, date coded 1945: M617. Introduced as part of the 44 pattern kit the tin contains: Wire cause. Cleaning brush. Pull through. Plastic oil bottle. Flannelette cloth. Would make an excellent addition for a No.4 rifle or No.5 Jungle Carbine.
WW2 British, LDV & Home Guard, Metal Respirator Tin with Civilian Respirator. Members of the LDV initially used their civilian issue respirators carried in its cardboard box slung over the shoulder with a piece of string, which gave little protection to the elements. The poor quality of the cardboard, during wet weather, made the boxes fall apart. During the period of name change, from LDV, over to Home Guard some units were issued with cylindrical metal containers to replace the boxes. These carrying tins could be better taken on exercises, parades and on patrol with the respirator remaining dry and free from damage. This example is in excellent condition with only minor scuff marks, retains its internal cloth bag, with instruction for use to inner surface of lid, original cord and is Labelled to ‘BLADON M.U. 42’
WW2 British, Leather Jerkin, Size 3, 1941. The leather jerkin was a simple garment that saw service in both world wars. The WW1 pattern was the number 1, whilst this example being WW2 is the number 2 pattern. Both patterns were very popular with troops as they were warm and easy to move in. The body was produced from leather and usually died brown. The inner was lined with Khaki drab or green wool similar to blanket material, four large buttons closed up the front. As issued the jerkin was had no collar or pockets, although some jerkins with field modifications to exist. This example is worn but in outstanding condition with NO moth to the liner and comes in a rare large size: Height: 5’11” to 6’ 2” Breast: 40” to 46” It was manufactured in February 1943 by Fink & Sons, has all the original button in place, however, the label does state ‘CAMOUFLAGED’, either its wrong or the camo’ has faded. The chance to own a very good example that displays well or can be used, with our modern larger body frame, for WW2 re-enactment. Price is set to reflect condition and larger sizing.
WW2 British, Mess Tins, Tinned Steel, 1942, with Storage Bag. The British Army, on introduction of the 37 Pattern Kit, decided to replace the older D-shaped mess tin for something more suitable to modern warfare. They adopted a rectangular pair of nesting aluminium tins with a folding steel handle. These proved to be lighter and more hygienic than the older model, however, these were quickly withdrawn to use the aluminium for aircraft production. Several changes to the basic design took place, rounding the corners, reducing the depth, adding reinforcement crimps to the top edge, adding a reinforcement groove along the long edge of the side, and finally moving away from aluminium to tinned steel. This pair of tins were manufactured in 1942, however, heavy tinning to the body of the pan has obliterated the manufactures name. As is standard the steel handles are attached to the main body by rivets and the pair come with an also un-issued buff/white cotton, draw string, storage bag. Perfect for those who wish to display an un-issued kit layout, priced to reflect the condition and rarity of this much sought-after piece of British kit.
WW2 British, Mk. V1a, Haversack waist Belt. For certain jobs/roles the haversack was deemed impractical to be worn on the chest and needed a respirator with a long hose to be used and the haversack to be worn on the side. The belt prevented the haversack from ‘flapping’ during vagarious movement. This example is in very good order, has the owners’ initials, FE, stamped to the buckles and is priced to reflect rarity and condition. Just the thing to finish off a long-hosed haversack and respirator combo.
WW2 British, MKII Helmet Fitted with Anti-Gas Curtain No. 1. This example with its Anti-Gas Curtain No. 1 is a rare survivor. The maker mark is obscured by the curtain fabric, however, its size 6 ¾ liner has its date of 1939 and maker mark still visible as ‘VERO’ (Everett W Vero & Co). The Anti-Gas Curtain No. 1 was introduced in the Autumn of 1939 and was manufactured from the same oilskin fabric as the ‘gas cape’. It was worn attached to the underside of the helmet brim and hung down over the neck enough to go over the collar. The Number 1 was found to be flawed in that liquid gas could ‘seep’ under the curtain to contaminate the underneath. It was replaced by the Number 2 in the summer of 1940. Priced to reflect, even with paint loss, the presence of its original ‘gas curtain’, as with most survivors the oilskin has hardened, and it is recommended that it be left as is. A lovely helmet with great patina and character. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more specific information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’.
WW2 British, MkVI Water Bottle, Dunkirk Era, 1940. Recognisable as of Inter-war/early war manufacture by its blue enamel and wire loop to the base of the spout, and 1940 dated webbing cradle. One of three popular variants this bottle still retains its woollen serge cover. With a capacity of two pints this type of water bottle was standard issue during both WW1and WW2. The webbing cradle is clearly broad arrow marked, 1940 dated and was manufactured by M.E.Co. I believe it may have a very thin application of Blanco, though it is very difficult to tell. Priced to reflect condition and early war production.
WW2 British, NAAFI, Teacup, 1944. With some damage a very nice 1944 dated teacup, manufactured by TAMS. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Priced to reflect chip to rim but would still make an excellent addition for any display of army NAAFI or barrack life.
WW2 British, News Chronicle, Cricket Annual, 1939 A are copy of the News Chronicle Cricket Album 1939 that would have graced to Christmas stocking of many a cricket mad young boy and even their fathers. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Number 2 Prismatic 6x30 Binoculars, 1942. The Number 2 Prismatic Binoculars were the standard general service optics used by British and Commonwealth forces during WW2. There were three patterns, of which only the second and third had graticule markings in the focal plane, the third pattern had the opportunity to fill the body with nitrogen gas to prevent misting. Neck staps came in leather or canvas, of which the canvas was 32 inches in length, between the adjustment buckles and had a width of 5/16”. The adjusting ends had an additional 5 inched that formed the hanging loop when affixed to the lugs of the binoculars. This example is the second pattern, with the canvas neck strap and webbing carry case and webbing shoulder strap, both dated to 1944. These optics come in used and ‘salty’ condition, ‘been there, seen it and done it’ and would suit the modern reenactor who wants to portray the British office during battle/patrol conditions. Priced to reflect condition, however, with a little time and patience they will clean to display condition.
WW2 British, Officers Dress Service Cap, Badges to Royal Engineers. Manufactured from khaki drab material with a plain peak and the crown stiffened with a wire former. These caps had brown leather chin strap, unless for rifle regiments which were black, held in place by two small brass buttons. Cap badges for these caps were always produced from a bronze finished metal or, in later stages of the war, the brown economy patterns. This example is badged to the Royal Engineers and has that salty worn in look with some staining and wear to the leather chin strap.
WW2 British, Ointment Anti-Gas No.2, Glass Jar Variant, Coloured Coded ‘Cream’. Anti-gas ointments were developed to protect troops from the effects of blistering gases and could be used as a preventative (applied in anticipation of an attack) or curative (applied to blisters after an attack). The ointment consisted of a strong alkali to neutralise acidic blistering agents and could also be used to decontaminate weapons and equipment. Personnel were issued with two tins; one to be stored in the haversack and the other in the pocket of the anti-gas cape. The ointment itself was predominantly manufactured by ‘British Drug Houses’ (sometimes stamped BDH) with most of the tins being made by the ‘Metal Box Co. and stamped with MB or the number 12. Ointment Anti-Gas No.2 is by far the most common anti-gas ointment used in WW2 and could even be purchased in a civilian form via chemists. Initially supplied in a glass jars, using white or brown glass, with a metal lid and later replaced by tubes held in a flat rectangular tin. The glass jars continued to be issued to Police and civilian organisations whilst the tins were issued to the armed forces. The ointment itself was a mixture of Chloramine-T and vanishing cream. This rare early example of the white glass jar (manufactured by UGB) variant is priced to reflect its rarity, excellent condition with the addition of its contents.
WW2 British, Propaganda, Crown Ducal, \'War Against Hitlerism\' Teapot. Phoney War period propaganda teapot made to replace aluminium stocks that would be used for the war effort. Manufactured by Ducal for Dyson & Horsfall of Preston it is transfer printed with ‘Liberty and Freedom’ to one side and ‘War Against Hitlerism’ on the other with a profusion of allied flags. In good clean condition with some very light crazing consummate with its age.
WW2 British, Pullover, SIZE 1, Dunkirk era, 1940. Sweaters came in several styles, such as Sweaters, Jerseys, Cardigans and Slipovers, and were worn in every theatre of operations. In general, they were all close-fitting garments made from knitted wool that had been dyed to an earth-tone colour including khaki, light green, grey or brown. The Pullover was normally ‘V’ necked with the neck and cuffs woven tighter to prevent them being pulled out of shape. This example is a small ‘Size 1’, was manufactured in 1940 by ‘PICK Brand’ and is in un-issued condition. Please note that there are a few, unseen, minor moth holes to the right arm pit, a great piece to finish of that small pack display. Laid flat the Pullover is 17” across from arm pit to arm pit and 24” from the top of the rear neck to the bottom of the lower hem, priced to reflect the overall condition of this early war survivor.
WW2 British, RARE, Mess Tins Storage Bag, 1940. Rare and un-issued storage bag, manufacture by ‘RED ROSE, PRESTON’ in 1940 for the much sought-after aluminium mess tins. Upgrade your early war equipment with this mint condition piece of kit. Priced to reflect rarity and condition.
WW2 British, Respirator Spectacles. The respirator could only function properly if a good seal was achieved between the mask and the wears face. Personnel who wore glasses ran the risk of the arm of the glasses preventing a proper seal, to overcome this problem the RAMC, in 1939, introduced a set of spectacles that could be worn with the majority of respirator face pieces. These spectacles have round lenses, white metal frame and cable earpieces to keep them firmly in place. The arms running from the lenses to the earpiece have a flat and thin profile which prevented the seal being broken. They were issued in a thin fibreboard case with an instruction label affixed to the inner lid. This example is in good order, has the original prescription lenses, I have a pair with modern lenses I used for re-enactment, and they still have the original owners name and service number to the case. Priced to reflect good condition and rarity.
WW2 British, Royal Engineers, Coloured Field Service Cap Colloquially called the ‘forage’ or ‘side’ cap this universal pattern was reintroduced into the British army at the same time as the Battledress, 1937. Officers’ models were often produced in barathea whilst other ranks were manufactured from plain khaki drab serge. However, in June 1937 Amendment No.1 to the existing Dress Regulations for the Army, 1934 stated in Para. 31A: ‘The colour of the cap, crown and piping will be decided by the colonel’s commandant or colonels of regiments or corps. The badge will be of authorised regimental pattern.’ This cap, the use of which is entirely optional, may be worn with mess dress and on other informal occasions; it will not be worn on any occasion when on parade or duty, and will be maintained in addition to, and not in substitution of, the forage cap. This example is coloured and badges to the Royal Engineers with dark blue crown, body, peak and curtain with yellow piping to the crown. Badges with the Royal Engineers grenade. A well-worn solid example with little to no mothing.
WW2 British, Sheet Music, \'(We\'re Gonna Hang Out) The Washing on the Siegfried Line\'. Essential for community and family singing around the piano at Christmas a good copy of \'(We\'re Gonna Hang Out) The Washing on the Siegfried Line\'. One of the most popular songs of the \'Phoney War\' period, shattered by the invasion of France in May 1940. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Sheet Music, \'Kiss Me Good-Night Sergeant-Major\'. Essential for community and family singing around the piano at Christmas, a good sheet music copy of \'Kiss Me Good-Night Sergeant-Major\'. One of the most popular British, civilian and military songs of WW2. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Sheet Music, \'The Quartermaster\'s Store\', hand dated \'1940\'. Essential for community and family singing around the piano at Christmas, a good sheet music copy of \'The Quartermaster\'s Store\', hand dated \'1940\' in pen to front cover. Another very popular British, civilian and military song of WW2. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Shoes, Canvas (PT), Plimsolls, 1941. ULTRA RARE!! British army plimsolls, brown fabric upper, brown painted steel eyelets, brown laces, brown rubber toe caps with black textured rubber to the sole. Manufactured by N.B.R. Co Ltd, 1941 in size 11. Used for physical training, barrack wear and made famous by Commandos for their stealth qualities, refer to final photo (highlighted in red). Unissued, mint, NOS, never worn, ULTRA RARE and impossible to upgrade, all rubber soft and supple, fabric clean and unmarked. I also have a 1940 dated cap comforter for sale, also made famous by British Commando units, refer to final photo (highlighted in yellow).
WW2 British, Spoon from the KFS set, Dunkirk Period, 1939. A three-piece eating utensil set was issued to all personnel, along with mess tins and drinking mug. The most common set being the separate knife, fork, and spoon, however, the knife was not commonly carried in the field as the issue clasp knife could be used and the missing knife saved both space and weight. Most were manufactured from nickel silver or nickel stainless and were usually marked with make name or initials and sometimes the date. Due to the huge range of manufactures, there are a vast range of slightly differing patterns. Rare, as an early dated example of British kit, it is broad arrow marked, dated 1939 and was manufactured by ‘G Ltd.’. Priced to reflect the rarity and condition of the item. I also have 1939 examples of the knife and fork available in the shop.
WW2 British, STUNNING, Uniform Grouping; Royal Army Medical Corps, 1944, with Attribution. Provenance of marriage photograph where Battledress can be seen being worn by its owner: Alan Wright met Eva towards the end of the war. She was in Belgium when it was liberated by the Allied Army. She was of Hungarian Jewish descend and, with her sister, managed to avoid capture until the Allies liberated Belgium in 1944. Both her parents, however, died in concentration camps. She met and married Alan when she was working as an interpreter. Eventually, she was given permission to come to the UK, whereas she spoke 5 languages, she continued her work as a translator. A rare chance to own a truly stunning, immaculate condition, Royal Army Medical Corps uniform grouping of: Identity discs belonging to 7685265, Alan C. Wright. GC cap with economy RAMC cap badge Battle dress blouse. Battle dress trousers. The discs, in addition to service number and name, have the owner’s religion and blood group. The GS cap has the original economy RAMC cap badge and was manufactured by S. & P. Harris Ltd. Glasgow in 1944, size 6 5/8. The blouse and trousers are of Canadian manufacture and are both, like the cap, dated to 1944. The blouse was manufactured by ‘The T. Eaton Co. Ltd’ at their Montréal factory in 1944. Size 7: Height 5’7” to 5’8” Breast 35” to 36” Stamped with the Canadian ‘Crows Foot’ mark. The trousers were manufactured by ‘The Top Tailors Ltd in September 1944 in size 10: Height 5’9” to 5’10” Waist 31” to 32” Breech 37” 38” Stamped with the Canadian ‘Crows Foot’ mark. The blouse has been profusely badged and includes: Sargent Stripes, 21st Army Group formation badges and RAMC flashes to both sleeves. RAMC service strip to left sleeve. 50th Northumbrian Division formation sign to right sleeve. In addition, the blouse has a lovely set of medal ribbons for: 1939-45 Star Africa Star, 8th Army Italy Star France and Germany Star Territorial Efficiency Medal In addition to the medal ribbons above the left breast pocket there is also attached an economy Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry cap badge, the significance of which may be found after further research. The Canadian Battledress was much prized by British troops who appreciated its more athletic cut and finer weave to the cloth. Early production had manufacture and size tags, however, this was replaced by ink stamps to the lining. The Battledress also did not have traditional buttons with stitching holes but metal ones with a stitching ‘post’ and were painted to match the garment. As an economy measure in 1943 the hooks and eyes of the collar fastening were replaced by a button and tab. Priced to reflect the condition and absolute rarity of these very sought after items, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, STUNNING, Uniform Grouping; Royal Army Medical Corps, 1944, with Attribution. WW2 British, STUNNING, Uniform Grouping; Royal Army Medical Corps, 1944, with Attribution. ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS.
WW2 British, SUPER RARE, Anti-Gas Cape. The anti-gas cape was adopted in 1938 and was actually a full-length coat with sleeves, produced from a green oilskin fabric. A second pattern produced after June 1940 was manufactured from camouflage material. The cape was longer than the standard rain cape, coming to just below the knees, and was closed using a series of press stud snaps. Above the left hip is positioned a box pocket intended for anti-gas cream and cotton waste, holes in the arm pit allowed for ventilation with the back being shaped with a ‘hump’ to accommodate wearing of the small pack. As the war progressed and the threat of gas attack decreased it became common practice for soldiers to use it as a raincoat. It was normally carried rolled on top of the small pack or secured to the back of the webbing belt. Owing to the delicate nature of the cotton fabric few survived, many were left rolled for years leading to the cloth becoming stuck together or the cloth has become ‘hard and brittle’. Very few examples now appear on the market and are on the ‘wants list’ of most collectors of British Army kit. This example is in very good order with most of the fabric still supple, displays well on a mannequin, with only minor ‘pin-holes’ and one tiny tear to the top press stud, please refer carefully to the photographs which form part of the description. The last three images have shown as honestly as possible any areas of damage; as stated there is a slight tear to the rear of the top press stud, a very small 4/5mm tear above the press stud to convert to marching order and the some of the stitching to the rear arm pit has rotted, please note that the fabric is intact and can easily be re-stitched. Priced to reflect condition and rarity displays on a mannequin very well, NOT TO BE MISSED!!
WW2 British, SUPER RARE, Anti-Gas Cape. **ADDITIONAL DETAIL PHOTOGRAPHS** The anti-gas cape was adopted in 1938 and was actually a full-length coat with sleeves, produced from a green oilskin fabric. A second pattern produced after June 1940 was manufactured from camouflage material. The cape was longer than the standard rain cape, coming to just below the knees, and was closed using a series of press stud snaps. Above the left hip is positioned a box pocket intended for anti-gas cream and cotton waste, holes in the arm pit allowed for ventilation with the back being shaped with a ‘hump’ to accommodate wearing of the small pack. As the war progressed and the threat of gas attack decreased it became common practice for soldiers to use it as a raincoat. It was normally carried rolled on top of the small pack or secured to the back of the webbing belt. Owing to the delicate nature of the cotton fabric few survived, many were left rolled for years leading to the cloth becoming stuck together or the cloth has become ‘hard and brittle’. Very few examples now appear on the market and are on the ‘wants list’ of most collectors of British Army kit. This example is in very good order with most of the fabric still supple, displays well on a mannequin, with only minor ‘pin-holes’ and one tiny tear to the top press stud, please refer carefully to the photographs which form part of the description. The last three images have shown as honestly as possible any areas of damage(refer to yellow highlighted circles); as stated there is a slight tear to the rear of the top press stud, a very small 4/5mm tear above the press stud to convert to marching order and the some of the stitching to the rear arm pit has rotted, please note that the fabric is intact and can easily be re-stitched. Priced to reflect condition and rarity displays on a mannequin very well, NOT TO BE MISSED!!
WW2 British, SUPER RARE, Knife from the KFS set, Dunkirk Period’, 1939. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. A three-piece eating utensil set was issued to all personnel, along with mess tins and drinking mug. The most common set being the separate knife, fork, and spoon, however, the knife was not commonly carried in the field as the issue clasp knife could be used and the missing knife saved both space and weight. Most were manufactured from nickel silver or nickel stainless and were usually marked with make name or initials and sometimes the date. Due to the huge range of manufactures, there are a vast range of slightly differing patterns. One of the most sought after and ‘super’ rare pieces of British personal kit, this early dated example is broad arrow marked, dated 1939 and was manufactured by Walker and Hall, Sheffield. Priced to reflect the rarity and condition of the item. I also have 1939 examples of the fork and spoon available in the shop. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 British, Telegram Dated 4th May 1940, Buckingham Palace. A small and unusual item of ephemera and dating to just four days prior to the Battle of France with Guard Divisions and Buckingham Palace interest.
WW2 British, The Triumph and Gem Comic, April 1940. A nice copy of the popular boys comic, The Triumph and Gem, dated April 1940. Usual browning and foxing to pages, a rare survivor!! Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, The Triumph and Gem Comic, Jan\' 1940. A nice copy of the popular boys comic, The Triumph and Gem, dated Jan\' 1940. Usual browning and foxing to pages, a rare survivor!! Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, The Triumph and Gem Comic, March 1940. A nice copy of the popular boys comic, The Triumph and Gem, dated March 1940. Usual browning and foxing to pages, a rare survivor!! Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, The Triumph and Gem Comic, May 1940. A nice copy of the popular boys comic, The Triumph and Gem, dated May 1940. Usual browning and foxing to pages, a rare survivor!! Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Unissued, Late War, Green Enamelled Mug. Not dated, however, this example has the tell-tale triple spur marks to base. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Still has its brown paper issue wrapping, however, as with many the enamel has chipped so priced to reflect this.
WW2 British, Unissued, Late War, Green Enamelled Mug. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. Not dated, however, this example has the tell-tale triple spur marks to base. Priced to reflect unissued condition.
WW2 British, Unit ‘Tin’ of Foot Powder, 16 Oz, Dunkirk Period, 1940. Foot powder was an essential issue of the British army and was used to soldiers to keep their feet dry and free from fungal infections. All the standard tins held 1.75 ounces of powder and can be found in oval, rectangular and oval tins. This unit sized ‘tin’ could be used to refill the smaller tins as and when needed. Clearly dated March 1940, holding 16 Oz and manufactured by ‘Boots’ of Nottingham.
WW2 British, VERY RARE, Mess Tins, Aluminium, 1939, with Dated Storage Bag. The British Army, on introduction of the 37 Pattern Kit, decided to replace the older D-shaped mess tin for something more suitable to modern warfare. They adopted a rectangular pair of nesting aluminium tins with a folding steel handle. These proved to be lighter and more hygienic than the older model, however, these were quickly withdrawn to use the aluminium for aircraft production. Several changes to the basic design took place, rounding the corners, reducing the depth, adding reinforcement crimps to the top edge, and adding a reinforcement groove along the long edge of the side. This pair of tins is a very rare survivor and was manufactured by L.A. Co. in 1939 and is accompanied by its khaki cotton storage bag, also dated to 1939; although the maker is unreadable (refer to photo). The earlier aluminium produced tins had two methods of attaching the handles to the pan: welding or riveting, these being the more common riveted variety. In excellent condition, however, the smaller pan has a small ‘dint’ to the top edge of one side, I’ll leave it to the purchaser to decide if they want to retain this piece of its history. The bag has dirt and marks consummate with age; however, I believe it is the original bag for the tins. I am also listing an un-issued 1940 dated bag that can be purchased to go with these tins. Priced to reflect the condition and rarity of this much sought-after piece of British kit. Very Rare!!
WW2 British, War Savings Commemorative Plaque, 1944. CUT DOWN Commemorative presentation wall plaque for supporting the ‘For Freedom War Savings Campaign’ (an extension of the National Savings’ campaign run for the government by Sir Robert Kindersley) of 1944 and was presented by the War Office to local saving committees in appreciation of their success in Salute the Soldier Week savings campaigns. Manufactured in ivory-coloured plastic by De La Rue Plastics. This example has unfortunately been cut down, refer to final \'thumb nail\' photo, fixing holes re-drilled and the bottom edge filed to shape, hence priced, un-cut examples regularly sell in excess of £250, to reflect this ‘editing’. I also have available one of the much sought after ‘Salute the Solider’ lapel badges.
WW2 British, Wartime, \'Dura-glit\' Polish Tin. Almost all packages, can and wrappers were reduced to a bare minimum to reduce waste during wartime. Tins and cans usually bore the rubric \'WAR-TIME PACK\' and were heavily simplified. The effectiveness of wartime salvage drives has made cans such as this relatively rare. Perfect to create an authentic kit layout or barrack room display.
WW2 British, Webbing Chinstrap Mk. III. The Chinstrap Mk. III was introduced as a result of a shortage of metal springs used with the Mk. I & II chinstraps. It was manufactured from a one-inch-wide strip of elasticized webbing which was folded over and sewn onto itself after being passed through a wire loop which was used to attach the strap to a lug on the inside of the helmet. The other end was passed through the opposite helmet lug and then through a small metal adjusting buckle. Most associated with the Mk. III steel helmet, however, after introduction it was used as a replacement on all Mk’s. of helmet. In good condition with a small storage grease mark and some minor fraying to one edge. Priced to reflect condition.
WW2 British, William & A.R.P. Rare to find with its dust jacket a nice copy of \'William and A.R.P.\' Third impression. Fading to spine with some minor tears to dust jacket and usual browning to pages. Another essential stocking filler for many a child at Christmas. Please refer to photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 British, Women’s Land Army, Corduroy Breeches, 1945. A truly lovely pair of Women’s Land Army, Corduroy Breeches in stunning complete condition. Manufactured in 1945 by ‘Arthur Crabtree’ they are Size 0: Height 4’10” to 5’0” Waist 22” to 24” Hips 34” to 36” The breeches come complete with all buttons, both original leg laces are present with their metal tip and the fabric appears to be undamaged. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2 British/Free French, Cigarette Papers. Manufactured by CP Ltd. at their Riverside factory in West London. Translation: ‘PAPIER SUPERIEUR GOMME PURETE ABSOLUMENT GARANTIE’. Superior gum paper purity absolutely guaranteed. ‘FRANCE LIBRE’ Free France. ‘PAPIERS A CIGARETTES’ Cigarette papers. ‘FFF’ Free French Army These cigarette papers were originally given to me by a neighbor who claimed that they were given to his mother by a Free French soldier in the famous ‘French Pub’ in London\'s Soho during the WW2.
WW2 Civilian Respirator in Issue Carrying Box Civilian respirator with cardboard box of issue in above average, supple condition. Sized ‘Large’ and manufactured in 1937. Designed in 1935 and becoming available in 1936, 38 million were produced. GAG0001
WW2 Commonwealth Forces Pack Filler, Tooth Soap. A good un-opened container of Enolin Tooth Soap, originally marketed for navel personnel, an essential and often missing item from the service wash roll. In good NOS condition.
WW2 Commonwealth Issue, Anti-Gas Curtain Number 2. Please note: HELMET NOT INCLUDED. The Anti-gas curtain No.2 replaced the No.1 in the summer of 1940 as the first model was found to be flawed as the helmet could become contaminated under the rim and drip down onto the forehead. An elastic band inside the curtain helped it ‘grasp’ the rim to create an effective seal with additional fabric covering the entire dome, a ‘chin flap’ that could be secured under the chin plus it was made from camouflaged oilcloth, rather than plain brown/green. This example was manufactured in 1942 by the Canadian, Dominion Rubber Company Limited and is priced to reflect rarity, excellent supple condition with only one or two tiny ‘pinprick’ holes. Please note: HELMET NOT INCLUDED.
WW2 Commonwealth Issue, Anti-Gas Hood. The Anti-Gas Hood was introduced with the Anti-Gas Cape and was worn over the head with a drawstring to seal under the chin. The length of the lower flap was sufficient to cover the neck and collar. It was discontinued in 1942 in favour of the No.2 Anti-Gas Ointment that could be applied to the neck before an attack. Whilst it gave excellent protection to the head it gave no protection to the helmet which would have to be decontaminated. There is some evidence that hoods returned to stores were reissued as rain hoods. This example was manufactured in 1941 by the Canadian, Dominion Rubber Company Limited and is priced to reflect rarity and near mint condition.
WW2 Commonwealth, 1937 Pattern Webbing Anklets, 1941. Anklets, also known as Gaiters, were issued as a left and right pair and replaced the puttees worn in WW1. They were manufactured in four sizes; 1 to 4, with 4 being the largest, one additional inch was added for each increase in the sized number, the height remained the same for all sizes. Throughout the war all anklets had a pair of brass buckles, later replaced with steel; however, the small straps or ‘tabs’ went through some changes from being webbing made with a brass end cap, webbing minus the cap and then leather, which overcame the fraying of the webbing tabs with the removed cap. When worn the buckles should be on the outside of the ankle with the tabs treaded so that they point to the rear, they should be worn tight enough to ‘blouse’ the trousers but not be so tight that they are difficult to put on. This pair are in outstanding, mint, unissued condition, manufactured in Canada by Z. T. & L. Ltd (Zephyr Loom and Textile) and clearly dated 1941. Webbing manufactured in Canada was worn by combatants from all the Commonwealth forces. Priced to reflect outstanding condition and early war date, much prized by Dunkirk era reenactors who require the brass capped tabs.
WW2 era British MKII Steel Helmet. Salty WW2 era British MKII steel helmet with large weave cameo\' net and 1944 dated Field Dressing. MKII liner, size 7, retaining some of its early brown factory paint to inner shell, possibly dated 1939. Owner marked: E. A. H. HHG0002
WW2 Era Cake/Puck of KG103 Khaki Green (Light) Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. This example is coloured to the shade of KG103 Khaki Green (Light) and has associated with the mid-war period. Priced to reflect rarity and lack of major damage.
WW2 Era Cake/Puck of KG103 Khaki Green (Light) Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. This example is coloured to the shade of KG103 Khaki Green (Light) and has associated with the mid-war period. **Please note that the cake/puck has a large crack across the centre. Priced to reflect rarity and damage.
WW2 Era Cakes/Pucks of KG3 Khaki Green (Dark) Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. These examples are coloured to the shade of KG3 Khaki Green (Dark) and are associated with the mid to late and post war period. At the time of uploading to the shop; 11 cakes/pucks of the Blanco were available; price is for one cake/puck.
WW2 Era Unopened Packet of Ty-Phoo Tea, 4 Oz. SPECIAL OFFER 50% PRICE DROP: was £64 now £32 per packet. An exceptional chance to own an original unopened 4 Oz. packet of Ty-Phoo Tea. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea. It is recommended that it is not used and is used for display purposes only. I also have the opportunity for you to purchase issue Tea Ration tins which can also be found in ‘WW2 British personal kit, pack fillers and comfort’. Price is for ONE packet only. SPECIAL OFFER 50% PRICE DROP: was £64 now £32 per packet.
WW2 Era, British, ‘Infantry Section Leading’, HMSO, 1938, printed, 1939. A grubby but intact copy priced to reflect early date and rarity. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2 Era, British, ‘S.O. Book 137’. Grubby and used, however, intact with some pages missing, priced to reflect early date and rarity. A cracking addition to any display of officer’s kit. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2 Era, British, ‘Small Arms Training’, HMSO, 1937, printed 1937. A grubby but intact copy priced to reflect early date and rarity. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2 era, British, ‘Tommy Cooker’. Self-contained \'solid fuel\' version of the WW1 pattern portable stove in a small tin with attachable pot stand. There were similar commercial stoves sold as the ‘Tommy\'s Cooker and the ‘Blackie’. This example is of the Blackie and is in good condition, still containing its fuel. There is some conjecture that these Blackie Cookers are of post war manufacture being that packaging refers to the Everest Expedition, however, this may not refer to the 1953 Hillary conquest of the mountain but to one of the British expeditions of the 1920’s e.g., the Mallory attempt of 1924. Priced to reflect the rarity of this much sought after item of kit, photographs of which show use in the trenches of the Phoney war. Priced to reflect rarity and unissued mint condition. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 Era, British, Cover for Army Book 153 & 153 Field Message Book, S.0. Grubby and used, however, intact with some pages missing, priced to reflect rarity. A cracking addition to any display of officer’s kit. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2 era, British, Private Purchase, Shaving Soap Holder. A WW2, British private purchase, ‘Bakerlite’, shaving soap stick holder, would enhance any wash roll display. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 Era, British, Pullover, SIZE 3. Sweaters came in several styles, such as Sweaters, Jerseys, Cardigans and Slipovers, and were worn in every theatre of operations. In general, they were all close-fitting garments made from knitted wool that had been dyed to an earth-tone colour including khaki, light green, grey or brown. The Pullover was normally ‘V’ necked with the neck and cuffs woven tighter to prevent them being pulled out of shape. This example is a large ‘Size 3’, the label is un-clear for the maker. Please note that there are some minor repairs needed to the ‘V-neck’ but that the rest of the pullover appears to be in good condition with tight cuffs to the sleeve. Laid flat the Pullover is 20” across from arm pit to arm pit and 24” from the top of the rear neck to the bottom of the lower hem, priced to reflect condition and lack of clear date.
WW2 era, CC41, Private Purchase, Towel. Whilst towels were standard issue, many examples of private purchase ‘sanitary’ items are known to have been used. These towels are not like the traditional terry towelling material, but rather an interwoven cotton fabric that is far coarser and much worse at absorbing water. Folding it out reveals it is a small hand sized towel rather than a full bath towel, despite them being used for all purposes including drying oneself after a full ablution. This example follows the army pattern but is clearly marked CC41 No 7463 that indicated that the item conformed to the Governments Utility regulations. Named to ‘Pilcher’ it is in excellent condition and would enhance any small pack or kit layout display. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 era, Comb. There is some conjecture as to whether these Canadian manufactured combs were issue or private purchase. Priced to reflect rarity and slight damage to one end. Please study the photo’s carefully as they form part of the description.
WW2 Era, European, ‘Naughty’ Postcards. Popular with squaddies when ‘tipsy’ in the back streets, these postcards were frowned upon but often ignored by the authorities and could be found in wallets and small packs. It’s hard for us now to imagine life abroad for a generation who, compared to youngster now, were naive and found these ‘end of the pier’ images racy. Priced as a pair and would finish of any display of personal kit, especially one portraying the Mediterranean theatre.
WW2 Era, Private Purchase, “Gillette” Safety Razor. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. Manufactured by ‘Gillette’ and made from Stainless Steel. Priced to reflect condition, would be a welcome addition to for anyone starting to create a WW2 wash roll or those collecting or re-enacting the Home Front. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 Era, Private Purchase, “Wardonia” Safety Razor. Until 1916, it was a statutory requirement for all members of the British Army to wear a moustache. Uniform regulation command number 1695 stipulated “the hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and the under-lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip…”. It is not clear how far this order was rigidly enforced but until General Sir Neville Macready, who apparently hated moustaches, repealed the order in October 1916 British soldiers were moustachioed! Nonetheless, shaving was still required; to appear stubbly was still effectively a breach of regulation. In the dirty environment of the trenches, without access to running water, basins, towels and even privacy, how did men even manage to shave? In some regiments, rules were relaxed in times of action meaning that stubble was permitted, although soldiers were expected to take the first opportunity to attend to their beards in calmer conditions. In the field, though, even obtaining clean water to shave was no easy matter. Complete washing was an irregular occurrence. According to one account, a single tub of water served for the whole company. Instead, soldiers might get a cursory wash of face and hands at best. In such circumstances ingenuity was required. Some soldiers took to using cold tea as shaving water – better than drawing water from a muddy puddle although even this likely sufficed in an emergency. Manufactured by ‘Wardonia’ of Sheffield and made from Bakelite and Stainless Steel. Priced to reflect condition, would be a welcome addition to for anyone starting to create a WW2 wash roll or those collecting or re-enacting the Home Front. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 era, Private Purchase, Reconnaissance Corps, Badged Cigarette Case. Manufactured from pressed stell with a hinged lid with the addition of a riveted Reconnaissance Corps cap badge to lid. In overall good condition with some minor scratching consummate with age.
WW2 Era/Post War, Private Purchase, Combined KFS. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. Towards the end of the war a new lightweight stackable set of eating utensils was developed, but few were issued, and it is now considered part of the 44 Pattern equipment. These three-piece sets were made from steel and die cast aluminium with a clasp at the end of the spoon handle to hold the set together when stacked. They were designed to be as light as possible, being half the weight of previous issue sets and unlike previous issues could fit inside the standard issue mess tin. Manufactured towards the end or post war this set is slightly shorter than the WD contract sets but follows that design by Richards of Sheffield. Priced to reflect good overall condition, would be a welcome addition for any reenactors kit. Please examine the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2 Framed Souvenir, German, 1,000 kg \'Luftmine\' Relics from the Manchester Blitz. Interesting relics from the Manchester Blitz, framed portions of parachute and parachute cord that fell on Broadheath, Altrincham on the 25th October 1941. Beautifully framed, by or for ‘Rippers Ltd’, having the George VI sypher to the rear. Glazed and approx.’ 20” wide the frame has a contemporary coat of ‘ambulance’ grey paint and has an exquisitely hand written dedication. A truly unique item and priced to reflect rarity. *Note: Contact me prior to posting to arrange a suitable method of shipping, this will be added to the purchase cost
WW2 German Aircraft Relic, Messerschmitt Me 110C-7, 6/ZG26, Werk No. 3418, 7th October 1940. Please note I also have a parachute D-Ring for sale from the same aircraft. Aircraft relic piece from Messerschmitt Me 110C-7, 6/ZG26, Werk No. 3418, shot down by Flt. Lieutenant M. L. Robinson of No. 609 Sqd. whilst escorting II/KG51 for an attack on Yeovil. Crash and exploded at Kingston Russell Dairy Farm, Long Bredy, near Dorchester, 04.00 HRS. Aircraft 3U+JP was a right off, Oberfw. K. Herzog and Obergefr. H. Schilling killed. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Aircraft relic, SUSPECTED FROM, Messerschmitt Me 110C-4, 1/ZG2. Part of the aircrafts hydraulic system this single relic is SUSPECTED to have come from: Messerschmitt Me 110C-4, 1/ZG2, shot down by Hurricanes during escort duty during a sortie for KG51 that crashed and burned out at North Baddesley at 4.00 p.m. on 13th August 1940, Adlertag (\"Eagle Day\"). SOME RECENT GENTLE CLEANING HAS UNCOVERED A WERK NO. FOR THE AIRCRAFT OF 8243, WORTHY OF FURTHER RESEARCH. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect some missing aspects of the provenance and sold as seen. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Aircraft Relic: Parachute ‘D-Ring’, Messerschmitt Me 110C-7, 6/ZG26 Werk No. 3418, 7th October 1940. Please note I also have another relic part for sale from the same aircraft. A relic parachute ‘D-Ring’, as shown in additional images, from Messerschmitt Me 110C-7, 6/ZG26, Werk No. 3418, shot down by 7th October 1940 by Flt. Lieutenant M. L. Robinson of No. 609 Sqd. whilst escorting II/KG51 for an attack on Yeovil. Crash and exploded at Kingston Russell Dairy Farm, Long Bredy, near Dorchester, 04.00 HRS. Aircraft 3U+JP was a right off, Oberfw. K. Herzog and Obergefr. H. Schilling killed. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Aircraft Relics from Heinkel He 111H-2 Werke No. 5536, 9/KG53. Smashing group of relics from Heinkel He 111H-2 Werke No. 5536, 9/KG53. The aircraft lost its bearings due to W/T failure during a sortie to bomb Gravesend on Tuesday, 29th October 1940. The crew bailed out and abandoned the aircraft as they thought they were above Holland. The aircraft crashed into the River Stour near Parkstone Key. All the crew: Oberfw. Metzger Uffz. Sigger Uffz. Klitscher Uffz. Ludecke survived, slightly injured and were captured. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Aircraft Relics from Junkers Ju 88A-1, Werk No. 3168, 9/KG77. The aircraft was engaged by Hurricanes of No. 310 Sqd. following an attack on London railway targets. The aircraft was attacked by various pilots including Flying Officer Fejfar, Flight Sergeant Jiroudek and Sergeants Prchal & Puda, etc. who jointly set the aircrafts starboard engine on fire. The aircraft crashed and burned out near Vange Creek, Pitsea Marshes, near Basildon, Essex at 5.40pm on the 18th August 1940, 3Z+FT was a right off. FW. Wahl, GEFR. Buschbeck and GEFR. Lesker were killed, however, FW. Graf baled out and was catured wounded. A cracking group of relics that also includes spent cartridge cases. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Aircraft Relics from Messerschmitt BF 110C-7 Werke No. 3418, 6/ZG26. Lovely group of relics from Messerschmitt BF 110C-7 Werke No. 3418, 11/ZG26, Aircraft 3U+JP. Shot down by RAF fighters whilst escorting a raid on the Westerland Aircraft Factory, Yeovil. The aircraft crashed at Kingston Russell Dairy Farm, Long Bredy, near Dorchester, 4 or 5:00pm, Monday, 7th October 1940. Shot down by Flight Lieutenant M. L. Robinson of 609 Sqd. During escort sortie. Oberfw. K. Herzog and Obergefr. H. Schilling both killed. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German Battle of Calais Relic M35/40 \'Stahlhelm\' Helmet An interesting relic from the 1940 Battle of Calais, double decal, German M35/40 \'Stahlhelm\' helmet shell. Found languishing in a French cellar during the 1990\'s this moderately pitted helmet shell has beautifully patina, the remains of its two decals with the addition of a large concussion crack to the steel. If it could only tell a story!!
WW2 German Heinkel He 111H-5 (Werke No. 1639) Wednesday May 7-8th 1941 Relics Linked to ‘Cats Eyes’ Cunningham, Plus Full History. Heinkel He 111H-5 (Werke No. 1639), aircraft 1G+DR shot down and destroyed by Squadron Leader J. Cunningham and Sergeant Rawnsley in a Beaufighter of No. 64 Sqd. Crashed at Andersea Farm Weston Zoyland, Somerset, 11.30 p.m. Recovered by the ‘Southwest Aircraft Recovery Group’, these items come with a comprehensive history. Priced to reflect their link to one of WW2’s most famous pilots. Please note I will soon be listing Cunningham’s autograph with a number of other important Battle of Britain pilots. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity and desirability of these important relics. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German, SD-1 ‘Bomblet’, INERT, Relic Condition with x5 AZ73 Fuses. Christmas & New Year ‘SALE’ Item: 15% OFF: Was £100 NOW £85 In ‘as found’, ‘inert’ condition, a rare example of the German SD-1 Bomblet. We will leave any restoration to the purchaser!! The SD-1 Splitterbombe (Fragmentation Bomb) was used primarily in two roles that were determined by the type of fuse and accessories fitted to the bomb. The first, of which this is an example, was as a fragmentation bomb with instantaneous fuse and when the bombs exploded above ground the case created large fragments which would kill enemy personnel and destroy unarmoured vehicles. The second role was as a general-purpose or armour-piercing role. In this role, the bombs were fitted with a time delay fuse which detonated the bomb after it had pierced a target destroying it with a combination of its blast and fragments. When the Germans over-ran France in the wake of the invasion of May 1940, it is said that one of the spoils of war was around two million \'bomblets’. This presented them with an intriguing, if positive problem; namely what to actually do with their newly found munitions. Already in the inventory were the Butterfly and Incendiary Bombs, both of which were delivered to the battlefield via an airdrop by the Luftwaffe, in large canisters. Prior to the arrival of the SD-1 ‘Splitterbombe’, the regular means of rendering an airfield inoperable was by either the use of regular bombing and/or strafing with machine gun fire. The SD-1 was the world\'s first tactical cluster bomb. Each canister was packed with a number of individual bomblets; the canisters were shaped like a standard high-explosive bomb and could therefore be carried in quantity by a regular bomber aircraft, or on racks under the wings. Fitted with a timed fuse, the canister would detonate above the ground, spreading its contents over a reasonably wide area and creating more damage than would be possible with a standard higher explosive content single bomb. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. I have left the item ‘un-restored’ and leave this for the purchaser to decide. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Worthy of further research. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 German, SUPER RARE & IMPORTANT, Duxford, Messerschmitt Me109E-4, ‘White-4’, Werk No. 1190, Relic Pieces. Relic parts from one of the most important famous German, Battle of Britain survivors: Messerschmitt BF109E-4, 4/JG26 Werke No. 1190 – White 4. A VERY RARE opportunity to own relic parts of this important aircraft, currently on display at Imperial War Museum, Duxford. Purchased by the museum in 1998 it previously belonged to Peter Foote who, in 1966 at Hurn airfield, undertook some remedial restoration work, which included removing these parts, which come with Peters handwritten label. We acquired the pieces from Richard C. Smith, famous aviation author, who auctioned them off to raise money for a local museum in Purfleet, Essex. History: The aircraft was built at Leipzig in 1939 by Erla Maschinwerk and was operated by the 4th Staffel, Jagdgeschwader 26 (4/JG26), based at Marquise-Ost. Flown by Unteroffizier Horst Perez on September 30th, 1940, it was attacked by Spitfires of 92 Squadron over beachy Head, later belly-landing in a field at east Dean, Suffolk. Prior to this it is believed to have been flown by Hauptmann Karl Ebbighausen, whose five previous ‘kills’ appear recorded on the tail fin, x2 Dutch aircraft dated May 13th, 1940, x1 French or Belgium dated May 18th, 1940, and x2 British dated May 25th and June 14th, 1940. Receiving only minor damage the aircraft was taken for examination to the Royal Aircraft Establishment and was later despatched to Canada and the U.S. to help raise funds for the ‘Bundles for Britain’ campaign. At the end of the war, it was delivered to the Arnprior Research Establishment in Ontario, Canada. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity and desirability of these important relics. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!! Copy, you will need to cut and paste, the link below for fascinating film about the aircraft: https://youtu.be/u2CCQ4CIaOk
WW2 German, V1 (‘Buzz Bomb’ / ‘Doodle Bug’), VZ80(A), Mechanical Impact, \"All-Ways\", Action Fuse. Christmas & New Year ‘SALE’ Item: 12% OFF: Was £400 NOW £352 OPERATION: When the bomb was launched, the arming ring of the fuse was pulled, removing the central part of the aluminium diaphragm and a spiralled arming wire. The removal of the latter released a lever which freed the balance wheel of the clock and allowed the clock to begin operating. After approx. 7 minutes, the arm holding down the arming bolt sprung to one side, and the arming detent was forced out by its spring, the fuse then fully armed. HISTORY: The V1 Flying Bomb, also known as a \'buzz bomb\' or \'doodlebug\', was one of the most fear-inducing terror weapons of the Second World War. In the face of relentless Allied bombing of German cities, Hitler created its \'revenge weapons\' (Vergeltungswaffen) in an attempt to terrorise British civilians and undermine morale. Powered by a simple but noisy pulsejet, more than 20,000 were launched at British and continental targets, mostly London and Antwerp, from June 1944 to March 1945. It carried a one-ton, high-explosive warhead and had a range of about 240 km (150 miles) but was, however, very inaccurate. At the impact site houses or buildings were totally demolished and destroyed. In the inner London suburbs where terrace houses were packed together, sometimes up to 20 houses would totally collapse, just at one hit. Brick walls were pulverised into small fragments. Further out from the epicentre walls, roofs and window frames were ripped out exposing the contents and innards of the house. Further out still, all the windows were blown out and roofing slates blown off. Every time a Doodlebug landed hundreds of houses were damaged. Ranging from total demolition to minor damage. This was a freezing, drenched summer and repairs would take several months. Londoners were de-housed in their tens of thousands or shivered in cold, damp and roofless houses. The blast area of a V1 extended across a radius of 400 -600 yards in each direction. Anyone unlucky enough to be close to the impact site would be blown apart or suffer crush injuries from falling masonry. Others would be trapped below collapsed buildings and have to be dug out. Further away from the impact site awful injuries were inflicted by shards of flying glass. During the course of the attacks the nature of the injuries changed somewhat. At the beginning people were caught unawares on the street and injuries from flying glass were widespread. Later on, people had understood the necessity of shelter in safe (er) areas of their home e.g. under the stairs. However, this had the effect of less flying glass injuries but more crush injuries from people being buried in the ruins of collapsed houses. The toll of human suffering was appx. 6184 people killed by V1’s and 17981 seriously injured and maimed. Tens of thousands of others received lesser injuries. Countless more would suffer the pain of bereavement or from the loss of their home and treasured possessions. Please refer to the photographs carefully as they form part of the description, priced to reflect the rarity. Left for the purchaser to display as they wish!!
WW2 Home Front, ULTRA RARE, ‘Air Raid Precautions: Notice to Households’. ULTRA-RARE!! An ultra-rare Air Raid Precautions: Notice to Households card from the pre-war or phoney war period. Perfect to finish that civilian respirator display, how many collections today have this rare piece of ephemera kept with their gas masks? With some minor creases but otherwise clean. ULTRA-RARE!!
WW2 Home Guard, ‘Manual of Modern Automatic Guns’. Manual of Modern Automatic Guns published by Bernards and sold to the public for one shilling. Aimed for members of the Home Guard it gives basic details for care and use of a range of automatic weapons e.g., Sten, Bren, Thompson. In very good condition, profusely illustrated with diagrams with accompanying text.
WW2 Iconic Blitz, Daily Mail, Newspaper Cover. One of the most sought after and iconic newspaper front covers from WW2. This Daily Mail dated 31st December 1940, details the London Blitz from the night of 29th/30th December 1940. Called the ‘Second Great Fire of London’, the fire around St. Pauls was recorded in the iconic photo taken by Herbert Mason from the roof of the daily Mail building, of which he stated: I focused at intervals as the great dome loomed up through the smoke... The glare of many fires and sweeping clouds of smoke kept hiding the shape. Then a wind sprang up. Suddenly, the shining cross, dome, and towers stood out like a symbol in the inferno. The scene was unbelievable. In that moment or two, I released my shutter. Another witness to the inferno was American correspondent Ernie Pyle, who stated: Into the dark shadowed spaces below us, while we watched, whole batches of incendiary bombs fell. We saw two dozen go off in two seconds. They flashed terrifically, then quickly simmered down to pinpoints of dazzling white, burning ferociously... The greatest of all the fires was directly in front of us. Flames seemed to whip hundreds of feet into the air. Pinkish-white smoke ballooned upward in a great cloud, and out of this cloud there gradually took shape—so faintly at first that we weren\'t sure we saw correctly—the gigantic dome of St Paul\'s Cathedral. St Paul\'s was surrounded by fire, but it came through. It stood there in its enormous proportions—growing slowly clearer and clearer, the way objects take shape at dawn. It was like a picture of some miraculous figure that appears before peace-hungry soldiers on a battlefield. The paper is in remarkably good condition with all six pages intact with only minor aging and very few if any tears.
WW2 Pad and Envelope Grouping. An interesting group of display items being a writing pad and Active Service Envelope. The pad, as can be seen, has no sheets left but has a cracking image of a British Tommy to the front cover. Inside was photograph that presumably was the recipient of the letters? On the reverse there is the address \'90 Stanley Road\' from which it is possible to identify the door using Google Street View, the use of a local directory from the period would probably give details of the family, an interesting research project for those long winter evenings!!
WW2 Pattern, British, Pullover, SIZE 3, 1948. Sweaters came in several styles, such as Sweaters, Jerseys, Cardigans and Slipovers, and were worn in every theatre of operations. In general, they were all close-fitting garments made from knitted wool that had been dyed to an earth-tone colour including khaki, light green, grey or brown. The Pullover was normally ‘V’ necked with the neck and cuffs woven tighter to prevent them being pulled out of shape. This example is a larger ‘Size 3’, was manufactured in 1948 by ‘Morley’ and is in un-issued condition. Please I consider this to be in ‘mint’ condition and I cannot find any moth or similar damage, why buy a ‘repro’ when you can wear the real thing. Laid flat the Pullover is 20” across from arm pit to arm pit and 23” from the top of the rear neck to the bottom of the lower hem, priced to reflect the larger size of this pristine, if post war item.
WW2 Period British ‘NAAFI’ Ash Tray. The ‘Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute’ is a company created by the British Government in 1920 to run recreational establishments for forces personnel, and their families, to relax and purchase goods. During WW2 the NAAFI ran over 7000 canteens manned by 96,000 personnel. In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. To accompany this iconic item from service personnel’s life I also have other articles available such as lighters, cigarette papers, matches, etc. Priced to reflect very good condition.
WW2 Period, British Milk Bottle, Survivor of the East End Blitz. Recovered from a test trench this unidentified milk bottle is a rare survivor, salvaged during building work by myself during building work at a school in East Ham, London. We were led to believe that the school was built on ‘hardcore’ retrieved from Blitz rubble. The rubble contained many broken tea pots and cups, smashed jam jars, etc. and this was one of just a few items that came out intact.
WW2 Period, British, ‘Beney Popular Utility Lighter’ with Original Packaging. Founded by Robert Ernest Beney of London, The Beney Company debuted its first mechanical lighter in 1919, and lighters were produced using the Beney brand into the mid-1950s. In addition to tea, smoking was one of the most important comforts available to troops. Small petrol lighters were not issue items but were carried, at least by the end of the war, in the pockets of most Tommy’s. Being able to light a flame is a very useful thing for a soldier so that he can smoke a cigarette, ‘brew-up, heat through some food or give himself some light. This example is the UL (Utility Lighter), Copper model, released in 1938, also available in Nickel, it is untested and comes with its original packaging. *Note: the last x2 images are for information and are not included in the sale.
WW2 Period, British, ‘Trench Lighter’ and Improvised Match Tin. Small petrol lighters were not issue items but were carried, at least by the end of the war, in the pockets of most Tommy’s. Being able to light a flame is a very useful thing for a soldier so that he can smoke a cigarette, ‘brew-up, heat through some food or give himself some light. Matches were another possibility but can become wet or damp, hence the need for a method for storing them ‘dryly’, I suspect that this small match tin originated as some kind of medical tin. To accompany these iconic items from service personnel’s life I also have other articles available such as cigarette packets and papers, match boxes, etc.
WW2 Period, British, Broad Arrow Marked, Tea & Sandwich Set. Often described as a pilot ‘ration set’ these faux leather sets have been thought of as being used by both RAF and Ferry pilots for sustenance, during long flights. The set comprises of a cream painted, tin plate sandwich tin, in good overall condition, a ‘Thermovac’ vacuum flask, in unbroken condition with its paper label still in situ and its faux leather, ‘card’ carry bag/box. A nice period piece to enhance any collection or to take on that vintage inspired picnic or ramble.
WW2 period, British, Chocolate Box with Photograph\'s, etc. A rare WW2 period Cadbury\'s \'Milk Tray\' chocolate box with period photographs. The perfect Christmas present for the period and found containing WW2 period photo\'s. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 Period, British, Cigarette Packet Pairing. Two of the most popular WW2 period cigarette packet brands in very good condition: Wills ‘Woodbines’, packet of 10 (empty). Players ‘Weights’, packet of 10 (empty). In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. To accompany these iconic items from service personnel’s life I also have other articles available such as lighters, cigarette papers, matches, etc. To avoid damage, I have padded the boxes, so they keep their shape.
WW2 Period, British, Cigarette Packet Pairing. Two of the most popular WW2 period cigarette packet brands in very good condition: Wills ‘Woodbines’, packet of 10 (empty). Players ‘Weights’, packet of 10 (empty). In addition to tea, cigarettes were one of the most important comfort items available to troops. As well as commercially available items, usually purchased at the NAAFI (Navy, Army, Air Forces Institute), many were part of the issued rations and were often used like money for wagers in card games, etc. Most cigarettes were available in boxed packets of ten or packed tins of fifty. Lighters were usually a private purchase item with boxes of matches readily available for lighting cigarettes, stoves, etc. To accompany these iconic items from service personnel’s life I also have other articles available such as lighters, cigarette papers, matches, etc. To avoid damage, I have padded the boxes, so they keep their shape.
WW2 Period, British, Private Purchase, Tea Diffuser. A nice little pack filler, this WW2 period tea diffuser is chrome plated and of British manufacture. This item would allow loose tea leaves to be re-used and would keep the precious brew free from leaves. One must never underestimate the importance of tea to the British soldier during both World Wars. Tea was vital to the soldiers’ morale. Naturally, it contains caffeine and can provide a boost of energy; but there are many who find it calming, as well. Tea is a part of British culture, even more so in the 1940’s than today. To the soldier, it was more than just a beverage; it was a reminder of home, family, and happier times. In barracks and camps, large urns of tea were housed in the cookhouses and dining halls. When soldiers were off duty, they could buy a cup at the NAAFI canteen found on every base (NAAFI was the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes). There were also mobile canteens which followed the men on training exercises; most of these were operated by the NAAFI, but others were from the YMCA, Salvation Army, and other civilian organizations. While tea breaks were commonly permitted on exercise, this was an impossible luxury in combat operations. Nevertheless, the troops became adept at quickly brewing tea at every possible opportunity. Any time a halt was called, and if there were no bullets flying overhead, out would come the tea.
WW2 Period, British, RAF Officers Shirt PLUS FREE GIFT. PLUS, FREE GIFT. A good example of a Second World War period RAF Officers shirt by \'Van Heusen\'. This shirt is typical of those worn by RAF Officers during WW2. It is made of the correct blue and white end-on-end cotton and features a double cuff. This example is a full half front pattern which slowly lost favour during the course of war. Inside the shirt the original label is still present and is still very clear and bright stating \' Van Heusen \'Service\' brand. The neckband also bares markings including \'RAF\' and the collar size which is 15\" which would be worn with a 16\" detachable collar. Measurements when flat: Armpit to armpit: 22” to 23” Armpit to cuff: 22” Length from collar to bottom hem: 35” The condition of the shirt is good with only ONE minor hole caused by braces to the left shoulder; this could easily be professionally repaired. As a FREE GIFT the shirt will be supplied with x3 collars, still in their original wrapping, plus x2 collar studs, a plain metal model for the rear of the collar and a more sartorial brass and composite for the front. Priced to reflect larger size and overall, very good condition. Perfect for the reenactor or modern mannequin display. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 period, British, Will\'s Wild Woodbine Cigarette, Promotional Playing Cards. A nice complete set of Will\'s Wild Woodbine Cigarette, Promotional Playing Cards. Essential for those Post-Christmas dinner party games and building Christmas house of cards. Please study the photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 period, Cadbury\'s \'Sliced Nut\' Milk Chocolate, Shop Display. A lovely condition WW2 period shop display, Cadbury\'s \'Sliced Nut\' Milk Chocolate bar. Please note that this item contains NO chocolate and was made for display purposes only. Please study photo\'s as they form part of the description.
WW2 Period, CC41, Civilian Shirt with Fixed Collar, CWS, ‘Wheatsheaf Make’. WW2 Period, CC41, Civilian Shirt with Fixed Collar, CWS, ‘Wheatsheaf Make’. An original 1940’s CC41, Utility labelled, men\'s shirt, with collar attached, made by C.W.S. Attached collar shirts were available from the 1930s onwards, but only became common in the 1940s. The original label is still bright and legible, featuring the standard CC41 logo as well as the fabric code X3025/1. C.W.S. was the acronym for the Cooperative Wholesale Society with the shirt probably being manufactured in Leicester. Prominent also is the Wheatsheaf logo, embroidered in bright yellow. Measurements when flat: Armpit to armpit: 21” to 22” Armpit to cuff: 21” Collar: 13” Please bear in mind that shirts of this period are cut in a very \'full\' manner meaning that a chest measurement of 22\" will fit around a 36-38\" chest, depending on desired fit, smaller collar size is ok when worn with to button undone. The shirt is in very condition, with only minor wear to the collar, something which could be rectified by, as ‘Make do and Mend’ suggested, ‘turning the collar’. This would be ideal for a small to medium sized reenactor or ideal for a home front or Home Guard display, remembering that Home Guard wore civilian shirts under their Battledress. Priced to reflect good condition and slightly smaller sizing. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2 Relics from German, 1,000 kg \'Luftmine\' that fell on Waverley Woods, Coventry. An interesting grouping of ‘Luftmine’ relics possibly linked to the Coventry raid of November 1940 and recovered from Waverley Woods 7 miles South of the city centre.
WW2, ‘Dominion’ (South Africa), North African Theatre, MKII Steel Helmet, 1942. Synonymous with the \'Desert Rat\' in the North African Campaign and worn by troops from all the Common wealth. MKII, South Africa manufactured, Steel Helmet. Made by the Transvaal Steel Pressing Syndicate in 1942. Unlike their British counterpart the South African helmets differed in a number of ways, firstly the plan of the helmet was almost circular, rather than oval and there are three punch holes to the rear rim intended for the fitting of a neck curtain. Neck curtains were NEVER officially sanctioned, however, the widespread use of neck curtains with the South African Polo helmet probably led to the TSP helmet having the three punched holes to allow for their use. Anecdotal and photographic evidence shows that troops did suspend field made or ‘add-hock’ curtains. This example is in OUTSTANDING condition, with its correct Jager Rand liner, large weave cammo’ net and neck curtain. The helmet is as purchased by myself a number of years ago and shows signs of the curtain being associated with the helmet for many years before that.
WW2, ‘Dominion’ (South Africa), North African Theatre, MKII Steel Helmet, 1942. ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS (I)
WW2, ‘Dominion’ (South Africa), North African Theatre, MKII Steel Helmet, 1942. ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS (II)
WW2, British and Commonwealth, Ankle Boots a.k.a. ‘Ammo Boots’, plus FREE GIFT!! Ankle boots were the standard issue foot ware for most of the British and Commonwealth armies during WW2. Often referred to as Ammo Boots, they came just above the ankle and were made from dyed black, pebbled, leather. Size was broken down by width fittings and normally marked S (small/narrow), M (medium/normal) and L (large/wide), the heels and soles were typically made from smooth leather, whose life was extended by the addition of metal cleats fitted to the front edge of the sole and heel. Hobnails were also added, to create traction for field use, to the sole with the pattern and number decreasing as the war wore on. These examples are in a good, wearable, size 12M (medium to normal width) and were manufactured by Wilkins and Denton (London) Ltd. The right-hand boot was manufactured in 1944, with the left hand being produced in 1942. This was not unusual as boots were issued on an individual level, dependant on the wear of each boot, and as we suspect that these boots were driver issued, lack of hobnails helped prevent the foot slipping off the clutch, break and accelerator pedals, with the right foot receiving more wear from constant use of the accelerator. ¬ Perfect for the reenactor who wants original kit or would suit a modern sized mannequin, a RARE piece of foot ware in this larger size. FREE GIFT: we will supply, free of charge, a set of late war, type hobnails. 26 in total, 13 per boot. This will allow the purchaser to convert to field use.
WW2, British, ‘DRILL, Up to Date’, Longmans. A good copy with only minor foxing, intended for Home Guard personnel. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘Durex’, ULTRA-RARE, Prophylactic Condom. Essential for stopping the spread of ‘Venereal Disease’ (VD) throughout the ranks, Prophylactic; a medicine or course of action used to prevent disease, no tunic pocket or wash roll is complete without one. For example, the rate of venereal VD encountered by the Eighth Army in Italy was more than twenty times that found in Britain. Dire warnings of the dangers of VD were published in the \"Health Notes\" issued by the director of medical services. As VD was considered a \"self-inflicted wound,\" a soldier admitted to the hospital with this condition lost trade and efficiency pay, which, in the case of a married soldier, would show up as a lower pay allotment sent to his wife. Largely for cultural reasons, the Eighth Army had much more serious problems with VD in Italy than it had encountered in North Africa. In one sample month (December 1943), 80,000 man-days were lost. At the Allied Conference on War Medicine in March 1944, the vexing question as to whether brothels should be licensed continued to prove controversial. Attempts to control venereal disease in this way had not been successful. This might have been because, as was revealed at the conference, prostitutes could take on as many as thirty men per day. Treatment with penicillin began in earnest in September 1944, and following this the bed state fell dramatically. The mass manufacture of latex-dipped condoms in Britain was established in 1932 by British Latex Products Ltd., under the direction of rubber technologist Lucian Landau, with financial backing from LRC (London Rubber Company). These condoms were produced under the flagship brand Durex, standing for “Durability, Reliability, and Excellence”. Soldiers soon found a number of non-sexual uses for condoms because they were readily available. Anecdotal evidence states that soldiers used condoms to protect their “other weapons” by covering the muzzles of their gun to prevent mud and other material from clogging the barrel. It is known that they were issued to ‘Chindits’ to keep objects such as matches and fuses dry during river crossings. This extremally rare and original un-opened packet of DUREX with original, perished, contents, was found in the pocket of an RAF officers tunic. Being branded it was probably ‘private purchase’ though there is photographic evidence that they were sometimes issued as part of the Prophylactic Kits issued to personnel go on leave. Priced to reflect the ULTRA-RARE nature of this often-overlooked item of personal kit. When will you find another? Note: the posters are for illustration and are not part of the sale.
WW2, British, ‘First Aid for the Fighting Man’, Messrs. Sifton, Praed & Co Ltd, 1943. A fine copy, priced to reflect condition. Intended for Home Guard & other Civil Defence personnel. Full of outstanding diagrams, etc. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘Home Guard Instruction No. 17 Anti-aircraft Training’, G.S. Publications, 1940. A good intact copy with only minor foxing, priced to reflect early date and rarity. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘Manual of Small Arms and Special Weapons, Bernards (Publishers) Ltd. A fine copy, priced to reflect condition. Intended for Home Guard personnel. Full of outstanding diagrams, etc. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘Notes on Map Reading’, HMSO, 1929, printed, 1940. A grubby but intact copy, priced to reflect early date and rarity. Packed with maps and diagrams, essential reading for any officer and would add to any display of officer’s kit. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘Phoney War’ Period, ‘War Weekly’, October 1939 – January 1940. Thirteen bound copies of ‘War Weekly’ copiously illustrated with period photographs and diagrams. An essential pictorial guide for allied kit, uniform and equipment, the first of four volumes by R.J. Minney, published by George Newnes. Condition: Fair/good. No dust jacket. Red cloth with blue lettering. Vol.1. Pages are moderately tanned and thumbed at the edges, with a few creased corners and foxing. Binding has remained firm.
WW2, British, ‘STEN Machine Carbine’, The Bravon Ledger Company, 1942. A fine copy, priced to reflect condition. Intended for Home Guard personnel. Full of outstanding diagrams, etc. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘The Bren Light Machine Gun’, Gale & Polden. A fine copy, priced to reflect condition. Intended for Home Guard personnel. Full of outstanding diagrams, etc. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, ‘The Morse Code’, Longmans, 1943. A good copy with only minor foxing, written R.G. Shackel, intended for civilian duty personnel. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, Adult General Civilian (GC) Respirator Grouping Including ULTRA-RARE Ear Defenders. Civilian gas masks were issued to all British households from 1938 onwards. Design by scientists at Porton Down, Wiltshire, manufacture began in 1936. Assembly was completed in a government factory sited in an old mill in Blackburn, Lancashire. During the two years prior to the Munich crisis, they were stored in sealed tins of nitrogen with an initial 35 million being issued after Munich. There were issued in 4 sizes: small, medium, large and extra-large, suitable for most members of the population. The filter was made of tinned steel containing a charcoal filter that was needed to be kept dry and was connected to the mask by a simple rubber band. Air was drawn in via the filter and exited via a simple rubber outlet valve situated above the filter. An additional filter was fitted, by wardens, after May 1940 to account for a new Arsenic-based gas. This grouping consists of the box of issue, being a sturdy cardboard box with a strip of linen or string to be worn over the shoulder, ‘cottage industry’ produced outer shoulder bag which greatly extended the life of the issue box, respirator in excellent, supple condition and a set of ULTRA-RARE rubber ear defenders. Priced to reflect overall excellent condition with the addition of the ultra-rare ear defenders. Worthy of some research with its clear link to a Norwich based training college, named to an Ivie Hudson
WW2, British, Army Housewife, Dunkirk Era, 1939. The WW2 British army Housewife, or ‘Hussif’, was issued to all troops to enable them to carry out running repairs in the field. This example has no markings; however, it does contain a 1939 dated packet of needles, three balls of darning wool, brass thimble, scissors, additional needles attached to khaki serge flap and a range of brass and steel buttons from various manufactures. A rare chance to obtain an early pack of dated sewing needles. Priced to reflect condition and early date.
WW2, British, ARP, Uniform Grouping, Kensington, London. Handsome ARP uniform grouping of blouse and trousers in very good condition, consisting of: An original Civil Defence A.R.P 59A pattern, battledress blouse dating from the Second World War and in a good large size No. 17. Height 5’11” and over. Breast 36” to 38” Waist 33” to 35” Manufactured by ‘S. Simpson Ltd.’ This pattern of blouse was introduced in mid-1942 as an austerity measure and replaced the earlier pattern which did not have exposed buttons. Officially designated \'Blouse A.R.P 59A\', this pattern was the heavier wool intended for use with Rescue party workers. The blouse features all its original plastic buttons, buckle and fastenings with little sign of wear and use. It is badged to Headquarters, Kensington, London and also has the ‘Kings Crown’, Civil Defence Corps breast badge to the left breast pocket. The service was stood down in May 1945, however, with the growing tensions of the Cold War, in 1949, the Civil Defence Corps (CDC) was set up/reactivated, with the badge coming from this era. Denoting the Kings Crown it therefor dates this badge from between 1949 to 1953. Of interest is the original ARP badge to the left breast pocket flap, a common practice to those that saw war service in the Corps and wanting it known they were an ‘old sweat’. An original pair of 1943 dated, Civil Defence Battledress Trousers ARP 58 in size 9. Height 5’7” to 5’8” Waist 30” to 32” Breech 36” and under Manufactured by ‘Alexandre Ltd.’ This pattern of trousers was introduced in July 1941 and used by various arms of the Civil Defence including ARP Wardens. Made from a very dark blue serge wool they feature a map pocket to the left leg, first field dressing pocket to the upper right leg, belt loops to the waist, slash pockets to each hip and a flapped rear pocket. Priced to reflect the condition and absolute rarity of these very sought after items, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description. Note: Also available are the helmet and whistle that came with the uniform grouping, please refer to my other listings.
WW2, British, ARP/Wardens Whistle and Helmet Grouping, London. This grouping came with the ARP uniform grouping also for sale, please refer to my other listings. The group consists of: 1. ARP whistle manufactured by Hudson & Co. of Barr Street, Hockley, Birmingham (found in the breast pocket of the ARP blouse I have listed). 2. Wardens helmet, as designated by the application to the centre front by the letter ‘W’, London helmets had the addition of an additional designation to the rear of the helmet, has a 1939 manufactured shell made by J.S.S. Please refer to photographs as they form part of the item’s description. For more specific information please refer to ‘MKII Helmet History’ below: MKII HELMET HISTORY: Following the end of WW1, the British Governments attitude of ‘peace through disarmament’ led to a considerable reduction in the size of Britain’s armed forces and a freezing of expenditure. Consequently, uniforms and equipment remained virtually unchanged until the mid-1930’s, when belatedly the rearmament programme brought some changes. During late 1937 it was decided that since it was desirable that steel helmets be totally non-magnetic, refurbished MKI helmets should be fitted with a stainless-steel rim and strap securing lugs, becoming known as the MKI* During early 1937 the Home Office began considering the purchase of steel helmets for the Air Raid Precautions Service, Police and Fire Services. During June 1937 the War Office informed the Home Office that they did not have the stock to supply these helmets and that the dies did now not exist to manufacture new helmets. At this point a joint decision was made to investigate the production of a war time estimated need for 2, 250, 000 new helmets. During early 1938 contracts were placed with three companies to begin the production of the required helmet shells: Harrison Bros. & Howson., William Dobson and Son. And Joseph Sankey & Sons Ltd. with liners being manufactured by Everet W. Vero & Co and Helmets Ltd. Helmet assembly was given to P.B. Cow & Co Ltd who began the work in late September 1938. Initial production was earmarked for the Police and Fire Services with Air Raid Precautions and the Armed Services being supplied from early 1939. These first helmets were painted in various colour schemes at time of manufacture to meet different requirements; Police were painted constabulary blue and fire service being a smooth grey green. Initial air raid precautions were also painted grey green, but this was later changed to black. Service helmets, for all three departments, were initially painted ‘khaki grey’ but in 1943 this was changed to ‘dark brown’. Priced to reflect condition and rarity, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2, British, ATS, Lisle Stockings. Often described as ‘passion killers’ these ATS stockings were warm and serviceable but hardly flattering. Grimly unbecoming, compared to the feminine lingerie available on the civilian market, a token effort had been made in the choice of shades of ‘pink’ as the standard colour. Spike Milligan stated that the top of these could be called the ‘giggle-line’, once passed you were laughing? Named and suffixed ‘W’ (Woman); W/394649 BOWIEH, worthy of further research.
WW2, British, Childs “Mickey Mouse’ Respirator. Produced in bright colours these respirators were intended for the under fives with children over five being issued the smallest size General Civilian Respirator. They consisted of a ‘red’ moulded face mask and ‘bright blue’ filter with the bright colours intended to make the mask less frightening. The design of the google like lenses and moulded face led to the nick name of ‘Mickey Mouse, being more expensive to manufacture parents were asked a replacement sum for lost masks of 3s 6d instead of the usual 2s 6d for the adult version. Priced to reflect the rarity of these masks, many of which were collected in by the Government at the end of the war.
WW2, British, Civilian Duty Haversack, Unissued with Anti-Dim Tin and Cloth. Carrying bags for the civilian duty respirator were simple, varying from hessian sack to cotton and were closed by a simple drawstring or a more sophisticated flap with button fastenings. This example is dated to 1942 and comes with an original Anti-Dim cloth and tin dated to 1938.
WW2, British, Civilian Duty Respirator and Haversack with Anti-Dim Tin and Cloth. All members of the civilian services such as the ARP were issued with a slightly more robust version of the General Civilian Respirator which was designated as the Civilian Duty Respirator. Designed by researchers at Proton Down it was initially called the Special Service Respirator with a name change prior to issue. It consisted of a moulded face piece that allowed for the fitting of a microphone for communication staff. Unlike the General Respirator the Duty Respirator had a filter that could be changed as employed a better grade of charcoal. Carrying bags for the civilian duty respirator were simple, varying from hessian sack to cotton and were closed by a simple drawstring or a more sophisticated flap with button fastenings. This example is dated to May 1940 and comes with the simpler draw string bag. Priced to reflect its good order, could be upgraded by the addition of the ‘mint’ haversack also available on the site.
WW2, British, Civilian Duty Respirator, Related to Bournemouth. All members of the civilian services such as the ARP were issued with a slightly more robust version of the General Civilian Respirator which was designated as the Civilian Duty Respirator. Designed by researchers at Proton Down it was initially called the Special Service Respirator with a name change prior to issue. It consisted of a moulded face piece that allowed for the fitting of a microphone for communication staff. Unlike the General Respirator the Duty Respirator had a filter that could be changed as employed a better grade of charcoal. This interesting example is complete with its original haversack, named to Bournemouth O.P. (I presume this to mean Observation Post) and is priced to relate its local history interest and its average condition with the usual ‘perishing’ and ‘hardening’ to parts of the rubber.
WW2, British, Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is not dated, manufactured by RBS and does not have the marlin spike. Please study the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2, British, Clasp Knife. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded. The full range of clasp knives, colloquially known as Jack or Pen knives, that were issued to British and Commonwealth forces can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, however, those produced during the war will normally have the broad arow stamp, date, and makers name or initials. Knives with the marlin spike were generally, but not exclusively, issued to airborne, commando or naval personnel. The purpose of the spike being to work effectively with rope, line, or cords. Common features to clasp knives included, though not always, were a single edged cutting blade, slot type screwdriver head with a lanyard ring at the opposite end. Except for the navel pattern knife all models had a separate blade that served as a can opener. Later war models can be identified by their flat metal slab sides and are considered to be part of the 44 Pattern issue of equipment intended for use in the Far East. This example is not dated was manufactured by RBS, does not have the marlin spike, however, it comes with the issue rope lanyard. Please study the photographs as they form part of the description. 18+ NOTE: Only to be sold to those over 18 years of age, verification will be needed, e.g., photo of driving licence or passport, before any sale is concluded.
WW2, British, Despatch Riders Coat, 1943. The longer despatch riders coat was introduced in the Spring of 1942 as an alternative to the lightweight jacket and leggings previously used during inclement weather. The coat features a series of press studs along its lower edge that could be used to fix the hem when wrapped around the legs. This converted the garment from a ‘trench coat’ type item to something similar to a set of waterproof ‘combination overalls’. One section of the coat overlapped the other when closed and fit could be adjusted by use of an attached belt, sleeve cuffs could also be adjusted to create a tighter wrist seal. An extra piece of cloth was also stored via buttons inside the coat that could be used to create a tighter neck seal. A large, flapped pocket was located on each hip and a single map pocket was located on the left breast, angled for easy access. The coat had epaulets to prevent slippage of webbing and arm pits had ventilation holes, essential when wearing waterproofed fabric that didn’t breathe to allow sweat to evaporate. This example was manufactured in 1943 and is date stamped size 2. When laid flat the sizes are as follows: Arm pit to arm pit: 22” Inner arm seam length: 22” Collar to lower hem: 46” Please study the pictures as they form part of the description. All buttons, press studs, belts and rubber sealing strips appear to be in place, however, seals to the should need some TLC. Priced to reflect larger size a relatively good condition with few, if any oil or grease marks. Would suit a larger sized reenactor or modern mannequin.
WW2, British, Despatch Riders Coat, 1943. Additional images relating to manufacture and sizing.
WW2, British, Dubbin Protective No1, 2 Oz. Dubbin was used as a protective measure against gas. It was rubbed into the leather to provide a waterproof seal and to prevent the absorbing of gas. As can be seen the WW2 issue tin differs from the post war via its gold rather than dark green colour and the lettering being embossed rather than printed. Priced to reflect rare war time date, contents and excellent condition.
WW2, British, Haversack Mark V-C Conversion Pocket, Unissued, 1940. A need for extra pockets on the haversack came about in 1939 when the anti-gas eye shields and anti-gas ointment became standard issue. To accommodate this need another bag was created that had two pockets and a single closing flap with a pair of press studs. This bag was intended to be sewn onto the front of the haversack with the new designation ‘Haversack Mark V-C for converted. The Mark VI haversack came into production at the same time as the conversion so only a limited number were produced. This example is in mint unissued condition and was manufactured by ‘W&G Ltd 1932’, dated to 1940. An excellent addition to any chronological collection of British respirators bridging the gap between the Mark V & Mark VI haversacks.
WW2, British, Home Guard, Rubberised, Economy Respirator Haversack, 1940. A rare economy and rubberised respirator haversack. Manufactured by T&T in 1940 for possible Home Guard use. Named to A.J. Halls with name written to inner closing flap and the service number stencilled to the strap. Priced to reflect rarity and grubby condition.
WW2, British, Mark VII, Respirator Haversack, 1942. In a further effort to economise production the Haversack Mk VII was introduced in early 1941. It eliminated the second closing flap by moving one set of pockets into the inside of the bag and number of metal drain vents to the base was reduced to two. Other changes included the inclusion of a small pocket for the newly designed ant-dim cloth tin that allowed for easier access, the haversack strap was further simplified by eliminating the metal hooks and a small pocket was added near the bottom to hold the whipped cord which held the bag close to the chest during the alert position and was fixed using a new metal, quick release tying disk. Priced to reflect condition and current availability.
WW2, British, MK IV, General Service Respirator with Type E, Buff Coded Filter and MK VI Haversack, 1939/40. The MK IV General Service Respirator and can be identified by its stockinet cover over the moulded rubber face piece and connecting tube. It was introduced in 1926 and produced in great numbers. It was assembled from several parts; a moulded rubber face piece has x2 splinter less eye pieces held in aluminium rims, of which early pieces were painted olive green whilst later versions were left as bare metal but had the addition of a screw thread that allowed damaged eye pieces to be changed. An outlet valve assembly, where the mouth would be, vented expelled air out of the mask and allowed inhaled breaths to enter the mask via a rubber tube connected to the filter. The filter was contained in a pressed steel ‘box’ carried in the haversack. The tin itself was ribbed to give greater strength with air inlet slits located on the sides to allow air to pass evenly through the filter material. The facepiece was held to the head via a harness assemble that fitted to the rear of the head. This example is of the early war MK IV and has parts dated 1939/40 from a range of manufactures. The respirator comes with a 1940 dated MK VI haversack. The mask, filter and haversack come profusely stamped. Priced to reflect early dated manufacture and excellent overall condition with only ‘crazing’ to one eye piece and hardening to the rubber harness. *Note: Haversack contents are available as other listing in the shop.
WW2, British, MK VI Respirator Haversack, 1940. The MK VI Haversack was introduced to simplify the MK V plus additional pockets for the newly standard Eye Shields and Anti-Gas Ointment. The strap was made simpler with added metal hooks to attach to the D-rings allowing it to be changed if damaged. This example is in ‘grubby’ but is structurally in excellent condition. We suspect it to be of Home Guard, or other civilian, issue as along with the users name it has a civilian address rather than a service number.
WW2, British, RARE, ‘The Defence of Bloodford Village’, Practical Press Ltd, 1943. A fascinating ‘what might have been’ account of a fictitious defence of an English village by the Home Guard in the Second World War. Published by the Home Guard late in 1940 when the invasion scare was at its height, the booklet, illustrated with maps, presents a narrative of a war game that might have become all too real. Used in Home Guard training to provides ideas and strategies, the publication gives a unique glimpse into British defences against Operation Sealion. An outstanding copy of this super rare book, written by Col G.A. Wade M.C. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, RARE, 1939 Pattern Great Coat. ** A well-known reenactor supply company charge just under £200 for a reproduction 1939 Great Coat, why not, for less than a score (£20), purchase the real thing. ** Several patterns of Great Coat existed during the span of the war, but all had common features. They were all made from heavy weight wool and generally extended to with 12-18 inches from the floor. The milled wool had a khaki drab colour, similar to Battledress, and was waterproofed. Prior to WW2 great coats were single breasted, however, the 1939 pattern became modified in 1940 to double-breasted. Design changes included a single pleat down the back for flexibility and a liner made from new materials for greater warmth. An inside button on the left front and a buttonhole on the left were added to support the weight of the fabric when the lapels were left folded down. This also ensured the collar was windproof when the coat was fully buttoned. The kept original features were the two large pockets at the side with overlapping flaps and no buttons, button down epaulets to the shoulder and a half belt to the rear which could be adjusted for greater comfort. The sleeves also had plain cuffs with no buttons or straps. This example is the extremely RARE and much sought after, 1939 pattern and was manufactured in Aug 1940 by L. Silberston & Sons. It comes in a very useful and wearable size 9: hight up to 6’2” with a chest size up to 42”. The item has its buttons in place, has one or two very, very minor moth nips (I had to really look hard to find any and they were very difficult to photograph), the half belt is securely in place, and it still retains its removeable ‘flap’ to seal the collar. There is no noticeable wear to cuffs, collar, or pockets. Please study the pictures as they form part of the description, as can been seen the inside is clean and bright. Priced to reflect rarity, great condition, and a larger size suitable for the modern reenactor or mannequin.
WW2, British, RARE, 1939 Pattern Great Coat. Additional images relating to manufacture and sizing.
WW2, British, RARE, Prophylactic Condom. Essential for stopping the spread of ‘Venereal Disease’ (VD) throughout the ranks, Prophylactic; a medicine or course of action used to prevent disease, no tunic pocket or wash roll is complete without one. For example, the rate of venereal VD encountered by the Eighth Army in Italy was more than twenty times that found in Britain. Dire warnings of the dangers of VD were published in the \"Health Notes\" issued by the director of medical services. As VD was considered a \"self-inflicted wound,\" a soldier admitted to the hospital with this condition lost trade and efficiency pay, which, in the case of a married soldier, would show up as a lower pay allotment sent to his wife. Largely for cultural reasons, the Eighth Army had much more serious problems with VD in Italy than it had encountered in North Africa. In one sample month (December 1943), 80,000 man-days were lost. At the Allied Conference on War Medicine in March 1944, the vexing question as to whether brothels should be licensed continued to prove controversial. Attempts to control venereal disease in this way had not been successful. This might have been because, as was revealed at the conference, prostitutes could take on as many as thirty men per day. Treatment with penicillin began in earnest in September 1944, and following this the bed state fell dramatically. Soldiers soon found a number of non-sexual uses for condoms because they were readily available. Anecdotal evidence states that soldiers used condoms to protect their “other weapons” by covering the muzzles of their gun to prevent mud and other material from clogging the barrel. It is known that they were issued to ‘Chindits’ to keep objects such as matches and fuses dry during river crossings. With an ‘un-branded’ packet this was probably issued to other ranks prior to leave or a night on the town. Priced to reflect the RARE nature of this often-overlooked item of personal kit. When will you find another? Note: the posters are for illustration and are not part of the sale.
WW2, British, String Vest. String vests were introduced during the early war years as part of the layering system for keeping warm. They were produced from thick cotton ‘strands’ that were woven into the form of sleeveless pullover shirt. Worn under the vest it trapped body heat keeping the wearer worm, it could also be worn during the summer, over the shirt to keep cool by drawing sweat away from the shirt allowing quicker evaporation. Five sizes were produced, with the smallest number being the smallest size with two slightly differing patterns. One pattern had woven shoulder straps with the most common having the more comfortable cloth strap. This example is in good wearable order; however, it lacks its date, maker, and size tag. Priced to reflect the missing tag. Perfect for the reenactor or modern mannequin display. Please refer carefully to the photographs as they form part of the description.
WW2, British, SUPER RARE, ‘Siren Suit’ with Attribution and Essential Shelter Pocket Fillers. An incredibly rare survivor, this Siren Suit is new to the market, is in remarkably good condition and can be named to its owner; Phyllis Purkiss. The suit was a one-piece garment for the whole body, resembling a boilersuit, which could be taken on and off quickly during times of air raid activity. The suit solved the problems of warmth and modesty when taking shelter during night-time bombing, they were roomy, allowing them to be pulled over the top of nightclothes at the sound of the siren, hence the name, Siren Suit. They were worn by both children and adults when sheltering in either private or public shelters. It is said that the suits were popularised by Churchill who was often seen wearing them in public, even to the extent of them being worn when meeting other world leaders such as Roosevelt and Stalin. Siren suits were constructed in a loose-cut design, with zippered or button closures, an optional belt, and large simple pockets. The suits were made of many fabrics, most typically wool, cotton, or other materials available under clothing rationing. They could be bought ready-made or could be hand-made with a pattern and available fabrics. Some suits, as with this one, had a panel at the back that opened to allow the wearer to use a toilet without removing the entire suit. In addition to being protective gear, siren suits for women were fashion statements and were marketed as such to avoid causing fear regarding the threat of raids. Some women claimed wearing the siren suit \"protected their modesty\" in a comfortable way. This example appears to be ‘homemade’ from wool and consists of a faux, fur lined ‘pixie’ hood, ‘epilates’ and shoulder pads, four patch pockets (with the addition of a touch pocket to the left breast pocket), full length ‘Lightning’ zip and a five buttoned and zipped back panel. The fabric is of ‘RAF’ blue, with, as can be expected from a garment of this age, one or two minor moth holes and grazes and a few contemporary ‘darned’ repairs. All buttons are present but at some point, in its life the trouser hem has been ‘let down’. The family tell me it is size 10-12 The original owner was Miss Phyllis Purkiss, born 1917 in Southend on Sea, Essex. She married in 1941 and lived a happy life, well into her 70’s (copies of the photos of Phyllis will be supplied). Note: In addition to the suit, we have added the missing torch for the torch pocket (in FULL WORKING ORDER), first aid guide, tin of essential shelter ‘bits & bobs’ (smelling salts, ear plugs, sewing items, safety pins, thimble, dressings, etc.) and a copy of the October 1942 ‘Lilliput’ magazine. Priced to reflect the condition and absolute rarity of this very sought after item, please refer to the photos as they form part of the description.
WW2, British, SUPER RARE, ‘Siren Suit’ with Attribution and Essential Shelter Pocket Fillers. WW2, British, SUPER RARE, ‘Siren Suit’ with Attribution and Essential Shelter Pocket Fillers. ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS
WW2, British, SUPER RARE, ‘Unarmed Action!’ Practical Press Ltd, 1942. An outstanding copy of this super rare book, written by Micky Wood who was the Light-Weight Wrestling Champion of Great Briton and Lieutenant – Instructor on Unarmed Combat to the Home Guard. Please study the photograph carefully as they form part of the item’s description.
WW2, British, The Voice of the Nazi, 1940. The Voice of the Nazi; Being Eight Broadcast Talks given between December1939 and May1940. 64 pages (complete). Wraps worn and marked with some tanning and foxing to pages. Still in fair condition, tightly bound and intact.
WW2, British, Vacuum-Packed Tin, Lyons Coffee, UNOPENED!! Ultra-rare ration tin of, ¼ Pound, vacuum-packed Lyons Coffee. Priced to reflect condition of tin and full, unopened contents.
WW2, Coventry Raid, Relic German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E) Tail Fin. A rare souvenir of the November 1940, Coventry Blitz that consists of a German Incendiary Bomb (B1E) Tail Fin. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, Deactivated and Inert, German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E). Inert B1E German incendiary bomb that was recovered in the 1990’s from the roof of a house in Canning Town, East London during house renovation. Found jammed between roof joists, deactivated and totally inert. Apart from some ‘deformation’ to the body behind the steel tile-breaker, due to its contact with the roof rafters, the bomb is in good condition with the tail being removed as part of the deactivation process. Profuse stampings and much of the paint remaining to the body. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device. Sorry, U.K Mainland Sales Only
WW2, Rare piece of Location and Dated Shrapnel from the Leeds Blitz, 1940. Since the original listing we have uncovered further information; the bomb would have been dropped by the Luftwaffe unit \'Kampfgeschwader 4\', specifically 3/K.G.4(1), probably from an He111 bomber. Please refer to the x2 additional photographs of the target maps for the date of the drop that we have added to the listing. Further information can be found at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kampfgeschwader_4 Interesting relic from the Leeds Blitz, a large (8/9 \" across the base) and extremely rare piece of German shrapnel inscribed via a copper plate ‘FIRST BOMB ON LEEDS 02.10 COPLEY HILL 25 AUGUST 1940’. The likely target was the London North Eastern Region Copley Hill five track railway locomotive shed and engineering works. A truly unique item and priced to reflect rarity. The Tony Harrison poem \"Shrapnel\" relates to the raid on Beeston Harrison, at the time a child, was sheltering in the cellar of a house on Tempest Road in Beeston, only 2 miles from Copley Hill. Leeds poet Tony Harrison A summer day with all the windows wide when suddenly a storm-presaging breeze makes the scribbled papers that I\'m sorting slide on to the floor. They\'re these you\'re reading, these. I rummage through my many paperweights, grandad\'s knuckleduster, this one from Corfu-- a rosette from the Kaiser\'s palace gates, and shrapnel from an air-raid I lived through. Down in our cellar, listening to that raid, those whistles, those great shudders, death seemed near, my mother, me, my sister, all afraid though my mother showed us kids no sign of fear. Maybe the blackout made the ground too dark for the aimer to see the target for his load but all the bombs fell on to Cross Flatts Park and not on to our house in Tempest Road. And not on to our school, Cross Flatts CP. A hit would mean no school and I\'d be spared old \'Corky\' Cawthorne persecuting me. If he\'d \'ve copped a bomb would I have cared? \'Don\'t talk like that!\' I heard my mother chide though she didn\'t know that Corky used to tell her frightened little son that when he died, because not christened, he would go to hell. On the rare occasions that I chose to speak in Corky\'s RI class I\'d make him mad, trying out bits of calculated cheek and end up being called \'a wicked lad. Sir, if you\'ve had your legs off, sir, like say poor Mr Lovelock down Maude Avenue will you get \'em back on Judgement Day? Does God go round and stick \'em back wi\'glue? Corky Cawthorne\'s cruel and crude RI put me off God for life. I swore I\'d go neither to Hell below nor Heaven on high, and Beeston was all of both I\'d ever know. He also taught music which he made me hate, not quite as much as God, into my teens. I\'d never \'ve come to music even late if that raid had blown me into smithereens. I went to see the craters the bombs made first thing in the morning and us lads collected lumps of shrapnel from the raid to prove we\'d seen some war to absent dads. There was a bobby there who didn\'t mind craters being used by kids so soon for play or hunting for shrapnel that he helped us find. Clutching my twisted lump I heard him say: \'appen Gerry must \'ve been \'umane or there\'d \'ve been a bloodbath \'ere last neet. They\'d be flattened now woud t\' \'ouses in Lodge Lane, Tempest Road, all t\' \'arlechs, Stratford Street. He dumped his bombs in t\'park and damaged nowt missing t\' rows of\'ouses either side. \'umane! \'umane! And \'im a bloody Kraut! And but for him, I thought, I could have died. So now I celebrate my narrow squeak, the unseen foe who spared our street in Leeds, and I survived to go on to learn Greek and find more truth in tragedy than creeds. I stroke my shrapnel and I celebrate, surviving without God until today, where on my desk my shrapnel paperweight stops this flapping poem being blown away. A flicker of faith in man grew from that raid where this shrapnel that I\'m stroking now comes from, when a German had strict orders but obeyed some better, deeper instinct not to bomb the houses down below and be humane. *Note: Shipping may be high due to the weight of this item.
WW2, Relic German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E) Tail Fin. Outstanding relic tail fin that fell on the Workington area, with the majority of its paint intact. Unfortunately, there record as to its dropping date. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, Relic German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E) Tail Fin. Relic tail fin that fell on Woodbury Common, 7 miles Southeast of Exeter, no drop date but found in 1941 and manufactured in 1937. Some paint loss to the base from the heat of the burning bomb. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, Relic Pieces, German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E) Relic remains consisting of the tail fin and upper and lower parts of the cylindrical body (three pieces in total) that fell on Offchurch, just South of Coventry, possibly 1941 or could have been from the Coventry raid of November 1940. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, Relic Pieces, German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E) Relic remains consisting of the tail fin and steel ‘tile-breaker’ with profuse stampings to the face of the steel end. Unfortunately, there record as to its dropping location. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, Relic Pieces, German Incendiary Bomb (B1 E). Relic remains of ‘burnt-out’ Incendiary that fell on Offchurch 10 miles South of Coventry and consisting of the tail fin with remains of Magnesium/Thermite to inner surface and a pool of ‘molten’ cooled Magnesium/Thermite. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device.
WW2, SUPER RARE, Deactivated and Inert, German, ‘Booby Trapped’, Incendiary Bomb (B1 EZA). This is the ‘booby trapped’ version of the B1 E, designated the B1 EZA and sectioned to act as a training aid for EOD and Civil Defence personnel such as SFP and ARP wardens. Under the tail fin, at the tip of the body, was placed a small hidden charge designed to explode and injure personnel who had picked up the burning bomb by its tail prior to it being extinguished in sand. The bomb consisted of a cylindrical body made of magnesium alloy and filled with thermite, an incendiary compound, to which was riveted a three-finned steel tail. These bombs did not explode, but on impact the needle in the igniter was driven into a small percussion cap which in turn ignited the thermite filling and, ultimately, the alloy casing itself which produced heat that was sufficient to melt steel. These bombs were 34.5cm long, and 5cm in diameter. When dropped on built-up areas such as towns and cities, the incendiary bomb proved to be one of the most effective weapons to be used by the German Air Force during the Second World War. During 1940-41, the Luftwaffe caused serious damage by dropping large quantities of incendiary bombs on British towns and cities, either by means of containers that were carried on bomb racks and released to open at a predetermined point, or from very large containers holding up to 700 bombs that remained on the aircraft. To defeat the efforts of the fire services, a small explosive charge was sometimes used in the tail or nose of the 1kg bomb that was either ignited by the heat itself or by means of a delayed action device. Sorry, U.K Mainland Sales Only
WW2, Two London Evening News, Original Censored Photographs of the London Blitz, 1941. Charlie Chaplin Link. Two original, rare and censored London Evening News press photographs of London Blitz damage, one relating to the home of Charlie Chaplin. Dated towards the end of April 1940, just before the end of the major London Blitz, some interesting survivors and worthy of further research.
WW2, USA & British, American Manufactured, Mackinaw Coat, 1942. The Mackinaw Coat, colloquially known as the Reefer or Jeep Jacket, was manufactured in both the USA and Britain. Soldiers from both nations wore the garment and they were produced in a waterproof poplin material and ranged in colour from khaki to olive drab. The front was double breasted with three pairs of double buttons, sleeves that had adjustable cuffs and large box pockets at the sides to each hip. Belting at the waist plus a large shawl collar, of which early versions were wool faced, help keep out the wind in inclement weather whilst the wool, blanket like lining, helped keep the wearer warm. This example was manufactured in in the USA, dated 1942 and sized at a 40. When laid flat the measurements are as follows: Arm pit to arm pit: 20 – 24” depending on placement of garment. Inner arm seam: 18”. Length from collar to lower hem: 36” Please study the pictures as they form part of the description. Priced to reflect the larger size, all buttons and belt in place. This also considers wear to lower sleeves and pocket edging. Ideal for the modern reenactor and would display well on a mannequin.
WW2, USA, Mackinaw Coat, 1942. Additional images relating to manufacture and sizing.
WW2/Post War British, 1937 Pattern Webbing Map Case. This example of the Webbing Map Case is the standard size as issued to infantry during WW2. The case has a stiffening board to prevent creasing, a clear ‘celluloid’ panel to protect the map from damage and to allow for annotation via ‘Chinagraph’ pencils and swivel clips to keep the map in place. The basic dimensions are 9.25” wide by 11.25” tall, each had an adjustable strap fastened to the back via a pair of brass buckles. In very good to what appears to be unissued condition priced to reflect unknown maker and date.
WW2/Post War Era Tin of ‘No. 103 Khaki Green (Light) Blanco. Blanco was used to clean and waterproof webbing in the sense that it covered stains and gave the webbing a consistent appearance. First the dirt needed to be brushed off then an even coating of the wet Blanco could be applied with a sponge or small brush, common practice was to use an old tooth or shaving brush. Once dry it could be lightly brushed to remove any excess. N.B. only the outside surfaces of the webbing had Blanco applied, this kept the Blanco off the uniform and avoided any staining. We suspect that this tin was manufactured post war, by Pickering’s, preliminarily for National Service use. **Please note that the tin has contents and is empty.